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  • 1.
    Andersson, R.
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Ottosson, T.
    University of Borås, Professional Services. University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Larsson, J.
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    A Case Study: A quality approach to managing supply chain risks.2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Carlsson, Jan
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Gwilt, Alison
    Sheffield Hallam University, UK.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Mattila, Heikki
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Torstensson, Håkan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lidström, Anna
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Feasibility of conditional design: Organizing a circular textile value chain by design principles2017Report (Other academic)
  • 3. Larsson, J.
    Agent-based modelling in fashion demand chains.2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4. Larsson, J
    et al.
    Petersson, J
    A Multiple Choise System for Designing Knitted Fashion Garments.2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5. Larsson, J
    et al.
    Petersson, J
    Agent-based modelling in fashion demand chains.2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Customer Perspective on Mass-customized Knitwear2012In: Fashion Practice: the journal of design, creative process & the fashion industry, ISSN 1756-9370, E-ISSN 1756-9389, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 177-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knit on Demand is a research project at the Swedish School of Textiles in collaboration with the knitwear producer Ivanhoe AB and the fashion retailer SOMconcept. The background to the project is the unpredict- able fashion market where garments are often produced on a forecast and not on actual demand. The essence of Knit on Demand is to let the customers themselves design the garments. Sales started in SOMcon- cept’s store in PUB Huset, Stockholm, in September 2009 and ended in December 2010. The aim of this article is to find out what factors are crucial in the customer’s experience of buying a mass-customized garment. By interviewing customers about the customization process, analyzing customer orders, and observing the customization process conclusions can be drawn.

  • 7.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Mass customised fashion: development and testing of a responsive supply chain for mass customised fashion garments2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The background to this thesis is the dynamics and institutions of the fashion world. They have developed out of reasons of convenience and on the whole they work, but there are possibilities of improvement. Time from style and colour-direction to market is up to 18 months, from design to market 12 months and from forecast to market six months. With such long lead-times, there will be a few inherited problems such as matching supply and demand and offering sizes to people with non-standard body shapes. Some of the problems are related to mass and volumes, it is simply not possible to produce garments that fit everybody’s needs and to keep them in stock. The result of the long lead-times and need for mass and volume is low forecast performance, a forecast error of ±40% six months prior to the season is not unusual, which in turn leads to a sell-through percentage of about 60 percent. To adress some the problems of the fashion world a research initiative called Knit on Demand has been developed. It is a research project at the Swedish School of Textiles, in collaboration with the knitwear manufaturer Ivanhoe AB and the fashion retailer SOMconcept AB. The purpose of the project was to “…develop and test a new production and logistic solution for agility in customer relations.” To fulfill the purpose of the project, a supply chain for customised knitwear was set up and then tested. Customers customised and bought their garments at SOMconcept in Stockholm; the order was then transferred to Ivanhoe who produced the garment and then delivered it to the customer within a couple of weeks. The supply chain has been analysed on supply chain performance, customer behaviour, design and technology. In addition to the Knit on Demand supply chain, SOMconcept’s other products have been analysed and a simulation of Shima Seikis Ordermade system has been performed. The methods in the thesis are mostly qualitative with elements of quantitativeness. An action research methodology was applied to develop the project and then a number of case studies and simulations. The results show that most of the customers that are purchasing mass customised garments are niche customers that would have problems finding garments that fit them in the conventional fashion outlet. Important to the customers are service in the store and the experience of customising their garments. Since a mass customisation concept works on niche markets it would benefit from the Long Tail economy that gives better access to niche customers.

  • 8.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    One-piece fashion: Demand driven supply chain management2009Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The fashion market is characterised by short life cycles, low predictability, and high impulse purchasing. In order to respond to these characteristics, companies are constantly introducing new collections and models. There are now so many new models introduced that the seasons have been erased and the leader of fast fashion, Zara, introduces 211 new models each week. Not all of these garments are sold at full price—the sell-through factor in fashion, which indicates how many of the total SKUs are sold at full price, is approximately 65 percent. One of the reasons why so much must be sold at a reduced price is that the fashion companies might have created a new buying behaviour among their customers by offering everything quickly. This new buying behaviour cannot be answered with traditional supply-chain management. Knit-on-Demand is a research project in the Swedish School of Textiles. The objective of the project is to demonstrate a production method for knitwear that may strongly influence the ability of the fashion industry to meet new demands for agility in customer relations. It will also provide insight and transparency in the total cost picture related to logistics and supply chain management, which leads to improved decision support in outsourcing and off-shoring strategies and may contribute to increased local fashion production. Knit-on-Demand differs from traditional garment manufacturing since nothing is produced to forecast and everything is produced to order from the end customer. Together with Ivanhoe AB, a producer of knitwear, and SOMconcept, a tailored fashion retailer, the idea of on-demand knitting has developed into a business concept where the customer is allowed to design their own garments. The customer chooses his or her fit, colour and model, places an order, and one week later the garment is delivered. The customer is not completely free in his or her design because the quality and lead-times of the production processes have to be guaranteed. Therefore, the process is really more a configuration of pre-engineered modules. The methods used are case studies with some action research as the researchers have taken an active role in the development of the project. Mass customisation as a concept and on-demand business have great potential to decrease wasteful overproduction of garments and benefit the customer, company, and society: The customer receives a garment that better fits his or her needs, the company is able to meet customer demand more accurately, and society does not have to pay for overproduction.

  • 9.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Re:think: towards positive impact2016In: Re:: en ny  samhällssektor spirar / [ed] Nils-Krister Persson, Borås: Högskolan i Borås, 2016, , p. 2p. 55-56Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The Long Tail of Fashion2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With Internet as an increasingly important factor in world economy new methods of doing business has evolved. The long tail economy first became evident in the music and book industry. Record labels are no longer making huge profits on selling records due to free downloads in peer-to-peer networks but also due to the development of on-line music stores like iTunes and similar solutions where the consumer can choose freely between a wider selection of products. Not only is the long tail economy visible in music and film industry but also in the fashion market where there is an increasing number of small online stores and fashion blogs driving the demand down the long tail of products. And not only are consumers buying their way down the tail, revenues are also moving down the tail as blogers are earning by advertising in affiliated networks. Drivers in the new economy are the Internet, the democratization of production- and distribution tools and the connection of demand and supply. Which has made it possible for everybody with a computer and an Internet connection to produce and distribute music, films and to some extent consumer goods. The market is no longer as hit driven as in the past but increasingly driven by the niches and the future of business is selling less of more. In the long tail economy the 80/20 rule is no longer that evident - we are moving down the long tail of products and services

  • 11. Larsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Andersson, P
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Petersson, J
    Knit on Demand: Simulation of an Agile Production and Shop Model for Fashion Products.2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Larsson, Jonas Larsson
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Atacac AB.
    Johansson, Mats
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Hernandez, Niina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    From Roll to Bag: D5.2 Final Product Construction Report2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the final product construction report for the From Roll to Bag project. The purpose of this report is to present the implementation of the new pattern technology to selected products and to present the modularity for consumer selection. For fulfilling the tasks (5.1 and 5.2) two garments where chosen, one jacket and one shirt, and customization options regarding fit, model, colour and function were developed for each of them. This includes implementation of novel pattern technology to products, graphics, a product architecture with customisation options and initial production tests to verify perfect fit in production and later in use. The more challenging part was to guarantee manufacturability as the patterns require automated manufacturing equipment due to their detailed construction and the pattern matching. Such equipment includes a cutter with a scanner that identifies the outline of the printed pattern and cuts accoringly. If garments with less detailed graphics are considered for production, pre-dyed fabrics can be used and that requires less investments in manufacturing equipment. Such set up would miss one point of the project but in the tradeoff between investment cost and product price point it may be a viable solution. The garments and customization modules are also fit for production but in order to achieve a detailed production evaluation with exact production times and material consumption a long run of products is needed. Considerations about customer’s experiences in this type value chains are also discussed.

  • 13.
    Larsson, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Mouwitz, Pia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Design for Mass Customized Knitted Garments2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Historically it has been only for the rich to have their suits, jackets, shoes and sweaters tailored. The rest of the population had to buy standard of the shelf mass-produced products. But as information technology and production techniques are refined, customized goods are made affordable to the masses and as volume goes up, prices go down. An increasingly number of companies is now offering customized goods to affordable prices and sometimes even cheaper then a mass produced garment. The idea is to offer the customer a garment that better suits his or her needs on fit, design and function. The main purpose of the paper is to analyse in what ways design for customization differs from regular design and how to build product architecture for customized knitwear. The challenge is to find out how many and which choices the customer should be able do in order to feel that he or she is designing the garment and translate these choices into a fully functioning concept. Customized garments generally need to be pre-engineered in order to assure lead-times, production-cost and quality, so the design cannot be completely free.

  • 14.
    Larsson, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Mouwitz, Pia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Peterson, Joel
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Knit on Demand: mass customisation of knitted fashion products2009In: Nordic Textile Journal, ISSN 1404-2487Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s fashion market is characterized by short life cycles, low predictability and high impulse purchasing. Many fashion companies are responding to this by constantly introducing new collections. Zara, which is considered to be the leader of fashion are introducing as many as 211 new models per week. One of the drawbacks of Zara’s and others’ methods is the resulting overproduction; many garments have to be sold to reduced price or are thrown away. An average of one third of the collections is considered waste. It costs money for the fashion companies; it reduces the sell-through factor and wastes natural resources. Knit on Demand is a research project at the Swedish School of Textiles that aims to reduce the waste and increase the sell-through factor and service level. A local producer of knitwear and a retailer of tailored fashion in Stockholm also participate in the project. The purpose of the project is to test new methods of supply chain management and to analyse whether mass customization is applicable on knitwear. There are several benefits with mass customised garments: the customer receives a garment that is better suited to his or her needs, the producer does not have to make garments on forecast, and the environment and natural resources are spared because only what is bought by the end consumer is produced and shipped.

  • 15.
    Larsson, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Peterson, Joel
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Evaluation of risks in a supply chain for customised knitwear2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of this paper It is generally accepted that short lead-times, postponement of processes and production close to the market decrease risk in supply chains. Knit-on-demand is a research project at the Swedish School of Textiles in collaboration with a knitwear manufacturer and a fashion retailer. In the project a business concept for mass customised knitwear has been developed and tested. This paper presents an evaluation of a risk analysis performed in 2007 on the Knit on Demand project. The evaluation in 2011 is made to conclude whether risks decreased with the mass customisation concept and if the expected results were the same as the outcome. Methodology The case study method is used and sources of evidence are interviews, documents, and value stream mapping. The data from the case studies are then converged in a “What-if” analysis. Findings The evaluation revealed how the risk level changes in a supply chain when introducing a mass customisation concept for fashion garments. Practical implications The concept was tested in its business environment for one year and four months. The tools developed for managing supply chain complexity and -risk in the Knit on Demand project are applicable to conventional knitwear production as well.

  • 16.
    Larsson, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Peterson, Joel
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Carlsson, Jan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Andersson, Peter
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Knit On Demand: Simulation of an agile production and shop model for fashion products2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In fashion business customer demand is changing due to fashion trends and new designs. Time from customer demand to customer demand fulfillment is essential for company’s ability to compete in the fashion retailing business. During the last 20 years there has been a dramatic technical development in the production of flat knitted garments. This has made it possible to rationalize design and production in a way that it’s possible to make a knitted garment ready made directly in the knitting machine, with a minimum of after coming processes. Objective of this paper is to present a design, production and shop model for the “Knit on Demand” concept and show of how this new production technology could be implemented in a fast fashion logistics system. A business model with the knitting machines and production equipment located in the store is presented. The customer takes part in the design process and garments are customized to fulfill actual demand. Aim is to present a lead time simulation of design- and production processes involved in the shop concept. Result is a model with starting point in customer demand and final point in demand fulfillment. Simulation shows that the customer could have an own designed garment in 2-5 hours. Simulation of the developed shop model is done in the software tool AutoMod. Methodology for this paper is based on a research project of the Knit on demand concept idea at the University College of Borås, literature research and discussions with suppliers of knitting production equipment.

  • 17.
    Larsson, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Peterson, Joel
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Mattila, Heikki
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The Knit on Demand Supply Chain2012In: AUTEX Research Journal, ISSN 1470-9589, E-ISSN 2300-0929, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 67-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As customers’ tastes become more differentiated, so must companies’ offerings evolve. The demand for variety may soon become unmanageable, and several companies are addressing this trend by adopting a system of mass customisation. One project, Knit on Demand, has been conducted by the Swedish School of Textiles in close collaboration with a knitting company and a retailer of tailored fashion in Stockholm. Production and sales of customised products pose logistical challenges for the companies involved, including the one-piece flow through almost the entire supply chain and the demand for short lead times in an otherwise slow environment, adding to the cost of manufacturing mass customised garments. Customisation has logistical benefits such as minimized inventory; hence, high inventory turnover and the possibility of fast response to meet customer demand. The Knit on Demand concept can be considered as leagile because it comprises both lean and agile components. It is lean in the manufacturing stage upstream and agile downstream to better respond to customer demand on the market.

  • 18.
    Larsson, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Peterson, Joel
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Mouwitz, Pia
    One-piece fashion, summary of Knit on Demand2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Knit on Demand is a research project at the Swedish School of Textiles in collaboration with Ivanhoe AB and SOMconcept AB. The purpose of the project is to test new production methods for knitwear that could strongly influence the fashion industry's need for agility. In autumn 2009 sales started in Stockholm. The project stands on three legs; design, knitting technology and logistics and the purpose of the paper is to describe the Knit on Demand project from these three perspectives. Designing the garments and the system was the most time consuming part of the project since the products had to be fashionable, manufacturable and preferably not to expensive so a few trade offs hade to be made. Look was however considered essential since fashion always comes first. For knitting a combination of fully fashion and cut and sew are used so that the garments keep some of the fully fashion advantages but remains easily customisable. Logistics becomes a little bit more complicated because of the unique garments but the logistic costs does still not make up more than 3-5 percent of the sales price of a garment. Return rates are below one percent, which is rather interesting to further analysis.

  • 19. Larsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Petersson, J.
    Ett kundanpassat flervalssystem för design av textila modeprodukter.2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Larsson, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Vellesalu, Ann
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Zethraeus, Adrian
    Carlsson, Jan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Feasibility of servitization: Transforming fashion value chains to circularity through service innovation2019Report (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Mouwitz, Pia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Peterson, Joel
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Beyond mass customisation: Mass individualisation2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For some years customers have been able to purchase mass customized garments on the Internet and “Design your own...” is very often used to attract the customer. Most of the products are standard products that the customer are allowed to change in a number of predetermined ways. Design however is something more than just choosing the colour or changing the length of the arms, it also involves changing the silouette and the whole expression of the garment. The idea is to create the basis for a new type of design and manufacturing that allows true own design for everybody.

  • 22.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Harper, Sara
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Vellesalu, Ann
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Competitive manufacturing for reshoring textile and clothing supply chains to high-cost environment – A delphi approach2017In: Data Driven Supply Chains / [ed] K. S. Pawar; A. Potter and A. Lisec, Nottingham: Centre for Concurrent Enterprise, Nottingham University Business School, 2017, p. 70-80Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Existing knowledge of reshoring, enabled largely by competitive manufacturing (CM) strategies in high-cost locations, is limited particularly in context to labour-intensive industries, like textile and clothing (T&C). The purpose of the paper is to identify and prioritize various CM-related supply chain factors that can enable reshoring of T&C to high-cost area. Following a systematic literature review, a multiple round Delphi study is conducted with T&C manufacturers in Sweden to seek practitioners’ perspective. While there is high consensus on the success factors, flexibility to meet short lead times, high product/service quality, and product/service customization; low degree of agreement is reached for the perceived challenges. Some out of literature debates emerged in terms of challenges related to CM in high-cost area, regarding increased fixed costs of production, rise in inventory level due to high product variety requirement, and low skill level against access to skills. Along with the decisive knowledge on the CM-related success factors for reshored supply chains, the Delphi study offers an interesting practitioners’ perspective from a labour-intensive sector like T&C.

  • 23.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Mattila, Heikki
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Tampere University of Technology.
    Honkala, Markku
    Tampere University of Technology.
    Local fashion value chains: Success factors and competitive advantages2016In: Textiles: Inseperable from the human environment, 2016, p. 631-638Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Globalization had forced fashion companies to move their manufacturing to low cost bases. However, in the recent times several challenges like poor transparency, ethical issues, high transportation costs, long lead times, etc. have motivated major reshoring initiatives. Steadily the fashion companies in the west are relocating back their production and are motivated by trends of greater product customization, supply chain transparency and digital technologies. In addition, several initiatives have been launched to support this development, for example the US initiatives: [TC]2 “Reshoring Fashion Initiative” and “Apparel Made for You”. However detailed scholarly discussion on what enables success of such local fashion value chain models are limited. This paper explores the drivers, critical success factors and competitive advantages in designing such local fashion value chains by drawing inferences from a European initiative called “fromRolltoBag”. An action research is employed to collect empirical data through observations and interviews with the project stakeholders. Results show that the competitive success lies in designing a consumer-driven, digitally-enabled fashion value chain, enabled by the strategy of differentiation through: (i) advanced digitalization of design and manufacturing operations, (ii) flexible, integrated and agile operations, and (iii) enhanced customer experience/interaction with the extended product-service system.

  • 24.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Torstensson, Håkan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Scott, Mirja
    Feasibility of Fashion Remanufacturing: Organizing fashion value chains for circularity through remanufacturing (including redesign)2018Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the increasing need of remanufacturing in fashion industry for leading towards dematerialization, higher revalue addition, possibility to generate highest profit margin, along with create more employment in the industry, it is still practiced on a very small scale. A net-positive environmental impact however, can only be made through remanufacturing with higher scale. However research investigations on this matter are insufficient and knowledge of the practices on new value chain models, associated processes, and designers’ approach to the product development process is still limited.

    The general aim of this study is to investigate how remanufacturing can be made feasible industrially for sustainable competitiveness in the fashion industry.

    This feasibility study was conducted by Re:Textile group in collaboration with several Swedish players, e.g. fashion branded retailers, local textile and apparel manufacturers, and charities. 3 participatory action projects were developed between 2017-2018 in order to elucidate the different possibilities of organizing remanufacturing in fashion industry context, and check the viability of these options. 3 different fashion remanufacturing models were considered to be interesting via literature review, and were planned for further exploration. These were: scaled remanufacturing, distributed redesign and PSS redesign-as-a-service.

    The study identifies the key decision making variables in each of these models, the critical success factors and also in connection assessing the feasibility of each model by constructing various scenarios.

  • 25.
    Persson, Nils-Krister
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Baghaei, Behnaz
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bashir, Tariq
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Brorström, Björn
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Hedegård, Lars
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Carlson Ingdahl, Tina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Löfström, Mikael
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Oudhuis, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pettersson, Anita
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Påhlsson, Birgitta
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kumar Ramamoorthy, Sunil
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Richards, Tobias
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Åkesson, Dan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Re: en ny samhällssektor spirar2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Resurser och hållbarhet är nära förknippade. Hållbarhet innebär att hushålla med resurser - materiella, miljömässiga och mänskliga. Och hushållning är per definition kärnan i ekonomi. Man börjar alltmer se framväxten av en hel arsenal av verktyg och förhållnings- och angreppssätt för att bygga hållbarhet. Detta förenas av ett synsätt att det som hitintills setts  om avfall och värdelöst, och rent utav besvärligt att ta hand om, nu blir en värdefull resurs. Det glömda och gömda kommer åter. Faktum är att många ord och begrepp kring detta börjar på just åter- eller re- . Internationellt talar man om Redesign, Recycling, Remake, Recycle, Recraft, Reuse, Recreate, Reclaim, Reduce, Repair, Refashion.

    Vad är då allt detta? Ja, vill man dra det långt, är det inte mindre än framväxten av ett nyvunnet sätt att tänka, ja av en ny samhällssektor, en bransch och en industri,  sammanbundet av filosofin att återanvändningen, spillminskningen, vidarebruket, efterlivet anses som viktiga faktorer för ett miljömedvetet samhälle. Re: blir paraplytermen för detta. I denna antologi av forskare från skilda discipliner vid Högskolan i Borås lyfts ett antal av dessa begrepp inom Re: fram.

  • 26.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    A Multiple Choice System for Designing Knitted Fashion Garments2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last 20 years there has been a dramatic technical development in the production of flat knitted fashion garments. This has made it possible to rationalize design and production of knitted products in a way that it’s possible to make a knitted garment ready made directly in the knitting machine, with a minimum of after coming processes. Starting point is a business model with the knitting machines located in the store. The customer takes an active part in the design process and garments are customized to fulfill actual demand. The objective of this paper is to develop a model for a “multiple choice” design system. The objective is also to combine the complete garment knitting technology with the area of mass customization and show how this could be implemented in the business of fashion products. The result is an overview of the area of mass customization, complete garment knitting technology and the Knit On Demand business concept. A multiple-choice system where the customer selects style, pattern, size, color and other features of the garment in order to customize the product is presented. Methodology for this paper is an inductive approach based on a literature survey and research project at the University College of Borås.

  • 27.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Agent Based Modeling in a Fashion Demand Chains2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation tools for understanding logistics and create explanations for logistics operations are often developed under a state of stability, equilibrium and linearity whereas logistics are considered non-linear and complex. Agent based modelling provides the opportunity to build rigorous computer simulations of non-equilibrium systems and unlike other simulation methods, no agent has full knowledge about the system it operates in and the agents act on heuristics rather than on rationality, much like customers and firms in the real world. In the last twenty years the development in knitting technology has made it possible to produce entire garments in one piece with no need for time-consuming cutting and sewing processes afterwards. This gives new opportunities to produce knitted garments closer to the customer and hence being able to respond faster to shifts in demand for knitwear. Agent Based Modelling will provide an excellent opportunity to simulate a demand chain of the kind where the customer designs the garment and the garment is produced instantly. The aim is to create and present an agent-based model for the logistics operations in the Knit On Demand research project. The simulation will not only help to gain insight about the dynamics and emergent behaviours in a textile demand chain but also in demand chain management as a whole, as well as providing a base to test theoretical frameworks.

  • 28.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Textile Challenges 1/08 Mass Customization & Innovation in Retailing.2008Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of seminars called Textile Challenges provide the industry as well as public institutions with the latest news from research and development within a broad range of subjects. From fashion logistics to design management to value driven processes, these seminars form meeting-points where discussion between academy and the business world can be taken to a fruitful level. Today’s business world faces a series of challenges for the future. New customer behaviour with internet shopping and the possibility for people to get another shopping experience then before. Mass customization, in marketing, manufacturing, and management, is the use of flexible computer-aided manufacturing systems to produce custom output. The challenge is to let the customer take an active part of the design and development of the product. New retailing concepts where modern computer equipment give the customer an interactive and positive shopping experience.

  • 29.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Carlsson, Jan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Andersson, Peter
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Knit on demand: development and simulation of a production and shop model for customised knitted garments2008In: International Journal of Fashion Design, Technology and Education, ISSN 1754-3266, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 89-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of computer technology and the Internet has made mass customisation of products more common in fashion design of today. Development in production of knitted garments has made it possible to make garments ready made, directly in the knitting machine. The objective of this article is to present a design, production and shop model for the ‘‘Knit on Demand’’ concept and to show how the complete garment knitting technology could be used for customised products. A business model with production equipment located in store is presented. Customers are involved in the design process and garments are customised to fulfil actual demand. A lead time simulation of design and production processes in the shop concept is presented. Simulation in the software tool AutoModTM shows that the customer could have a self-designed garment in two to five hours.

  • 30.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Mujanovic, Malik
    Mattila, Heikki
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Mass customisation of flat knitted fashion products: simulation of the co-design process2011In: Autex Research Journal, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 6-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1995, the Japanese manufacturer Shima Seiki introduced the first complete garment knitting machine capable of producing a ready-made flat knitted article under the trade name WholeGarment. Recently, the company also developed a co-design software tool, Ordermade WholeGarment®, for the customisation of knitted fashion garments. Factory Boutique Shima, their retail shop for on-demand production of customised knitted garments, makes it possible for clients to modify a knitted garment according to personal taste in style, colour, pattern and size. This study examines how such a process streamlines the interaction between customer and shop personnel, while expediting the programming of the knitting machine. In comparing the manual co-design process with the Ordermade WholeGarment® system, we used a computer simulation to analyse the efficiency and lead times of each concept. The case study method was employed with an inductive approach based on company visits and interviews.

  • 31.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Co-design tool for customised knitwear2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a mass customisation co-design tool for knitted fashion garments, and how this tool could reduce time both in programming of the knitting machine, and in the co-design process between the customer and the company. Initial results in this paper shows that it is possibly to customise and design the fashion product with much less help than before from a shop assistant. Customer information is transformed and transferred into program code automatically, and the garment can be knitted without time consuming programming of the knitting machine. The work is based on literature study, company visits and interviews

  • 32.
    Torstensson, Håkan
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Hjort, Klas
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Ericsson, Dag
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Hållbar distanshandel2012Report (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Vellesalu, Ann
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kapsali, Veronika
    University of the Arts London.
    Crew, Julia
    University of the Arts London.
    McGee, Kathy
    University of the Arts London.
    Teunissen, Jose
    University of the Arts London.
    The hackathon model as a framework for competence mapping of research, conceptual ideation, technical realisation and entrepreneurship at masters level education for fashion-tech design2019In: INTED2019 Proceedings, Valencia, Spain, 2019Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fashion-tech is an interdisciplinary field that intersects design, natural sciences, engineering, economics and management and defined as ‘technology that enables a fashion experience for the user wearing it or interacting with it’. Benchmarking research, conducted as part of the Education for Fashion-Tech (E4FT) project funded by Erasmus+, revealed that training at Master’s Level within this field is fragmented in terms of skills and knowledge required for business and product innovation. The aim of E4FT is to enhance the knowledge and skills of learners in the novel field of fashion-tech. This study draws upon a hackathon model as a framework to assess master’s student competences in research, conceptual ideation, technical realisation and entrepreneurship in fashion tech design and product development. This paper evaluates the findings from the hackathon event to underpin the development of a bespoke MA level programme in fashion-tech design within the project. A three day hackathon, designed to test the limits of participant knowledge in the design and development process of fashion-tech products, was carried out with a participant group of 23 MA level design and management students from University of Borås, University of the Arts London and Politecnico di Milano. Data on participant experience and perception of own knowledge and skills was collated via pre- and post-event surveys and analysed using statistical analysis. Findings revealed that perceived levels of competence in research, conceptual ideation, technical realisation and entrepreneurship increased by an average of 12,6% as a result of the hackathon. Furthermore, the participants found the hackathon approach a valuable and engaging learning method.

1 - 33 of 33
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