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  • 51.
    Kapur, Jyoti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Smells: olfactive dimension in designing textile architecture2017Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing with non-visual attributes challenges ways of representation. This research explores methods for designing with invisible materiality within the research practice, as well as ways of representation through textiles when designing spaces. Exploring textiles and smells within a space, the research program investigates spatial interactions.

    This research focuses on designing embodied experiences using tangible materials as expressions of smells. Through the spatial installations and performances Sight of smell, Touch of smell, and Smell, space, and body movement, haptics were explored as one of the methods of interaction with smells through textiles.

    Through the sense of touch, this research also investigates ways of revealing, activating, and disseminating smells within a space. Smells were purposely added through the methods of dyeing, coating, and printing to the textile materials that did not inherently embody any smells, As a result, tactile surfaces create non-visual expressions of smell. Further ideas of research in this area would explore another perspective of designing with smells in spaces. As an example, by designing textiles being smell absorbers, dividers, and re ectors, could compliment the spatial concepts and deals with the already existing smells in a living environment.

    In this licentiate thesis thinking through the olfactive dimension to design textiles is not only novel for the textile design eld; but also, its proposal for application in the spatial design is quite unique, and o ers a new dimension for spatial design. 

  • 52.
    Kapur, Jyoti
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Suarez, Daniel
    UDK, Berlin.
    Resetar, Iva
    UDK, Berlin.
    Beyer, Bastian
    RCA, London.
    Cabrero, Marina
    RCA, London.
    Open Studio Presentation2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 53.
    Karlsson, Rebecca
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    The iconic flower: Deconstruction of iconic flower prints to investigate the relation between form,print and the body through volume, padding and draping to achieve new expressions in dress.2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This bachelor degree work explores the interrelation between print and form in fashion design. The aim of this work is to use the deconstruction of iconic flower prints to investigate the relation between form, print and the body through volume, padding and draping to achieve new expressions in dress.

    The work is both textile and design driven and the main focus has been to investigate transfer print technique in relation to drawstrings, padding and quilting with focus to create and enhance different interesting forms in each flower print. Through the use of polyester fabric in different qualities additional possibilities are shown within the techniques.

    The work strives to present a new design process and method that can be seen as a suggestion in how to achieve new expressions in dress. The value of this work is the new way of approaching the print technique in relation to shape within the fashion field. Through the interaction between fashion and textile, the collection challenge the traditional way of creating garments by letting the print decide the result.

  • 54.
    Keune, Svenja
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    On Textile Farming: Seeds as Material for Textile Design2018Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Presently, designing with living systems such as insects, fungi and bacteria has become an area of extended interest, proposing collaborative processes of designing and manufacturing - as a solution for symbiotic ways of living. On the scale of the interior, modern systems for interior gardening, combining both functional, e.g., food supply, purifying the air, and aesthetic values, experience exceptional popularity, ensuring a complementary perspective on horticultural landscapes indoors. As a result, the spaces where people live and crops grow increasingly intersect and therefore open

    up for developments that bridge both areas and where aesthetic perspectives become equally important. However, modern indoor gardening systems are shaped by commercial horticultural practices, bringing reservoirs such as buckets, tubs or tanks, mostly built of plastic, into the homes. Textile Farming aims to explore alternative forms of plant organisation by blending seeds and textile structures into a hybrid material for textile interior scenarios. Consequently the materials’ performative capacity becomes part of the textile design process. A foundational part are forms of human management, e.g. activation of the seeds, maintenance of the plants, interaction with the hybrid textile structures within and beyond interiors, that leads to experiences and expressions. By practice based design research and through a series of design examples that explore the transformative potential of seeds in textile structures, alternative forms of plant organisation and methods for the textile design process lead to scenarios that propose alternatives to how we live with and organise plants today.

  • 55.
    Koohnavard, Saina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Made You Look: Investigating illusion through garment2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Visual dominance. Our human perception, that with great authority, powerfully influences and controls all of our senses. In turn, our minds try to acquire and maintain meaningful perceptions in what we are experiencing, may that be in a chaotic world, a cacophony in colour or vibrations in patterns. This project explores disturbances in pattern and colour and how these elements can deceive the eye. Playing with elements such as opacity, layers and transparency the nine outfits presented in this project attempt to explore the principles of Gestalt psychology to create disorder and confusion. Significantly, the project discusses our perception of pattern and colour and how with small measures these components can outsmart our senses, highlighting the importance of psychological methods and techniques in design rather than scientific or mathematical.

  • 56.
    Kooroshnia, Marjan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    On textile printing with thermochromic inks2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis describes an exploration of the principles of applying leuco dye-based inks to textile design practice. The main motivation has been to explore the design properties and potentials of leuco dye-based thermochromic inks when printed on textiles in order to obtain an understanding and facilitate the design of dynamic surface patterns. The significance of this is related to the development of a methodology to assist designers in seeing possibilities, making informed decisions, and predicting colour transitions at different temperatures when designing a dynamic surface pattern.

    The research was conducted by undertaking a series of design experiments using leuco dye-based thermochromic inks, which resulted in various working methods and two pedagogical tools. This process offered the insight and depth of understanding required to design dynamic surface patterns, in that it highlighted the different colour-changing properties of leuco dye-based thermochromic inks, which have the potential to create a more complex and dynamic range of patterns on textiles than those that exist today. There is much to explore beyond the current design possibilities offered by thermochromic inks, and it is hoped that designers and researchers can apply the knowledge that has been obtained during the work of this thesis to their practical explorations so as to move towards new ways of thinking and designing, and further innovation in textile design.

  • 57.
    Kristensen Johnstone, Tonje
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Surface patterns, spatiality and pattern relations in textile design2017Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate thesis focuses on surface patterns, spatiality, and pattern relations in textile design, and aims to explore surface patterns as spatial definers and what they mean in the context of surface patterns. A secondary focus relates to applying conceptual spatial determinations as alternative design variables in design processes, and exploring how these could be used to define and analyse pattern relations.

    Through a series of exploratory design experiments that used printed and projected surface patterns in a three-dimensional setting, which were documented using photographs and film, the notion of pattern relations, wherein scale was used as a design variable, was explored. The outcome of the experiments showed the expressional possibilities that surface patterns may provide in a defined space, and how these are connected to pattern relations. In order to encourage an accompanying discussion regarding alternative methods of analysing surface patterns, the construction of a theoretical model was initiated. Workshops with design students were used as another practical method in this work.

    The results showed that there is great potential in using conceptual spatial determinations to define pattern relations by viewing surface patterns as spatial definers, rather than taking a traditional perspective on their functions. Another outcome is the theoretical model, which proposes a specific approach to pattern relations.

    This research demonstrates how conceptual spatial determinations can benefit the textile design process, as well as design teaching, which could in turn provide the field with new expressions that may lead to a change in or fruitful addition to the practice.

  • 58.
    Krogh Tolstrup, Anne
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Illusory deception: Investigating the possibilities of garment through colorful print and layering2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This degree work explores the possibilities of illusory print expressions in fashion design, through the layeringand gathering of opaque and transparent garments. The three-dimensional illusion, in the silhouettes, createan interesting relationship between multiple layering of garment and print. In combination they expressdepth, movement and deception on the human body resulting in an interesting effect that creates an opticalillusion. The discovery of illusionary effect is a result of multiple investigations between diverse prints invarious materials gathered in layers. Depending on which angle the viewer look, different visual illusionsappear and activates the feeling of movement and three-dimensional illusion on the human body. The effectof utilizing different tactility surfaces in the concept of layering is a new visual expression in dressing. Theoutcome should be seen as a motivation to explore and translate things around us by transforming the worldinto a print and decorate it on the body in multiple layers and colors.

  • 59.
    Krull Eriksen, Katrine
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Introducing Plaster: Exploring Artistic Expressions of Natural Dyed Plaster2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introducing Plaster is a degree work in textile design exploring the fusion of natural dyes and plaster, and how this can be applied as a textile design material. The outcome is presented as an experimental investigation, placed in the context of surface and material design. This study derived from a growing interest in how new materials can be implemented into the field of textile design using established textile techniques and methods. Natural dye, texture and flexibility where explored through the method of hands-on-experimentation. The study moved foreword by asking the question: “What happens if?”, and the findings have been analyzed and selected for further development. The final collection consists of five pieces made entirely from plaster, showing another approach to how textile techniques and methods can be developed and adapted to fit materials from another field, for instance: Plaster.

  • 60.
    Landahl, Karin
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    The Myth of the Silhouette: On form thinking in knitwear design2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis presents and discusses the results of foundational experimental designresearch in the field of fashion design methodology, with a particular focus onknitwear. The research explored and broadened the foundations of form-thinkingin the design process for knitwear and knitting, with the objective of developingalternative form-concepts and working methods relevant to practitioners andstudents active in the field.

    Knitting is not simply designing using yet another technique; it is designing from adifferent perspective. When making a knitted item, no material has to be preparedbeforehand, as material and item can be created at one and the same time. Thus,the prevalent distinction between form and material as two separate parameters inthe design process for knitwear can be questioned. Hence, developing the designprocess for knitwear by focusing on alternative ways of understanding the notionof form is of great significance as regards further developments in the wider field ofknit and knitwear design.

    The key aim of the research was to replace the silhouette – used as a guidingprinciple in form thinking – with the notion of invariants, which define what wedo as we knit a given garment. The notion of invariants used in this thesis comesfrom topology, and refers to properties that do not change under non-destructivetransformations. The form of the garment is then given by basic invariants, whichdefine what we build and how we build it. As these properties do not changeunder non-destructive transformations, they do not suggest a specific silhouettewith regard to ready-made garments, but rather a more fundamental form, whichcharacterises the garment throughout making and use. Employed in this way,the notion of an invariant introduces a form of concrete geometry which focusesdirectly on the specifics of making.

    Several initial experiments are described in brief, and this is followed by a discussionof the three more elaborate design experiments which led to the development of atheoretical framework. This is then exemplified with the last design experiment, inwhich theory informs the set-up, and consequently shows the design potentials ofthe suggested method.

  • 61.
    Larsen, Ulrik Martin
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Dressing wearing: Movement directed by dress - dress directed by movement2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Contemporary dance and modern ballet often focus on conveying emotions through patterns of movement which may be abstract, obvious, or anywhere in between, supported by music, sound, or spoken words that set the mood. Scenography is typically sparse or confined to the available space, leaving the dancers as the main instrument of communication. This work explores dressing and wearing, with a focus on how garments can inform and direct movement, choreography, and performance, and in turn how movement may inform and contribute to the development of dynamic garments. Through a series of live experiments, ranging from self-instigated performance/video work in collaboration with choreographers and dancers to performances of garment interaction associated with everyday life dressing, the performative, spatial, and interactive properties of garments are explored. The results present alternative models of collaborative interaction related to various aspects of kinaesthetics, choreography, scenography, and performance space, and offer wide-ranging creative potential. The work shows how designers and choreographers can collaborate on performance scenarios within the context of modern ballet and contemporary dance productions, thus creating conceptual garments that influence the design, choreography, and movement pattern based on a re-conception of what it means to dress and to wear. In relation to the act of dressing and undressing, alternative types of garment and ways of wearing and performing were found where garments act as co-choreographers in the development of performances. Moreover, by having wearing and dressing as a form of choreography these acts, act as the co-creator of garments both in our everday lives and on stage. As a consequence, the results also demonstrates how the agency of garments can function as a manuscript in modern dance, and how performance itself redefines the notion of wearing and the concept of garments.

  • 62.
    Larsson, Jennifer
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    KNOTS: A work about exploring design possibilities in draping based on principles of a knot.2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work is an exploration of design possibilities within draping based on a knot. This to show alternative possibilities and expressions through the knot in construction of clothing. The knot serves as a draping tool, has a function in each garment and is also decorative.

    The result is performed in 7 outfits based on experiments draped on a mannequin or my own body. The experiments are developed mainly through the branching strategy (Jones 1992)achieved with draping sessions in different materials, sizes and placements of the knot.

    Having the knot as starting point allows alternative expressions in construction of well known garments. It is also suggesting a method of closing a piece of clothing using the garment itself which could be developed further in 2D pattern construction.

  • 63.
    Larsson, Jonas Larsson
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Atacac AB.
    Johansson, Mats
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Hernandez, Niina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    From Roll to Bag: D5.2 Final Product Construction Report2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the final product construction report for the From Roll to Bag project. The purpose of this report is to present the implementation of the new pattern technology to selected products and to present the modularity for consumer selection. For fulfilling the tasks (5.1 and 5.2) two garments where chosen, one jacket and one shirt, and customization options regarding fit, model, colour and function were developed for each of them. This includes implementation of novel pattern technology to products, graphics, a product architecture with customisation options and initial production tests to verify perfect fit in production and later in use. The more challenging part was to guarantee manufacturability as the patterns require automated manufacturing equipment due to their detailed construction and the pattern matching. Such equipment includes a cutter with a scanner that identifies the outline of the printed pattern and cuts accoringly. If garments with less detailed graphics are considered for production, pre-dyed fabrics can be used and that requires less investments in manufacturing equipment. Such set up would miss one point of the project but in the tradeoff between investment cost and product price point it may be a viable solution. The garments and customization modules are also fit for production but in order to achieve a detailed production evaluation with exact production times and material consumption a long run of products is needed. Considerations about customer’s experiences in this type value chains are also discussed.

  • 64.
    Larsson, Josefin
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Exquisite corpse: Exploring the methods of surrealism to challenge the hierarchies of body, dress and accessories2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Just as the surrealistic movement challenged our perception of reality, the present work applies surrealistic methods to challenge our preconceived hierarchies between body, dress, and accessory. Adding to past surrealistic work in fashion design, the present work does not only strive to create surrealistic expressions, but to enhance the creative process through surrealistic methods. Three surrealistic methods were tested: Entopic Graphomani, Frottage, and Exquisite Corpse. The methods ability to challenge hierarchies between body, dress, and accessory was assessed through their ability to result in an element of surprise. For the present work, Exquisite Corpse had the greatest potential. By using participant observation and an adapted version of Exquisite Corpse seven looks were developed. The present work concludes that the surrealistic methods can by used not only to develop surrealistic expressions, but also to enhance the creative process within fashion design.

  • 65.
    Lebis, Evelyn
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Interactive Costume Design2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Is improvisation during collaboration a design choice? What is the difference between responsive inspiration and collaboration? Who is in charge of the artistic end result? And what influences the designer’s mood? These questions come across when investigating how to present wearable technology and the role of performance.

  • 66.
    Lentsius, Kairi
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Cut In: Exploring Curved Laser Cut Lines & The Relation To Garment Construction2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project investigates laser cutting in relation to textile manipulation and creating three-dimensional form. More precisely, this collection of nine outfits becomes an exploration about expressions of laser cut lines and their interrelation to the body through folding and draping the textile material. The laser cut bridge line used, will be the guiding part for a garments construction and through this different shapes are tested. This way of working with the material, its character and added manipulation will propose a new understanding of and an alternative for constructing a garment. This investigation is also a proposal for a new mind-set when it comes to using laser cutting in fashion design. Laser cutting has mainly been regarded as a technique for decoration, yet the machine could have a much greater role in the design process. Textile manipulation in this work is seen not only as a surface decoration but as a method of creating a 3D form from a 2D material which in this case is a method of design for shaping a garment. Through this, the work will hopefully challenge the industry in terms of working with laser cutting, garment construction and also textile manipulation.

  • 67.
    Lewis, Erin
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Högskolan i Borås.
    Design Potentials of Magnetic Yarns2018In: : 8th European Conference on Protective Clothing, May 7-9, Porto, Portugal, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Magnetism holds a strong potential as a design material due to the array of possible expressions based on its fundamental behaviours of attraction and repulsion. The magnetic phenomenon presents itself simultaneously as visual and non-visual material through its quality of being imperceptible under certain conditions until manifested in some way, such as physical interaction or electronic control. This balancing of physical constants, material and immaterial considerations of magnetic phenomenon, become a rich site for exploration and experimentation when combined with the immense variables available in textile design such as yarn attributes (yarn number, yarn twist, fiber composition) and textile structure (woven, non-woven, knit, twisted and interlaced). Therefore, the use of magnetism as a design material holds a strong potential for dynamic and responsive textile expressions when used in composition with one another. While the discourse surrounding the material-immaterial relationship is active and present across various design disciplines [1,2,3], the representation of magnetic phenomenon as a design material remains underrepresented in the field of textile design. This experiment illustrates a method of creating yarns that are responsive to magnetic fields through a process of hand-painting natural, synthetic, and combination yarns with a widely-available ferromagnetic solution. The result is a reference catalogue of yarns exhibiting design potentials for textile-based magnetic interactions.

    Experiment

    This poster presentation describes a method of creating yarns that are responsive to magnetic fields through a process of hand-painting natural, synthetic, and combination yarns with a widely-available ferromagnetic solution. The yarns measure 10 cm in length and are grouped in bundles to form tassels. They are anchored to a fixed structure at a central point from which all movement arises. A magnetic field is applied to the yarns through the use of permanent- and electro-magnets. These painted yarns exhibit a unique variety of behaviours and characteristics ranging from lifting/dropping, expansion/compression, splaying, and fluctuating movements, as well as the yarn’s ability to hold structural form. These expressions are based on the yarn variants of fiber composition, weight, twist, flexibility, absorption ability, and evenness of absorption.

    Results

    This experiment results in a catalogue of natural and synthetic yarn attributes pre- and post- ferritic treatment, which identities their magnetic and behavioural abilities. The results suggest design potentials to be further explored through textile construction methods such as weaving and knitting.

    Figure 1. Magnetic yarns in a woven textile construction.

    Acknowledgement

    This research is supported by the Swedish School of Textiles, University of Borås, Sweden

    References

    1. Wiberg, M. (2014). Methodology for materiality: Interaction design research through a material lens. Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 18(3), 625-636.
    2. Dunne, Anthony. (2006). Hertzian Tales: Electronic Products, Aesthetic Experience, and Critical Design (Rev. ed.]. ed.). MIT Press.
    3. Kwon, H., Kim, H., & Lee, W. (2014). Intangibles wear materiality via material composition. Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 18(3), 651-669.

     

  • 68.
    Lewis, Erin
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Högskolan i Borås.
    Kinetic Body Extensions for Social Interactions2018Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This studio invites participants to explore ways of extending physical expressivity through a combined use of wearable electronics and structural textile design. Participants are introduced to an electronics and material prototyping method developed by Social Body Lab for constructing kinetic textile body extensions intended for use in social interactions. Participants will learn to use a servo motor in combination with folded and pleated paper, textiles, and structural materials to create a kinetic wearable module that can expand and contract in form. These kinetic modules can vary in size, form, complexity, and placement on the body, depending on the intended application. Pressure, flexion, ambient light, and electromyography (EMG) are sensors that will be explored as possible triggers for these modules using body movements and gestures. Through prototyping, testing, wearing, and group discussion, participants will explore ways in which their kinetic body extensions can amplify, extend, or subvert existing body language.

  • 69.
    Lewis, Erin
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Högskolan i Borås.
    Magnetic Textiles: Exploring the Non-Visual in Textile Design2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Form and Materials 2

     

    Magnetic Textiles: Exploring the Non-Visual in Textile Design

    Instructor: Erin Lewis

     

    This workshop will explore the design possibilities of magnetic phenomenon in textile design. Magnetic phenomenon holds the quality of being imperceptible until manifested in some way, such as through physical interaction. This phenomenon presents itself as a non-visual material, and, paradoxically, as a physical material to be utilized in design. The inclusion of magnetic threads in textile constructions allow for hidden attributes to be expressed, for example through kinetic behaviours and haptic feedback, which thereby enhance the dimensions of design available to us. This area of non-visual material exploration becomes particularly rich when combined with the variables specific to textile design such as yarn compositions, structure, and texture.

     

    In this workshop students will work with magnetic and non-magnetic threads, wires, or yarns, to create a series of magnetic textile design samples using one or more textile construction technique(s) of their choosing (e.g. knitting, crochet, weaving, etc.). Students will design textiles that emit sound waves or electromagnetic radiation, or that are kinetically actuated through the use of neodymium magnets. Students will have both independent and supported work periods. Samples will be presented on the last day of the workshop in a group critique format.

  • 70.
    Linderoth, Louise
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Have a seat: An exploration of the typical pair of jeans within construction and expression based on the sitting body. Focusing on the question “are you your legs?2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work investigates the typical denim jean in a sitting position with a focus on serving several possible answers to the question ”are you your legs?”. By exploring both the constructional, preconceptional and expressional possibilities within a pair of jeans, a method of using the waist-line and hem-line as measurement-points is found. The purpose of this study is to investigate the way of wearing jeans in a static seated position. Trough the years mainly the standing body has been used as base to create clothes. Only a few construction- and design-methods has been seen based on a sitting body. By challenging the narrow frame of jeans in both construction and expression, a range of innovative examples are found. Trough keeping and exaggerating the typical jean-details such as stitchings, pockets and flys, the jeans are still recognizable as the typical pair of jeans and the focus on distortion and challenging of a pair of jeans in relation to the sitting body is clear. By using the sitting body as base in both construction and design develpoing the limit is pushed further in questioning what a body is, what it needs and how it could be dressed.

  • 71.
    Ljungdahl, Sarah
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    smock x knit: Exploring the possibility of shape in knitwear by looking at theaesthetic properties of smocking, drawing inspiration from sportswear.2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Since late eighteenth century smocking has been a part of different fields of fashion. From agricultural clothing and swimsuits, and also inspiring architecture.

    The approach of smocking has always been to tighten the fabric against the body. This work will challenging this by exploring the possibility to build form with smocking on the body, placing it in the context of personas on a winter vacation.

    By extracting elements of the smocking and sketching directly in the knitting machine using different techniques and yarn with contrasting characteristics, the ambition has been to translate aesthetic aspects of smocking via volume, pattern, material and colour into knitted material, targeting a sporty silhouette and expression.

    The result show an alternative way to bout fabricate and view the smocking. By letting the technique build form, placing it in a sports context suggest that smocking no longer is a technique solely for romantic dresses.

  • 72.
    Lundberg, Sara
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    OMG(s)!: Investigating the spiritual body2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work aims to discuss the contemporary view on religion and is an investigation of the body’s capacity for spiritual expression. By combining spirituality with contemporary fashion scene and what is praised today, the result presents a suggestion for a new religion, with references to the development of religion through the history of humanity and how the body has functioned in that, exchanged to materials, shapes and symbols used of the contemporary man. The work defines spirituality and religion as two different things, that spirituality is genetic and religion is based on culture. The assumtion is that culture creates its religion based in inherited spirituality. It is be based on the findings of the connections between culture and religion, the ideas of human transformed into gods, and aims to state the importance of religion in societies, even in our modern one, and that is it natural to believe, but the work also aims to brakes the illusion of religions as “real”, but rather is a social and cultural construction to help us deal with our inherited spirituality.

  • 73.
    Malmgren de Oliveira, Stefanie
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Acts of seeing: seeing as a methodological tool in fashion design2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fashion design can be described as perpetually having to produce new suggestions of dress. The foundational tool for realising such propositions in a precise and focused way is the act of seeing. Rather than referring to the sense of sight or visual perception, the act of seeing builds on the concept of the ‘inner eye’ in the sense of imagination, discovery, and the direction of design ideas.

    Seeing as a foundational act in the creative process is not a novel concept; on the contrary, it is usually an intuitive act that any designer performs when directing design ideas towards aesthetic goals. However, systematisation and an awareness of seeing in design processes, as methods of developing ways of working in the field of fashion design, are still open for further research. Therefore, the research presented in this thesis is aimed to systematically explore the act of seeing as a methodological tool in fashion design processes.

    The experiments described in this thesis were used to explore the act of seeing in relation to concepts such as ideation, decision-making, direction, and reflection. The acts of seeing were documented iteratively in photographic sequences, and were important materials for documentation and reflection. The interaction between seeing and doing was recorded using action/reaction chains, and analysed through two modes of seeing: forming and materialising.

    The most important contributions of this research are: 1) The hypothesis that the act of seeing is a methodological tool that is fundamental to creative processes. 2) A framework of ideas that builds on the interplay between the act of seeing and consequential act of doing, which was the basis for experiments that shifted between the two modes forming and materialising. 3) A mapping of different kinds of seeing.

    This raises awareness of design sensibilities, and could lead to more conscious and focused ways of working in which the act of seeing is a foundation for ways of designing that are both methodological and systematic.

  • 74.
    Malmgren De Oliveira, Stefanie
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    On seeing: in fashion design2016Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In fashion design, the designer strives for the development of ideas in view of significant visual goals. The process of specifying and developing ideas is a highly visual process. Based on what has been ‘seen’ as for example in a reference material or in explorations, designers define possible tracks to follow, decide which ideas to deepen or which ones to reject. Their activities can thus be described as a process of seeing.

    There is nothing novel about the importance of seeing as an act in the design process; on the contrary, seeing, is usually an intuitive act that any designer explicates throughout the process of shaping his/her vision. However, the systematisation of seeing in the design process in order to advance ways of working in the field of fashion design is still very much an area that is open for further research.

    In this thesis, possible ways of seeing are explored through experiments in different stages of the design process. Based on an image serving as a point of departure, seen elements were derived and put in relation to a body in a two-dimensional photographic sketching stage, in accordance with different ideas of dress. Selected ideas were then further elaborated and explored in terms of their design possibilities.

    The results of the experiments are propositions of design ideas that have been ‘seen’ in a single sketch or a series of sketches. The contribution of this licentiate thesis are: 1) A thorough mapping of two design stages (point of departure and two-dimensional sketching stage), and how they provide a deeper understanding of the design process, leading to 2) an improved sensibility with regard to design possibilities, their value and developments, and finally 3) the establishing of a methodology with which to discern the composition of a visual language/vision in fashion design based on ‘seeing’.

    The act of seeing is presented as the fundamental tool of designing for shaping a vision. By delving into the systematisation of the notion of seeing in a fashion design process, a methodology of seeing is introduced, which aims to enhance the possible ways of visualisation when designing.

  • 75.
    Maschke, Christina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    The patterned thread: new textiles inspired by ikat2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The work of this MA thesis develops a new approach to hand weaving in which the design process is led by the technique of resistant dyeing. The process is inspired by the visual properties of traditional ikats. It follows the technical ikat procedure of primary resistant dyeing and subsequently weaving. Whithin the research a new way of weaving is explored in which the dyed thread dictates the weaving process and therefore influences the weaving motif. In addition different design variables such as material, binding pattern and finishing are used to push forward the developed concept. The aim of this work is to explore new aesthetic expressions between regular and irregular motifs through the application of design thinking. The result presents an innovative approach in the ikat technique in order to create random distributed patterns and how they can be already influenced in the stage of yarn preparation.

  • 76.
    McQuillan, Holly
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Archer, Jen
    Massey University.
    Menzies, Greta
    Massey University.
    Bailey, Jo
    Massey Univeristy.
    Kane, Karl
    Massey University.
    Fox, Emma
    Massey University.
    Make/Use:: A System for Open Source, User-Modifiable, Zero Waste Fashion Practice2018In: Fashion Practice: the journal of design, creative process & the fashion industry, ISSN 1756-9370, E-ISSN 1756-9389, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 7-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses Make/Use, a multi-disciplinary research project exploring “User Modifiable Zero Waste Fashion”. In particular, it addresses the use of textile print and a parametric matrix to facilitate the cognitive and creative processes involved in the transformation from two-dimensional (2D) to three-dimensional (3D) form. The Make/Use project centers on the development and testing of an embedded navigational system by which users can formulate a functional understanding of the form and construction of a garment and its opportunities for manipulation. It questions how the encoding of navigational clues and markers into a garment might aid in its facility for creation and modification by the user, aiming to enhance emotional investment and connection, and extending its functional life by providing embedded opportunities for alteration and visible repair.

  • 77.
    Meier, Florian
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    "beau platt“: Contemporary Fashion Practice in the field of concrete and virtual visualizations of flat expressions2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work traces the visual potential of 2Dimensional space inthree dimensional garments and questions aesthetic standardsin the field of menswear. The aim is to discuss the visualconsensus of flat and spatial construction.

    Construction has been chosen as the key aspect for digital and analoginvestigations. It builds the main emphasis of this project and leads toa deeper visual understanding of how we perceive garments with clearborders between three - and two dimensional sections.

    The design process has a dual structure.

    1st stage - ‚virtual investigation‘

    This is where the experiments start. By using Simulation andrendering software such as ‚CLO3D‘, ‚Marvellous Designer‘ and ‚Keyshot‘the aim is to develop and unlock multiple constructionprinciples that deal with similar visual aspects. These results suggest anetwork of variations (garment types/parts, e.g. sleeve construction,trousers etc..) that need to be translated into real prototypes.

    2nd stage - ‚Analog translation‘

    Based on the preferred results of the 1st stage, the aim is to filter oneconstruction principle for further studies.The choice of working with the flat sleeve construction is the keyaspect and builds the fundamental for ellaborating the design process.This phase is mainly characterised by material and shape experimentsand relates to a lasting construction principle.

    The result suggest a spread of examples that deal with the sameconstruction principle. The examplified versions include differentmaterial qualities and differ in terms of their complexity in detailsolutions and production.The final choice works as a unit and offers different ways ofapproaching and developing the construction principle further.Especially the layering aspect in example 8 and 9 became dominantand very important for increasing the visual expression.That indication offers an imidiate and direct approach and showsthe potential within the field of 2D expressions.Nevertheless my next step would lead me back to the digital studiesto understand more about the diversity of layers in two dimensionalgarments. Eventually it would suggest both a wearable as well as aconceptual outcome.

  • 78.
    Melin, Lena
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Min magiska värld2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 credits / 18 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    ”Min magiska värld” is a textile installation with the intent purpose of creating a story time escape for pre-schoolers. Thus, acts as a re-presentment of a creative approach towards the childpractical décor of a library. With an outset of three textile patterns, the textile installation seeks to create an illusion of “ fantasy meets reality “ in the visual aspect of an enchanting grove. The fabric in knitted wool have been designed, fabricated and felted to be placed within the selected area. The layout of the patterns bears the essence of creating an increased notion of participation as well as to instil an impression of the kind of harmony that could be sensed in the forest.

  • 79.
    Moëll, Caroline
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    JERSEY, SURE !: Special developed jersey knits with color effects2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the effect of single jersey, based on its original formas a cylinder. It is also an investigation of color and transforming surfaceof garment.The outfits are based on the cylinder in construction. With some cuts andseams, developed into garments.

    The surface of the fabric has qualities recognizable to rib, but the constructionis different. By using cotton and polyester yarns, the stripesshrinks in different directions and when the body integrates with thefabric, shape, gravity and movement will make the material transform byopen and closing the lines.

    Different color effects are presented in the collection. The result is suggestingdifferent color effects, depending on size of the stripes, the saturationof the colors and the placement on the body.

  • 80.
    Nilsson, Linnéa
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Open Structures: Designing alterable 3D printed textiles2015In: Tangible Means - Experiential Knowledge through Materials proceedings / [ed] Anne Louise Bang, Jacob Buur, Irene Alma Lønne & Nithikul Nimkulrat, Kolding, 2015, p. 133-144Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design of textiles is flexible. The soft, pliable nature of textiles means that their expressiveness and physical properties can be altered long after the material has been produced, by e.g. adding or removing colour, pattern, density, or by printing, laser-cutting, etc. This transformability means that the design of textiles can be further developed in another design process in relation to a specific product or context. In the emerging field of textiles produced using 3D modelling and additive manufacturing, structures can be defined in detail and, later, altered or completely redesigned in CAD programs. However, the designs of these textiles are generally fixed when the structures emerge from the 3D printer. This paper describes a practice-based project that explores the transformability of 3D printed textiles, considers the question of whether some of the openness that characterises their digital form can be introduced to their physical form, and then explores what form this could take. It begins by describing the project which forms the basis for the exploration, the outcome of which thus far consists of two experimental 3D printed textiles with changeable physical structures. It then discusses the considerations and decisions involved when designing for such transformable textiles, proposing ways to understand and describe what is taking place: First, by relating them to the considerations made when defining open design systems; second, by introducing two types of design decisions, which together define which aspects of the textile’s design are closed to further development, and which are open for others to develop. 

  • 81.
    Nilsson, Linnéa
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Textile Influence: exploring the relationship between textiles and products in the design process2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Textile materials and textile design are a part of countless products in our surroundings,as well as diverse design fields and industries, each of which has very different materialtraditions and working methods. The aim of this thesis is to add to our understandingof the relationship between textiles and products in the design process, and to explorehow textiles enter and influence product design processes and how products functionin textile design processes. A further aim is to examine the effect of new textiletechnology, such as smart textiles and 3D printed textiles, on this dynamic.

    This thesis is the result of an interplay between theoretical work, experimentalpractice-based projects, and observation of design practice, and it presents two typesof results: Firstly, descriptions of how the relationship can manifest itself in the designprocess, which give a broad picture of the relationship between textile and productand in so doing add to our understanding of textiles as design materials and highlightsome of the additional complexities and possibilities for the design process that comewith new forms of textiles. Secondly, this thesis presents ways of describing thedynamics between textiles and products in the design process, with the intention ofopening up for reflection on how we design, and can design, with textiles. Here, themain outcome is a theoretical framework which examines the relationship from botha product design and a textile design perspective, and includes methods and questionsthat can be used to explore and define how textiles and products meet in the designprocess.

  • 82.
    Nilsson, Linnéa
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Designing with Smart Textiles: A new research program2011In: Nordes, ISSN 1604-9705, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    No longer is it sufficient to add ‘smart’ to textiles to secure interesting research results. We have surpassed the initial stages of explorations and testing and now need to raise the bar. We have thus specified a research program in which we investigate what it means to design with smart textiles. What can we design with smart textiles? And how do we design with smart textiles? We now explore how these complex, often abstract, materials can enter traditional design practices and what role smart textile can play in the design of our environment. In this paper, we discuss the challenges we see at present, we outline our new research program and we qualify it through three examples of our ongoing projects: The smart textile sample collection, Dynamic textile patterns, and Bonad [tapestry]. The paper is as much an invitation to join forces, as it is a description of a maturing process within design research. We are over the first love, now what?

  • 83.
    Nilsson, Saga
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    More than meets the dye: a textile design exploration of combining fibre-specific dyeing and structural weaving to create a multidimensional fabric2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project explores the combination of a woven structure consisting of different fibers with dyeing to create a multidimensional woven textile capable of altering in expression. This project aims to show how a designer can work with fibre-specific dyeing and multiple fibers in a woven textile and the many possibilities this lends in a design process. With a sustainable approach to the matter used in the project, creating more with less, a suggestion is made of an alternative method of creating multidimensional fabrics. The chemical reaction between pigment and fiber is explored to show a greater appreciation for the textile material and to create fabrics capable of multiple expressions. One woven fabric, in individual pieces, is dyed in reactive-, acid- and disperse-dye. The cellulose-, wool- and synthetic yarns in the fabric absorb their intended pigment but also show how they react to another category of dye. A series of dyed samples, all originating from the same woven material with an abstract pattern, show the varied expression the treatment can achieve. The fabric and method presented in the project show an example of how one can compose a series of textiles with less matter but with more expression.

  • 84.
    Nitsche, Tanja Marie
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    About Solving and Dissolving: Investigating the design possibilities of bio plastic2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Translating the conceptual term of sustainability into materials and exploring bio plastics in order to generate visually and tacitly intriguing objects are the aims for this project. Other designers and previous projects in the field of textile design showed how the material works in a small scale. This project used the material’s design properties to generate groups of object elements. The three main design properties of the material, transparency, biomorph expression and flexibility, and their opposites, opaqueness, geometric expression and stiffness, were combined in different sets which resulted in the used artistic methodology. Therefore, the material properties and earlier established techniques formed the base for finding the overall forms of the installations.

    The collection and a book about the surface design possibilities for plant based plastic show how the material can be manufactured. The installations focus on the interplay between colour, light and shadow, material texture and pattern in relation to the overall shape of the object. Moulding, laser cutting and the addition of other ingredients like recycled paper, fibres and mica powder influenced the material’s durability, flexibility, transparency and texture. Experiments revealed that the colours change over time and all of them are highly influenced in their intensity and shade by the light source behind the material.

    This project visualises how all these factors interact and which techniques and tools are required to process the new material. Moreover, it generates new options for a new formal language and terminology for sustainable interior textiles.

  • 85. Nordenståhl, Caisa
    SCALE UP!: An exploration of the limitations of the printing screen, the fabric width and the circle as a shape2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    SCALE UP! is an exploration in hand-printed surface patterns in relation to scale. The aim is to make hand-printed large-scale surface patterns, by challenging the limitations of the printing screen, the fabric width and the circle as a shape; with the circle as a pattern and structure to visualise it, by colours and bleed-through. The project is based in an interest in working large-scale, in the area of screen printing. We often see printed full-width fabrics where the repeat fills the whole width. However, a possibility to take it one step further and not be limited by the width of the fabric or the size of the printing screen was seen. Why be satisfied with the size of a full-width pattern and see the printing screen as a frame to keep within? The striving to challenge the size of the printing screen and the fabric width were the basis of the project. The result is one piece ~4,2 x 4,8 m big consisting of six hand-printed cloths.

  • 86.
    Nordqvist, Amanda
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Colour and light2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 credits / 18 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work explores how colour and light can be used as the prime design materials. They are investigated in unison in relation to spatiality. Colour is a way for us to understand and identify what we see, it is primary for how we interpret our surroundings. The aim is to explore colour, light and reflections, by the means of printing and dyeing of translucent materials, as an attempt to challenge the visual perception of the spectator and the experience of how spatiality is perceived. The project investigates how the boundaries of a textile can be questioned, for example where does a pattern begin and end? Does it only belong to the textile or can it transcend to it’s surroundings? The investigational process is experimental and explores combinations of colour and light in translucent materials, coloured through the techniques of heat transfer printing and dyeing. Swatches made are analysed in relation to each other and to light, with a focus on their visual performance. The final design examples discusses the idea of how textile, light and colour can be used to create, define and illuminate spatiality.

  • 87.
    Norrsell, Lovisa
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    GIVING TEXTILES FORM: Exploring Self-supporting Possibilities2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Giving textiles form is a project in textile design exploring how textiles can create self-supporting three-dimensional forms with after finishing techniques. The project focuses on the textile to be self-supporting, by working against and challenging the properties of a textile fabric. The motive for the project is to widen the definition of what a textile can do. The methods of origami and traditional Japanese wood joinery are used to find a functioning and durable construction, as well as manipulating the textiles with colour and after finishing techniques. The result of this work is three coloured textile forms that are three-dimensional and self-supporting, the use of colour strengthens the depth and adds a spatial dimension. This work contributes to broaden the field of textile design by expanding the use of textile.

  • 88.
    Persson, Anna
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Functional Styling: Exploring a Textile Design Space2010In: Duck Journal for Research in Textiles and textile Design, ISSN 2042-0854, Vol. 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    As interactive materials enter the world of textile design, a new area is defined. From an interaction design perspective, interactive (or smart) textiles obviously differ from, for example, a computer game or a word processing program in various ways. One difference is that interactive textiles are experienced as physical materials and are not pixels changing colour on a computer display. But the main difference lies in the diverse aesthetical values; computer software and hardware are related to advanced technology, hard material and functionality whereas textiles are familiar, tactile, flexible and touchable. Still,textiles can build on advanced technology.To be able to understand the full potential of interactive textiles, we need to consider them as something new, designed in the intersection between textile design and interaction design. The experimental approach taken in the Functional Styling project is inspired by the work made at the Interactive Institute within the IT+textiles design program where a series of experiments and design examples were made in the field of interactive textiles, exploring the aesthetics and emerging expressions of smart textiles rather than technical functionality. This paper reports on a collaboration between the Smart Textiles Design Lab at the Swedish School of Textiles, University of Borås, and designers and technicians at Kasthall, a company with a long tradition in producing hand tufted and woven high-class quality carpets.

  • 89.
    Persson, Josephine
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Attention to Details: To challenge predetermined expressions within garments and accessories,through explorations of their details and giving them new meaning byabstraction.2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The primary purpose of this study is to investigate and challenge the predetermined silhouettes of street wear; silhouettes and identity that has been ”approved” by the structures of society. The study aims to open up for discussion, and explore the area in which might be considered to be ”wrongdoings”, in order to push the boundaries that we have set on the different components a garment can be built up with. The study was conducted with the method of deconstruction, to be able to fully understand the archetypes of garments and accessories within the chosen field. The focus laid on the details, and how one could abstract these and rework them into something else; another silhouette and purpose. The result shows garments that has pushed their on limitations in silhouettes and identity; opened up for other kinds of context, and embraces the possibilities of their details when it comes to shape.

  • 90.
    Peterson, Karin
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Tacit Cad2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 91.
    Peterson, Karin
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Tacit CAD2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 92.
    Peterson, Karin
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Talman, Riikka
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Merging Formable Textileas and Flexible Moulds: In search of new design methods and expressive qualities in the fields of textile and fashion.2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 93.
    Porcher, Mathieu
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    CAMOLUTION: Contemporary surface pattern expressions in textile design.2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Camolution is a project that explores the camouflage pattern in a textile designcontext. The motive is to reinterpret an obsolete concealment function andinstead, to hide and reveal visual textile aspects within the pattern. Theprimary aim of this work is to develop a contemporary camouflage patterncollection of printed and knitted textiles, and to explore the concealmentfunction through visual deceptions. The patterns were developed witha method that uses a selection of rules in colour contrasts,style influences and textile proprieties to design a series of patternexperiments. The final pattern designs were screen printed, digitalprinted and knitted, and applied as garment prototypes. This part wasdone in collaboration with the fashion brand Björn Borg. The result setsout a collection of textiles and clothes connected by three differentconcepts of misled vision. It was found that the camouflage function in thiswork was an efficient tool to advertise the brand symbols within the textiles.This work proposes an alternative design method of using the camouflageconcept in textile design, contributing with new expressions, techniquesand qualities.

  • 94.
    Ragnarsson, Julia
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    WHO ARE U WEARING?: investigating iconic celebrity fashion images as dress2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This collection is an observation of the relationship between celebrity culture, fashion and the female form. Exploring how the modern fashion image is communicated to a wider audience through mass media. At the same the work aims to explore new ways of developing clothing from a starting point in figurative prints. The work explores the body as the new context of the celebrity image in order to display different perspectives of both image and body. This has been found through an interaction between print and body, the visual perception within the relationship of these and from a social point of view. The work displays thoughts regarding perspectives on body ideals, female stereotypes, fashion, clothing, mass media and fame in today’s society. The bodies of celebrities are seen as walking billboards and advertisement for designers, the work questions this adopted culture by highlighting the phenomenon. While the work is a comment on the ridiculousness within the mass media and celebrity worship, it is also a homage to these women who have put a mark in fashion history. The final result could be seen as a series examples of possible outcomes from working with the image in relation to body. But also as a statement on how the current state of fashion, where new ideas seem less important as who is wearing what.

  • 95.
    Randestad, Stina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    BREED2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Breed has a concept and a main goal, to be unpredictable and visually impressive. The idea that it was built on was to try to create a collection with the method of breeding and the rules of genetics. At first, twelve individuals were created. They were all given characteristics – “genes”, handed out in a random way, decided by the toss of a dice. The individuals bred and were blended into a second generation, who thereafter procreated into a third. This third generation of eight characters, four females and four males, carry genes and features from their ancestors. They have been twisted, mutated and mixed, just like in nature. It is voluminous line-up with clashes between references, colours and styles. The challenge has been to let chance take decisions and to do something that was unexpected and was going to give an unpredictable result. Breed has not been done for a commercial destination but would be suitable for styling artists, editorials for fashion magazines, costumes in music videos or artistic films. The method is supposed to make people interested, the result is supposed to give the onlooker a smaller chock, a tingling sensation and the impression of a new subculture, a modern day tribe or a new breed. Or simply “What crazy person made this?”

  • 96.
    Rothman, Maria
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    The needle has a point, stitch has a function: Exploring the embroidered stitch in a functional context2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project within the textile design field explores the textile technique embroidery. By using design methods based on words and actions the technique was used in another angle approach that allowed the stitches to be used in a more functional context. This approach differs from how embroidery is traditionally looked upon, an added decorative surface to an already functional object. Embroidery has been explored in a way to see if the technique could be used as something more than just an added surface and if that added surface could be manipulated so that the stitch has both decorative and functional aspects. Stitches has been developed, discovered and realised that they can add density, stability, assembly and form to a material. This has resulted in an alternative way of using embroidery that puts the stitch in the position of being vital to both the expression and function of the object.

  • 97.
    Schultz, Maike
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    The Clothes I Live In2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This work explores the relation between the body and garments by illustrating the cycle of dressing, wearing and undressing in woven images. Based on experimental methods, such as scanning and photographing, images of garments are generated capturing garment details, surface qualities, movement, folds and volume. These demonstrate the constantly changing relation between the body and garments within the cycle of dressing, wearing and undressing. In translating the photographs and scans of the garments into weaves, a shading technique for jacquardweaving is applied that enables a translation of an image of a 3D-garment into a flat weave keeping the 3D qualities present in the picture. Through a gradation of satin weaves, different hues are created in order to define shadows and other surface qualities.  The changing relation between the body and garments is interpreted in different ways including the body’s presence as well as its absence which results in immediate material responses of the garments and demonstrates the various appearances of the body within this relation. This work results in a variety of woven images pointing out the different stages within the cycle of dressing, wearing and undressing. By using the image as a tool, its pictorial value of capturing moments of change and succession is emphasized. With this work, a new perception of bodily shapes in textiles is provided. Instead of imitating the body’s presence in garments through 3D – forms, alternative ways are shown in how to achieve a corporal illusion in flat weaving-constructions.

  • 98.
    Schweiger, Ronja
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Adamant Textile: The reciprocal impact of concrete and textile2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The primary goal of this study is to investigate the combination of concrete merged with textiles. Furthermore, it investigates exchanging the characteristics of these contrasting materials. Consequently, the work shows the reciprocal influence of both textile and concrete to each other. The resulting final collection presents six pieces with the main intention to present different expressions of flexibility. These appear through the interaction of textile and concrete, with the textile providing the flexibility. Depending on the precise characteristics of the used textiles, the flexibility can be shown through the tension in a fabric, the ability to be squeezed or the movement. A subsequent range of experiments investigates techniques, methods and material qualities to prove, that the required effects of the end result can be fulfilled. The crucial factors are the textile materials, the connection between concrete and textile and the treatment of the resulting surface or object. Depending on which way the crucial components are fused, a variety of expressions in the results can be accomplished. These can be described as rather organic through to geometric, and also depends whether the piece is in motion. The outcomes provide an overview of design possibilities, of incorporating such contrasting materials to create different properties and unexpected characteristics in each piece. Based on the final results, it can be concluded that the major objective, to explore design possibilities through a reciprocal interaction of textile and concrete, gives a strong and impressive expression. The approach of this relatively broad research is nevertheless important for the textile field. Therefore, it suggests further exploration, using the results as a foundation and narrow it down by focusing on specific factors.

  • 99.
    Setterberg, Lisa
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Concatenated2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project explores how to use concatenated shapes as a way of creating inconstant garment constructions. The process starts wide by both testing chains, stitching and knots. But narrows down along the way to only focus on linked shapes without the use of stitches or glue. Different materials and shapes is tested to find a construction that not only hold together but also gives the user playfulness and the opportunity to easily change their own garment. Various forms were tested to be linked together, such as circle, rectangle, square, but also asymmetrical shapes. A choice was made to only focus on the circle to make the design process as focused as possible. Different ways in how to link the circle was tested, different scales, materials and colours. However did this round shape reach the end of the road and the investiga- tion resulted limited. In order to bring the project forward was the circle put aside. The process continued instead with classic clothing design as the basis for the shapes. This shapes resulted in a better variety and stronger garment reference. It opens up for more ways of concatenating garments and textile opportunities that are not restricted by the technique. Pieces that can be assembled in different ways by the user gives the wearer the opportunity to change the expression without buying a new garment. The pieces are also easier to recycle when there is no seams, zippers or other trimmings.

  • 100.
    Silfors Granberg, Emma
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Work It!: exploring gender-issues through extreme contrasts2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore gender-issues by the means of extreme contrasts in functionality. The motivation behind the work comes from the structural objectification of women that is maintained through fashion and social media, and how this is an issue that mainly regards women. By morphing extreme contrasts in dress, by the means of male coded work wear, and female coded shape wear, this work explores gender related norms, ideals and statuses. Through this work, shape was decided through try-outs with garments and/or their components, with a research that was based on today’s ideals, and social media trends. Lines in garments became increasingly more important during the process, and the components of garments in the different categories too. In the result the importance of colour, material and shape regarding gender-issues in dress is highlighted, since they often convey a gender coded expression. To disrupt this inherit gender, the result demonstrates how these components can be mixed. Breaking down status in gender attributes could be used to create a more equal sphere in fashion.

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