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  • 51.
    Nilsson, Linnéa
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Designing with Smart Textiles: A new research program2011In: Nordes, ISSN 1604-9705, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    No longer is it sufficient to add ‘smart’ to textiles to secure interesting research results. We have surpassed the initial stages of explorations and testing and now need to raise the bar. We have thus specified a research program in which we investigate what it means to design with smart textiles. What can we design with smart textiles? And how do we design with smart textiles? We now explore how these complex, often abstract, materials can enter traditional design practices and what role smart textile can play in the design of our environment. In this paper, we discuss the challenges we see at present, we outline our new research program and we qualify it through three examples of our ongoing projects: The smart textile sample collection, Dynamic textile patterns, and Bonad [tapestry]. The paper is as much an invitation to join forces, as it is a description of a maturing process within design research. We are over the first love, now what?

  • 52.
    Nilsson, Saga
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    More than meets the dye: a textile design exploration of combining fibre-specific dyeing and structural weaving to create a multidimensional fabric2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project explores the combination of a woven structure consisting of different fibers with dyeing to create a multidimensional woven textile capable of altering in expression. This project aims to show how a designer can work with fibre-specific dyeing and multiple fibers in a woven textile and the many possibilities this lends in a design process. With a sustainable approach to the matter used in the project, creating more with less, a suggestion is made of an alternative method of creating multidimensional fabrics. The chemical reaction between pigment and fiber is explored to show a greater appreciation for the textile material and to create fabrics capable of multiple expressions. One woven fabric, in individual pieces, is dyed in reactive-, acid- and disperse-dye. The cellulose-, wool- and synthetic yarns in the fabric absorb their intended pigment but also show how they react to another category of dye. A series of dyed samples, all originating from the same woven material with an abstract pattern, show the varied expression the treatment can achieve. The fabric and method presented in the project show an example of how one can compose a series of textiles with less matter but with more expression.

  • 53. Nordenståhl, Caisa
    SCALE UP!: An exploration of the limitations of the printing screen, the fabric width and the circle as a shape2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    SCALE UP! is an exploration in hand-printed surface patterns in relation to scale. The aim is to make hand-printed large-scale surface patterns, by challenging the limitations of the printing screen, the fabric width and the circle as a shape; with the circle as a pattern and structure to visualise it, by colours and bleed-through. The project is based in an interest in working large-scale, in the area of screen printing. We often see printed full-width fabrics where the repeat fills the whole width. However, a possibility to take it one step further and not be limited by the width of the fabric or the size of the printing screen was seen. Why be satisfied with the size of a full-width pattern and see the printing screen as a frame to keep within? The striving to challenge the size of the printing screen and the fabric width were the basis of the project. The result is one piece ~4,2 x 4,8 m big consisting of six hand-printed cloths.

  • 54.
    Nordqvist, Amanda
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Colour and light2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 credits / 18 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work explores how colour and light can be used as the prime design materials. They are investigated in unison in relation to spatiality. Colour is a way for us to understand and identify what we see, it is primary for how we interpret our surroundings. The aim is to explore colour, light and reflections, by the means of printing and dyeing of translucent materials, as an attempt to challenge the visual perception of the spectator and the experience of how spatiality is perceived. The project investigates how the boundaries of a textile can be questioned, for example where does a pattern begin and end? Does it only belong to the textile or can it transcend to it’s surroundings? The investigational process is experimental and explores combinations of colour and light in translucent materials, coloured through the techniques of heat transfer printing and dyeing. Swatches made are analysed in relation to each other and to light, with a focus on their visual performance. The final design examples discusses the idea of how textile, light and colour can be used to create, define and illuminate spatiality.

  • 55.
    Persson, Anna
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Functional Styling: Exploring a Textile Design Space2010In: Duck Journal for Research in Textiles and textile Design, ISSN 2042-0854, Vol. 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    As interactive materials enter the world of textile design, a new area is defined. From an interaction design perspective, interactive (or smart) textiles obviously differ from, for example, a computer game or a word processing program in various ways. One difference is that interactive textiles are experienced as physical materials and are not pixels changing colour on a computer display. But the main difference lies in the diverse aesthetical values; computer software and hardware are related to advanced technology, hard material and functionality whereas textiles are familiar, tactile, flexible and touchable. Still,textiles can build on advanced technology.To be able to understand the full potential of interactive textiles, we need to consider them as something new, designed in the intersection between textile design and interaction design. The experimental approach taken in the Functional Styling project is inspired by the work made at the Interactive Institute within the IT+textiles design program where a series of experiments and design examples were made in the field of interactive textiles, exploring the aesthetics and emerging expressions of smart textiles rather than technical functionality. This paper reports on a collaboration between the Smart Textiles Design Lab at the Swedish School of Textiles, University of Borås, and designers and technicians at Kasthall, a company with a long tradition in producing hand tufted and woven high-class quality carpets.

  • 56.
    Ragnarsson, Julia
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    WHO ARE U WEARING?: investigating iconic celebrity fashion images as dress2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This collection is an observation of the relationship between celebrity culture, fashion and the female form. Exploring how the modern fashion image is communicated to a wider audience through mass media. At the same the work aims to explore new ways of developing clothing from a starting point in figurative prints. The work explores the body as the new context of the celebrity image in order to display different perspectives of both image and body. This has been found through an interaction between print and body, the visual perception within the relationship of these and from a social point of view. The work displays thoughts regarding perspectives on body ideals, female stereotypes, fashion, clothing, mass media and fame in today’s society. The bodies of celebrities are seen as walking billboards and advertisement for designers, the work questions this adopted culture by highlighting the phenomenon. While the work is a comment on the ridiculousness within the mass media and celebrity worship, it is also a homage to these women who have put a mark in fashion history. The final result could be seen as a series examples of possible outcomes from working with the image in relation to body. But also as a statement on how the current state of fashion, where new ideas seem less important as who is wearing what.

  • 57.
    Randestad, Stina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    BREED2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Breed has a concept and a main goal, to be unpredictable and visually impressive. The idea that it was built on was to try to create a collection with the method of breeding and the rules of genetics. At first, twelve individuals were created. They were all given characteristics – “genes”, handed out in a random way, decided by the toss of a dice. The individuals bred and were blended into a second generation, who thereafter procreated into a third. This third generation of eight characters, four females and four males, carry genes and features from their ancestors. They have been twisted, mutated and mixed, just like in nature. It is voluminous line-up with clashes between references, colours and styles. The challenge has been to let chance take decisions and to do something that was unexpected and was going to give an unpredictable result. Breed has not been done for a commercial destination but would be suitable for styling artists, editorials for fashion magazines, costumes in music videos or artistic films. The method is supposed to make people interested, the result is supposed to give the onlooker a smaller chock, a tingling sensation and the impression of a new subculture, a modern day tribe or a new breed. Or simply “What crazy person made this?”

  • 58.
    Rothman, Maria
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    The needle has a point, stitch has a function: Exploring the embroidered stitch in a functional context2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project within the textile design field explores the textile technique embroidery. By using design methods based on words and actions the technique was used in another angle approach that allowed the stitches to be used in a more functional context. This approach differs from how embroidery is traditionally looked upon, an added decorative surface to an already functional object. Embroidery has been explored in a way to see if the technique could be used as something more than just an added surface and if that added surface could be manipulated so that the stitch has both decorative and functional aspects. Stitches has been developed, discovered and realised that they can add density, stability, assembly and form to a material. This has resulted in an alternative way of using embroidery that puts the stitch in the position of being vital to both the expression and function of the object.

  • 59.
    Schultz, Maike
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    The Clothes I Live In2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work explores the relation between the body and garments by illustrating the cycle of dressing, wearing and undressing in woven images. Based on experimental methods, such as scanning and photographing, images of garments are generated capturing garment details, surface qualities, movement, folds and volume. These demonstrate the constantly changing relation between the body and garments within the cycle of dressing, wearing and undressing. In translating the photographs and scans of the garments into weaves, a shading technique for jacquardweaving is applied that enables a translation of an image of a 3D-garment into a flat weave keeping the 3D qualities present in the picture. Through a gradation of satin weaves, different hues are created in order to define shadows and other surface qualities.  The changing relation between the body and garments is interpreted in different ways including the body’s presence as well as its absence which results in immediate material responses of the garments and demonstrates the various appearances of the body within this relation. This work results in a variety of woven images pointing out the different stages within the cycle of dressing, wearing and undressing. By using the image as a tool, its pictorial value of capturing moments of change and succession is emphasized. With this work, a new perception of bodily shapes in textiles is provided. Instead of imitating the body’s presence in garments through 3D – forms, alternative ways are shown in how to achieve a corporal illusion in flat weaving-constructions.

  • 60.
    Setterberg, Lisa
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Concatenated2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project explores how to use concatenated shapes as a way of creating inconstant garment constructions. The process starts wide by both testing chains, stitching and knots. But narrows down along the way to only focus on linked shapes without the use of stitches or glue. Different materials and shapes is tested to find a construction that not only hold together but also gives the user playfulness and the opportunity to easily change their own garment. Various forms were tested to be linked together, such as circle, rectangle, square, but also asymmetrical shapes. A choice was made to only focus on the circle to make the design process as focused as possible. Different ways in how to link the circle was tested, different scales, materials and colours. However did this round shape reach the end of the road and the investiga- tion resulted limited. In order to bring the project forward was the circle put aside. The process continued instead with classic clothing design as the basis for the shapes. This shapes resulted in a better variety and stronger garment reference. It opens up for more ways of concatenating garments and textile opportunities that are not restricted by the technique. Pieces that can be assembled in different ways by the user gives the wearer the opportunity to change the expression without buying a new garment. The pieces are also easier to recycle when there is no seams, zippers or other trimmings.

  • 61.
    Simonsson, Frida
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    KNITTING BIG: Ett undersökande i trikåteknikens möjligheter till volym i relation till en möbel2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

     Knitting Big är ett undersökande examensarbete i textildesign med fokus på stickningens möjligheter och förmåga att skapa tredimensionalitet i relation till en möbel. Syftet var att få kunskap i stickningens möjligheter till volym samt att svara på frågeställningarna: Hur förändrar den strukturerade textilen intrycket av formen? Jag vill även ta reda på vad etablerade möbelföretag anser om trikåns möjligheter inom möbeltextil. Projektet har utformats i skolans tre trikåtekniker: handstickning/handmaskin, industriell rundstickning samt industriell flatstick. Under projektet har jag samarbetat med möbelföretaget Homeline. Resultatet av projektet är tre stycken separata textilier som alla ger exempel på volym i trikå. Textilierna är monterade som textila överdrag på pallen ”Polly Fat” från möbelföretaget Homelines sortiment.

  • 62.
    Syversætre Johannessen, Vega
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    White Noise: An exploration of tufted surfacesin relation to sound, physicalcontact and tactility.2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 credits / 18 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project is about exploring a textile surface with the design elements of sound, physical contact and tactility. It is interesting to analyse how audio and physical elements can help stimulate the human senses. The aim is to bring these elements into a design context and create a textile surface that can give people a sensory and spatial experience. Through tufting it is possible to work with long and short pile, which adds tactile values in the material. The outcome of this exploration is a vast tufted landscape that partly covers the wall and continues out on the floor. The surface has an abstract visual appearance with irregular shapes that defines the different material. The large scale has an overwhelming effect and invites people to interact and explore the surface. This challenges the fundamental structures of architecture and increases the importance of tactile and human senses, such as curiosity in spatial environments

  • 63.
    Talman, Riikka
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Exploring the relationship between material and textile structure in creating changing textile expressions2015In: EKSIG 2015 – Tangible Means - Experiential Knowledge Through Materials, Kolding, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the relationship between potentially dynamic materials and textile structures for designing textiles with inherent changing qualities. Textiles are usually designed to retain their appearance for as long as possible. Yet all textiles wear out and change over time, both physically and aesthetically. This means the life spans of textile object and the material it is made from will not necessarily be equal. The dynamic changeable qualities in textiles could instead be enhanced by using the potentially dynamic, changing qualities inherent to materials and combining them with textile structures. Through contextualisation and design examples, this paper discusses the possibilities of embedding these qualities into textiles, and presents a series of woven and knitted designs that combine these materials into different textile structures. Two materials with differing dynamic qualities were chosen for the experiments. These are polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) yarn—a material that melts in water and uncoated copper wire—which creates a patina when it reacts with air. These materials are combined into woven and knitted structures and then exposed to two types of stimuli to explore how different stimuli affect the way in which the materials change: passive exposure to weather, and an active workshop with fashion design students. The results are initial explorations into the basic principles of combining potentially dynamic materials into textile structures to create textiles that take advantage of how different materials change over their life span, and how this might look. Through embedding different time spans into textiles instead of designing static expressions, the life span of materials and textile objects could be better matched, enabling the designer to tailor a more appropriate life span for textiles.

  • 64.
    Theise, Helena
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    F ME F YOU: an investigation of the expressional potential of rectangular pattern construction in relation to print2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work is exploring the rectangle as a pattern construction. It is the most recognised geometric shape, can it still provide us with new expressions in fashion? This project is conducted through clear restrictions in the method, and through draping translated into garments through flat pattern construction. The result is a collection with a complex expression, mixing poetic shapes with playful prints full of contrast, which signifes harmony but does not follow the classical notions of beauty. The value of this work lies in the finding of new expressions in fashion, proposing that it is of utmost importance to challenge what we think we know to be true.

  • 65.
    Torkildsby, Anne Britt
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Existential design: revisiting the "dark side" of design thinking2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims to discuss ways of opening up the design brief when designing for extreme environments such as intensive care units and remand prisons. Focusing on “designials” (fundamental forms of design being), the methodology intends to illustrate the fact that objects may directly impinge upon certain “existentials” (fundamental forms of human being). Moreover, the method is a form of critical design that enables designers to shift focus, from analysis of the functionality of a design in use, e.g. by performing a functional analysis, to analysis of the form of being human that a design in use defines. More importantly, this thesis considers what may happen if we do not take into account this aspect of design; in other words, the “dark side” of design thinking.

  • 66.
    Torkildsby, Anne Britt
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Existential design: the "dark side" of design thinking2012Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims to discuss ways to open up the brief in designing for extreme environments, such as intensive care units and remand prison. Focusing on „designials‟ (fundamental forms of design being), the methodology intends to illustrate that things; objects may directly impinge on certain „existentials‟ (fundamental forms of human being). Moreover, the method is a form of critical design enabling designers to shift focus from “analysing the functionality of a design in use” (Torkildsby 2012, p. 18), e.g. by performing a functional analysis, to “analysing the form of being human that a design in use defines” (Ibid), and more importantly, what may happen if we do not – thus the “dark side” of design thinking. Here I am outlining the existential designial analysis in a design manual and further discussing, through the context of a fictive dialogue, How, Why and When it can be applied to the design of these environments.

  • 67.
    Voksepp, Emmy
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Dyeing diversity: Exploring interrelations between plant dyeing techniques, design methods and biodegradable materials in textile design2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 credits / 18 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work explores the expressive potential of plant dyeing techniques in relation to weaving by proposing a method in regard to non-toxic containment, biodegradable materials and ethical values. Textile design and ethical values have been combined to create an “Textethical Design Method”. The personal ethical values that have been used in this project are based on a “diversity perspective”. These consist of openness in material choices that wish to expand the view of quality in relation to textile material, but also by connecting and evolving the expression through knowledge between the material selections, production and aesthetics. This project focus on finding plant dyes that are uncharacteristic for the earth tones that plant dyeing techniques often are associated with, where red cabbage was the most successful pigment. The textile techniques that will be used are plant dyeing on a multiplied layered weaved surface to investigate depth through color and three-dimensional shape. The project strives to contribute with development in design methods, sustainability and broader the field of plant dyeing techniques.

  • 68.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Irreversible Color Expressions2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary preconception of color within textile design is more or less seen as a static and measurable phenomena, but in this project will the opposite be investigated, textile colors are crafted to investigate expressions that is evolving over time. This practice based design research project presents a series of textile color samples that will give guidance to a number of plant dyed expressions. Textiles are dyed without any mordant, meaning no added chemical or salts that will influence on the color or color fastness. The objective in this project is to investigate and visualize color changing textile expressions from plant dye, and to verify the changing process within the color samples. This will be documented and fulfilled in two phases: 

    Åland 2013 - Report no.1 (this report) plant dyed samples are documented and presented as visual scanned color samples with foundational information like; materials, plants, dyeing methods etc. Evaluation of first phase in the project covering what visual color you get from different combination of textile materials/fibres and plants etc. 

    Åland 2013 - Report no.2 (to be presented) same samples will be juxtaposed and presented a second time, after being exposed to light etc. in x time. Evaluation and comparison between the scanned samples presented in report no. 1 and in report no. 2 with respect to visual color changes.

  • 69.
    Dumitrescu, Delia (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kooroshnia, Marjan (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Keune, Svenja (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Talman, Riikka (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kapur, Jyoti (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Exhibition on on-going research, experimental work and prototypes in textile design from the Smart Textiles Design Lab at Techtextil 2017 in Frankfurt on 9-12th May 20172017Artistic output (Unrefereed)
  • 70.
    Talman, Riikka (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Exhibition on on-going research, experimental work and prototypes in textile design from the Smart Textiles Design Lab at the PhD exhibition at “Shaping (Un)common Grounds”, ArcInTex-conference, Eindhoven, the Netherlands on 2014/10/13-172014Artistic output (Unrefereed)
12 51 - 70 of 70
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