Change search
Refine search result
1 - 32 of 32
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Asp, Margareta
    et al.
    Mälardalens Högskola.
    Wiklund Gustin, Lena
    Mälardalens Högskola.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnéuniversitet.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnéuniversitet.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Palmér, Lina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Samvetsstress och dåliga villkor bakom sjuksköterskeflykten2017In: Dagens NyheterArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Ge sjuksköterskor utrymme att göra kvalificerade bedömningar av patientens omvårdnadsbehov och låt dem också få gehör för de omvårdnadsinterventioner de föreslår. Det skulle inte bara bidra till att minska samvetsstress och arbetsrelaterad ohälsa hos sjuksköterskor utan också bidra till att de stannar i yrket, skriver sex forskare i vårdvetenskap.

  • 2.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Horberg, Ulrica
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Holst, Hanna
    Andersson, Niklas
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    The Encounter between Caring Sciences and the Lifeworld: The Art of Making Knowledge Alive and Embodied2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientific knowledge is characterized by abstract descriptions and structures, which are not identical to the lived reality. Scientific knowledge cannot directly be applied on the lived existence, without being transformed and adjusted to the individual’s very complex lifeworld. Learning in caring contexts is an encounter between the scientific knowledge of caring and the learner’s lifeworld. This encounter needs a support that has the potential to bring caring science to life and to start an intertwining process with the lifeworld that creates embodied knowledge. Lifeworld didactics are built on an approach about learning as an individual process and that learning takes its point of departure in the learner’s previous experiences, which accompanies the learning process. The challenges within lifeworld didactics are to be open and sensitive to the learner’s lifeworld and with tact support the development of a reflective attitude in the learning process. Lifeworld didactics strategies are of crucial importance in different caring contexts. This symposium presents three lifeworld led phenomenological research projects that have focused on acquiring caring science knowledge in caring contexts, more precisely it is the encounter between caring science and the lifeworld. The research is within the framework of lifeworld didactics, but the three projects each have a special focus.

  • 3.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Andersson, Niklas
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Holst, Hanna
    The encounter between Caring Science and the Lifeworld2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientific knowledge is characterized by abstract descriptions and structures which are not identical to the lived reality. Scientific knowledge cannot directly be applied on the lived existence, without being transformed and adjusted to the individual’s very complex lifeworld. Learning in caring contexts is an encounter between the scientific knowledge of caring and the learner’s lifeworld. This encounter needs a support that has the potential to bring caring science to life and to start an intertwining process with the lifeworld that creates embodied knowledge. Lifeworld didactics are built on an approach about learning as an individual process and that learning takes its point of departure in the learner’s previous experiences, which accompanies the learning process. The challenges within lifeworld didactics is to be open and sensitive to the learner’s lifeworld and with tact support the development of a reflective attitude in the learning process. Lifeworld didactics strategies are of crucial importance in different caring contexts. This paper presents three lifeworld led phenomenological research projects that have focused on acquiring caring science knowledge in caring contexts, more precisely it is the encounter between caring science and the lifeworld. The research is within the framework of lifeworld didactics, but the three projects each have a special focus. The first illustrates how the learning and caring processes merge and become an intertwined phenomenon in nursing students’ learning. The research is carried out in Dedicated Educational Units (DEU), within psychiatric and orthopedic care. Three perspectives are illustrated in the project; that of the students, the supervisors and the patients. The overall aim is to develop a supervision model that has the potential to support the students’ learning processes as well as the patients’ caring processes. The second illustrates how the concepts ‘patient perspective’ and ‘patient participation’ can be implemented in a clinical setting for elderly patients in order to improve the quality of care. This project is inspired by Participatory Action Research and is built on collaboration between the university and the health care services. The aim is to develop reflective educational material in terms of filmed drama episodes, based on the result of two studies about elderly patients’ participation in team meetings. The third illustrates the perspective of lifeworld didactics in two phenomenological studies that focus on Students` learning in an encounter with patients and Students` learning on the way to becoming professional - supported by supervision in pairs of students. The findings show patterns of essential meanings that have specific significance in the art of supporting students` learning in clinical education. These are; the significance of responsibility, its extent and shape in relation to the supervisor’s ability to adopt a reflective supervising attitude and to be supportive enough but at the same time to not assume the responsibility. The learning process shows to be a challenge for students, where safety in pairs of students has a great significance when coping with the challenge to learn and develop.

  • 4.
    Eskilsson, C.
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Hörberg, U.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för hälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    Ekebergh, M.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindberg, E.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Carlsson, G.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Caring and learning intertwined in supervision at a dedicated education unit ‒ a phenomenological study2015In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 753-764Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supervising student nurses in clinical praxis entails dealing with both caring and learning aspects. There is a dearth of research focusing on both the caring and learning aspects in supervision. The present study describes how caring and learning is intertwined in supervision. The study was performed with a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach and analyzed phenomenologically for meanings. Eight interviews were conducted with supervisors on an orthopedic-dedicated education unit. The findings reveal how supervisors constantly move in order to be either close to or standing back, adjusting to the students’ and the patients’ needs. This is described in more detail via the constituents: handling responsibility in constant movement, participating in a new and different way, coexisting with students creates meaning and development. The findings show that a reflective attitude in supervision , clear structure for daily activities, and a lifeworld-led didactics can promote a learning and caring environment. Supervisors’ demanding task requires pauses in order to maintain motivation among supervisors. A mutual link between supervisors, students and patients is crucial in order to create an environment where caring and learning are intertwined. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.

  • 5.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ekebergh, M.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Hörberg, U.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för hälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    Managers' responsibility to support caring and learning in clinical education units2017In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7940, E-ISSN 2324-7959, Vol. 5, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Managers in clinical education units (CEUs) have the responsibility to facilitate evidence-based environments for both caring and learning. Promoting such environments might be challenging in times of financial constraints and organisation changes.

    Objective:The purpose of this study was to describe how managers experience their responsibility to support the caring and learning environments in CEUs. 

    Methods:The study method followed the principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) grounded in a phenomenological approach. The study was conducted at a hospital in Southern Sweden. Ten first- and second-line managers responsible for CEUs were interviewed. The interviews were conducted as reflective dialogues using an open, and bridled approach.

    Results:The results show that clinical education unit managers regard the responsibility to support caring and learning environments as a challenging experience, elucidated in three themes: (1) to have or to take responsibility; (2) cooperation that supports and challenges; and (3) bringing it all together— a daily struggle.

    Conclusions:In conclusion, the managers of CEUs need to be aware of the importance of common theoretical grounds for caring and learning. Caring and learning are more likely to be intertwined when responsibility is taken, when collaboration between actors is characterised by respect and when an awareness of the importance of reflection is present. Awareness of the importance of creating opportunities for reflection and mutual collaboration among the different actors involved could lead to improvements in nursing education and, therefore, improved patient care.

  • 6. Friberg, F
    et al.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    [external].
    Lepp, M
    Creating room for learning at work: nurses' experiences of participating in an educational program on the function of patient teaching2008In: International journal for human caring, ISSN 1091-5710, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 38-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe an educational program concerning nurses´ patient-teaching work and how it was experienced by the nurses. The program consisted of five sessions, each with a main theme, which explored four main teaching/learning strategies. Interviews were conducted with the nurses and analyzed qualitatively. The analysis revealed three themes: intercollegial learning, increased awareness of pedagogical complexity, and increased preparedness. The study showed that participation in an educational program at work is one strategy by which nurses can become more closely linked with their patient-teaching function, which has direct consequences for practice.

  • 7.
    Gustafsson, Tanja
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Maurin Söderholm, Hanna
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    The Development and Process Evaluation of the ACTION Study. A Person-centred Communication Intervention Targeting Nursing Staff in Home Care for Older Persons2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Person-centred communication is important to assure the quality of home care services and to promote older persons independence and influence over their lives. Previous research indicates challenges regarding communication between professionals and home care recipients, and how to deliver efficient educational efforts in the home care context. Hitherto, research on design and implementation of this type of intervention is scarce.

    Aims and objectives: To describe the development and process evaluation of an education intervention in person-centred communication for nursing staff (NS) in home care.

    Method: The web-based education consisted of eight modules, including short video based lectures and movies, one group supervision, and reflective assignments. The content was based on previous research of health care communication and person-centred care. Data was collected from multiple sources (web analytics, interviews, evaluation forms, and field notes), before, during and after the implementation, and analysed by a combination of quantitative and qualitative approaches.

    Results: In all, 23 NS participated in the education. Initial analysis indicate that a majority of the participants completed six or more modules. Overall, the content was experienced as relevant and interesting. The flexibility and accessibility of the web-based format was appreciated, as well as the mix of lectures, short movies, reflective assignments and group supervision. Challenges included developing content relevant to work teams with diverse competence levels and individual differences (e.g. age, language, motivation). Furthermore, time constrains and structure of work emerged as barriers for implementing the education, in some cases adding stress and fragmentation to NS´ work.

    Conclusions: This type of intervention seems to be a feasible approach for flexible educations in person-centred communication for NS. Engagement and commitment from managers and team leaders may be key factors in succeeding, with impact on participants´ motivation to fulfil the education.

  • 8. Karlsson, P
    et al.
    Grabowski, A
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Den äldre patientens delaktighet2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Att leda och organisera vården på vårdvetenskaplig grund2015In: Teoretiska grunder för vårdande / [ed] Arman, M. Dahlberg, K. & Ekebergh, M., Stockholm: Liber, 2015, 1, p. 267-277Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Interpersonal relations in the context of a team meeting: in the light of the work of Heidegger and Merleau -­‐ Pontys philosophy2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Kommentar till föreläsning av Dan Stiwne2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lecturers’ lived experiences of guiding reflective seminars during nursingeducation2018In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 31, p. 165-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, reflective seminars were integrated during a three-year nursing programme in Sweden. The specific characteristics of the reflective seminars are built upon a foundation in lifeworld theory and caringscience. As teaching in higher education demands an academic degree but not necessarily formal pedagogicaleducation, lecturers involved in reflective seminars are often left without guidance concerning what constitutes areflective learning activity in nursing education. The aim of the present study is to describe the lived experienceof guiding reflective seminars during nursing education from the lecturers' perspective. Eight university lecturerswere interviewed. To capture humans’ lived experiences, the present study is imbued with the principles ofreflective lifeworld research. The result indicates that the reflective seminar includes the need for activity,balance and safety, which is further developed through the following constituents: a foundation in caring sciencecontributes to security; guiding the reflection requires continual vigilance; a lack of trust in oneself inhibits theability to guide reflection and closeness to the students. In summary, the result indicates that guiding a reflectiveseminar is an exhausting mission in which the lecturer has to balance the moment according to a multifacetedlevel. Further development of mentoring and introduction to the assignment are needed.

  • 13.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Reflektionens betydelse för fortsatt utveckling i yrkesrollen: Att fortsätta vara öppen och reflekterande2015In: Reflektion i lärande och vård: en utmaning för sjuksköterskan / [ed] Berglund, M. & Ekebergh, M., Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, p. 227-239Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Tid för vårdande möten: att vidmakthålla och utveckla vårdandet med patientperspektivet i fokus2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The overall aim is to examine how a patient perspective, grounded in caring science, can be preserved and developed in the context of hospital care. Methods: The first study examines attitudes towards caring science in a clinical practice. Data were collected through focus group interviews with seven nurses, three head nurses and four senior preceptors. An interpretive approach guided the study. The results called for collaboration between clinical praxis and the academy, according to how caring science can be preserved and developed. Study II–III functioned in accordance with this goal and were conducted in collaboration with a hospital ward for people over seventyfive years of age. In an attempt to develop care the patients were invited to attend a team meeting. The data in these studies were collected using interviews and observations. Fifteen patients (study II) and nine nurses (study III) who had experienced patient participation in a team meeting participated. In these studies, a reflective lifeworld approach guided the research process. Study IV is presented as a general structure and philosophical examination in the light of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty’s philosophies. Main Findings: To preserve and develop a patient perspective is strongly connected to existential issues, such as lived time, intersubjectivity and a meaningful existence. For the patients, vulnerability is exposed and increased when the need for hospital care arises. The team meeting is experienced as an emotional situation where existential dimensions need to be recognized. The nurses desire to develop caring is challenged by organizational and economic demands. Time presents both a possibility for an encounter as well as a threat to excellent care. Conclusions: There is a need to challenge narrow processes in modern health care that value the staffs’ work and the patients’ vulnerability in quantifiable measures of efficiency. The challenge is to take into account something that is invaluable - human existence.

  • 15.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Methodological support for the further abstraction of and philosophical examination of empirical findings in the context of caring science2016In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phenomena in caring science are often complex and laden with meanings. Empirical research with the aim of capturing lived experiences is one way of revealing the complexity. Sometimes, however, results from empirical research need to be further discussed. One way is to further abstract the result and/or philosophically examine it. This has previously been performed and presented in scientific journals and doctoral theses, contributing to a greater understanding of phenomena in caring science. Although the intentions in many of these publications are laudable, the lack of methodological descriptions as well as a theoretical and systematic foundation can contribute to an ambiguity concerning how the results have emerged during the analysis. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodological support for the further abstraction of and/or philosophical examination of empirical findings. When trying to systematize the support procedures, we have used a reflective lifeworld research (RLR) approach. Based on the assumptions in RLR, this article will present methodological support for a theoretical examination that can include two stages. In the first stage, data from several (two or more) empirical results on an essential level are synthesized into a general structure. Sometimes the analysis ends with the general structure, but sometimes there is a need to proceed further. The second stage can then be a philosophical examination, in which the general structure is discussed in relation to a philosophical text, theory, or concept. It is important that the theories are brought in as the final stage after the completion of the analysis. Core dimensions of the described methodological support are, in accordance with RLR, openness, bridling, and reflection. The methodological support cannot be understood as fixed stages, but rather as a guiding light in the search for further meanings.

  • 16.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Bondas, Terese
    Persson, Eva
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Någon annans ansvar: en fokusgruppsstudie om integrering av teori och praxis2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Bondas, Terese
    Persson, Eva
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    NÅGON ANNANS ANSVAR- EN FOKUSGRUPPSSTUDIE OM INTEGRERING AV TEORI OCH PRAXIS2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ekebergh, M.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Persson, E.
    Lunds Universitet, Medicinska Fakulteten.
    Hörberg, U.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för hälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    The importance of existential dimensions in the context of the presence of older patients at team meetings-in the light of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty's philosophy2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study is to explore interpersonal dimensions of the presence of older patients at team meetings. The theoretical foundation of the study is grounded in caring science and lifeworld phenomenology. The results from two empirical studies, that indicated the need for a more in-depth examination of the interpersonal relationships when an older patient is present at a team meeting, were further explicated by philosophical examination in the light of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty's philosophy. The empirical studies were performed in a hospital ward for older people, where the traditional rounds had been replaced by a team meeting, to which the patients were invited. The analysis of the general structure and philosophical examination followed the principles of reflective lifeworld research. The philosophical examination is presented in four meaning structures: mood as a force in existence; to exist in a world with others; loneliness in the presence of others; and the lived body as extending. In conclusion, professionals must consider patients' existential issues in the way they are expressed by the patients. Existence extends beyond the present situation. Accordingly, the team meeting must be seen in a larger context, including the patients' life as a whole, as well as the ontological and epistemological foundations on which healthcare is based. ©2015 E. Lindberg et al.

  • 19.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för hälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    Possibilities for gaining a greater understanding of complex phenomena through the abstraction of and philosophical examination of empirical findings grounded in caring science and lifeworld phenomenology2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phenomena in caring science are often complex and laden with meanings. Empirical research with the aim of capturing lived experiences is one way of revealing the complexity. Sometimes, however, results from empirical research need to be further discussed. The aim of this presentation is thus to describe the methodological support for the further abstraction of and philosophical examination of empirical findings grounded in caring science and lifeworld phenomenology.  In order to systematize the support procedures, we have used a reflective lifeworld research (RLR) approach. In the first stage, data from several (two or more) empirical results on an essential level are synthesized into a general structure. The second stage can then be a philosophical examination, in which the general structure is discussed in relation to a philosophical text, theory, or concept.

    The methodological support will be discussed in relation to an example from empirical research focusing on the phenomenon of older patients’ participation in team meetings. The results from two empirical studies, that indicated the need for a more in-depth examination of the interpersonal relationships when an older patient is present at a team meeting, were further explicated by philosophical examination in the light of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy.

    Core dimensions of the described methodological support are, in accordance with RLR, openness, bridling, and reflection and can be seen as a guiding light in the search for further meanings.

  • 20.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Hörberg, Ulrika
    Persson, Eva
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    It made me feel human. A phenomenological study on older patients´ experiences of participating in a Team meeting.2013In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 8, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focused on older patients participating in a team meeting (TM) in a hospital ward in Sweden. A process had taken place on the ward, in which the traditional round had developed into a TM and understanding what participating in a TM means for the older patient is necessary for the development of care that facilitates older patient's participation. The aim of this study was to describe the caring, as experienced by the older patients on a ward for older persons, with a specific focus on the team meeting. A reflective lifeworld research (RLR) design was used. Fifteen patients, 12 women and three men (mean age of 82 years) were interviewed while they were hospitalized in a hospital ward for older people. In the essential meaning of the phenomenon, the TM is described as being a part of a wider context of both caring and life. The need for hospitalization is an emotional struggle to overcome vulnerability and regain everyday freedom. The way in which the professionals are able to confirm vulnerability and create a caring relationship affects both the struggle for well-being and the possibilities for maintaining dignity. The essence is further explicated through its constituents; Vulnerability limits life; Life is left in the hands of someone else; Life is a whole and Space for existence. The result raises concern about how the care needs to be adjusted to older people's needs as lived bodies. The encounter between the carer and the patient needs to be developed in order to get away from the view of the patient as object. An expanded vision may open up for existential dimensions of what brings meaning to life. One way, as described by the patients, is via the patient's life stories, through which the patients can be seen as a whole human being.

  • 21.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Karlsson, Pernilla
    Den äldre patientens delaktighet på en utbildningsvårdsavdelning2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Karlsson, Pernilla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Avdelningen för Omvårdnad Hälsohögskolan Jönköping.
    Reflective seminaries grounded in caring science and lifeworld theory – A phenomenological study from the perspective of nursing students2018In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 61, p. 60-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Creative strategies are needed in nurse education to integrate theory, practice and lived experiences.Towards that end, reflective seminars, conducted in congruence with reflective lifeworld theory andcaring science, were implemented during a three-year nursing programme. The reflection seminars took placeduring the theoretical parts of education and the clinical placements. Each reflection group consisted of six tonine students, and the seminars were led by a lecturer from the university.

    Objectives: This article aims to describe the experiences of learning about caring science by participating inreflective seminars that were integrated into courses during a three-year nursing education programme.

    Design: A phenomenological approach was used, and qualitative group interviews were conducted.

    Setting: The study was conducted at a university in southern Sweden.

    Participants: Twenty three students, 19 women and four men, volunteered to participate. All participants were atthe end of a three-year nurse education programme. Data were collected through four group interviews with fiveto seven participants in each group.

    Methods: This study used a reflective lifeworld research approach based on phenomenological philosophy

    Results: The findings reveal that nursing students experience reflective seminars as being valuable for theirprofessional development. The result is described in more detail via four meaning units: An obtained awarenessof the value of reflection in clinical practice; Reflection contributes to an approach of thoughtfulness; Caringscience has become second nature, and Reflection as a strength and a challenge at the threshold of a profession.

    Conclusions: This study contributes to the understanding of reflective seminars grounded in lifeworld theory as adidactic strategy that enables students to increase their knowledge of caring science and develop their reflectiveskills

  • 23.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lundvall, Maria
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Hälsohögskolan Jönköping.
    Participating in reflection seminars: Progressing towards a deeper understanding of caring science described by nursing students2017In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few studies focus on how reflection seminars can support the learning of knowledge in caring science when inserted throughout the curriculum. The aim of this study was to describe students’ experiences of participating in reflection seminars, using lifeworld theory and focusing on caring science. A qualitative descriptive study based on interviews was carried out, and ten students between 21 and 33 years of age volunteered to participate. A reflective lifeworld research approach was used. Reflection seminars contribute to developing students’ ability to relate to caring and life. A deeper understanding is obtained when reflection sessions are spread over a longer period and when reflection becomes a process. The process helps caring science to become more natural and useful. Reflective seminaries based on a theoretical foundation contribute to facilitate learning more readily. A good atmosphere pervaded by a lifeworld perspective characterized by openness and thoughtfulness contributes to learning.

  • 24.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Persson, Eva
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Bondas, Terese
    'The responsibility of someone else': a focus group study of collaboration between a university and a hospital regarding the integration of caring science in practice.2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 579-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of the study was to develop insights into how nurses, senior preceptors and head nurses experience the integration of caring science in practice and how they value the contributions of nursing students to the integration of caring science in practice. BACKGROUND: Research still reveals differences between theory and practice by nursing students. In Sweden, clinical education units have become one way of creating consistency between university and health care practices on values of caring. METHOD: The study is hermeneutic in design comprising data from three focus group interviews. The participants include registered nurses, senior preceptors and head nurses. RESULT: The study shows that roles and mandates are not clearly defined between the different actors. The university and hospital collaboration in caring science integration was regarded as 'someone else's responsibility'. Research and development seemed excluded from the everyday life of the hospital units. The students seemed to fall somewhere between the hospital 'practice and concrete world of production' and the university 'theory world of education and research'. Three themes emerge: 'integration--someone else's responsibility', 'the hospital--a culture of production' and 'the hospital and the university--different realities'. DISCUSSION: The results suggest the need for professionals within health care and university to reflect on their responsibilities in terms of research and development. The ethos of caring science implies the alleviation of suffering and caring for vulnerable patients including research and development.

  • 25.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Persson, Eva
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Nurses’ Experience of Older Patient Involvement in Care with a Specific Focus on the Round2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research shows that there are several challenges when the patient perspective is to permeate clinical practice. The present study is part of a larger research project in Sweden where researchers together in cooperation with a geriatric ward are developing forms for care based on the lifeworld perspective with the patient’s story in focus. The hierarchical structure of the health care sector along with the exposure of the patient role means that in many situations, the patient is assigned a passive role in care – especially the older ones. By tradition, the round is the time for crucial decisions that concern the patient’s care. Also in other ways, the round mirrors the hierarchical care structure. Thus, the studied phenomenon is as follows: How nurses experience patient involvement in care with a specific focus on the round. The preliminary results of the study show that through his/her approach, the nurse can either support patient participation or confirm prevailing hierarchical traditions where the patient is subordinated. Patients’ lived experiences of being involved in care will be described in a future study. In extent, the study can contribute to new knowledge about the phenomenon, Patient involvement in care with a specific focus on the round, both from a nurse and patient perspective, as well as give an insight to the use of phenomenological lifeworld research in a cooperation project between clinical caregivers and researchers.

  • 26.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Persson, Eva
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Older Patients’ Participation in Team Meetings: A phenomenological study from the nurses’ perspective2013In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the importance of patient participation is acknowledged in today's healthcare, many challenges remain before patient participation can become an integral part of care provision. The ward round has traditionally been the forum for crucial decisions about patient care, but often with limited possibilities for patient participation. As part of the process of improving patient participation, the round in the present study has been replaced by a team meeting (TM) to which the patient has been invited. The aim of this study is to highlight nurses' experiences of older patients' participation in TMs. The research process was guided by the principles of phenomenological reflective life world research. Data were collected in a Swedish hospital, in a ward specializing in older patients. Nine nurses, who had invited and planned for a patient to participate in TMs and/or had experienced TMs in which patients participated, were interviewed. The essential meaning of patient participation in the TM, as experienced by the nurses, is that patient participation can be supported by a safe relationship in which the patient can make his or her voice heard. Participation is challenged by the patients' vulnerability and by the subordinated role assigned to the patient. The essential meaning is further described by its constituents: "the need for a guide," "patient participation challenged by structures," and "creating space for the whole human being." In conclusion, the nurse plays a core role in guiding the patient in an unfamiliar situation. The meaning of patient participation in the TM needs to be discussed by professionals so that the patient perspective is present.

  • 27.
    Lundvall, Maria
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Palmér, Lina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lost in an unknown terrain: a phenomenological contribution to the understanding of existential concerns as experienced by young women in Sweden2019In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to describe young women’s (16–25 years old) experiences of living with existential concerns for which they have sought support from healthcare professionals, teachers, family, or friends, among others. Methods: This phenomenological study is based on a reflective lifeworld research (RLR) approach. Nine young women were interviewed about their experience of living with existential concerns. Results: The results show the essential meaning of the phenomenon of “existential concerns ”that can be described as living a life that is marked in a profound way by a feeling of being lost in an unknown terrain. To further understand the essential meaning, four constituents are described: the unpredictable body, longing for comprehension, playing a game, and longing to share one’s vulnerability. Conclusions: Young women with existential concerns are vulnerable, as they are profoundly influenced by these concerns. They have to navigate through daily life while trying to fit in and to make their situation comprehensible. These young women have a longing to share their existential concerns with a trustworthy person, while at the same time they fear revealing their existential concerns and risking being rejected by others. A lifeworld-led, caring science approach, intertwined with the results of the present study, has the potential to direct caring practice.

  • 28.
    Lundvall, Maria
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linneaus University .
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Palmér, Lina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lost in an unknown terrain: a phenomenological contribution to the understanding of existential concerns as experienced by young women in Sweden2019In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 14, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to describe young women's (16-25 years old) experiences of living with existential concerns for which they have sought support from healthcare professionals, teachers, family, or friends, among others.

    Methods: This phenomenological study is based on a reflective lifeworld research (RLR) approach. Nine young women were interviewed about their experience of living with existential concerns.

    Results: The results show the essential meaning of the phenomenon of "existential concerns" that can be described as living a life that is marked in a profound way by a feeling of being lost in an unknown terrain. To further understand the essential meaning, four constituents are described: the unpredictable body, longing for comprehension, playing a game, and longing to share one's vulnerability.

    Conclusions: Young women with existential concerns are vulnerable, as they are profoundly influenced by these concerns. They have to navigate through daily life while trying to fit in and to make their situation comprehensible. These young women have a longing to share their existential concerns with a trustworthy person, while at the same time they fear revealing their existential concerns and risking being rejected by others. A lifeworld-led, caring science approach, intertwined with the results of the present study, has the potential to direct caring practice.

  • 29.
    Lundvall, Maria
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Palmér, Lina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Healthcare professionals’ lived experiences of conversationswith young adults expressing existential concerns2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction:

    This paper describes first-line department healthcare professionals’ experiences of conversations with young adults (16–25 years) who express existential concerns. Existential concerns encompass questions about the meaning of life and the choices people must make, and they are sometimes expressed during the period in which a child is becoming an adult. Sometimes the transition to adulthood can be difficult, and many young adults seek support from people in first-line departments, such as primary care providers, youth guidance centre personnel and student health service employees in high schools and universities. Conversations in which existential concerns are recognised may be important for preventing mental illness in the future.

    Aim:

    The study aimed to describe healthcare professionals’ lived experiences of conversations with young adults who express existential concerns.

    Approach and methods:

    This qualitative study utilises thematic meaning analysis. Interviews were conducted with healthcare professionals working in first-line departments, and data were analysed based on the principles of reflective lifeworld research. The study followed ethical codes of conduct and conformed to the ethical guidelines adopted by the Swedish Research Council.

    Findings:

    The results are presented in three themes of meaning: searching for innermost thoughts requires being present, uncertainty about the unpredictable and awakening of one’s own existential concerns.

    Conclusions and implications:

    Healthcare professionals are affected when young adults express their existential concerns, and they need more support to strengthen their ability to stay present and create inviting atmospheres

  • 30.
    Palmér, Lina
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Karlsson, Katarina
    The lifeworld story as an opportunity to understand existential dimensions of importance for caring practice — from the perspective of children, new mothers and older people2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With a common ground in the epistemology of lifeworld phenomenological and hermeneutical approaches, we explored the possibility of understanding existential phenomena in different stages of human life, such as children’s illness and experience of medical procedures, childbirth and breastfeeding and old age. Through various forms of lifeworld theory-based data collection methods, examples of how lifeworld stories can emerge are presented. There is humbleness and an understanding that there may be more to be understood than what may be directly apparent in the story of a patient. This gives rise to the fact that analyses may sometimes need to be further developed with the aid of philosophical examination and interpretation, which open up opportunities to understand what is unspoken and hidden in stories. Such examination and interpretation also make it possible to deepen what is said. The philosophy of existence can help researchers get hold of what does not appear immediately and what is hinted at but not stated directly, and uncover hidden meanings in stories. Such in-depth understanding may have significance for developing caring practice by potentially bridging the dualistic view of human beings as body and soul. Through a lifeworld theory-based research approach, caring that takes into account existential dimensions in people's lives in relation to caring can be developed and stimulated.

  • 31.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Tanja
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Maurin Söderholm, Hanna
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Holmström, I K
    ACTION - A person-centred communication intervention in home care of older persons2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Nilsson, Christina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Palmér, Lina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Qualitative thematic analysis – based on phenomenology2018Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 32 of 32
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf