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  • 51.
    Korvela, Nina
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Emotional reactions to fairness and favorable and unfavorable outcomes2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Korvela, Nina
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Work performance and wages: distributive justice and emotional reactions2008Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    People often encounter situations where they evaluate outcomes that they and other persons receive. Part of this evaluation concerns how fair the distribution is. Whether people are treated fairly or unfairly give rise to different emotional reactions. In Study I work performance in relation to outcome in fair or unfair distributions (i.e., distributive justice) and discrete emotional reactions was examined. In the first study participants read one of five possible work-related vignettes after which they rated emotions toward their boss, a co-worker and self. Variations in the vignettes were made with regard to own performance compared to the co-worker’s performance and own outcome in comparison with the co-worker’s outcome (i.e., salary). The results showed that participants in the most positive and fair situations reported happiness-related emotions toward oneself. In contrast, in the most negative and unfair situation participants reported sadness-related emotions toward oneself, envy toward the co-worker and anger-related emotions toward the boss. Besides considerations about justice, different aspects of culture have consequences for everyday life (Fiske, 2002). In Study II it was examined if discrete emotional reactions to work performance in relation to outcome in fair or unfair distributions were regulated differently in different cultural settings. In the second study participants read one of two possible work-related vignettes after which they rated emotions toward their boss, a co-worker and self. In line with Fiske (1992), emotions were regulated differently by participants in Indonesia (with authority ranking likely to be the predominant relational model) than in Sweden (with market pricing being the predominant model). Emotions which can be directed outward (as anger and envy) and have negative consequences in a relation were avoided by participants from Java in Indonesia. In contrast, emotions that can be directed inwards (as shame and uneasiness) and have negative consequences on the self, but not the relation, were experienced to a higher degree by the participants from Java in comparison with their Swedish counterparts.

  • 53. Kuzmicova, Anezka
    et al.
    Dias, Patricia
    Vogrincic Cepic, Ana
    Albrechtslund, Anne-Mette
    Kotrla Topic, Marina
    Minguez Lopez, Xavier
    Nilsson, Skans Kersti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Teixeira-Botelho, Ines
    Social Space in Silent Reading Practices2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 54. Lind, Ingvar
    et al.
    Haglund, Björn
    Jensen, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Allwood, Jens (Editor)
    Perception2012In: Kognitionsvetenskap, Studentlitteratur , 2012, p. 143-158Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Martinovski, Bilyana
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Emotion in negotiation2010In: Handbook of Group Decision and Negotiation / [ed] D.M. Kilgour, C Eden, Springer Verlag , 2010, p. 65-86Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Martinovski, Bilyana
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Morais, Danielle Costa
    Daher Dantas, Suzana de Franca
    Reframing framing: Emotion and interactivity in group decision and negotiation2012In: Proceedings of Group Decision and Negotiation 2012, Vol. II, p. 3-13Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Nur’aini A’yuninnisa, Rizqui
    et al.
    Gadjah Mada University Indonesia.
    Adrianson, Lillemor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Subjective well-being of Indonesian and Swedish collegestudents: A cross-cultural study on happiness2019In: International Journal of Research Studies in Psychology, ISSN 2243-7681, E-ISSN 2243-769X, ISSN 2243-7681, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 25-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to explore and compare levels of subjective well-being and contributing factors that promote happiness in two countries, Indonesia and Sweden. A total of 104 Swedish and 112 Indonesian college students participated in this study. The instruments used were Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS; Watson, Clark, & Tellegen, 1988), Satisfaction with Life Scale (Diener, Emmons, Larsen, & Griffin, 1985), and an open-ended question, “What are the three most important things in your life that make you happy?” Data analyses were conducted in two phases for qualitative and quantitative data. Two major themes, interdependent and dependent factors of happiness, emerged from the qualitative data. Results showed that respondents from both countries reported interdependent factors as their main happiness contributor. The quantitative result demonstrated no significant effects on subjective well-being for culture and its interaction with the happiness factor. Instead, only the happiness factor had a significant effect on subjective well-being. People with interdependent happiness were happier than those who pursue independent happiness factors. This study observed no difference in the level of subjective well-being and happiness factors across the cultures.

  • 58.
    Oudhuis, Margareta
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Olsson, Anders
    Spelar värderingar någon roll för arbetsmiljön? En studie om konsekvenser vid övergång till utländskt ägande och vid generationsskiften i företag2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Research shows that values held by company managers affect both working with working environment issues and the working environment itself. The questions this study is trying to answer are as follows: - Which values regarding working environment and working environment issues exist today and in the future? - Are values important for the working environment and when working with working environment issues? These research questions will be answered by two different studies: - The shift from Swedish to foreign management after takeovers of Swedish companies. Interviews were made with managers and safety delegates at two different case companies, one with American ownership and the other with British ownership. - The shift from older to younger generation in family companies. Interviews were made with managers at two different case companies, one small company and one multinational company. The first study shows a forceful change of values within the American company followed by a decrease in the psycho-social environment. In the British owned company notably no such changes had occurred. One reason for the different outcomes appeared to be that while top management in the British owned company was Swedish the American company was run by American top management. The conclusion drawn from the comparison between these two companies is that values held by management are of great importance. The second study focusing the shift of generations in family companies showed that in spite of many differences between the two case companies, such as line of business, size and age, there were many similarities in what took place after the shift. Improvements were made regarding efficiency, profit, health and well-being of staff. The management values had changed in a direction Hofstede found is in line with the contemporary Swedish values, such as an increase of delegation and involvement. In summary, our study as well as other research show that foreign management in many cases have conflicting opinions and values compared to the new management generation. The result also shows that on one hand there is an interest and ambition to focus on working environment issues among the companies in our study, but that a lot more needs to be done, especially concerning psycho-social environment issues. On the other hand there also seems to be forces working against improvements of the working environment. The basic line in our study is that management values had a direct impact on the working environment and on working with working environment issues. Tidigare forskning visar att företagsledningens värderingar har betydelse för hur arbetsmiljöarbetet bedrivs och hur arbetsmiljön ser ut på våra arbetsplatser. De frågor föreliggande studie söker svar på är: - Vilka värderingar på arbetsmiljö och arbetsmiljöarbete finns idag och kan komma i framtiden? - Vilken betydelse har värderingar för arbetsmiljö och arbetsmiljöarbete? Dessa frågeställningar besvaras med hjälp av två skilda studier: - Övergång från svensk till utländsk management vid uppköp av svenska företag. Intervjuer genomfördes med chefer och skyddsombud i två olika fallföretag, ett amerikanskägt och ett brittiskägt. - Övergång från äldre till yngre generations chef i samband med generationsskiften i familjeföretag. Intervjuer genomfördes med chefer i två olika fallföretag. Av den första studien framgick att det amerikanska fallföretaget efter uppköpet fått kraftigt förändrade värderingar och en försämrad psykosocial arbetsmiljö, medan det engelskägda företaget inte förändrats i nämnvärd grad vare sig i värderingar eller i sitt arbetsmiljöarbete. En väsentlig skillnad var att toppledningen i det engelskägda företaget var svensk, medan det amerikanska styrdes av en amerikansk toppledning. Jämförelsen mellan de båda företagen visade således att det har stor betydelse vilka värderingar ledningen har. Den andra fallstudien visade att trots att de båda fallföretagen var väldigt olika i många avseenden, till exempel bransch, storlek och ålder, fanns många likheter i vad som hänt efter generationsskiftet. Ledarskapet hade blivit mer delegerat/ konsultativt i båda företagen och arbetet med psykosociala frågor hade utvecklats. Många förbättringar hade skett efter generationsskiftet, både när det gäller effektivitet, lönsamhet, personalens hälsa och trivsel. Ledningens värderingar hade förändrats i och med generationsskiftet i riktning mot det Geert Hofstede funnit prägla samtida svenska värderingar, såsom ökad delegering och ökad delaktighet. Sammantaget visar vår studie såväl som tidigare forskning att utländsk ledning i många fall står i konflikt med de uppfattningar och värderingar som den nya generationens chefer ger uttryck för. Resultatet visar också att det finns intresse och ambitioner vad gäller arbetsmiljöfrågor bland de undersökta företagen men att mycket återstår att förbättra, speciellt beträffande den psykosociala arbetsmiljön. Det finns också krafter som verkar mot förbättringar av arbetsmiljön. Ledningens värderingar visade sig ha ett direkt genomslag både på arbetsmiljö och arbetmiljöarbete.

  • 59.
    Palmérus, Kerstin
    et al.
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Jutengren, Göran
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Swedish Parents' Self-Reported Use of Discipline in Response to Continued Misconduct by Their Pre-school Children.2004In: Infant and Child Development, E-ISSN 1522-7219, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 79-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the effects that re-occurring episodes of child transgression have on Swedish parents' use of discipline strategies. Mothers and fathers from 84 two-parent families were interviewed about their responses to first- and second-time episodes of hypothetical transgressions committed by their 3-6-year-olds. The results showed that when their children did not respond to initial discipline, parents exchanged their use of verbal control for the strategies of coercion and behaviour modification and thereby increased the pressure on their children to comply. However, this finding was valid only for serious transgressions. For mild transgressions, parents' behaviour was consistent across first- and second-time episodes. The conclusion that is drawn is that parents appear to be willing to follow up initial disciplining attempts. The Swedish corporal punishment ban, which has been in force since 1979, therefore appears not to have influenced parents to become permissive in their attitudes toward their children's misconduct. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)(journal abstract)

  • 60. Petersson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Music Therapy as a Caring Intervention: musicians’ learning of a new competence.2011In: International Journal of Music Education, ISSN 0255-7614, E-ISSN 1744-795X, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 3-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of competence in providing music therapy has rarely been the focus of interest in empirical research, as most music therapy research aims at measuring outcomes. Therefore, the aim of this study is to analyse and describe musicians’ learning processes when they study music therapy as a caring intervention. An initial presumption is that musicians are highly qualified to take advantage of the potential of music but need to become familiar with the caring perspective. Ten freelance musicians participated in an education programme with music therapy anchored in a lifeworld-oriented caring science model. They were interviewed about their learning experiences. The data was analysed according to a phenomenographic method. The musicians’ understanding of their learning music therapy is described in terms of four qualitative categories: conversion, openness, reflection and practice. Learning as a continuous process is discussed in relation to pedagogic theories about tacit knowledge and ‘learning by doing’.

  • 61.
    Pokka, Helena
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Mänskliga mötens betydelse i kampen mellan psykologiska och pedagogiska traditioner och trender2011In: Lärarutbildning och vetenskaplighet, ISSN 1404-0913, no 2, p. 55-71Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Är teori och praktik i lärarutbildningen olika sidor av samma mynt eller repre-senterar de olika verkligheter? Syftet med denna text är att diskutera teori, praktik och vetenskaplighet i lärarutbildningen utifrån min erfarenhet som lä-rarutbildare och praktiserande psykolog. Jag kommer att diskutera möjligheter att hitta sammanlänkande broar mellan akademisk teoretisk verklighet och praktikernas verklighet. Jag utgår då från att ett vetenskapligt förhållningssätt innebär en vilja till helhetssyn med öppenhet, nyfikenhet och ödmjukhet i för-hållandet till olika sorters kunskap. Jag tänker också presentera några kun-skapstraditioner och anknyta dessa till lärarutbildningens förhållningssätt till teoretisk och praktisk kunskap.

  • 62. Prpic, Katarina
    et al.
    Oliviera, LuisaHemlin, SvenUniversity of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Women in Science & Technology2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Ramdhani, Neila
    et al.
    Universitas Gadjah Mada.
    Ancok, Djamaludin
    Universitas Gunadarma.
    Adrianson, Lillemor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    The Importance of Positive Affect: The Role of Affective Personality in Predicting Organizational Citizenship Behavior2017In: Makara Hubs-Asia, ISSN 2355-794X, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 62-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research demonstrates inconsistent results in predicting how affect influences organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). This study aims to solve the inconsistency by taking the position that positive affect and negative affect are orthogonal, and their interaction produces four types of affective personality. They are ‘Self-fulfilling’ (high positive affect and low negative affect), ‘High affective’ (high positive affect and high negative affect), ‘Low affective’ (low positive affect and low negative affect) and ‘Self-destructive’ (low positive affect and high negative affect). The study hypothesizes that the self-fulfilling group displays the highest mean of OCB while the self-destructive displays the lowest. The high affective and low affective groups lie somewhere in between the two groups. The participants of this study were 227 employees, consisting of 151 males and 76 females with ages ranging from 20 to 60 years old (mean=38). They were measured using the Organizational Citizenship Behavior Scale (OCBS) and Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS). Based on the scores of their positive and negative affect dimensions, they were classified into four groups of affective personality types. One-way ANOVA analysis supported the hypothesis. The self-fulfilling group revealed the highest mean of Organizational Citizenship Behavior while the Self-destructive group revealed the lowest. The High affective and Low affective groups were located in between the first two groups. This paper discusses this contribution and highlights how it is potential to explain organizational behavior.

  • 64. Strand, Jennifer
    et al.
    Jutengren, Göran
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Kamal, Lana
    Tidefors, Inga
    Parenting Difficulties and Needs Described by Victims and Perpetrators of Intimate Partner Violence2015In: Journal of Child Custody, ISSN 1537-9418, Vol. 12, no 3-4, p. 273-288Article in journal (Refereed)
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