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  • 51.
    Carbonaro, Simonetta
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Votava, Christian
    Wenn Konsum aus dem Zirkus der Emotionen ausbricht2012In: …und schopping-center, Das Lesebuch und Nachdenkbuch / [ed] K. Schneider, EKAZENT, Wien , 2012, p. 262-283Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotions as an experience of the senses are not the same emotions as a manifestation of feelings. Lifestyle and Experiential Marketing understand emotions as intangible added value and create a world of sensuality without meaning. In these imaginary worlds consumers have begun to look for reliable clues on the lookout, they have developed a deep longing for the authentic. Another dealing with emotions is presented, which is influenced by the desire of people for meaning and identity, and a new understanding of marketing and communications. Based on the socio-cultural model of consumption and strategy of real quality, it shows how to operate successfully in our troubled presence on the market.

  • 52.
    Carlsson, Jan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    F3: Fashion, function, futures: research catalogue2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A comprehensive textile research environment is under development at the University of Borås. It combines scientific and artistic competences in the three key areas design, technology and management. Two strong R&D programmes – F3 and Smart Textiles – form the organizational foundation of this environment. Within the R&D programme F3 the textile value chain in its totality and complexity is the subject of scientific studies. The programme has a multi-disciplinary approach, in accordance with the overall research policy of the University of Borås. It involves research groups from a number of prominent research fields at the University, most notably Fashion and Textile, Logistics and Commerce and Resource Recovery. A close cooperation between academia and the regional business community is a condition for realization of the application profile of F3. The fact that it resides physically in Borås is part of the auspicious conditions for the programme. Both historic and contemporary factors provide excellent reasons for appointing Borås the textile capital of Sweden. Borås with the surrounding Sjuhärad area holds in its textile tradition a culture-historical heritage of trade and industry; a heritage that lives on and is constantly renewed in the dynamic textile and fashion industry based in the region.

  • 53. Christoforidou, Despina
    et al.
    Olander, Elin
    Svengren Holm, Lisbeth
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Warell, Anders
    Good Taste vs Good Design: A tug of war in the light of Bling2012In: The Design Journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 185-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some products are considered ‘bad taste’ and therefore of less value. However, if we focus on what a product does with and for its users, rather than on what a product is, we can disregard superficial statements based on taste and instead get a better understanding of good design. This reasoning is based on the relationship between ‘good taste’ and ‘good design’, terms which are sometimes confused and treated as synonyms. In this article, we explore the tension between ‘good taste’ and ‘good design’ and how designers can use that tension in the design process. We consider ‘good taste’ to be rooted in a subjective context of inherent values, whereas ‘good design’ arises from competence and is based on professional skill. In this paper, ‘bad taste’ is exemplified by products associated with the lifestyles of rap artists and the subculture of bling. Our experience is that bling products often generate strong feelings and opinions and are dismissed by many as ‘bad taste’ because their appearance is incompatible with what is perceived to be ‘good design’. In the context of a course on trends, industrial design students were given the task of exploring how bling products are perceived in everyday life. Their views on bling were compatible with how bling is presented in the media. The students perceived bling products to be far from what is regarded as ‘good taste’ within their own culture. Consequently, they were unable to regard bling as a source of inspiration in their design work. However, when the students began to consider what the product does rather than what it is, they were able to use bling as a source of creativity. What other design opportunities are overlooked by regarding products as being in ‘bad taste’?

  • 54.
    Ciszuk, Martin
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Doppåsar2009In: BUNAD, ISSN 1503-9633, no 3, p. 22-24Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Om dopdräkter från 17- och 1800-talet

  • 55.
    Ciszuk, Martin
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Gunnistermannens Dräkt2010In: Bunad, ISSN 1503-9633, no 1, p. 26-31Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In 1951 a body of a man was found during peat digging in a peat bog at Gunnister, Shetland Islands, Great Britain. The man had been wearing a shirt, breeches, coat and a jacket made of fulled wool fabrics. His stockings, gloves, 2 caps and a small purse were knitted from wool yarn. In the purse there were two Dutch and one Swedish coin of 1683, which date the costume to around 1700. Following a partnership agreement between Shetland Amenity Trust and National Museums Scotland in 2008, detailed studies were undertaken on all of the artifacts with a view to making a full set of replicas. The project started with thorough studies and documentation at the museum in Edinburgh. Next step was the practical work: The wool was sorted, washed, carded or combed and spun. Several spinning, weaving, knitting, fulling and sewing samples were performed before the production of the clothes could start. All operations were carried out as close to the originals as possible. The success of the project is an effect of a close cooperation between participants having different competences, deep knowledge of craft, and experience from the reconstruction of historical and archaeological textiles.

  • 56.
    Ciszuk, Martin
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Silk Weaving in Sweden During the 19th Century: Textiles and texts - An evaluation of the source material2012Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Silk-weaving in Sweden during the 19th century. Textiles and texts - An evaluation of the source material. With the rich material available, 19th century silk-weaving invites to studies on industrialisation processes. The purpose of this licentiate thesis is to present and discuss an empirical material regarding silk production in Sweden in the 19th century, to examine the possibilities and problems of different kinds of materials when used as source materials, and to describe how this material can be systematized and analysed in relation to the perspective of a textile scientific interpretation. The introductory sections of the thesis provide a background to textile research and the subject of textile science. This is followed by an overview of previous research on silk-weaving in Sweden and a historical overview of silk-weaving in Sweden, the Jacquard machine, and the K.A. Almgren Sidenväveri, where large parts of the source material have been preserved. After these overviews, the research material is described and systematized: first the main materials, textiles, machines and other objects, and then the various written sources. By way of conclusion, the empirical material is summarized in a critical discussion where the various groups of materials are evaluated in comparison to one another. A discussion on theory and methodology regarding objects as sources and the use of experience-based knowledge in academic research is developed in connection to the critical discussion. Finally, the potential of the material is demonstrated through a textile example. The presentation is an introduction to the cultural-historical analysis that will follow in the PhD thesis. Here, the empirical material will be analysed through the use of knowledge in handicrafts, which may create new dimensions of silk production in Sweden and the complexity of the industrialisation process.

  • 57.
    Ciszuk, Martin
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The Reconstruction of a Mid-19th century Brussels Carpet.2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Ciszuk, Martin
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Viola, Flora, Mynta, Ranka, Kaprifol: 1700-talestyger blommar igen2008In: Vävmagasinet, ISSN 0281-3343, Vol. 2, p. 22-24Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 59. Czarniawska, Barbara
    et al.
    Donatella, Pierre
    Solli, Rolf
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Help! We have too much money2013In: Coping with Excess - How Organizations, Communities and Individuals Manage Overflows / [ed] Barbara Czarniawska, Orvar Löfgren, Edward Elgar , 2013, p. 45-63Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By analyzing a wide range of settings – from corporate firms and public administration to everyday domestic routines – the book offers an in-depth understanding of the complexities of overflow phenomena. It questions when, where and why overflow emerges and for whom this is a problem or a blessing.

  • 60.
    Dahlström, Mats
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    A Book of One's Own: Examples of Library Book Marginalia2011In: The history of reading, Volume 3: Methods, Strategies, Tactics / [ed] Shaquat Towheed, Rosalind Crone, Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, Vol. 3, p. 115-131Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In early 2007 there was an art exhibition in Stockholm by Swedish artist Kajsa Dahlberg,1entitled A Room of One’s Own/A Thousand Libraries.2The exhibition included a printed edition of a quite peculiar book the artist had composed. The book and the exhibition triggered some thoughts about book studies and the role of the reader, about bibliography and textual studies, and about marginalia and other kinds of reader interaction in books. But let us begin from the beginning — here is the background of the exhibition and the book.

  • 61.
    Dahlström, Mats
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    A Matter of Fact: on transmission ideals2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholarly editing based on textual criticism means examining a bulk of documents and their texts, clustering these around the abstract notion of a work, arranging them in a web of relations and trying to represent this web in the scholarly edition, a surrogate purporting to represent the work. The way the edition positions the documents to the work, and itself as mediator between them, is affected by such factors as ideology, epistemology, aim and function, tradition, and supporting and distributing media. Scholarly editions are to some extent hermeneutical documents and subjective interpretations, in two senses: they carry with them a history of ideology and a hermeneutical heritage, and they also exert an interpretative influence over the objects they are designed to manage. Nevertheless editions have a strong tradition of conveying a sense of value-free objectivity, a mere recording of (matters of) fact. Charles Bazerman has observed that ”... to write science is commonly thought not to write at all, just simply to record the natural facts." This is a scientific legacy within scholarly editing as well. Further, the transmission that both scholarly editors and e.g. digitizers at libraries are engaged in when transferring a perceived content (such as 'text') from one document to another, can be differently recognized by the 'transmittors' as media models, i.e. as either: 1/ context-free content delivery, or 2/ interpretative and tool-dependent content manipulation, or 3/ a process that is defined by a context-dependent and content-circulating ecosystem of media. As a consequence, scholarly editing is historically a field where conflicting ideals battle: on the one hand, the ideal that the edition (bordering on 'archive') should strive for total exhaustiveness, uniformity, perfect mimetics and universal tools; on the other, that editions should recognize and be valued for their authority to select and deselect, explain and interpret, define and constitute. This paper will looks at some of these models and ideals that might seem to be in conflict, and specifically discusses to what extent they are prolonged or even boosted (= tradition), or perhaps changed or even annihilated (= innovation) within the realm of digital scholarly editing. And if the two fields of scholarly editing and library activities (such as digitization and metadata scheme production) are increasingly brough closer to one another, how does that development fit with the aforementioned models and ideals?

  • 62.
    Dahlström, Mats
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Critical transmission2014In: Ars edendi lecture series III / [ed] Eva Odelman, Denis Searby, Stockholms universitet , 2014, p. 13-27Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Dahlström, Mats
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Digital utgivning av källmaterial2016In: Digital publishing and research, Helsingfors: Helsingfors universitet , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Dahlström, Mats
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Digitized library collections: an open source approach2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    If publicly funded libraries (PFL) such as national libraries were to adopt a more open source approach when making digitized cultural heritage (CH) material available, users would be granted not only open access to delivery files at a surface level (in e.g. PDF, JPG, or XHTML) but ”deep access” to archival file material and technical documentation as well (such as TIFF, full XML/TEI, scripts, style sheets and machine instructions). PFL:s would thereby strengthen the force behind the values of equal access, of supporting education and research, and of distributing not only digitized material but competence and methods as well. They might also come one step closer to sharing information-rich material with other digitizing institutions by constructing valid banks of commonly and mutually accessible digitized CH material. As of yet however, this is far from the case. Many PFL:s are rather adopting a policy to restrict public access to light-weight delivery versions while charging users for access to the archival, deep level (or hiding it away altogether). This paper examines some of the arguments for such a restrictive policy and discusses feasible ways of bypassing some of the open source obstacles.

  • 65. Dahlström, Mats
    Digitizing cultural heritage material2017In: Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries 2017, Göteborg: University of Gothenburg , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 66. Dahlström, Mats
    Digitizing projects2014In: A course handbook for ETQI: Effective training tools for application to qualification improvement in the library sector, European Commission, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Dahlström, Mats
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Editing Libraries2011In: Bibliothek und Wissenschaft, ISSN 0067-8236, Vol. 44, p. 91-106Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Dahlström, Mats
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    'Icgrblc': digitala textspöken2011In: Svenska Vitterhetssamfundets årsanföranden, Vol. 15, p. 1-24Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 69.
    Dahlström, Mats
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Lights and shadows: digitization, digital  facsimiles and scholarly editing2017In: Digital Scholarly Editing and Modern Greek studies / [ed] Anna-Maria Sichani, Athens: National Library of Greece , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Dahlström, Mats
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Swedish digital humanities2018In: Human IT, ISSN 1402-1501, E-ISSN 1402-151X, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 82-94Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 71.
    Dahlström, Mats
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Till bords med Ibsen2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Dahlström, Mats
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Utgåvor som fönster2015In: Digitale kildeutgivelser, Oslo: Nasjonalbiblioteket , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Dahlström, Mats
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT. University of Antwerp.
    Dillen, Wout
    Litteraturbanken: the Swedish  Literature Bank2017In: RIDE, ISSN 2363-4952, Vol. 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Litteraturbanken (The Swedish Literature Bank) is a freely available digital collection of Swedish literary works, ranging from medieval to contemporary literature. It is the result of a cooperation between literary and linguistic scholars, research libraries, and editorial societies and academies. The collection consists not only of digital facsimiles, but of ocr’ed, proof-checked and TEI-encoded transcriptions as well, including EPUB and HTML versions of texts, and in addition scholarly presentations and didactic introductions to works and authors in the collection. It is also being used as a publishing platform for ongoing Swedish scholarly editing projects. Litteraturbanken currently comprises more than 2.000 works, mounting up to more than 100 million of machine-readable words. Litteraturbanken‘s main weak spot is transparency; it does not openly provide satisfactory ways to ensure the editors accountability for the edited texts and images. As a whole, however, Litteraturbanken is an impressive endeavour and paves the way for fruitful cooperation and massive data exchange with e.g. computational linguistics and bibliographic databases.

  • 74.
    Dahlström, Mats
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Eklund, Johan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Litteraturbanken: utvärderingsrapport2011Report (Other academic)
  • 75.
    Dahlström, Mats
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Kjellman, Ulrika
    Hansson, Joacim
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Documents reconstructed: digitization and institutional practice as mediation2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Libraries and other memory institutions have throughout history developed a range of methods and tools for transmitting full texts between material carriers and across media family borders. In this sense, library digitization belongs to the same tradition as 20th century microfilming and the ancient transcribing of manuscripts. The Gutenberg era marked a sharp decline in this full text transmitting business, and libraries devoted their time to producing bibliographical knowledge organization (KO) labels for documents rather than reproducing the full documents themselves. With digital reproduction technologies however, libraries have drawn a historic circle. They are yet again dedicating much energy and attention to the full text transmission they largely abandoned at the dawn of the printed age. In so doing, they take on a much more explicit role of producing and shaping the digital cultural heritage (CH) in addition to its accustomed role of preserving it and making it available. In this paper, we will discuss the practices of digitization within the library institutional setting, and in particular, the national library setting

  • 76.
    Darányi, Sándor
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    First- and second-order change as symmetry and symmetry breaking in folklore text content evolution: From Heraclitus to Lévi-Strauss2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We distinguish between first- and second order change and identify the former with perpetual alternation on an existential plane, the second with moving out into existential space. The first type can be demonstrated by two antagonistic processes inherent in a Markov chain of two pairs of complementary values: the chain gradually alternates between the opposite terminal states and the pattern is symmetrical. Such an existential plane catches an essential feature of Heraclitus’ philosophy, and can be illustrated by examples from classical Greek mythology. The same material also exemplifies Lévi-Strauss’ formula of myth, symmetrical in its weak and asymmetrical in 2 its canonical form. Since the weak form equals the orbit of a Klein group, we hypothesize that the canonical form, and thereby symmetry breaking, can be generated by element exchange between two respective Klein groups. The framework for such processes is text variation in folklore, described by ethnosemiotics.

  • 77.
    Darányi, Sándor
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Forró, László
    Detecting Multiple Motif Co-occurrences in the Aarne-Thompson-Uther Tale Type Catalog: A Preliminary Survey2011In: Anales de Documentación, ISSN 1575-2437, E-ISSN 1697-7904Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 78.
    Darányi, Sándor
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Forró, László
    Toward Sequencing Multiple Motif Co-Occurrences2011In: Tanulmányok az örökségmenedzsmentröl 2. Kulturális örökségek kezelése [Studies in Heritage Management 2: The Management of Cultural Heritage]. / [ed] L. Bassa, Információs Társadalomért Alapítvány , 2011, p. 247-260Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Catalogs project subject field experience onto a multidimensional map which is then converted to a hierarchical list. In the case of the Aarne-Thompson-Uther Tale Type Catalog (ATU), this subject field is the global pattern of tale content defining tale types as canonical motif sequences. To extract and visualize such a map, we considered ATU as a corpus and ana-lysed two segments of it, “Supernatural adversaries” (types 300-399) in particular and “Tales of magic” (types 300-749) in general. The two corpora were scru-tinized for multiple motif co-occurrences and visualized by two-mode clustering of a bag-of-motif co-occurrences matrix. Findings indicate the presence of canonical content units above motif level as well. The organization scheme of folk narratives utilizing motif sequences is reminiscent of nucleotid sequences in the genetic code

  • 79.
    Darányi, Sándor
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Wittek, Peter
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Conceptual machinery of the mythopoetic mind: Attis, a case study2015In: Proceedings of QI-15, 9th International Quantum Interaction Symposium, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In search for the right interpretation regarding a body of related content, we screened a small corpus of myths about Attis, a minor deity from the Hellenistic period in Asia Minor to identify the noncommutativity of key concepts used in storytelling. Looking at the protagonist's typical features, our experiment showed incompatibility with regard to his gender and downfall. A crosscheck for entanglement found no violation of a Bell inequality, its best approximation being on the border of the local polytope.

  • 80. Declerck, Thierry
    et al.
    Lendvai, Piroska
    Darányi, Sándor
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Multilingual and Semantic Extension of Folk Tale Catalogues2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We address the multilingual and semantic upgrades of two digital catalogues of motifs and types in folk-literature: the Thompson’s Motif-Index of Folk-Literature (TMI) and the Aarne-Thompson-Uther classification system (ATU). The methods convert, translate, and represent their digitized content in terms of various (so far often implicit) structural and linguistic components. The results will enable (i) utilizing these resources for semi-automatic analysis and indexing of texts of relevant genres, in a multilingual setting, and (ii) pre-processing the data, for analysing motif sequences in folktale plots. We plan to publish the resulting data, which can be made available in the Linked Open Data (LOD) framework.

  • 81.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Knitted Light: Space and Emotion2008In: The Nordic Textile Journal 2008, Special Edition Smart Textiles, p. 158-169Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Relational Textile Expressions for Space Design- an example of practice-based research in architectural design2011In: Proceedings of Symposium and annual meeting in the Nordic Association of Architectural Research, Aarhus, Denmark, 4-6 May 2011, Nordic Association of Architectural Research , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Starting with Allen’s definition on architectural design as a material practice, this paper develops further the discussion on practice-based research methods and on the role of the artifact in development of foundational theory of architectural design. Relational Textile Expressions for Space Design is an example of practice-based research in architectural design, where research by material design aims to develop theoretical knowledge based on designed experiments.

  • 83.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Relational Textiles2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between technology and the expression of form have always been interconnected in the architectural design process; associating the art of envisioning spaces with the craft of materializing them. Recently in terms of surface fabrication, computational tools of representation and material fabrication opened for architectural design new possibilities to explore novel spatial expressions. Surface design processes in architecture start to borrow from the logic of representation of different non-hierarchical structures, e.g., biological systems or textile construction techniques. Relating to that, the present fascination of textiles in architectural design relies on this specific way of building surface design as non-hierarchical form, and by that, allowing the designer to play with the depth of the surface design at micro and macro levels. Exploring different relations between digital and physical through textiles expressions, this research reassess static principles of form–marking the turn from static to relational principles. Thus, the intention is to describe how the character of the textiles and computation as design material redefines the notion of space trough surface aesthetics merging the digital to the physical, and how spatiality can be questioned through textile and interaction aesthetics. Using practice-based research methodology, this research opens and explores this design space by relating theory and practice; it questions and reframes fundamental concepts of expression and scale in architecture by proposing methods for surface design, and a specific language to describe textile architectural aesthetics.

  • 84.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Relational Textiles for Space Design:design methods and expressions2011Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of the Smart Textiles field opens possibilities for designers to combine traditional surface fabrication techniques with advanced technology in the design process. When it comes to the field of Smart Textiles as interactive materials for space design, it is essential to understand the identity of the material through design and also to understand the novel expressions being mediated for space. Thus, the purpose of this thesis is to develop knowledge by design on Smart Textiles as materials for architecture and to do so through design. The thesis formulates a research program to frame the design explorations. Thus, Relational Textiles for Space Design is defined as a research program in architecture where the focus lies on developing methods to design interactive textile surfaces using knitted constructions. The program is illustrated by the design projects e.g., Knitted Light, Touching Loops, Designing with Heat and Tactile Glow. As a result of the research, a new methodological framework for interactive textile design is proposed. The framework defines the notions of field and frame of reference for the design. These notions form a method to discuss design variables of relational textile expressions. Based on the design examples, the emerging expressions are described according to the field relations that the interactive textile introduces in space. Thus, expressions of spatialization e.g., reduction, amplification, addition and disassociation are introduced.

  • 85.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Relational textiles: surface expressions in space design2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of the Smart Textiles field opens possibilities for designers to combine traditional surface fabrication techniques with advanced technology in the design process. The purpose of this work is to develop knowledge on interactive knitted textiles as materials for architecture and to do so through practice-based design research. The thesis formulates a research program in order to frame the design explorations, in which scale and material expression are major placeholders. Consequently, Relational Textiles for Space Design is defined as a research program with focus on surface aesthetics and the program is illustrated by design experiments exploring the expressiveness of light, heat and movement as design materials. As a result of the research presented in this thesis, a new methodological framework for interactive textile design is proposed. The framework defines field of reference and frame of reference as basic notions in surface design. These notions form a basic frame used to revise and present the methods behind the design examples Knitted Light, Touching Loops, Designing with Heat, Tactile Glow, Repetition and Textile Forms in Movement. Relating the space of Relational Textiles for Space Design to existing surface methodology in architecture gives rise to new issues that need to be addressed. For which levels of the design process will these textiles be integrated? The last chapter reflects on the role of Relational Textiles for Space Design as possible methods or expressions in the existing space of surface prototyping.

  • 86.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Davis, Felecia
    Pattering by Heat2012Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Patterning by Heat: The Responsive Textile Structures presents 4 different computational textile structures that change the appearance of space through 2 different transformations that happen in the surface expression. The first typology of material is pixilated, designed with yarn that melts at high temperature; accordingly, the fabric opens or breaks when it receives current. The opening allows designers flexibility to experiment with see through effects on the fabric, or to ‘write’ upon the fabric making apertures, collecting foreground and background together in one shape. The second material has been designed with yarn that shrinks or draws solid lines in the fabric when it receives current. The shrinking reveals a more opaque patterning in the textile closing parts of that textile off, transforming the nature of that space. Both breaking and shrinking yarns have been knitted into four different architectural tension structures that are designed using computation and textiles to track people’s presence in space by the changes that appear in the surface design.

  • 87.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Lundstedt, Lotta
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Persson, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Satomi, Mika
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Repetition: interactive expressions of pattern translation2012In: Proceedings The Art of Research 2012, The art of research 2012 Making, Reflecting and understading, 28-29 November 2012 at Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture Helsinki, Finland, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a way of opening a space where methods from the fields of fashion design, textile design and interaction design overlap, the project Repetition intersects different methodologies through practice-based research in design. Experiments were conducted to explore ways of creating relationships between body and space by means of translating information as pattern design between garments and interactive knitted walls. By arranging a startup performance, we reflected on the expressional variables that influence the expression of the pattern translations; variables concerning the garments, the walls, the print and the movements were illustrated by the expressions found. The result formulates specific descriptions regarding accuracy and distribution of pattern translation, illustrating basic concepts of pattern formations identified in visual changes appearing in the garment. By communicating our understanding of basic expressions, Repetition aims to formulate a new framework for collaborative work as a method for further design.

  • 88.
    Dumitrescu, Delia Mihaela
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Landin, Hanna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Mohr, Christian
    University of Borås, Central Administration.
    Knitted Forms in Movement2014Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Presence in a space has own rhythm of change; it is organic,but it can be expressed structurally by the textile forms. The textile acts as a mirror between spaces that have been separated; the textile collects and spreads information through changes in structure. Motion sensors embedded in the textile are tracking the movement in one space, after a short time the textile starts to rotate the knitted modules in a slow pace repositioning its patterns.

  • 89.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Persson, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Exploring Heat as Interactive Expressions for Knitted Structures2011In: Nordic Design Research Conferences, Making Design Matter Proceedings of Nordes 2011. Nordic Design Research Conference 2011, Helsinki, Finland, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a practice-based research project in which design experiments were conducted to explore how knitted structures can be designed with particular emphasis on various interactive heat expressions. Several heat transformable structures, able to both sense and react to human touch, were developed in the textile collection Knitted Heat. The designed textiles serve as references to reflect further on the role of interactive textiles as materials for potential designs. Specific scenarios defined by shrinking, breaking, stiffening, texturizing and warming expressed by the textile transformations exemplify and discuss their potential as complementary for other design processes.

  • 90.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Persson, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Touching Loops2009Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Touching Loops is a collection of three knitted textiles with structure-changing interactive properties. The textiles are able to sense and react to touch by shrinking, breaking or becoming stiff. The textiles are thought of as interactive architectural material. When they are touched, a specific area in the textile becomes hot. A microcontroller that is connected to the textile is programmed to sense and react to touch. The materials in the samples react to heat in different ways by shrinking, becoming stiff or by breaking into pieces. The developing process consisted in programming the patterns for industrial machines in such a way that the conductive silver yarns are of important matter for the material aesthetics besides their function to generate heat. The three knitted pieces react in different ways when current passes trough the conductive yarns. The first piece combines a silver coated copper yarn and Pemotex yarn in a ridge pattern. In the second sample a Jaquard pattern combines shrinking polyester monofilament, a Grilon yarn and a silver coated copper yarn. This piece reacts to heat by breaking and shrinking. The third piece is constructed with partial knitting and ridge patterns and the yarns used are Pemotex, a Grilon yarn and the silver coated copper yarn. When the conductive yarn gets hot, the ridges shrink and harden. The aim of the project is to explore possibilities for expressive interactive tactile knitted materials and structures. The textiles are seen as a possible material to use in the context of architecture.

  • 91.
    Ekström, Karin M.
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Jönsson, Håkan
    Lunds universitet.
    Matturismen kan ge landsbygden ett lyft2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 92.
    Ekström, Karin M.
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Jönsson, Håkan
    Lunds universitet.
    På resa i matlandet2016Book (Other academic)
  • 93.
    Ekström, Karin M
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Nordlund Andersson, AgnetaUniversity of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.Tijburg, KatrinUniversity of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.Torstensson, HåkanUniversity of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.Süld, KarinUniversity of Borås, Library and Learning Resources.Svengren Holm, LisbethUniversity of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.Thornquist, ClemensUniversity of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The Nordic Textile Journal: Special Edition: Sustainability & Innovation in the Fashion Field2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All articles in fulltext.

  • 94.
    Ericsson, Amanda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The Life of a Dress. An introduction2014Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Life of a Dress is a travelling exhibition and series of workshops. In the light of the global trade of second-hand clothing the project aims to investigate how value-adding activities in participatory handicraft workshops in local communities may engage a population from different generations and nationalities in an exercise in reappropriating these materials. It is a further aim of the project to observe and induce aspects of developing, influencing and reconstructing sustainable patterns of consumption and production. The project explores models for fashion remanufacturing and creates opportunities for further development. The exhibition features collaborations with celebrated photographers and presents a world of dresses and artworks that have been produced or found along the way. In its centre, an open workshop developing shared ideas and skills from its participants takes place.

  • 95.
    Ericsson, Amanda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The Life of a Dress: Mozambique2014Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Life of a Dress explores possible ways to use, improve and reconfigure the current system of fashion through reclaiming what the system itself is creating and wasting. The concept of sustainable design is explored as an approach which is here defined as being sensitive to the local and global context. The exhibition and workshop has since 2009 visited different continents and countries to share its content and learn from local projects and people about ways of how to rethink the use of materials. It is exploring how second-hand dresses found in local markets and streets may be used as assets for further transformation. Craft workshops and prototyping labs are created around the collected materials and people are invited to join in. During these workshops participants are encouraged to challenge current structures and ways of thinking around materials and making. The BIG MAMA, a mini-dress similar to an oversized t-shirt is one example of a product which is made in most of the workshops. It is a catalyst element normally brought in to the making process to see how the participants interact with the given materials and each other and how this may vary between different countries. The exhibitions are normally built up around the map dress which rests like a symbol for the global nature of textiles, clothing and fashion. Imagination is used and regarded as the main renewable resource in and outside this project. Creativity and its various forms of expressions is further explored and used to drive to project forward.

  • 96.
    Eriksson, Kajsa
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Förbi Gående Möte2007Other (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Eriksson, Kajsa
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Goodbye2007Other (Other academic)
  • 98.
    Eriksson, Kajsa
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    i2007Other (Other academic)
  • 99.
    Eriksson, Kajsa
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    We are leaving you now2007Other (Other academic)
  • 100. Eson Bodin, Ulla
    Bergakungen2007Other (Other academic)
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