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  • 1.
    Davide, Giacalone
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen.
    Wendin, Karin
    University of Copenhagen.
    Kreme, Stefanie
    Wageningen University and Research Centre.
    Fröst, Michael Bom
    University of Copenhagen.
    Wender, Bredie
    University of Copenhagen.
    Olsson, Viktoria
    Kristianstad University.
    Otto, Marie H
    University of Copenhagen.
    Skjoldborg, Signe
    University of Copenhagen.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Risvik, Einar
    University of Stavanger.
    Health and quality of life in an aging population - Food and beyond2016In: Food Quality and Preference, ISSN 0950-3293, E-ISSN 1873-6343, Vol. 47, p. 166-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Europe the percentage of citizens aged 65 and over is increasing at an unprecedented rate, and is expected to account for over 30% of the population by 2050. Coupled with an increase in life expectancy, this massive demographic change calls for a major effort to ensure quality of life in our older population. A thorough understanding of the elderly as food consumers, their nutritional needs, their food perception and preferences is increasingly needed.

    The role of food in healthy aging was a prominent theme at the 6th European Conference on Sensory and Consumer Research, which had quality of life across the life span as a focal point. This short paper is based on a workshop held at the EuroSense meeting, focusing on research from sensory and consumer scientists. The workshop featured contributions focusing on food-related perception, needs and behavior of the elderly, and aimed at demonstrating the relevance of sensory and consumer scientists in promoting food-related well-being in an aging population. The workshop contributions are here reviewed and summarized three main themes: nutritional needs, food perception and aging, and behavioral drivers of food consumption.

  • 2.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    A purchaser network for increased energy efficiency in supermarkets2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Ulla Lindberg has been coordinator of the BeLivs programme since 2011. She has worked with the SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Department of Energy Technology, since 1997. Her main areas of focus are improved energy efficiency in supermarket, refrigeration and heat pumps.

    Ulla has many years of experience working with supermarket energy efficiency together with different partners and in different projects. With the collected knowledge and expertise from those involved within the network the wish is to apply needed competence to the development towards more energy efficient supermarkets. The projects she takes part in are therefor many times interdisciplinary and provides an effective link between the research and commercialisation.

  • 3.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Aktivt Åldrande – individuellt anpassade måltidslösningar för hälsa och livskvalitet hos äldre – Beställning och distribution av mat för den äldre2016Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    "Active Ageing – Personalised food and meal solutions for health and quality of life" (Aktivt åldrande – individuellt anpassade måltidslösningar för hälsa och livskvalitet hos äldre. Diarienr 2013-02780) is a project that aims to maintain the quality of life and autonomy of older persons, through individual and personalised meal solutions that fit their needs and requirements. The target group are primarily the age 75 or older. Five work packages are included in the project. This report describes the work package that had the scope of developing a concept for the ordering, distribution and delivery of meal to the elderly.

    Refrigeration technology and the cold-chain will play an important role in the concept by preserving the safety and quality of foods during its transportation to the elderly. Refrigeration technology and the cold-chain will also make it possible to prepare specific types of foods that meet the demand of the elderly. In particular for the elderly consumers that would like to eat at home and decrease their independency and overall quality of life. It is also important the value chain and concept for the business model must be flexible and taking into account needs from the elderly consumers at all stages, starting from ordering the meal, handling in the household and disposing of the packaging material.

    An interdisciplinary approach – combining knowledge of ICT (information and communications technology) – Technology, food quality, packaging, logistic, sensory, and waste/return systems for the food that is distributed is increasingly necessary. As the demand for food for the elderly is on the rise, the development of new products, models and services might be facilitated by collaborating with SMEs (micro, small and medium-sized enterprises) and other business partners interested in delivering solutions for the elderly consumers. The concept for the ordering, distribution and delivery of meal to the elderly developed in the project can be used by other end users and/or for other products and services.

  • 4.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Exploring barriers to energy efficiency in supermarkets2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy efficiency activities in sections of grocery stores for chilled groceries are subject to particular challenges as this is a complex indoor environment given that the goal of store owners is to offer consumers chilled groceries of high quality in a comfortable environment while at the same time trying to reduce energy use. Consequently, it is important to maintain the right temperature in the right place and to be aware of the consumers’ shopping situation. The way chilled groceries are displayed, the form of refrigeration, the building size, and business and merchandising practices may differ between retail stores, impacting energy efficiency. Finding a balance between being energy effective and efficient, i.e., doing the right things or doing things right, is therefore important. This particular environment, where consumers interact with store staff, other consumers, chilled groceries, and other environmental factors, is a surprisingly unexplored part of retail, especially when it comes to consumers’ behaviors and perceptions. This thesis is multidisciplinary, and the research has been broadened from studying measured and perceived comfort parameters in supermarkets to incorporating qualitative studies with a clearer and deeper interest in consumers’ perceptions and behaviors. In this thesis, findings from the cold environment of chilled food display cabinets, either with doors or without, are discussed and tangible commodities are used to illustrate how ‘details’ such as doors on cabinets matter to consumers. The consumers are of the main interest since they make up the businesses. The aim of this thesis is to gain knowledge of how to improve energy efficiency and the store layout for chilled groceries by adding consumer insights. Four specific papers contribute to this thesis’ aim of overcoming specific challenges faced by retail grocery stores as regards energy efficiency. The results show how details such as doors can affect consumers’ perceptions and behaviors. The details that matter concern how consumers perceive and behave in relation to having doors or no doors on cabinets, with different forms of approach or avoidance behavior in terms of accessibility, both beneficial and problematic. Moreover, the results also show that knowledge of how to provide service to the consumer, in particular in the foodscape and with doors on cabinets, can affect the store’s energy use in a positive way and contribute toward more sustainable and energy efficient retail grocery stores. By elaborating these results in relation to “foodscape”, this thesis contributes to research on servicescape. The thesis also contributes to research on in-store energy efficiency in relation to four challenges that retail grocery stores face: building design, retail context, consumer insights, and management. The perspectives of the consumers may help to overcome barriers to energy efficiency, aid in the design of a functional foodscape and facilitate technology change for sustainable and efficient energy use in supermarket buildings.

  • 5.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    How to expand expiry dates to reduce food waste2015In: World cold chain summit to reduce food waste, 2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Indoor thermal environment in Supermarkets: A study of measured and perceived comfort parameters2009Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the supermarket environment three different groups must be considered: food (food quality), personnel (working conditions) and customers. Customers are of particular interest since they make up the commercial basis for the supermarket. Currently, however, there are no recommendations on the indoor environment for this category. To start a discussion on this topic and to provide a tentative recommendation, this thesis presents a state-of-the-art overview related to different systems and their operation in supermarkets as well as theories for the thermal balance of humans, display cabinets and refrigerated food.

     

    Few studies compare the perceived indoor thermal environment in supermarkets based on questionnaires with simultaneous measurements of the thermal environment. In this thesis the findings of such investigations in the cold environment of chilled food display cabinets are discussed. The basic hypothesis is that objective measures can be used in order to estimate the perceived thermal environment sufficiently well, with the following assumptions and limitations:

     

    • the comfort equation in ISO 7730 can be used to estimate the perceived thermal comfort (Predicted Mean Vote, PMV), in a supermarket.

    • the comfort equation can be used outside its verified range in terms of thermal gradients and residence time sufficiently well to prescribe suitable thermal environments for customers and personnel in supermarkets.

    • the mean temperature at the point of residence is more important for the perceived comfort than the temperature gradient between ankle and head.

    • questionnaires can be used to evaluate thermal comfort for customers and personnel in a supermarket environment.

     

    This work shows that it is possible to use objective measurements in order to estimate the perceived thermal environment in supermarkets, with some limitations. Perceived and predicted PMV have shown systematic interdependence. In summer, however, differences between the measures tend to be larger. For customers, the perceived PMV is lower during the summer. The perception, however, is not as low as the predicted PMV would indicate. One reason is probably that in summer customers are wearing light clothes, light indoor shoes and are more exposed to the cold environment than the case would be in winter. However, customers do not stay very long in this environment and it is not necessary to account for a long exposure time in the cold environment. As a result of this work the thesis proposes some guiding principles for an appropriate thermal environment in chilled food aisles and discusses some ideas for future work.

  • 7.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Research for the retail grocery context: A systematic review on display cabinetsIn: Trends in Food Science & Technology, ISSN 0924-2244, E-ISSN 1879-3053Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. RISE Research Institute of Sweden.
    Fahlén, Per
    Axell, Monica
    Fransson, Niklas
    Thermal comfort in the supermarket environment: multiple enquiry methods and simultaneous measurements of the thermal environment2017In: International Journal of Refrigeration, ISSN 0140-7007, Vol. 82, p. 426-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the supermarket environment three factors must be considered: food (food quality), personnel (working conditions), and customers.The customers do not remain in this environment very long but are of particular interest since they constitute the supermarket’s commercial basis. However, there are no recommendations on the indoor environment based on this category. This study compares the perceived indoor thermal environment with simultaneous objective measurements of the thermal environment and includes multiple enquiry methods. These methods have been used for this specific environment in order to understand how customers perceive, evaluate, and prefer variations in the thermal environment.

    Measurements were performed in summer and winter in front of twelve display cabinets, over 1100 questionnaires have been received.To provide recommendations, this study presents measured and perceived comfort in supermarkets, information which can be used for prescribing suitable thermal environments for customers.

  • 9.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Fahlén, Per
    SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Axell, Monica
    SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Fransson, Niklas
    University of Gothenburg.
    Thermal comfort in the supermarket environment-multiple enquiry methods and simultaneous measurements of the thermal environment2016In: 4th IIR International Conference on Sustainability and the Cold Chain, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the supermarket environment three factors must be considered: food (food quality), personnel (working conditions), and customers. The customers do not remain in this environment very long but are of particular interest since they constitute the supermarket’s commercial basis. However, there are no recommendations on the indoor environment based on this category. This study compares the perceived indoor thermal environment with simultaneous objective measurements of the thermal environment and includes multiple enquiry methods. These methods have been used for this specific environment in order to understand how customers perceive, evaluate, and prefer variations in the thermal environment. Measurements were performed in summer and winter in front of twelve display cabinets, and over 1100 questionnaires have been received. To provide recommendations, this study presents measured and perceived comfort in supermarkets, information which can be used for prescribing suitable thermal environments for customers.

  • 10.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Fahlén, Per
    SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Axell, Monica
    SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Rolfsman, Lennart
    SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Fransson, Niklas
    University of Gothenburg.
    Supermarket environment, thermal comfort, energy and food quality efficiency2016In: 4th IIR International Conference on Sustainability and the Cold Chain. Proceedings: Auckland, New Zealand, April 7-9, 2016., 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a supermarket setting, customers likely feel the chilled air from refrigerated units displaying their contents to passing customers. Supermarkets, by their nature, contain a diverse range of perishable goods stored in different designed units within one large building, whose distinct storage temperatures result in the unusual thermal environment that customers encounter when shopping. Unfortunately, this open environment results in huge amounts of wasted cold air from display units , the reduction of thermal comfort for customers, and a reduction in the quality of the food. A possible solution to improve comfort for customers, reduce cold air waste, help preserve foods, and save money for retailers includes innovative doors for open display cabinets. Such doors will save money for the retailer by lowering the costs for energy in supermarkets. Doors should, therefore, be viewed as an option and solution for not only the merchandiser, but also for the customer.

  • 11.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Ruud, Svein H.
    SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Designing a Zero Carbon supermarket2016In: Sustainable Retail Refrigeration / [ed] Evans, J., and A.M. Foster, Wiley-Blackwell, 2016, 1, p. 313-328Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Editors Judith A. Evans and Alan M. Foster present readers with a collection of expert contributions on the ways in which to optimize refrigeration display cabinets and refrigeration systems for sustainability. The selections that make up the main body of the text cover the latest technologies and contemporary best practices from around the world in maximizing efficiency and minimizing waste in retail refrigeration. The Editors are both faculty members of London South Bank University in the UK. (© Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR)

  • 12.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Salomonson, Nicklas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Sundström, Malin
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Wendin, Karin
    Kristianstad University, Sweden/ University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Consumer perception and behavior in the retail foodscape – A study of chilled groceries2018In: Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, ISSN 0969-6989, E-ISSN 1873-1384, Vol. 40, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the retail grocery business, new competitors such as pure e-commerce players are growing fast, and, in order to compete, ‘brick and mortar’ stores such as supermarkets need to become more professional at providing excellent customer service, and to use the physical servicescape as the main competitive advantages. However, supermarkets also face a challenge to offer consumers high quality products while at the same time providing a pleasant and functional servicescape. Products like groceries often need to be stored in cabinets due to strict regulations and in order to maintain correct temperatures. Some of these cabinets have doors which make them more energy-efficient (Evans et al., 2007 ;  Faramarzi et al., 2002), reduces costs, and contributes to grocery quality, but it can also affect the perceived servicescape, and risk a negative impact on sales (Waide, 2014; Kauffeld, 2015). For example, moisture from the atmosphere that condenses on the inside of the door glass (Fricke and Bansal, 2015) may make the cabinets less transparent, and doors can obstruct consumers from passing by. Thus, having chilled groceries in cabinets with doors can be both beneficial and problematic. However, no studies have been conducted on how open (no doors) or closed (with doors) cabinets for chilled groceries impact consumer perception and behavior. Hence, the purpose of the study is to contribute to an understanding of how consumers behave and what they perceive when shopping chilled groceries from cabinets with doors and without doors in the supermarket.

    Based on a qualitative research approach, combining in-store observations and focus group interviews, and focusing on Bitner's (1992) three environmental variables in the servicescape, i.e. (1) ambient condition, (2) space and functions, and (3) signs, symbols and artifacts, the study investigates the question: do open or closed cabinets for chilled groceries in the supermarket impact consumer perception and behavior, and if so, how?

    Our results indicate that consumers’ behavior and perceptions of the foodscape differ when there are doors or no doors on the cabinets. The paper thereby contributes to servicescape research by focusing on a particular part of supermarkets – the foodscape for chilled groceries–and by enhancing the understanding of environmental variables in the servicescape. The results further show how doors lead to different forms of approach or avoidance behavior in terms of accessibility and that consumers’ vision, olfaction and tactility all influence consumers’ perceptions of freshness and cleanliness in relation to doors or no doors. Our results also have practical implications for retailers who are designing new stores or considering changes in existing store layouts.

  • 13.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. SP Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Salomonson, Nicklas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Sundström, Malin
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Wendin, Karin
    Sveriges Tekniska Forskningsinstitut.
    Doors or no doors: consumers behaviour and experiences when purchasing chilled foods in supermarkets2016In: The 5th Nordic Retail and Wholesale Conference: NRWC 2016, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Salomonsson, Nicklas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Karin, Wendin
    SP.
    Sundström, Malin
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Doors or no doors: consumers’ behaviour and experiences when purchasing chilled food in supermarkets2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies have shown that it is of importance to keep the chilled air inside the

    cabinet for refrigerated food. Accordingly, the physical environment in front of the

    cabinets affect both the thermal comfort for consumer and personnel, the energy usage

    for the supermarket and the quality for the chilled food products. Knowledge on what

    consumers experience and how they behave in-store when introduced to vertical

    cabinets with doors for chilled food creates new business opportunities for retailers, as

    well as saving energy. Most consumers are aware of environmental issues and the need

    of energy savings, however they lack knowledge on the impact by fitting doors on

    cabinets in stores, besides energy savings, doors might also prevent consumers from

    buying products from closed cabinets. There is a strong need to develop a deeper

    understanding from the consumers´ behaviors in order to understand and improve the

    servicescape and shopping experience in supermarkets were refrigerated food is

    displayed.

    The purpose of this study is to investigate what consumers perceive and how they

    behave in supermarket store settings when being introduced to closed vertical display

    cabinets for chilled food. In doing so, we elaborate on the servicescape literature and

    how the influence of servicescapes might be used in order to develop the understanding

    of how new technique might facilitate the provision of service offerings in-store. From

    the qualitative consumer study, we underline the importance of considering the physical

    environment as well as sensory perception and experiences when introducing doors on

    cabinets in a supermarket. The experiences, insights and definitions about freshness in

    parallel with consumer behaviour with or without doors on the cabinets for refrigerated

    food is further discussed.

    Keywords: consumer, behaviour, supermarket, sensory, servicescape

    Subject classification codes: include these here if the journal requires them

  • 15.
    Persson, Nils-Krister
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Baghaei, Behnaz
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bashir, Tariq
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Brorström, Björn
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Hedegård, Lars
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Carlson Ingdahl, Tina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Löfström, Mikael
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Oudhuis, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pettersson, Anita
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Påhlsson, Birgitta
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kumar Ramamoorthy, Sunil
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Richards, Tobias
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Åkesson, Dan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Re: en ny samhällssektor spirar2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Resurser och hållbarhet är nära förknippade. Hållbarhet innebär att hushålla med resurser - materiella, miljömässiga och mänskliga. Och hushållning är per definition kärnan i ekonomi. Man börjar alltmer se framväxten av en hel arsenal av verktyg och förhållnings- och angreppssätt för att bygga hållbarhet. Detta förenas av ett synsätt att det som hitintills setts  om avfall och värdelöst, och rent utav besvärligt att ta hand om, nu blir en värdefull resurs. Det glömda och gömda kommer åter. Faktum är att många ord och begrepp kring detta börjar på just åter- eller re- . Internationellt talar man om Redesign, Recycling, Remake, Recycle, Recraft, Reuse, Recreate, Reclaim, Reduce, Repair, Refashion.

    Vad är då allt detta? Ja, vill man dra det långt, är det inte mindre än framväxten av ett nyvunnet sätt att tänka, ja av en ny samhällssektor, en bransch och en industri,  sammanbundet av filosofin att återanvändningen, spillminskningen, vidarebruket, efterlivet anses som viktiga faktorer för ett miljömedvetet samhälle. Re: blir paraplytermen för detta. I denna antologi av forskare från skilda discipliner vid Högskolan i Borås lyfts ett antal av dessa begrepp inom Re: fram.

  • 16.
    Radon, Anita
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Johansson, Pia
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Sundström, Malin
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Alm, Håkan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Behre, Martin
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Göbel, Hannes
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Hallqvist, Carina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Hernandez, Niina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Hjelm-Lidholm, Sara
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    König, Rikard
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Löfström, Tuwe
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Sundell, Håkan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Wallström, Stavroula
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    What happens when retail meets research?: Special session2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    special session Information

    We are witnessing the beginning of a seismic shift in retail due to digitalization. However, what is meant by digitalization is less clear. Sometimes it is understood as means for automatization and sometimes it is regarded as equal to e-commerce. Sometimes digitalization is considered being both automatization and e-commerce trough new technology. In recent years there has been an increase in Internet and mobile devise usage within the retail sector and e-commerce is growing, encompassing both large and small retailers. Digital tools such as, new applications are developing rapidly in order to search for information about products based on price, health, environmental and ethical considerations, and also to facilitate payments. Also the fixed store settings are changing due to digitalization and at an overall level; digitalization will lead to existing business models being reviewed, challenged and ultimately changed. More specifically, digitalization has consequences for all parts of the physical stores including customer interface, knowledge creation, sustainability performance and logistics. As with all major shifts, digitalization comprises both opportunities and challenges for retail firms and employees, and these needs to be empirically studied and systematically analysed. The Swedish Institute for Innovative Retailing at University of Borås is a research centre with the aim of identifying and analysing emerging trends that digitalization brings for the retail industry.

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