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  • 51.
    Lentsius, Kairi
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Cut In: Exploring Curved Laser Cut Lines & The Relation To Garment Construction2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project investigates laser cutting in relation to textile manipulation and creating three-dimensional form. More precisely, this collection of nine outfits becomes an exploration about expressions of laser cut lines and their interrelation to the body through folding and draping the textile material. The laser cut bridge line used, will be the guiding part for a garments construction and through this different shapes are tested. This way of working with the material, its character and added manipulation will propose a new understanding of and an alternative for constructing a garment. This investigation is also a proposal for a new mind-set when it comes to using laser cutting in fashion design. Laser cutting has mainly been regarded as a technique for decoration, yet the machine could have a much greater role in the design process. Textile manipulation in this work is seen not only as a surface decoration but as a method of creating a 3D form from a 2D material which in this case is a method of design for shaping a garment. Through this, the work will hopefully challenge the industry in terms of working with laser cutting, garment construction and also textile manipulation.

  • 52.
    Linderoth, Louise
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Have a seat: An exploration of the typical pair of jeans within construction and expression based on the sitting body. Focusing on the question “are you your legs?2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work investigates the typical denim jean in a sitting position with a focus on serving several possible answers to the question ”are you your legs?”. By exploring both the constructional, preconceptional and expressional possibilities within a pair of jeans, a method of using the waist-line and hem-line as measurement-points is found. The purpose of this study is to investigate the way of wearing jeans in a static seated position. Trough the years mainly the standing body has been used as base to create clothes. Only a few construction- and design-methods has been seen based on a sitting body. By challenging the narrow frame of jeans in both construction and expression, a range of innovative examples are found. Trough keeping and exaggerating the typical jean-details such as stitchings, pockets and flys, the jeans are still recognizable as the typical pair of jeans and the focus on distortion and challenging of a pair of jeans in relation to the sitting body is clear. By using the sitting body as base in both construction and design develpoing the limit is pushed further in questioning what a body is, what it needs and how it could be dressed.

  • 53.
    Lundberg, Sara
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    OMG(s)!: Investigating the spiritual body2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work aims to discuss the contemporary view on religion and is an investigation of the body’s capacity for spiritual expression. By combining spirituality with contemporary fashion scene and what is praised today, the result presents a suggestion for a new religion, with references to the development of religion through the history of humanity and how the body has functioned in that, exchanged to materials, shapes and symbols used of the contemporary man. The work defines spirituality and religion as two different things, that spirituality is genetic and religion is based on culture. The assumtion is that culture creates its religion based in inherited spirituality. It is be based on the findings of the connections between culture and religion, the ideas of human transformed into gods, and aims to state the importance of religion in societies, even in our modern one, and that is it natural to believe, but the work also aims to brakes the illusion of religions as “real”, but rather is a social and cultural construction to help us deal with our inherited spirituality.

  • 54.
    Malmgren De Oliveira, Stefanie
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    On seeing: in fashion design2016Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In fashion design, the designer strives for the development of ideas in view of significant visual goals. The process of specifying and developing ideas is a highly visual process. Based on what has been ‘seen’ as for example in a reference material or in explorations, designers define possible tracks to follow, decide which ideas to deepen or which ones to reject. Their activities can thus be described as a process of seeing.

    There is nothing novel about the importance of seeing as an act in the design process; on the contrary, seeing, is usually an intuitive act that any designer explicates throughout the process of shaping his/her vision. However, the systematisation of seeing in the design process in order to advance ways of working in the field of fashion design is still very much an area that is open for further research.

    In this thesis, possible ways of seeing are explored through experiments in different stages of the design process. Based on an image serving as a point of departure, seen elements were derived and put in relation to a body in a two-dimensional photographic sketching stage, in accordance with different ideas of dress. Selected ideas were then further elaborated and explored in terms of their design possibilities.

    The results of the experiments are propositions of design ideas that have been ‘seen’ in a single sketch or a series of sketches. The contribution of this licentiate thesis are: 1) A thorough mapping of two design stages (point of departure and two-dimensional sketching stage), and how they provide a deeper understanding of the design process, leading to 2) an improved sensibility with regard to design possibilities, their value and developments, and finally 3) the establishing of a methodology with which to discern the composition of a visual language/vision in fashion design based on ‘seeing’.

    The act of seeing is presented as the fundamental tool of designing for shaping a vision. By delving into the systematisation of the notion of seeing in a fashion design process, a methodology of seeing is introduced, which aims to enhance the possible ways of visualisation when designing.

  • 55.
    Maschke, Christina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    The patterned thread: new textiles inspired by ikat2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The work of this MA thesis develops a new approach to hand weaving in which the design process is led by the technique of resistant dyeing. The process is inspired by the visual properties of traditional ikats. It follows the technical ikat procedure of primary resistant dyeing and subsequently weaving. Whithin the research a new way of weaving is explored in which the dyed thread dictates the weaving process and therefore influences the weaving motif. In addition different design variables such as material, binding pattern and finishing are used to push forward the developed concept. The aim of this work is to explore new aesthetic expressions between regular and irregular motifs through the application of design thinking. The result presents an innovative approach in the ikat technique in order to create random distributed patterns and how they can be already influenced in the stage of yarn preparation.

  • 56.
    McQuillan, Holly
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Archer, Jen
    Massey University.
    Menzies, Greta
    Massey University.
    Bailey, Jo
    Massey Univeristy.
    Kane, Karl
    Massey University.
    Fox, Emma
    Massey University.
    Make/Use:: A System for Open Source, User-Modifiable, Zero Waste Fashion Practice2018In: Fashion Practice: the journal of design, creative process & the fashion industry, ISSN 1756-9370, E-ISSN 1756-9389, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 7-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses Make/Use, a multi-disciplinary research project exploring “User Modifiable Zero Waste Fashion”. In particular, it addresses the use of textile print and a parametric matrix to facilitate the cognitive and creative processes involved in the transformation from two-dimensional (2D) to three-dimensional (3D) form. The Make/Use project centers on the development and testing of an embedded navigational system by which users can formulate a functional understanding of the form and construction of a garment and its opportunities for manipulation. It questions how the encoding of navigational clues and markers into a garment might aid in its facility for creation and modification by the user, aiming to enhance emotional investment and connection, and extending its functional life by providing embedded opportunities for alteration and visible repair.

  • 57.
    Meier, Florian
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    "beau platt“: Contemporary Fashion Practice in the field of concrete and virtual visualizations of flat expressions2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work traces the visual potential of 2Dimensional space inthree dimensional garments and questions aesthetic standardsin the field of menswear. The aim is to discuss the visualconsensus of flat and spatial construction.

    Construction has been chosen as the key aspect for digital and analoginvestigations. It builds the main emphasis of this project and leads toa deeper visual understanding of how we perceive garments with clearborders between three - and two dimensional sections.

    The design process has a dual structure.

    1st stage - ‚virtual investigation‘

    This is where the experiments start. By using Simulation andrendering software such as ‚CLO3D‘, ‚Marvellous Designer‘ and ‚Keyshot‘the aim is to develop and unlock multiple constructionprinciples that deal with similar visual aspects. These results suggest anetwork of variations (garment types/parts, e.g. sleeve construction,trousers etc..) that need to be translated into real prototypes.

    2nd stage - ‚Analog translation‘

    Based on the preferred results of the 1st stage, the aim is to filter oneconstruction principle for further studies.The choice of working with the flat sleeve construction is the keyaspect and builds the fundamental for ellaborating the design process.This phase is mainly characterised by material and shape experimentsand relates to a lasting construction principle.

    The result suggest a spread of examples that deal with the sameconstruction principle. The examplified versions include differentmaterial qualities and differ in terms of their complexity in detailsolutions and production.The final choice works as a unit and offers different ways ofapproaching and developing the construction principle further.Especially the layering aspect in example 8 and 9 became dominantand very important for increasing the visual expression.That indication offers an imidiate and direct approach and showsthe potential within the field of 2D expressions.Nevertheless my next step would lead me back to the digital studiesto understand more about the diversity of layers in two dimensionalgarments. Eventually it would suggest both a wearable as well as aconceptual outcome.

  • 58.
    Melin, Lena
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Min magiska värld2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 credits / 18 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    ”Min magiska värld” is a textile installation with the intent purpose of creating a story time escape for pre-schoolers. Thus, acts as a re-presentment of a creative approach towards the childpractical décor of a library. With an outset of three textile patterns, the textile installation seeks to create an illusion of “ fantasy meets reality “ in the visual aspect of an enchanting grove. The fabric in knitted wool have been designed, fabricated and felted to be placed within the selected area. The layout of the patterns bears the essence of creating an increased notion of participation as well as to instil an impression of the kind of harmony that could be sensed in the forest.

  • 59.
    Moëll, Caroline
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    JERSEY, SURE !: Special developed jersey knits with color effects2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the effect of single jersey, based on its original formas a cylinder. It is also an investigation of color and transforming surfaceof garment.The outfits are based on the cylinder in construction. With some cuts andseams, developed into garments.

    The surface of the fabric has qualities recognizable to rib, but the constructionis different. By using cotton and polyester yarns, the stripesshrinks in different directions and when the body integrates with thefabric, shape, gravity and movement will make the material transform byopen and closing the lines.

    Different color effects are presented in the collection. The result is suggestingdifferent color effects, depending on size of the stripes, the saturationof the colors and the placement on the body.

  • 60.
    Nilsson, Linnéa
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Open Structures: Designing alterable 3D printed textiles2015In: Tangible Means - Experiential Knowledge through Materials proceedings / [ed] Anne Louise Bang, Jacob Buur, Irene Alma Lønne & Nithikul Nimkulrat, Kolding, 2015, p. 133-144Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design of textiles is flexible. The soft, pliable nature of textiles means that their expressiveness and physical properties can be altered long after the material has been produced, by e.g. adding or removing colour, pattern, density, or by printing, laser-cutting, etc. This transformability means that the design of textiles can be further developed in another design process in relation to a specific product or context. In the emerging field of textiles produced using 3D modelling and additive manufacturing, structures can be defined in detail and, later, altered or completely redesigned in CAD programs. However, the designs of these textiles are generally fixed when the structures emerge from the 3D printer. This paper describes a practice-based project that explores the transformability of 3D printed textiles, considers the question of whether some of the openness that characterises their digital form can be introduced to their physical form, and then explores what form this could take. It begins by describing the project which forms the basis for the exploration, the outcome of which thus far consists of two experimental 3D printed textiles with changeable physical structures. It then discusses the considerations and decisions involved when designing for such transformable textiles, proposing ways to understand and describe what is taking place: First, by relating them to the considerations made when defining open design systems; second, by introducing two types of design decisions, which together define which aspects of the textile’s design are closed to further development, and which are open for others to develop. 

  • 61.
    Nilsson, Linnéa
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Textile Influence: exploring the relationship between textiles and products in the design process2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Textile materials and textile design are a part of countless products in our surroundings,as well as diverse design fields and industries, each of which has very different materialtraditions and working methods. The aim of this thesis is to add to our understandingof the relationship between textiles and products in the design process, and to explorehow textiles enter and influence product design processes and how products functionin textile design processes. A further aim is to examine the effect of new textiletechnology, such as smart textiles and 3D printed textiles, on this dynamic.

    This thesis is the result of an interplay between theoretical work, experimentalpractice-based projects, and observation of design practice, and it presents two typesof results: Firstly, descriptions of how the relationship can manifest itself in the designprocess, which give a broad picture of the relationship between textile and productand in so doing add to our understanding of textiles as design materials and highlightsome of the additional complexities and possibilities for the design process that comewith new forms of textiles. Secondly, this thesis presents ways of describing thedynamics between textiles and products in the design process, with the intention ofopening up for reflection on how we design, and can design, with textiles. Here, themain outcome is a theoretical framework which examines the relationship from botha product design and a textile design perspective, and includes methods and questionsthat can be used to explore and define how textiles and products meet in the designprocess.

  • 62.
    Nilsson, Linnéa
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Designing with Smart Textiles: A new research program2011In: Nordes, ISSN 1604-9705, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    No longer is it sufficient to add ‘smart’ to textiles to secure interesting research results. We have surpassed the initial stages of explorations and testing and now need to raise the bar. We have thus specified a research program in which we investigate what it means to design with smart textiles. What can we design with smart textiles? And how do we design with smart textiles? We now explore how these complex, often abstract, materials can enter traditional design practices and what role smart textile can play in the design of our environment. In this paper, we discuss the challenges we see at present, we outline our new research program and we qualify it through three examples of our ongoing projects: The smart textile sample collection, Dynamic textile patterns, and Bonad [tapestry]. The paper is as much an invitation to join forces, as it is a description of a maturing process within design research. We are over the first love, now what?

  • 63.
    Nilsson, Saga
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    More than meets the dye: a textile design exploration of combining fibre-specific dyeing and structural weaving to create a multidimensional fabric2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project explores the combination of a woven structure consisting of different fibers with dyeing to create a multidimensional woven textile capable of altering in expression. This project aims to show how a designer can work with fibre-specific dyeing and multiple fibers in a woven textile and the many possibilities this lends in a design process. With a sustainable approach to the matter used in the project, creating more with less, a suggestion is made of an alternative method of creating multidimensional fabrics. The chemical reaction between pigment and fiber is explored to show a greater appreciation for the textile material and to create fabrics capable of multiple expressions. One woven fabric, in individual pieces, is dyed in reactive-, acid- and disperse-dye. The cellulose-, wool- and synthetic yarns in the fabric absorb their intended pigment but also show how they react to another category of dye. A series of dyed samples, all originating from the same woven material with an abstract pattern, show the varied expression the treatment can achieve. The fabric and method presented in the project show an example of how one can compose a series of textiles with less matter but with more expression.

  • 64. Nordenståhl, Caisa
    SCALE UP!: An exploration of the limitations of the printing screen, the fabric width and the circle as a shape2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    SCALE UP! is an exploration in hand-printed surface patterns in relation to scale. The aim is to make hand-printed large-scale surface patterns, by challenging the limitations of the printing screen, the fabric width and the circle as a shape; with the circle as a pattern and structure to visualise it, by colours and bleed-through. The project is based in an interest in working large-scale, in the area of screen printing. We often see printed full-width fabrics where the repeat fills the whole width. However, a possibility to take it one step further and not be limited by the width of the fabric or the size of the printing screen was seen. Why be satisfied with the size of a full-width pattern and see the printing screen as a frame to keep within? The striving to challenge the size of the printing screen and the fabric width were the basis of the project. The result is one piece ~4,2 x 4,8 m big consisting of six hand-printed cloths.

  • 65.
    Nordqvist, Amanda
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Colour and light2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 credits / 18 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work explores how colour and light can be used as the prime design materials. They are investigated in unison in relation to spatiality. Colour is a way for us to understand and identify what we see, it is primary for how we interpret our surroundings. The aim is to explore colour, light and reflections, by the means of printing and dyeing of translucent materials, as an attempt to challenge the visual perception of the spectator and the experience of how spatiality is perceived. The project investigates how the boundaries of a textile can be questioned, for example where does a pattern begin and end? Does it only belong to the textile or can it transcend to it’s surroundings? The investigational process is experimental and explores combinations of colour and light in translucent materials, coloured through the techniques of heat transfer printing and dyeing. Swatches made are analysed in relation to each other and to light, with a focus on their visual performance. The final design examples discusses the idea of how textile, light and colour can be used to create, define and illuminate spatiality.

  • 66.
    Persson, Anna
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Functional Styling: Exploring a Textile Design Space2010In: Duck Journal for Research in Textiles and textile Design, ISSN 2042-0854, Vol. 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    As interactive materials enter the world of textile design, a new area is defined. From an interaction design perspective, interactive (or smart) textiles obviously differ from, for example, a computer game or a word processing program in various ways. One difference is that interactive textiles are experienced as physical materials and are not pixels changing colour on a computer display. But the main difference lies in the diverse aesthetical values; computer software and hardware are related to advanced technology, hard material and functionality whereas textiles are familiar, tactile, flexible and touchable. Still,textiles can build on advanced technology.To be able to understand the full potential of interactive textiles, we need to consider them as something new, designed in the intersection between textile design and interaction design. The experimental approach taken in the Functional Styling project is inspired by the work made at the Interactive Institute within the IT+textiles design program where a series of experiments and design examples were made in the field of interactive textiles, exploring the aesthetics and emerging expressions of smart textiles rather than technical functionality. This paper reports on a collaboration between the Smart Textiles Design Lab at the Swedish School of Textiles, University of Borås, and designers and technicians at Kasthall, a company with a long tradition in producing hand tufted and woven high-class quality carpets.

  • 67.
    Porcher, Mathieu
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    CAMOLUTION: Contemporary surface pattern expressions in textile design.2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Camolution is a project that explores the camouflage pattern in a textile designcontext. The motive is to reinterpret an obsolete concealment function andinstead, to hide and reveal visual textile aspects within the pattern. Theprimary aim of this work is to develop a contemporary camouflage patterncollection of printed and knitted textiles, and to explore the concealmentfunction through visual deceptions. The patterns were developed witha method that uses a selection of rules in colour contrasts,style influences and textile proprieties to design a series of patternexperiments. The final pattern designs were screen printed, digitalprinted and knitted, and applied as garment prototypes. This part wasdone in collaboration with the fashion brand Björn Borg. The result setsout a collection of textiles and clothes connected by three differentconcepts of misled vision. It was found that the camouflage function in thiswork was an efficient tool to advertise the brand symbols within the textiles.This work proposes an alternative design method of using the camouflageconcept in textile design, contributing with new expressions, techniquesand qualities.

  • 68.
    Ragnarsson, Julia
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    WHO ARE U WEARING?: investigating iconic celebrity fashion images as dress2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This collection is an observation of the relationship between celebrity culture, fashion and the female form. Exploring how the modern fashion image is communicated to a wider audience through mass media. At the same the work aims to explore new ways of developing clothing from a starting point in figurative prints. The work explores the body as the new context of the celebrity image in order to display different perspectives of both image and body. This has been found through an interaction between print and body, the visual perception within the relationship of these and from a social point of view. The work displays thoughts regarding perspectives on body ideals, female stereotypes, fashion, clothing, mass media and fame in today’s society. The bodies of celebrities are seen as walking billboards and advertisement for designers, the work questions this adopted culture by highlighting the phenomenon. While the work is a comment on the ridiculousness within the mass media and celebrity worship, it is also a homage to these women who have put a mark in fashion history. The final result could be seen as a series examples of possible outcomes from working with the image in relation to body. But also as a statement on how the current state of fashion, where new ideas seem less important as who is wearing what.

  • 69.
    Randestad, Stina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    BREED2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Breed has a concept and a main goal, to be unpredictable and visually impressive. The idea that it was built on was to try to create a collection with the method of breeding and the rules of genetics. At first, twelve individuals were created. They were all given characteristics – “genes”, handed out in a random way, decided by the toss of a dice. The individuals bred and were blended into a second generation, who thereafter procreated into a third. This third generation of eight characters, four females and four males, carry genes and features from their ancestors. They have been twisted, mutated and mixed, just like in nature. It is voluminous line-up with clashes between references, colours and styles. The challenge has been to let chance take decisions and to do something that was unexpected and was going to give an unpredictable result. Breed has not been done for a commercial destination but would be suitable for styling artists, editorials for fashion magazines, costumes in music videos or artistic films. The method is supposed to make people interested, the result is supposed to give the onlooker a smaller chock, a tingling sensation and the impression of a new subculture, a modern day tribe or a new breed. Or simply “What crazy person made this?”

  • 70.
    Rothman, Maria
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    The needle has a point, stitch has a function: Exploring the embroidered stitch in a functional context2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project within the textile design field explores the textile technique embroidery. By using design methods based on words and actions the technique was used in another angle approach that allowed the stitches to be used in a more functional context. This approach differs from how embroidery is traditionally looked upon, an added decorative surface to an already functional object. Embroidery has been explored in a way to see if the technique could be used as something more than just an added surface and if that added surface could be manipulated so that the stitch has both decorative and functional aspects. Stitches has been developed, discovered and realised that they can add density, stability, assembly and form to a material. This has resulted in an alternative way of using embroidery that puts the stitch in the position of being vital to both the expression and function of the object.

  • 71.
    Schultz, Maike
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    The Clothes I Live In2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work explores the relation between the body and garments by illustrating the cycle of dressing, wearing and undressing in woven images. Based on experimental methods, such as scanning and photographing, images of garments are generated capturing garment details, surface qualities, movement, folds and volume. These demonstrate the constantly changing relation between the body and garments within the cycle of dressing, wearing and undressing. In translating the photographs and scans of the garments into weaves, a shading technique for jacquardweaving is applied that enables a translation of an image of a 3D-garment into a flat weave keeping the 3D qualities present in the picture. Through a gradation of satin weaves, different hues are created in order to define shadows and other surface qualities.  The changing relation between the body and garments is interpreted in different ways including the body’s presence as well as its absence which results in immediate material responses of the garments and demonstrates the various appearances of the body within this relation. This work results in a variety of woven images pointing out the different stages within the cycle of dressing, wearing and undressing. By using the image as a tool, its pictorial value of capturing moments of change and succession is emphasized. With this work, a new perception of bodily shapes in textiles is provided. Instead of imitating the body’s presence in garments through 3D – forms, alternative ways are shown in how to achieve a corporal illusion in flat weaving-constructions.

  • 72.
    Setterberg, Lisa
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Concatenated2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project explores how to use concatenated shapes as a way of creating inconstant garment constructions. The process starts wide by both testing chains, stitching and knots. But narrows down along the way to only focus on linked shapes without the use of stitches or glue. Different materials and shapes is tested to find a construction that not only hold together but also gives the user playfulness and the opportunity to easily change their own garment. Various forms were tested to be linked together, such as circle, rectangle, square, but also asymmetrical shapes. A choice was made to only focus on the circle to make the design process as focused as possible. Different ways in how to link the circle was tested, different scales, materials and colours. However did this round shape reach the end of the road and the investiga- tion resulted limited. In order to bring the project forward was the circle put aside. The process continued instead with classic clothing design as the basis for the shapes. This shapes resulted in a better variety and stronger garment reference. It opens up for more ways of concatenating garments and textile opportunities that are not restricted by the technique. Pieces that can be assembled in different ways by the user gives the wearer the opportunity to change the expression without buying a new garment. The pieces are also easier to recycle when there is no seams, zippers or other trimmings.

  • 73.
    Simonsson, Frida
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    KNITTING BIG: Ett undersökande i trikåteknikens möjligheter till volym i relation till en möbel2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

     Knitting Big är ett undersökande examensarbete i textildesign med fokus på stickningens möjligheter och förmåga att skapa tredimensionalitet i relation till en möbel. Syftet var att få kunskap i stickningens möjligheter till volym samt att svara på frågeställningarna: Hur förändrar den strukturerade textilen intrycket av formen? Jag vill även ta reda på vad etablerade möbelföretag anser om trikåns möjligheter inom möbeltextil. Projektet har utformats i skolans tre trikåtekniker: handstickning/handmaskin, industriell rundstickning samt industriell flatstick. Under projektet har jag samarbetat med möbelföretaget Homeline. Resultatet av projektet är tre stycken separata textilier som alla ger exempel på volym i trikå. Textilierna är monterade som textila överdrag på pallen ”Polly Fat” från möbelföretaget Homelines sortiment.

  • 74.
    Skjöth Hedlund, Irma
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    BORN ON THE BEACH: Women's wear marked by resort wear2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work explores the field of resort wear within women's wear fashion and the possibilities in development of creating wear by the act of wearing. It questions the meaning of resort, the behavior, life style and a state of mind that is creating wear in a certain context. Having resort wear as a starting point the motive is created by the way of wearing and is to explore the possibilities of evaluation in hierarchy in dressing by using a method of draping. The collection aims to develop a new construction method and wear by compression, using shapes from swimwear in a resort wear context as a draping tool. The work develops the idea of resort wear and is targeting the field from a new angle. The construction method is thereby essential forthe exploration of expression and shape. Resulting in a proposition of a method of construction and development through existing garment and non-existing three-dimension shape. The final result is an outcome of creating wear by a method and a context. Thereby the collection can be looked upon as an example of the possibilities in developing generalized garments with in a fashion field.

  • 75.
    Svensson, Lena
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Dependent form: Finding form by using two shapes dependent on eachother2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The interest of this work is found in the potential ways of constructinggarments and how form can be explored within that field.This work explores how one can use draping as a construction methodapplied on garments to change the traditional shape and to create new formand silhouettes.

    The possibility to create form by using two depending components is thefoundation and aim of this collection. It will embrace different qualities inmaterials and challenge traditional garments and the view on how we usuallyand suppose to wear these garments.

    Garments are dependent mostly on the body of the wearer in first hand, onecould say that this work challenges that order when the two pieces aredeveloped being dependent on each other in first hand.

    Through relationship of fastening and uniting materials I will explore thepossibilities within form and volume and push the expression within thebasic forms within a traditional wardrobe.

    My aim is to further investigate the possibilities within womens wear bylooking at material, color and silhouette through a deconstructed way ofdraping.

    A collection of seven outfits is the result of this work. The outfits willchallenge the field of construction and how we traditionally make garments.The shapes and expression will be based on the interaction between garmentsand the materials.

  • 76.
    Syversætre Johannessen, Vega
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    White Noise: An exploration of tufted surfacesin relation to sound, physicalcontact and tactility.2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 credits / 18 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project is about exploring a textile surface with the design elements of sound, physical contact and tactility. It is interesting to analyse how audio and physical elements can help stimulate the human senses. The aim is to bring these elements into a design context and create a textile surface that can give people a sensory and spatial experience. Through tufting it is possible to work with long and short pile, which adds tactile values in the material. The outcome of this exploration is a vast tufted landscape that partly covers the wall and continues out on the floor. The surface has an abstract visual appearance with irregular shapes that defines the different material. The large scale has an overwhelming effect and invites people to interact and explore the surface. This challenges the fundamental structures of architecture and increases the importance of tactile and human senses, such as curiosity in spatial environments

  • 77.
    Talman, Riikka
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Exploring the relationship between material and textile structure in creating changing textile expressions2015In: EKSIG 2015 – Tangible Means - Experiential Knowledge Through Materials, Kolding, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the relationship between potentially dynamic materials and textile structures for designing textiles with inherent changing qualities. Textiles are usually designed to retain their appearance for as long as possible. Yet all textiles wear out and change over time, both physically and aesthetically. This means the life spans of textile object and the material it is made from will not necessarily be equal. The dynamic changeable qualities in textiles could instead be enhanced by using the potentially dynamic, changing qualities inherent to materials and combining them with textile structures. Through contextualisation and design examples, this paper discusses the possibilities of embedding these qualities into textiles, and presents a series of woven and knitted designs that combine these materials into different textile structures. Two materials with differing dynamic qualities were chosen for the experiments. These are polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) yarn—a material that melts in water and uncoated copper wire—which creates a patina when it reacts with air. These materials are combined into woven and knitted structures and then exposed to two types of stimuli to explore how different stimuli affect the way in which the materials change: passive exposure to weather, and an active workshop with fashion design students. The results are initial explorations into the basic principles of combining potentially dynamic materials into textile structures to create textiles that take advantage of how different materials change over their life span, and how this might look. Through embedding different time spans into textiles instead of designing static expressions, the life span of materials and textile objects could be better matched, enabling the designer to tailor a more appropriate life span for textiles.

  • 78.
    Theise, Helena
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    F ME F YOU: an investigation of the expressional potential of rectangular pattern construction in relation to print2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work is exploring the rectangle as a pattern construction. It is the most recognised geometric shape, can it still provide us with new expressions in fashion? This project is conducted through clear restrictions in the method, and through draping translated into garments through flat pattern construction. The result is a collection with a complex expression, mixing poetic shapes with playful prints full of contrast, which signifes harmony but does not follow the classical notions of beauty. The value of this work lies in the finding of new expressions in fashion, proposing that it is of utmost importance to challenge what we think we know to be true.

  • 79.
    Torkildsby, Anne Britt
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Existential design: revisiting the "dark side" of design thinking2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims to discuss ways of opening up the design brief when designing for extreme environments such as intensive care units and remand prisons. Focusing on “designials” (fundamental forms of design being), the methodology intends to illustrate the fact that objects may directly impinge upon certain “existentials” (fundamental forms of human being). Moreover, the method is a form of critical design that enables designers to shift focus, from analysis of the functionality of a design in use, e.g. by performing a functional analysis, to analysis of the form of being human that a design in use defines. More importantly, this thesis considers what may happen if we do not take into account this aspect of design; in other words, the “dark side” of design thinking.

  • 80.
    Torkildsby, Anne Britt
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Existential design: the "dark side" of design thinking2012Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims to discuss ways to open up the brief in designing for extreme environments, such as intensive care units and remand prison. Focusing on „designials‟ (fundamental forms of design being), the methodology intends to illustrate that things; objects may directly impinge on certain „existentials‟ (fundamental forms of human being). Moreover, the method is a form of critical design enabling designers to shift focus from “analysing the functionality of a design in use” (Torkildsby 2012, p. 18), e.g. by performing a functional analysis, to “analysing the form of being human that a design in use defines” (Ibid), and more importantly, what may happen if we do not – thus the “dark side” of design thinking. Here I am outlining the existential designial analysis in a design manual and further discussing, through the context of a fictive dialogue, How, Why and When it can be applied to the design of these environments.

  • 81.
    Voksepp, Emmy
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Dyeing diversity: Exploring interrelations between plant dyeing techniques, design methods and biodegradable materials in textile design2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 credits / 18 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work explores the expressive potential of plant dyeing techniques in relation to weaving by proposing a method in regard to non-toxic containment, biodegradable materials and ethical values. Textile design and ethical values have been combined to create an “Textethical Design Method”. The personal ethical values that have been used in this project are based on a “diversity perspective”. These consist of openness in material choices that wish to expand the view of quality in relation to textile material, but also by connecting and evolving the expression through knowledge between the material selections, production and aesthetics. This project focus on finding plant dyes that are uncharacteristic for the earth tones that plant dyeing techniques often are associated with, where red cabbage was the most successful pigment. The textile techniques that will be used are plant dyeing on a multiplied layered weaved surface to investigate depth through color and three-dimensional shape. The project strives to contribute with development in design methods, sustainability and broader the field of plant dyeing techniques.

  • 82.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Irreversible Color Expressions2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary preconception of color within textile design is more or less seen as a static and measurable phenomena, but in this project will the opposite be investigated, textile colors are crafted to investigate expressions that is evolving over time. This practice based design research project presents a series of textile color samples that will give guidance to a number of plant dyed expressions. Textiles are dyed without any mordant, meaning no added chemical or salts that will influence on the color or color fastness. The objective in this project is to investigate and visualize color changing textile expressions from plant dye, and to verify the changing process within the color samples. This will be documented and fulfilled in two phases: 

    Åland 2013 - Report no.1 (this report) plant dyed samples are documented and presented as visual scanned color samples with foundational information like; materials, plants, dyeing methods etc. Evaluation of first phase in the project covering what visual color you get from different combination of textile materials/fibres and plants etc. 

    Åland 2013 - Report no.2 (to be presented) same samples will be juxtaposed and presented a second time, after being exposed to light etc. in x time. Evaluation and comparison between the scanned samples presented in report no. 1 and in report no. 2 with respect to visual color changes.

  • 83.
    Bågander, Linnea
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Neidert Sestan, Nicole
    Cuttlefish2017Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The performance Cuttlefish questions the form, identity and movement qualities of the dancer and through this it opens up for the discussion, what is a body? The body forms, the viewer can relate to on an emotional level, they became new personas and identities through the new movement qualities and forms. The costume design suggests and push both the choreography and the narrative further, since these new bodies, in themselves, are a choreography and narrative.

    Performed at Falkhallen events venue in Falkenberg, Sweden on 26th of September 2017

  • 84.
    Dumitrescu, Delia (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kooroshnia, Marjan (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Keune, Svenja (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Talman, Riikka (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kapur, Jyoti (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Exhibition on on-going research, experimental work and prototypes in textile design from the Smart Textiles Design Lab at Techtextil 2017 in Frankfurt on 9-12th May 20172017Artistic output (Unrefereed)
  • 85.
    Talman, Riikka (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Exhibition on on-going research, experimental work and prototypes in textile design from the Smart Textiles Design Lab at the PhD exhibition at “Shaping (Un)common Grounds”, ArcInTex-conference, Eindhoven, the Netherlands on 2014/10/13-172014Artistic output (Unrefereed)
  • 86.
    Kapur, Jyoti (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Suarez, Daniel (Designer)
    UDK, Berlin.
    Resetar, Iva (Designer)
    UDK, Berlin.
    Beyer, Bastian (Designer)
    RCA, London.
    Cabrero, Marina (Designer)
    RCA, London.
    Exhibition: Research through Collaboration2016Artistic output (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Bågander, Linnea
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kent, Karolin
    Karolin Kent, movement and visual art.
    INSIDE/OUTSIDE: Horizontal2017Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The performance INSIDE/OUTSIDE questions the borders of the body both through how material movement allow the body to extend in scale and by changing the inside and outside perspective of dress. Through this it also questions the notion of wearing. The form suggest and instructs the choreography and becomes a co-choreographer pushing the narrative further and opening up for interaction between bodies through its materiality.

    Dance performance performed at the Falkhallen events venue in Falkenberg, Sweden on May 10, 2017 and the ‘everything and everybody as material’ conference, June 7-9, 2017 

    Dance performance performed at the Falkhallen events venue in Falkenberg, Sweden on May 10, 2017 and the ‘everything and everybody as material’ conference, June 7-9, 2017 

  • 88.
    Bågander, Linnea
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kent, Karolin
    Karolin Kent, movement and visual art.
    INSIDE/OUTSIDE: Vertical2017Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The performance INSIDE/OUTSIDE questions the borders of the body both through how material movement allow the body to extend in scale and by changing the inside and outside perspective of dress. Through this it also questions the notion of wearing. The form suggest and instructs the choreography and becomes a co-choreographer pushing the narrative further and opening up for interaction between bodies through its materiality. This version of INSIDE/OUTSIDE, is developed to create interaction and somatic experience for the audience with their bodies, each other, the materiality and the dancer. 

    Dance performance performed at Improspekcije festival, Zagreb, Croatia, 10-11 of November

  • 89.
    Kapur, Jyoti (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Performative exhibit: Touch of smell2017Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The exploration of material is in a performance, that is investigating how human interactions develop when spaces are designed using smell as a design material. In the digital world, the touch and the sensation to the physical materials are lacking in everyday life. However, at the same time, the need to be connected to ourselves through our body is ever growing. This however is quite unlike to our affinity of moving fast in all aspects of life. As Juhani Pallasmaa (2012) points out that a haptic architecture brings about slowness and intimacy which is understood and appreciated only gradually with time. Also, written by Ezio Manzini (1989) touch being the most analytic of all the human senses, can help us explore the shapes and surfaces of a material better than the eyes.

    In an attempt to re-initiate the experience through the sense of smell and touch, this paper aims to question how can smells be used as a design material in our living environments. Speculating buildings and interior spaces, using invisible immaterial, this research is focusing on ways of designing interactions with smells and how these interactions open or close architectural spaces without having physical boundaries. In this paper, the design experiments are investigating how we will respond and interact with smell in architectural spaces.

  • 90.
    Kapur, Jyoti (Designer, Curator)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Stasiulyte, Vidmina (Designer, Curator)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Keune, Svenja (Curator, Designer)
    Tomico, Oscar (Curator)
    Barcelona School of Design and Engineering.
    Keith, Sara (Curator)
    School of Textiles and Design, Heriot Watt University.
    Suarez, Daniel (Designer)
    UDK, Berlin.
    Resetar, Iva (Designer)
    UDK, Berlin.
    Beyer, Bastian (Designer)
    RCA, London.
    Cabrero, Marina (Designer)
    RCA, London.
    Gowrishankar, Ramyah (Designer)
    UDK, Berlin.
    Pečiulytė, Justė (Designer)
    VAA, Vilnius.
    Lundberg, Sara (Designer)
    VAA, Vilnius.
    Pineyro, Ana (Designer)
    RCA, London.
    Nachtigall, Troy (Designer)
    Tu/e, Eindhoven.
    Mackey, Angella (Designer)
    Svechtarova, Mila (Designer)
    Bertin, Marion (Designer)
    SPECULATE, COLLABORATE, DEFINE - TEXTILE THINKING FOR FUTURE WAYS OF LIVING2017Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    About the exhibitionHow can we design for the future? In this avant-garde exhibition architects, interaction, fashion and textile designers show their works in progress when they speculate about, collaborate on, and define how to strengthen the foundations of design for more sustainable forms of living. 

    The exhibition Speculate, collaborate, define – textile thinking for future ways of living, is a work in progress by the PhD students in the ArcInTexETN project. ArcInTexETN is an EU-funded training network of early stage researchers exploring new expressions of living through textile thinking.  They collaborate in three scales – building, interior, and body – looking into methods for turning current scientific knowledge into the design of new forms of living.

    With videos as their main medium, the students present different takes on the subject. In “Ahti”, a speculative short film about the first human being born in space, the story is set in the future. It’s 2076 and there is no water left on our planet Earth. Ahti wears the same suit every day, like a second skin. The skin has different properties that protect him and allow him to walk on any surface, levitate, communicate and store energy.

    Have you heard about the Wolpertinger? It’s a hybrid animal whose appearance evokes the idea that, however different the parts are, they constitute a whole, functioning organism. With the animal as an analogue, a collection of videos are projections of different pieces of work, showing a patchwork of cooperation, exposing the working process of collaborative design.

    The film “What is interior?” presents an interior landscape, a shifting view of this paradoxical space, narrated by a linguistic review that argues to define the term interior. The film gives an examination of the definitions that frame the term, as well as creating the fleeting textures that shapes it.

    In addition to the video projections there are also three individual installations. So, bring your nose and your curiosity! This is not only an audio-visual exhibition.

  • 91.
    Kapur, Jyoti (Designer, Actor)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pečiulytė, Justė (Designer, Actor)
    VAA, Vilnius.
    Staging a smelly atmosphere2017Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a collaborative proposal for a presentation at the Symposium, we suggest a performance/workshop format. The invited participant enacts a specific spatial atmosphere of a design studio, where smells are quintessential to a working space and also to the design process. This workshop/performance becomes a method to investigate, how the spaces can be arranged using the olfactive boundaries. If the tactile surfaces create non-visual expressions going beyond a graphical and visual representation. And how change in smells make a distinctive effect in design decisions and design processes for a designer.

    Additionally, the workshop/performance is an experimental research presentation format that enables an activated state (smells) and gives a playground for learning. It is a way to display, explore and finally, to discuss the ‘designer experience’ conveyed by embodied interactions with the materials.

    We use the design studio as  a framework which is susceptible to be adaptive, hence open for negotiation with existing conditions. We also estimate the importance for it to articulate the tactile, visual and verbal aspects of the designing environment. Therefore, studio as a stage, a material setting to improvise and enact with, is more specifically what interests us.

  • 92.
    Kapur, Jyoti (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Workshop: Playing with Smells2017Artistic output (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this workshop is creating games for interacting with smells by exploring different textile materials, shapes and forms of different sizes. Some smells will be pleasant and others will not. This workshop is intended to bring back the attention to human instinctive senses of touch and smell through the physical materials.

    The idea of creating games is to provide a multi-sensorial experience and playful interaction with the textile objects and materials. This is challenging to distract the attention onto something analogue in the midst of the fast and the digital way of interactions within our environment. However, the sense of smell does not need a conscious attention, the smells around us send messages even without being focussed on the source of smells. These messages are interpreted subjectively based on individual experiences, and learnt associations for example, disgust or appeal. The reaction or reflex to smells happens while the other senses are stimulated at the same time. However, to be able to make the experience with smells more tangible, the interactions in the games are designed through the sense of touch. This gives a sense of almost a synesthetic experience. 

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