Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 528
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1. Abylaev, Mansur
    et al.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Torstensson, Håkan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Resilience challenges for textile enterprises in a transitional economy and regional trade perspective: a study of Kyrgyz conditions2014In: International Journal of Supply Chain and Operations Resilience, ISSN 2052-868X, Vol. 1, no 1, 54-75 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to contribute to the resilience development of the textile sector in a transitional economy, based on a case study of the Kyrgyz Republic, where the transition to a free market system generated broken supply chains, low diversification, a high open economy level of the textile sector and dependence on international trade regulations. The approach used is based on theories of organisational resilience, literature studies and fieldwork. Scenarios are developed and analysed by event tree and SWOT analysis, to identify resilience properties of the textile sector. Findings focus on the implications of future membership or non-membership, respectively, in the Customs Union of Belarus, Kazakhstan and Russia, where both supportive and adverse effects have been identified. The results contribute to the knowledge of the transitional economy conditions and serve as a guideline for stakeholders about enhancing resilience, both at the industrial and organisational levels, of the Kyrgyz textile sector.

  • 2. Abylaev, Mansur
    et al.
    Torstensson, Håkan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Supply chain resilience of Kyrgyz textile companies in regional international trade integration2013In: / [ed] Pawar, KS & Rogers, H, Nottingham University Business School , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transitional period of the Kyrgyz economy from planned to free market economy modified the structure of the textile sector. The state owned big textile producers were fragmented into small sized private apparel manufacturers. The main success factor of transformation was the international trade regulation and international textile market conjuncture. Latest regionalization processes of Kyrgyz apparel exporting countries modify the existing competitive advantage of Kyrgyz apparel cluster and obligate to redesign the supply chain in order to withstand the disruption. The main purpose of the paper is to analyze the success factors of resilient supply chain during transitional period and the possibility of transferring from the global to a regional supply chain as the main resilience factor of Kyrgyz apparel companies.

  • 3.
    Agnhage, Tove
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Nierstrasz, Vincent
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Perwuelz, A.
    Guan, J.P.
    Chen, G.Q.
    Eco-design innovative methods for fabric finishing2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Rethinking design fashion: New materiality, smart products, and upcycling2014In: Swedish Design Research Journal, ISSN 2000-964X, Vol. 12, no 2, 53-60 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing operations in much of textile fashion have migrated from the developed economies to developing countries in search of cost economies. Consideration for the natural environment has been lost in the process due to lack of clarity what corporation or some other participant in what kind of an economy is most responsible. This paper is intended as a thought piece on how new materialisms offers an approach to bring back responsible concern for the natural environment in textile fashion and, perhaps, beyond.

  • 5.
    Andersen, Laerke
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The synthetic Kingdom2011Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fashioning the Future Awards has quickly established itself as the leading international student competition for design and innovation in sustainable fashion and attracts entries from all over the world. Founded by the Centre for Sustainable Fashion at London College of Fashion to celebrate and empower the next generation of fashion professionals, the aim of the awards is to employ creativity to challenge the current status quo and to redefine the shape and scope of the fashion industry. Selected finalists – who come from over 30 countries around the world including Brazil, India, Australia and Canada will have their work captured through film, photography, display and interactive media, and showcased in the East Wintergarden at Canary Wharf which will be open to the public from 11th – 13th November 2011. The exhibition will be a multi sensory experience and a beautiful representation of how solutions to some of the world’s toughest environmental imperatives will come from the next generation of designers.

  • 6.
    Andersen, Laerke
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Haim, Dana
    TBBBS2011Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    londonprintstudio’s forthcoming exhibition strategies of artists and designers who stretch and invisibly mend the codes and clothes we ‘wear’. Clothes entwine references, ironies and identities. Historically garments express a collective state of mind, status, allegiance, expressed disillusionment with authority. In the 1920’s and 1930’s, couturier Schiaparelli clothes that referenced surrealism. londonprintstudio exhibitions explore ideas and boundaries between art, popular culture and social engagement.

  • 7.
    Andersen, Laerke
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Haim, Dana
    TBBBS2011Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Culture Club by Picnic Magazine, Tel Aviv is a four-day pop-up experience which aims to showcase the dynamic and creative spirit of Israel. The Culture Club is less an exhibit and more an experience. It is a snapshot of cultural life in Israel that reflects its vibrant, creative soul; a celebration of pleasure through the senses that showcases the art of joy in a place typically characterized by politics and religion.

  • 8.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Hilletoft, Per
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Lean Six Sigma strategy in telecom manufacturing2014In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, Vol. 114, no 6, 904-921 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Lean Six Sigma strategy ensures flexible, robust, and efficient processes. However, to make them more agile in order to sustain in today’s highly competitive environment, something more is required. This could include staff training, strengthening company culture and collaborating with key partners in the supply chain.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Hilletoft, Per
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Lean Six Sigma strategy: A case study from Sweden2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Lean Six Sigma strategy ensures more flexible, robust, and efficient processes. However, to make them agile, something more is required. This could include training the staff, strengthening company culture and collaborating with key partners in the supply chain.

  • 10. Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Svensson, Victor
    Preventive maintenance is an enabler for operation excellence in support processes2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    TPM in a Lean office environment can create values both in a business and an employee dimension. In the employee dimension TPM reduces the risk of missing/forgetting areas of responsibility and creates more involvement. In the business dimension objectives such as cost, quality and supporting the reduction of waste improved. Preventive maintenance meetings can be included and performed once a month in the ordinary departmental “stand-up meetings”. Methods like 5S, which need to be updated on a continuous basis, and standardized maintenance should also be connected to the TPM work. But first all employees should be trained in order to have the same direction/behavior.

  • 11.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Torstensson, Håkan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    How to Integrate Suppliers by Training in Lean Thinking2013In: / [ed] Dahlgaard Park, Su Mi, Dahlgaard, Jens, Gomišček, Boštjan, University of Maribor , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Much research has addressed how to implement lean in a focal company, but little has been published about how to integrate suppliers in strategies and the focal company’s culture, such as lean production or lean thinking. The purpose of the article is to investigate if suppliers can become more integrated in the supply chain by training in lean thinking at the focal company and to explain a possible structure of the training. Design/methodology/approach: A multiple-case study has been conducted of the focal com- pany and five of its supply companies. The findings are supported empirically by on-site interviews and by observations, as well as by a binomial two-proportion test that was used to analyse the statistical data of the delivery precision. Findings: While the training programme does not show a conclusive result for the supply chain, it has made a difference for all participating suppliers. In most cases the training programme was a trigger that started or boosted the internal work with continuous improvements. In some cases it helped create structured ways of working and improved the internal production flows.

  • 12. Andersson, Viktor
    et al.
    Persson, Nils-Krister
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Comparative study of organic thin film tandem solar cells in alternative geometries2008In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 104, no 12, 6- p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Optical modelling of one folded tandem solar cell and four types of stacked tandem solar cells has been performed, using the finite element method and the transfer matrix method for the folded cell and the stacked cells, respectively. The results are analysed by comparing upper limits for short circuit currents and power conversion efficiencies. In the case of serial connected tandems all of the five cell types may be compared, and we find that the folded cells are comparable to stacked tandem cells in terms of currents and power conversion efficiencies.

  • 13.
    Andréasson, Annie
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Exhibition review: Nordic Award in Textiles 20082009Other (Other academic)
  • 14. Aneja, Arun
    et al.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The Quest for Continual Growth in Textiles: Innovation Diversity and Organizational Resiliency2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The brutally competitive nature globally and raw material volatility of textile industry are some of the reasons why companies cannot afford to fall behind in efficiency, innovation or organizational resiliency. The present article seeks to explore the common thread and textile-related scientific views that changed our lives through the ages. Who were the textile dream weavers and the companies that transformed our industry? In addition we explore how we can use the teachings of these lessons to build novel platforms for innovations in textiles for the future. Today, textiles and fiber science in US and Europe, from its once lofty perch in the global economy, stands in stark contrast to its preeminent position of just a decade ago. Its influence on the society as a whole has eroded enormously. Many of the synthetic fiber products that once fueled the rapid growth of the industry have become mature commodity products now characterized by low growth and lower profit margins. Intense global cost pressure, higher consumer expectations, a highly diverse customer base, shorter fashion cycles and reduced R&D spending have all contributed to the current malaise. What does the future hold and how can we reverse the trend to achieve and sustain the impressive credentials of the past? To add to the current dilemma, organizational ‘health’ and growth processes are constantly threatened in this era of turbulence. James Moore, in his book ‘The Death of Competition’ (1995) describes this dynamics as a ‘co-evolving’ one with unpredictable changes in markets, technology, workforces and organizations. Thus the drive for survival and success has translated, in recent times, to quest for resiliency – to survive and thrive in turbulences. On the other hand, most managers and academicians agree that innovation ensures superior organizational performance while recent research has shown that most resilient companies can dynamically orchestrate diverse innovation strategies. This has intensified the organization’s search for differentiated products and services, processes, business models, technology, strategies etc. pushing firms to gain competitive advantage and also to develop new knowledge and innovation performances to drive sustainable growth. This has resulted in organizations to follow multiple innovation strategies and to prudently devise their innovation repertoire for delivering growth, hence, success in turbulent times emphasizing resiliency. In this paper, authors diagnose an organization’s innovation in terms of the tendency to utilize its resources and dynamic capabilities, and streamline them along an ‘innovation topology’ viewed through a two dimensional matrix of (i) locus of development - innovation either internal or external to the organization, and (ii) change in performance - innovation either in use or being created newly. The portfolio of innovation strategies include sustaining innovation (internal) or through mergers and acquisitions (M&A)/joint ventures (JV) (by extending firm boundary) but using existing resources and capabilities in both cases; or radical/break-through innovations (creating new capacities internally) or disruptive/transformational innovation (exploring and creating new capacities beyond existing boundaries). A case study approach is adopted using Du Pont Company with its unparallel 200 years of ‘history of innovation and transformation’ for validating the proposed model. This is seminal from both business and academic theory-building perspective for devising unique innovation repertoire and organizational resiliency for continual growth.

  • 15. Aneja, Arun
    et al.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Militky, Jiri
    Kupka, Karel
    Kremenakova, Dana
    Torstensson, Håkan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Textile Thru the Looking Glass: A Novel Perspective2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, textiles and fiber science in US, Europe and Japan from its once lofty perch in the global economy, stands in stark contrast to its preeminent position of few decades ago. Its influence on the society as a whole has eroded enormously. Many of the synthetic fiber products that once fuelled the rapid growth of the industry have become mature commodity products now characterized by low growth and lower profit margins. To add to the current dilemma, organizational ‘health’ and growth processes are constantly threatened in this era of turbulence. Thus the drive for survival and success has translated, in recent times, to quest for resiliency – to survive and thrive in turbulences. On the other hand, most managers and academicians agree that innovation ensures superior organizational performance while recent research has shown that most resilient companies can dynamically orchestrate diverse innovation strategies. Resiliency in such a context has become a prerequisite for a sustained long term business prosperity fuelled by diverse technological innovations. This has intensified the organization’s search for differentiated products and services, processes, business models, technology, strategies etc. pushing firms to gain competitive advantage and also to develop new knowledge and innovation performance to drive sustainable growth. Organizations now follow multiple innovation strategies to pragmatically devise their innovation repertoire for delivering growth, hence, success in turbulent times while emphasizing resiliency. What does the future hold and how can we reverse the trend to achieve and sustain the impressive credentials of the past? To understand the significance of what the future may hold, and to reverse the downward spiral of the industry, we must evaluate the successes and failures of the past and come to grips with rapid global changes and turbulences currently underway. The present article seeks to explore such an inexorable phenomenon of quantifying and correlating innovation and business resiliency over a time line, from the annual financial data of 35 healthy and unhealthy companies along with 5 textile companies over a span of few decades. These are then extrapolated with certain predictive capabilities to suggest future trends and strategies for the textile companies. Learning from these companies, if adopted, will yield capacity to transform the scenario. Assessments and classification of the economic health of a company is typically made based on some quantity derived from selected indices, such as Altman’s Z-score. These methods can describe an instantaneous status, or a “time snap” of an economical subject but lack information about the time-dynamics of the assessment, which is important for investors, shareholders and the management. We suggest using historical data to estimate current trends in the form of the first and second time-derivative of the appropriate quantity in the time domain. This new information is independent on the quantity itself and beside more precise description can be used as new predictor to improve effectiveness of classification of successful and unsuccessful subjects. This approach is further discussed in this paper.

  • 16. Aronsson, Hanna
    et al.
    Hjort, Klas
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Näslund, Hanna
    Torstensson, Håkan
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Service delivery requirements of mail order/e-commerce customers: an important consumer insight2010In: Proceedings of Nofoma 2010, Kolding, NOFOMA , 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, mail order and e-commerce organisations view the consumers as one entity, meaning there is no differentiation of service. Research has shown that return levels depend on both age and lead-time, and consequently end user requirements are of great interest. This study investigates expected lead-time service requirements of one organisations mail order/e-commerce customers and measures the gap between the expected and the specified service. A case study was performed with one of the leading Swedish mail order/e-commerce organisations. The descriptive study combined qualitative and quantitative data answering questions regarding the consumer’s requirements and how they vary depending on age. This research is based on primary data from a customer survey with answers from more than 6 000 respondents. The proposition that the gap between specified and expected customer service requirements varies with age and lead-time was supported, thus indicating that mail order and e-commerce organisations should work closer with their customers. They should likely segment their customers and differentiate their service delivery. The presented research results describe what service requirements regarding lead-time are, and how they vary with age for customers of one organisation. There is a gap between the customers’ service requirements and the service specified/delivered by the case organisation and the gap varies with age as proposed. The only normative statement is that close cooperation between the case organisation and its customers is vital. How customers should be categorized and how to differentiate the service delivery will be topics of further research.

  • 17.
    Aspers, Patrik
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Economic Sociology2011In: Encyclopedia of Consumer Culture / [ed] D Southerton, Sage , 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Aspers, Patrik
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Markets2011Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Our lives have gradually become dominated by markets. They are not only at the heart of capitalistic economies all over the world, but also central in public debates. This insightful book brings together existing knowledge on markets from sociology, economics and anthropology, and systematically investigates the different forms of markets we encounter daily in our social lives. Aspers starts by defining what a market actually is, analyzing its essential elements as well as its necessary preconditions and varied consequences. An important theme in the book is that a whole host of markets are embedded within one other and in social life at large, and Aspers discusses these in the context of other forms of economic coordination, such as networks and organizations. Combining theory with empirical examples, the book cuts to the core of understanding how different markets function, the role they have played in history, and how they come into being. This accessible and theoretically rich book will be essential reading for upper-level students seeking to make sense of markets and their complex role in social life.

  • 19.
    Aspers, Patrik
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Markets, Evaluations and Rankings2011In: Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, ISSN 0172-6404, Vol. 36, no 3, 19-33 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Aspers, Patrik
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Value in Markets2011In: The Worth of Goods: Valuation and Pricing in the Economy / [ed] J Beckert, Patrik Aspers, Oxford University Press , 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Aspers, Patrik
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Darr, Asaf
    Trade shows and the creation of market and industry2011In: Sociological Review, ISSN 0038-0261, E-ISSN 1467-954X, Vol. 59, no 4, 758-778 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses the question of the constitution of markets in advanced societies. Specifically, the article studies the role of the traveling trade show in creating the real time computing market, which is part of the US electronics sector, during the mid-1990’s. Real time computing products assist the transfer, storage and processing of digital signals in real time and support many of the internet applications we use today.By applying ethnographic methods,we explore the general question of how economic actors cope with uncertainty in the phase of market-making and at the cutting edge of technology. The paper makes two contributions to the existing literature. First, it shows that the attempt to organize a trade show in real time computing was triggered by the uncertainty experienced by sellers regarding the identity of prospective buyers and about the exact use to which they would put the emergent technology which is offered for sale. Secondly, we trace the history of an emergent market.We claim that trade shows for innovative products are important venues at which markets coalesce.The identification and ordering of market actors, the institutionalization of a distinct business culture and the social networks developed among market actors and across the subsidiary markets provided the basic social infrastructure for what later became known as the real time computing industry.

  • 22.
    Aspers, Patrik
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Godart, Frederic
    Sociology of Fashion: Order and Change2013In: Annual Review of Sociology, ISSN 0360-0572, E-ISSN 1545-2115, Vol. 39, 171-192 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we bring together the existing sociological knowledge on fashion, and the main part of the review is of classical and recent sociological work. To further the development of this largely interdisciplinary field, we also highlight the key points of research in other disciplines. We define fashion as an unplanned process of recurrent change against a backdrop of order in the public realm. We clarify this definition after tracing the origins and history of fashion. As a social phenomenon, fashion has been culturally and economically significant since the dawn of Modernity, and has increased in importance with the emergence of mass markets, both in terms of production and consumption. Most research on fashion is concerned with dress, but we argue that there are no domain restrictions that should constrain fashion theories. We identify venues around which sociologists could develop further research on the topic of fashion.

  • 23.
    Baghaei, Behnaz
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Berglin, Lena
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Tailoring of the mechanical and thermal properties of hemp/PLA hybrid yarn composites2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we worked on improving the orientation of hemp fibres in composites by using our recent development of co-wrapped yarn structures. We investigated the influence of fibre content and wrap density on the properties of composites. Composites were fabricated by compression moulding of 0/90 bidirectional prepregs. Compared to neat PLA, the tensile and flexural modulus and the strength of the PLA-hemp composites were significantly higher as a result of the increased fibre content. Impact strength of the composites decreased initially up to 10 mass % fibre loading, but even higher fibre loading caused an improvement in impact strength. From the DMTA results, it was evident that incorporation of the fibres gives a considerable increase in storage modulus and a decrease in tan δ values. From the general trend in the results obtained, it can be affirmed that co-wrapped hybrid yarn with lower wrapping density leads to lower mechanical properties in the composite. The study performed with DSC revealed that the crystallisation temperature of the hemp-reinforced PLA composites decreased compared to pure PLA, which indicates that the hemp fibres hinder the migration and diffusion of PLA molecular chains to the surface of the nucleus in the composites.

  • 24.
    Baghaei, Behnaz
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Berglin, Lena
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Tailoring of the mechanical and thermal properties of hemp/PLA hybrid yarn composites2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we worked on improving the orientation of hemp fibres in composites by using our recent development of co-wrapped yarn structures. We investigated the influence of fibre content and wrap density on the properties of composites. Composites were fabricated by compression moulding of 0/90 bidirectional prepregs. Compared to neat PLA, the tensile and flexural modulus and the strength of the PLA-hemp composites were significantly higher as a result of the increased fibre content. Impact strength of the composites decreased initially up to 10 mass % fibre loading, but even higher fibre loading caused an improvement in impact strength. From the DMTA results, it was evident that incorporation of the fibres gives a considerable increase in storage modulus and a decrease in tan δ values. From the general trend in the results obtained, it can be affirmed that co-wrapped hybrid yarn with lower wrapping density leads to lower mechanical properties in the composite. The study performed with DSC revealed that the crystallisation temperature of the hemp-reinforced PLA composites decreased compared to pure PLA, which indicates that the hemp fibres hinder the migration and diffusion of PLA molecular chains to the surface of the nucleus in the composites.

  • 25.
    Baghaei, Behnaz
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Berglin, Lena
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Hybrid natural fibre reinforcements and prepregs for thermoplastic composites with improved performance and properties2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Baghaei, Behnaz
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Berglin, Lena
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Manufacture and characterisation of thermoplastic composites made from PLA/hemp co-wrapped hybrid yarn prepregs2013In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 50, 93-101 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PLA/hemp co-wrapped hybrid yarns were produced by wrapping PLA filaments around a core composed of a 400 twists/m and 25 tex hemp yarn (Cannabis Sativa L) and 18 tex PLA filaments. The hemp content varied between 10 and 45 mass%, and the PLA wrapping density around the core was 150 and 250 turns/metre. Composites were fabricated by compression moulding of 0/90 bidirectional prepregs, and characterised regarding porosity, mechanical strength and thermal properties by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Mechanical tests showed that the tensile and flexural strengths of the composites markedly increased with the fibre content, reaching 59.3 and 124.2 MPa when reinforced with 45 mass% fibre, which is approximately 2 and 3.3 times higher compared to neat PLA. Impact strength of the composites decreased initially up to 10 mass% fibre; while higher fibre loading (up to 45 mass%) caused an increase in impact strength up to 26.3 KJ/m2, an improvement of about 2 times higher compared to neat PLA. The composites made from the hybrid yarn with a wrapping density of 250 turns/metre showed improvements in mechanical properties, due to the lower porosity. The fractured surfaces were investigated by scanning electron microscopy to study the fibre/matrix interface.

  • 27.
    Baghaei, Behnaz
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Berglin, Lena
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Ramamoorthy, Sunil Kumar
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Hemp/PLA Co-Wrapped Hybrid Yarns For Structured Thermoplastic Composites2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, natural fibre-reinforced polymer composites have been attracting attention from the viewpoint of reducing the impact on the natural environment. Currently, the use of thermoplastic resins in composites is clearly of higher potential than the use of thermoset. There are many thermoplastic polymers derived from renewable raw materials, which are also biodegradable. Polylactic acid (PLA) is one such candidate, and it shows rather good properties that are suitable for applications that do not require long-term durability or elevated mechanical performance at higher temperatures. In order to make their possible use in many technical applications more attractive, the mechanical properties of the PLA can be enhanced by using reinforcements. Hemp fibres can be considered to be a good choice for reinforcing polymer composites, due to their high stiffness, strength, and aspect ratio. Highly ordered textile reinforcements, such as interlaced woven fabrics and unidirectional fabrics made from natural-fibre yarns, perform considerably better than random non-woven mats in natural-fibre composites. At present, the commercially available plant-fibre yarns are not intended for structural composites, but for textiles, which have entirely different demands on the yarns. Thus, work is needed to tailor-make the best plant-fibre yarn for reinforcement of composites. This also includes investigation of the possibility of combining plant-fibre yarns with the matrix polymer in fibre form into one hybrid yarn (a composite preform), and how to do it (twisting or blending). It is well known that fibres provide the highest strength and stiffness when they are continuous and aligned in the direction of the applied load. Natural fibres are naturally discontinuous and conventional spun staple yarns tend to be highly twisted, which leads to fibre misalignment and poor resin wet-out. The structured natural-fibre composites reported so far are based on twisted yarns produced by long-established conventional spinning methods, mainly ring spinning. In this paper, we report our work on improving the orientation of hemp fibres in composites by using our recent development of co-wrapped yarn structures. This novel co-wrapped yarn consists of low twist and very fine hemp yarns next to PLA filaments in the core part, which are wrapped by PLA filaments. By varying the composition of hybrid yarn, it is possible to vary the hemp fibre content from 10 to 45 wt %. An exciting recent advancement has been a new family of aligned natural-fibre reinforcements, which has overcome these issues by using low twist yarns. We also report the influence of fibre content and wrap density (number of wraps per unit length) on the properties of composites. Before compression moulding, multilayer 0/90 bidirectional hybrid yarn prepregs were prepared by winding the hybrid yarn around a steel rectangular frame. We investigated the mechanical and thermo-mechanical properties of hemp-reinforced PLA composites. Compared to neat PLA, the tensile and flexural modulus and the strength of the PLA-hemp composites were significantly higher as a result of the increased fibre content. Impact strength of the composites decreased initially up to 10 wt % fibre loading, but even higher fibre loading caused an improvement in impact strength. From the DMTA results, it is evident that incorporation of the fibres gives a considerable increase in storage modulus and a decrease in tan δ values. These results show the reinforcing effect of hemp on PLA matrix. From the general trend in the results obtained, it can be affirmed that co-wrapped hybrid yarn with lower wrapping density leads to lower mechanical properties in the composite. The study performed with DSC revealed that the glass transition temperature and the crystalline melting point of PLA were not affected significantly after reinforcement with hemp. The crystallisation temperature of the hemp-reinforced PLA composites decreased compared to pure PLA, which indicates that the hemp fibres hinder the migration and diffusion of PLA molecular chains to the surface of the nucleus in the composites. No noteworthy differences in calorimetric data from DSC for composites were observed between the hybrid yarn preforms with different wrapping density. Future work will concentrate on efforts to evaluate the biodegradability of these developing and promising composites.

  • 28.
    Bartley, Kristina
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Berggren Torell, Viveka
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Oudhuis, Margareta
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Motherhood and blogs about children’s fashion2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Bashir, Tariq
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Ali, Majid
    Cho, Sung-Woo
    Persson, Nils-Krister
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    OCVD polymerization of PEDOT: effect of pre-treatment steps on PEDOT-coated conductive fibers and a morphological study of PEDOT distribution on textile yarns2013In: Polymers for Advanced Technologies, ISSN 1042-7147, E-ISSN 1099-1581, Vol. 24, no 2, 210-219 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The functionalization of textile fibers with intrinsically conductive polymers has become a prominent research area throughout the world. A number of coating techniques have already been utilized and optimized to get the uniform layers of conductive polymers on the surface of different substrates. In our previous study, we produced poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)-coated conductive fibers by employing oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD) technique. This paper describes the effects of pre-treatment steps, such as surface treatment of textile fibers with organic solvents, drying of oxidant-enriched fibers at variable temperatures and time, and oxidant type on the electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties of PEDOT-coated conductive fibers. Two well-known oxidants, ferric(III)chloride and ferric(III)p-toluenesulfonate (FepTS), were studied, and then their results were compared. In order to verify the PEDOT-coated layer and, to some extent, its impregnation inside the viscose yarns, a morphological study was carried out by using the attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging technique and computed tomography scanning across the obtained conductive fibers. Differential scanning calorimetric and thermogravimetric analysis were utilized to investigate the thermal properties and the contents of PEDOT in PEDOT-coated fibers. The mechanical properties of conductive fibers were evaluated by tensile strength testing of produced fibers. Effects of all of these pre-treatment steps on electrical properties were analyzed with Kiethly picoammeter. This study cannot only be exploited to improve the properties of conductive fibers but also to optimize the oCVD process for the production of conductive textile fibers by coating with different conjugated polymers.

  • 30.
    Beckert, J
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Aspers, PatrikUniversity of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The Worth of Goods: Valuation and Pricing in the Economy2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Interdisciplinary contributions from sociology, economics, political science, and marketing Presents empirical studies of both financial and some unusual markets - wine, art, fashion Pioneering work at intersection of sociology, economics, and marketing Chapters by leading international scholars in economic sociology Revisits both established theories of value and current thinking How do we place value on goods - and, importantly, why? Valuation and pricing are core issues in the market economy, but understanding of these concepts and their interrelation is weak. In response, The Worth of Goods takes a sociological approach to the perennial but timely question of what makes a product valuable. Structured in three parts, it first examines value in the broader sense - moral values and how they are formed, and the relations between economic and non-economic values - discussing such matters as the value of an oil spill, the price of a scientific paper, value in ethical consumption, and imaginative value. The second part discusses the issues surrounding valuation in aesthetic markets, specifically wine, fashion models, art, and the creative industries. The third part analyzes valuation in financial markets - credit rating agencies, stock exchange markets, and industrial production. This pioneering volume brings together leading social scientists to provide a range of theoretical tools and case studies for understanding price and the creation of value in markets within social and cultural contexts and preconditions. It is an important source for scholars in economics, sociology, anthropology, and political science interested in how markets work, and how value is established. Readership: Academics, researchers, and advanced students in Business and Management, Sociology, Economics, and Marketing The specification in this catalogue, including without limitation price, format, extent, number of illustrations, and month of publication, was as accurate as possible at the time the catalogue was compiled. Occasionally, due to the nature of some contractual restrictions, we are unable to ship a specific product to a particular territory. Jacket

  • 31.
    Behre, Martin
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Ljungkvist, Torbjörn
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Löfström, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Undervisning för och examination av dyslektiker2009In: PUH – pedagogiska utvecklingsprojekt i högskolan: Ett samarbete mellan Västra Götalands högskolor, ISSN 1653-1396Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Bender Jørgensen, Lise
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    A Brief History of NESAT2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Bender Jørgensen, Lise
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Anmeldelse af: Penelope Walton Rogers: Cloth and Clothing in Early Anglo-Saxon England, AD 450-7002008In: Kuml: Årbog for Jysk Arkæologisk Selskab, ISSN 0454-6245, 347-350 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Bender Jørgensen, Lise
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Hvordan utdannes dagens og morgendagens arkeologer i Trondheim?2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Bender Jørgensen, Lise
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Praksisstudier og læring i arkeoligiutdanningen2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Bender Jørgensen, Lise
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Présentation du livre ”Purpureae Vestes II”2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Bender Jørgensen, Lise
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Review of: Christensen, A.E. & Nockert, M. (red): Osebergfunnet Bd IV, Tekstilene2008In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 3, 210-212 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Bender Jørgensen, Lise
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Self-bands and other subtle patterns in Roman textiles2008In: Purpureae vestes II. Vestidos, Textiles y Tintes. Estudios sobre la producción de bienes de consumo en la Antigüedad. / [ed] C Alfaro, L Karali, Publicacions de la Universitat de Valencia (PUV). Ort : Valencia , 2008, s. 135-141 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Bender Jørgensen, Lise
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The Textiles from Oseberg: A History of Research2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Berggren Torell, Viveka
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    As fast as possible rather than well protected Experiences of football clothes2011In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 3, 83-99 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenological view that human beings ‘take in’ the world and experience themselves as subjects through their bodies as a starting point, players in both men’s and women’s teams, kit men, purchasing managers, sporting directors, and a coach from Swedish football clubs have been interviewed about their perceptions and experiences of football clothing. Since the body is both a feeling and knowing entity, clothes are seen as components of body techniques, facilitating or restricting body movements in a material way, but also as creators of senses, like lightness and security; in both ways, influencing the knowledge in action that playing football is. In this article, the content of the interviews is discussed in relation to health. When clothes are primarily related to a biomedical view that health means no injuries and illnesses, warm pants and shin guards are mentioned by players, who are rather ambivalent to both, since these garments counteract a feeling of lightness that is connected to the perception of speed. Players want to be fast rather than well protected. If clothes, instead, are interpreted as related to a broad conception of health, including mental, social, and physical components, the relation body–space-in-between–clothes seems to be an important aspect of clothing. Dressed in a sports uniform, unable to choose individual details, the feeling of subjectivity is related to wearing ‘the right-size’ clothes. Also new textile technology, like injury-preventing and speed-increasing tight compression underwear, is perceived by players based on feelings that they are human subjects striving for both bodily and psychological well-being.

  • 41.
    Berggren Torell, Viveka
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Barnmode: Materialitet och identitet2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Berggren Torell, Viveka
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Hellre lätt och snabb än väl skyddad Om fotbollskläder relaterat till hälsa2011In: Kulturstudier, kropp och idrott Perspektiv på fenomen i gränslandet mellan natur och kultur / [ed] David Cardell, Helena Tolvhed, Idrottsforum.org: Malmö , 2011, 169-192 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Berggren Torell, Viveka
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    How the discourse of the fashionable child was established through advertigins and articles in Swedish magazines in the 1930s to 50s.2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Berggren Torell, Viveka
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Innan Oxforddownfårets tidevarv2013In: Dolda innovationer. Textila produkter och ny teknik under 1800-talet / [ed] Klas Nyberg, Pia Lundqvist, Kulturhistoriska bokförlaget , 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Om ull och ullhandel 1800-tal

  • 45.
    Berggren Torell, Viveka
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    "It must be a little more close fitting...: On football clothes' contributions to constructions of femininity2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Berggren Torell, Viveka
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    ”It must be a little more close-fitting…” On clothes’ contributions to constructions of femininity within football2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Berggren Torell, Viveka
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Klädda för fotboll Lätta, snabba och snygga2012In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 21, no 2, 29-33 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Berggren Torell, Viveka
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Knuts, Eva
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Design, craft and culture: Some remarks on production of textile craft in the companies Vävkompaniet and Designbrenner2011In: Conference Proceedings, papers from the conference Current issues in European Cultural Studies, Linköping University Electronic Press , 2011, 81-93 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    According to anthropological research it is fundamental that aspects of conceptuality and materiality are tied together in handicraft products. Objects have a social history and a cultural biography as well as a material form (Appadurai 1996). Thus analyzing crafting knowledge must involve both looking for bodily competences performed in the meeting with the materials (hand operations, touch, rhythm etc) and mapping cultural meanings on craft. In the ongoing project “Design, craft and culture” this is done through visual/sensory ethnography. Participant observations with video-filming and interviewing are done at Vävkompaniet, a cooperative running handicraft shop, and Design Brenner, private family company for tufting. This paper brings up cultural meanings on craft, expressed by the craft practitioners themselves. What producers in both companies tell about work practices, inspiration, how they relate to the textile tradition etc. is discussed. Their definitions of the concepts craft, art craft, sloyd and design are especially highlighted. This is important since debate regarding craft as material expression versus craft as conceptual art implies different focuses when it comes to what counts as important knowledge - skill in using the proper raw material and technique to make useful products, or skill to materialize ideas in creative ways?

  • 49.
    Berggren Torell, Viveka
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Knuts, Eva
    Soft, colorful and unique2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Berggren Torell, Viveka
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Ranglin, Ulla
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Knowledge in action in weaving2012Conference paper (Refereed)
1234567 1 - 50 of 528
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf