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  • 251.
    Allan, J
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    The inclusion challenge2012In: Bildning för alla! En pedagogisk utmaning, Högskolan Kristianstad , 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 252.
    Allan, J
    [external].
    The inclusive teacher educator: Spaces for civic engagement2010In: Discourse. Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, ISSN 0159-6306, E-ISSN 1469-3739, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 411-422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is concerned with the teacher educator who is aspiring to be inclusive. It considers the obligations which arise within Higher Education Institutions and the extent to which these contribute to a loss of civic engagement and a lack of capacity to pursue inclusion, social justice and equity. The paper argues that this need not be the case and a reorientation for teacher educators is offered which affords teacher educators opportunities to, in Bourdieu's terms, ‘play seriously’. This reorientation is in relation to three significant spaces – the ontological, the aesthetic and the epiphanic – and it is argued that operating within these spaces could enable new practices of inclusive teacher education to emerge.

  • 253.
    Allan, J
    [external].
    The sociology of disability and the struggle for inclusive education2010In: British Journal of Educational Studies, ISSN 0007-1005, E-ISSN 1467-8527, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 603-619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article charts the emergence of the sociology of disability and examines the areas of contestation. These have involved a series of erasures and absences – the removal of the body from debates on the social model of disability; the disappearance of the Other from educational policies and practices; and the absence of academics from political discourses and action. The paper considers the contribution of the sociology of disability to inclusive education and examines some of the objections currently being voiced. It ends with some reflections on the possibilities for academics within the sociology of disability to pursue alternative forms of engagement and outlines a series of duties that they might undertake.

  • 254.
    Allan, J
    [external].
    Thinking again about inclusion2012In: Includering. Perspektiver i barnehagefalige praktiser / [ed] A Arnesen, Oslo: Universitetsforlaget , 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 255.
    Allan, J
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Catts, R
    Social capital, children and young people: Implications for practice, policy and research2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Social capital, children and young people is about the relationships and networks - social capital - that children and young people have in and out of school. Social capital has become of increasing interest to policy makers but there has been little evidence of how it operates in practice. In this unique collection, the social capital of children and young people, and in one case parents and teachers, is explored in a wide range of formal and informal settings. The contributors to the book, who include academic researchers and educational professionals, provide in-depth accounts of social capital being developed and used by children and young people. They offer critical reflections on the significance of social capital and on the experiences of researching the social capital of sometimes vulnerable people. This book is essential reading for anyone concerned with how children and young people get along, get by and get on.

  • 256.
    Allan, J
    et al.
    [external].
    Duffy, C
    Loening, G
    Moran, N
    Knowledge exchange with Sistema Scotland2010In: Journal of education policy, ISSN 0268-0939, E-ISSN 1464-5106, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 335-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a knowledge exchange project, funded by the Scottish Funding Council and undertaken by a group of researchers from three higher education institutions in Scotland and the project partner, Sistema Scotland. This newly established charity is attempting to implement a major programme of social change, developed in Venezuela, within the Raploch, a disadvantaged area of Scotland. The researchers’ combined knowledge of education, music and psychology has guided their knowledge exchange activities with the project partner and among themselves. The paper outlines the development of Sistema Scotland and the programme, El Sistema, on which it is based. It details the knowledge exchange activities undertaken, which used Derrida’s notion of aporia to try to engage Sistema Scotland with different perspectives and understandings, and a practical method for conducting meetings based on Open Space Technology. The various ‘encounters’ with children, service providers and stakeholders are reported and this is followed by a critique of the processes of knowledge exchange. The paper ends with a discussion of the prospects for successful knowledge exchange.

  • 257.
    Allan, J
    et al.
    [external].
    Harwood, V
    Medicus interruptus in the behaviour of children in disadvantaged contexts in Scotland2013In: British Journal of Sociology of Education, ISSN 0142-5692, E-ISSN 1465-3346, ISSN ISSN 0142-5692, EISSN 1465-3346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The medicalisation of the behaviour of children is a phenomenon that is attracting growing attention, with particular concern about the increased likelihood of children living in disadvantaged contexts receiving a medical diagnosis, such as attention-de fi cit hyperactivity disorder, and treatment. This paper reports on a study of professionals involved with children experiencing behavioural problems. The professionals interviewed in this study articulated their own reservations about the medicalisation of children ’ s behaviour and revealed a number of strate- gies for interrupting the process towards diagnosis. These interruptions, analysed using Deleuze and Guattari ’ s concept of deterriorialisation, took place along linguistic, visual and affective planes and were successful in encouraging teachers and head teachers to see alternatives to the medical route. The fi ndings have implications for existing practice in the response to, and support for, behavioural problems and for teacher education.

  • 258.
    Allan, Julie
    et al.
    [external].
    Ozga, JennySmith, Geri
    Social capital, professionalism and diversity2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 259.
    Allan, Julie
    et al.
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Persson, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Social capital and trust for inclusion in school and society2018In: Education, Citizenship and Social Justice, ISSN 1746-1979, E-ISSN 1746-1987Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on the outcomes for students who experienced a strongly inclusive learning environment as a means for all to succeed. This Swedish lower secondary school dramatically improved its results, and the article reports the outcomes from the students’ perspectives. Social capital, with its emphasis on relationships, was used to structure interviews with students who had since moved on to high schools across Sweden and was also used to analyse the interview data. Two elements of social capital that appeared to be strongly associated with the students’ success – trust and confidence – are discussed in depth. The article concludes with a consideration of the significance of the role of schools in cultivating trust and the risks associated with schools ignoring this obligation.

  • 260.
    Allan, Julie
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Smyth, Geri
    I’Anson, John
    Mott, Jane
    Understanding disability with children’s social capital2009In: Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, ISSN 1471-3802, E-ISSN 1471-3802, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 115-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a specific event which attempted to facilitate discussions with children and young people about diversity issues, including disability. The concept of social capital was operationalised and used as both a resource to stimulate discussions and as an explicit goal. The paper first reports on the processes involved and the topics identified for discussion by the children and young people and then considers their engagement with disability. Their insights on knowing disability, relationships, and provision and support illustrate a shift from an essentialising of impairment to an articulation of barriers which excluded disabled people and the lessons which teachers might take from these are discussed.

  • 261. Allwood, Carl Martin
    et al.
    Erikson, Martin G.
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Grundläggande vetenskapsteori för psykologi och andra beteendevetenskaper2010Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Grundläggande lärobok om vetenskapsteori, med fokus på psykologi och andra beteendevetenskaper.

  • 262.
    Allwood, Carl Martin
    et al.
    Göteborgs Universitet, psykologiska institutionen.
    Erikson, Martin G
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Grundläggande vetenskapsteori: för psykologi och andra beteendevetenskaper2017 (ed. 2:a)Book (Other academic)
  • 263. Allwood, Carl Martin
    et al.
    Granhag, Pär Anders
    Jonsson, Anna-Carin
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Child witnesses' metamemory realism2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, ISSN 0036-5564, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 461-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the degree of realism in the confidence judgments of 11 to 12-year-olds (41 girls and 40 boys) of their answers to questions relating to a short film clip showing a kidnapping event. Four different confidence scales were used: a numeric scale, a picture scale, a line scale and a written scale. The results demonstrated that the children showed a high level of overconfidence in their memories. However, no significant differences between the four confidence scales were found. Weak gender differences were found in that the girls were slightly, but significantly, better calibrated than the boys. In addition, although both boys and girls overestimated the total number of memory questions they had answered correctly, the boys gave higher estimates compared with the girls. In brief, the results indicate that, at least in the context investigated, 11–12 year-old children’s confidence in and estimations of their own event memory show poor realism (overconfidence and overestimation). A comparison with previous research on adults indicates that 11 to 12-year-old children show noticeably poorer realism.

  • 264. Allwood, Carl Martin
    et al.
    Granhag, Pär Anders
    Jonsson, Anna-Carin
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Does mood influence the realism of confidence judgments?2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 253-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown that mood affects cognition, but the extent to which mood affects meta–cognitive judgments is a relatively overlooked issue. In the current study we investigated how mood influences the degree of realism in participants’ confidence judgments (based on an episodic memory task). Using music and film in combination, we successfully induced an elated mood in half of the participants, but failed to induce a sad mood in the other half. In line with previous research, the participants in both conditions were overconfident in their judgments. However, and contrary to our prediction, our data indicated that there was no difference in the realism of the confidence between the conditions. When relating this result to previous research, our conclusion is that there is no, or very little, influence of mood of moderate intensity on the realism of confidence judgments.

  • 265. Allwood, Carl Martin
    et al.
    Jonsson, Anna-Carin
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Om betydelsen av elevers metakognitiva förmåga2001Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This text describes the characteristics of a number of different types of metacognitive judgments relevant for schoolchildren’s studies. It is argued that metacognitive judgments play an important role in children’s learning at school. Moreover, it is also argued many of the modern types of educational approaches, such as the so called ”problem based learning” approach do not have a clear strategy when it comes to the role and training of meta-cognition in the school context.

  • 266. Allwood, Carl Martin
    et al.
    Jonsson, Anna-Carin
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Granhag, Per-Anders
    The effects of source and type of feedback on child witnesses’ metamemory accuracy2005In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, ISSN 0888-4080, E-ISSN 1099-0720, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 331-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the effect of feedback on the accuracy (realism) of 12-year-old children's metacognitive judgments of their answers to questions about a film clip. Two types of judgments were investigated: confidence judgments (on each question) and frequency judgments (i.e. estimates of overall accuracy). The source of feedback, whether it was presented as provided by a teacher or a peer child, did not influence metacognitive accuracy. Four types of feedback were given depending on whether the participant's answer was correct and depending on whether the feedback confirmed or disconfirmed the child's answer. The children showed large overconfidence when they received confirmatory feedback but much less so when they received disconfirmatory feedback. The children gave frequency judgments implying that they had more correct answers than they actually had. No main gender differences were found for any of the measures. The results indicate a high degree of malleability in children's metacognitive judgments.

  • 267. Allwood, Carl-Martin
    et al.
    Granhag, Pär-Anders
    Jonsson, Anna-Carin
    The cognitive interview and Its effect on witnessess' confidence2004In: Psychology, Crime and Law, ISSN 1068-316X, E-ISSN 1477-2744, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 37-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today there is ample evidence that the Cognitive Interview (CI) enhances witnesses’ memory. However, less is known about how the CI affects eyewitnesses’ confidence. To address this shortcoming we conducted a study analyzing how realism in confidence was affected by the CI. All participants (n /79) were first shown a filmed kidnapping. After 2 weeks we interviewed one-third of the participants according to the guidelines of the CI, one-third according to a Standard Interview (SI), and one-third were not interviewed at all (Control condition). Participants in all three conditions were then asked to answer 45 forced-choice questions, and to give a confidence judgment after each choice. For the 45 questions, no differences in accuracy were found between the three conditions. Confidence was higher in the CI and SI conditions, compared with the Control condition. CI and SI did not differ in metacognitive realism but both showed lower realism compared with the Control condition, although only CI significantly so. The results indicate that the inflation in confidence is more likely to be explained in terms of a reiteration effect , than as a consequence of the particular mnemonics characterizing the CI (e.g. ‘‘mental reinstatement of context’’). In sum, CI does not seem to impair (or improve) the realism in witnesses’ confidence, and does not inflate confidence in erroneous recall, compared to a SI

  • 268.
    Allwood, Carl-Martin
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Lund University.
    Jonsson, Anna-Carin
    Department of Psychology, Lund University.
    Stability and variability in the realism of confidence judgments over time, content domain and gender2003In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 559-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the influence on the realism of confidence judgments of four different factors, the individual, the knowledge domain (crystallized and fluid intelligence), gender and cognitive style (Need-for-Cognition, NfC). Seventy-nine high-school students answered questions on word knowledge (WORD) and logical/spatial ability (DTK); both tests were administered on three occasions with two weeks between each trial. After each test question, each individual gave a confidence rating of his or her answer. The results showed some, but not perfect, individual stability. Furthermore, within-subject differences were found between domains (WORD/DTK); the participants showed better calibration and less overconfidence for the WORD-test as compared to the DTK-test. No stable gender differences were found for any of the two tests. Finally, the results show that having high NfC is not associated with better realism in confidence judgments. These results suggest that the realism of confidence judgments is, at least on the distal level, influenced by many different factors.

  • 269.
    Allwood, Jens
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Lenzen, Manuela (Editor)
    Knoblich, Günther (Editor)
    Dimensions of embodied communication: towards a typology of embodied communication2008In: Embodied communication in humans and machines, Oxford University Press, 2008Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 270.
    Allwood, Jens
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Multimodal Corpora2008In: Corpus Linguistics. An International Handbook, Vol. 1-2, p. 207-225Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 271.
    Allwood, Jens
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Ahlsén, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Multimodal Intercultural Interaction and Communication Technology: A conceptual framework for designing and evaluating Multimodal Intercultural Communicators2009In: Multimodal Corpora, Springer , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 272.
    Allwood, Jens
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Boholm, Max
    Repeated head movements, their function and relation to speech2010In: In Proceedings of the Workshop on Multimodal Corpora: Advances in Capturing, Coding and Analyzing Multimodality (MMC2010), Valetta, Malta May 18 / [ed] M. Kipp, J. C. Martin, P. Paggio, D. Heylen, D. Tapias, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 273.
    Allwood, Jens
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Grammer, Karl
    Kopp, Stefan
    Ahlsén, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Stocksmeier, Thorsten
    Modeling embodied feedback with virtual humans2008In: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349, Vol. 4930Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 274.
    Allwood, Jens
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Hammarström, Harald
    Hendrikse, Andries
    Ngcobo, Mtholeni N.
    Nomdebevana, Nozibele
    Pretorius, Laurette
    van der Merwe, Mac
    Work on Spoken (Multimodal) Language Corpora in South Africa2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes past, ongoing and planned work on the collection and transcription of spoken language samples for all the South African official languages and as part of this the training of researchers in corpus linguistic research skills. More specifically the work has involved (and still involves) establishing an international corpus linguistic network linked to a network hub at a UNISA website and the development of research tools, a corpus research guide and workbook for multimodal communication and spoken language corpus research. As an example of the work we are doing and hope to do more of in the future, we present a small pilot study of the influence of English and Afrikaans on the 100 most frequent words in spoken Xhosa as this is evidenced in the corpus of spoken interaction we have gathered so far. Other planned work, besides work on spoken language phenomena, involves comparison of spoken and written language and work on communicative body movements (gestures) and their relation to speech.

  • 275.
    Allwood, Jens
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Hendrikse, A.P.
    Ahlsén, Elisabeth
    Words and alternative basic units for linguistic analysis2010In: In Linguistic Theory and Raw Sound / [ed] P. J. Henrichsen, Samfundslitteratur, Copenhagen , 2010, p. 9-26Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 276. Allwood, Jens
    et al.
    Jensen, MikaelUniversity of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Kognitionsvetenskap2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 277.
    Allwood, Jens
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Jokinen, Kristiina
    Hesitation in Intercultural Communication: Some Observations and Analyses on Interpreting Shoulder Shrugging2010In: Computing and Communication: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, (LNCS) / [ed] T. Ishida, Springer , 2010, p. 55-70Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper concerns the different ways in which hesitation, and hesitation related phenomena like uncertainty, doubt and other phenomena where lack of knowledge is involved are expressed in different cultures. The paper focuses especially on shoulder shrugging as a signal of hesitation or uncertainty, and starts from the observation that shoulder shrugging has different interpretations depending on the interlocutor’s cultural background. It is not commonly used in Eastern cultures while in Western cultures it is a sign of uncertainty and ignorance. The paper reports a small study on the differences in interpretation of a particular video tape gesture, and draws some preliminary conclusions of how this affects intercultural communication between human interlocutors and between humans and conversational agents.

  • 278.
    Allwood, Jens
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Kopp, Stefan
    Grammer, Karl
    Ahlsén, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Oberzaucher, Elizabeth
    Koppensteiner, Markus
    The analysis of embodied communicative feedback in multimodal corpora: a prerequisite for behavior simulation2008In: Language resources and evaluation, ISSN 1574-020X, E-ISSN 1574-0218, Vol. 41, no 3-4, p. 255-272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Communicative feedback refers to unobtrusive (usually short) vocal or bodily expressions whereby a recipient of information can inform a contributor of information about whether he/she is able and willing to communicate, perceive the information, and understand the information. This paper provides a theory for embodied communicative feedback, describing the different dimensions and features involved. It also provides a corpus analysis part, describing a first data coding and analysis method geared to find the features postulated by the theory. The corpus analysis part describes different methods and statistical procedures and discusses their applicability and the possible insights gained with these methods.

  • 279.
    Allwood, Jens
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Yavada, Yogendra P
    Hardie, Andres
    Lohani, R R
    Rhegmi, Bhim
    Gurung, S
    Gurung, A
    McEnery, Tony
    Hall, Pat
    Construction and annotation of a corpus of contemporary Nepali2008In: Corpora, ISSN 1749-5032, E-ISSN 1755-1676, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 213-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we describe the construction of the 14-million-word Nepali National Corpus (NNC). This corpus includes both spoken and written data, the latter incorporating a Nepali match for FLOB and a broader collection of text. Additional resources within the NNC include parallel data (English–Nepali and Nepali–English) and a speech corpus. The NNC is encoded as Unicode text and marked up in CES-compatible XML. The whole corpus is also annotated with part-of-speech tags. We describe the process of devising a tagset and retraining tagger software for the Nepali language, for which there were no existing corpus resources. Finally, we explore some present and future applications of the corpus, including lexicography, NLP, and grammatical research.

  • 280.
    Alm, Håkan
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Culture Shock in Bangkok: Little anecdotes from Bangkok and Thailand2000Other (Other academic)
  • 281.
    Alm, Håkan
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Self Services and Disservices: Improving Avatars with Co-Design2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Corporations and government agencies that use Avatars claim there are substantial benefits for using them in their respective organizations; including 24/7 service availability, quick answers without a phone queue, and improved consistency in the responses provided. “There are also potential cost savings by having an Avatar answering questions compared to using personnel” (Lind and Salomonson, 2006). However, these benefits may not be great enough as the lack of possible human communication may lead to alienation between individuals and organisations. Furthermore, a robot may “miss out” on business opportunities that a human would act on. A robot will not hear and understand nuances in speech, with the risk that a potentially problematic situation may not be adequately resolved, leading to dissatisfaction with products and services delivered. Many companies measure the satisfaction with Avatars by analysing question and answer logs to see if the Avatar appears to give satisfactory answers. Few of these companies have actually asked their customers (e.g. IKEA and SAS until recently) what they really feel about the quality of the answers they receive. User Centered Design, Participatory Design and other methods are the preferred ways of developing such systems, but these do not include all stakeholders. This thesis addresses this exclusion of all stakeholders by applying a co-design research approach for developing avatars for e-Services. Case studies from Mark Municipality, Sweden and Scandinavian Airlines Systems (SAS) are presented in this thesis showing how improvements of service quality aspects with Avatars can be managed by applying a four-step Co-Design research approach. From the first step of Co-Design, through interviews, log analysis and a channel survey, findings show that the failed dialogues with Avatars Eva (SAS) and Elin (Mark) are mainly concerned with five factors: interactivity; dialogue capability; consistency; knowledge; and synonyms. In the second step of carrying out customer workshops, a number of ideal scenarios are suggested for the Avatars to perform better. In the third step, SAS decision makers decided to implement the first three scenarios: Eva’s synonyms, knowledge and consistency. Mark decision makers decided to shut down their Avatar Elin, as they did not believe they had the necessary resources. In the fourth step, another channel survey was carried out for SAS as well as a new log analysis in order to know the impact of the redevelopment of the above three scenarios. An important result of the study was that the company adopted the continuous use of Co-Design as an approach to continuous improvement of the service quality performed by the Avatar Eva. This, for example, led to an increase of 14 percentage points on the users overall satisfaction level. The results also open a new set of questions framing the relation and transformation between Co-Design as a research approach for knowledge creation and Co-Design as a method for innovation and service quality improvements. This thesis also presents an Extended Co-Design Model, which illustrates how Co-Design inspires SAS staff. In addition, the staff of the supplier of the Avatar use it for other functions within and without SAS.

  • 282.
    Alm, Håkan
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Forsgren, Olov
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Successful use of avatar/e-services: powerful, but needs a knowledge manager with proper methods2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we are presenting some theoretical background, some practical applications and some future scenarios of the use of the human being as a metaphor for design and implementation of e-services/avatars. The main conclusion is that e-services/avatars technology is a powerful concept but without a new profession as knowledge manager in the background, there’s a big risk for failure. We are also presenting a co-design model as a tool for the knowledge manager.

  • 283.
    Alm, Håkan
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Forsgren, Olov
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Johansson, Torbjörn
    Göbel, Hannes
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    X-services: eXtended avatar-services with integrated human – driven knowledge management – a new service galaxy2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 284.
    Alm, Håkan
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Janecek, Paul
    Forsgren, Olov
    Co-design Research and Business Development: Case of Scandinavian Airlines (SAS)2014In: Systemic Practice and Action Research, ISSN 1094-429X, E-ISSN 1573-9295, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 465-483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Co-design practices are carried out in different fields of studies. Some of the key advocates of Co-design originate from business. In this study the four steps of Co-design approach is applied. From the first step of Co-design, through interviews, log analysis and a channel survey, findings show that the failed dialogues with Avatar Eva are mainly concerned with five factors: interactivity; dialogue capability; consistency; knowledge; and synonyms. In the second step, carrying out customer workshops, we suggested ten ideal scenarios for Avatar Eva to perform better. In the third step, SAS decision makers decided to implement the first three scenarios: Eva’s synonyms; knowledge and Eva’s consistency. In the fourth step, another channel survey was carried out as well as a new log analysis to know the impact of the redevelopment above three scenarios. An important result of the study was that the company adopted a continuous use of Co-design as an approach of continuous improvement of the service quality performed by the Avatar Eva. It also opens a new set of questions framing the relation and transformation between Co-design as a research approach for knowledge creation and Co-design as a method for innovation and service quality improvements. The study presents an Extended Co-design Model, which illustrates how the Co-design inspires staff to use it for other functions within and without the SAS.

  • 285.
    Alm, Håkan
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Lind, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Salomonson, Nicklas
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Brems, Mikael
    Guth, Kerstin
    Karlsson, Pia
    Sundhäll, Ralf
    Metod för utveckling av medborgarkontakter i Marks kommun2008Report (Other academic)
  • 286.
    Alm, Klas Håkan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Academic Portfolio2016Other (Other academic)
  • 287.
    Alm, Klas Håkan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Mobile Payments: A Game Changer?2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 288.
    Alm, Klas Håkan
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Söderholm, Jonas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    International Higher Education: Local Initiatives Enabling Global Citizens2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Education at University of Borås is internationally connected to varying degree and form. This report looks at a selection of initiatives in order to explore the past, present and future role of UB internationalization. As a basis for the review, 7 students are interviewed on their international experience in their education – exchange studies and minor field studies (MFS) respectively. The participants stress the role of personal development and career enablement, and perceive their international experience as a distinct, unique element of their education. Possibilities and problems are then identified and related to the current literature on international education, learning and pedagogics. The study lands in a critical discussion on the future development of UB education. Key points of development: To meet the Bologna 20 percent commitment, more efforts need to be made on promoting and enabling internationalization to students, faculty and administrators. Curricular hurdles need to be removed as not to hamper students’ programme progression for going abroad. Teachers’ competency building efforts such as the Teaching and learning in higher education course could benefit from further elements of internationalization.

  • 289. Almerud, Peter
    Arbetsplatsbibliotek: en marginalisead biblioteksverksamhet som sökt nya former2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 290. Almerud, S
    et al.
    Alapack, R.J.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö University.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Växjö University.
    Beleuguered by technology: Care in technologically intense environments2008In: Nursing Philosophy, ISSN 1466-7681, E-ISSN 1466-769X, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 55-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern technology has enabled the use of new forms of information in the care of critically ill patients. In intensive care units (ICUs), technology can simultaneously reduce the lived experience of illness and magnify the objective dimensions of patient care. The aim of this study, based upon two empirical studies, is to find from a philosophical point of view a more comprehensive understanding for the dominance of technology within intensive care. Along with caring for critically ill patients, technology is part of the ICU staff's everyday life. Both technology and caring relationships are of indispensable value. Tools are useful, but technology can never replace the closeness and empathy of the human touch. It is a question of harmonizing the demands of subjectivity with objective signs. The challenge for caregivers in ICU is to know when to heighten the importance of the objective and measurable dimensions provided by technology and when to magnify the patients’ lived experiences, and to live and deal with the ambiguity of the technical dimension of care and the human side of nursing.

  • 291. Almerud, S
    et al.
    Alapack, R.J.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö University.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Caught in an Artificial Split: A Phenomenological Study of Being a Caregiver in the Technologically Intense Environment2007In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 130-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A symbiotic relationship exists between technology and caring, however, technologically advanced environments challenge caregivers. The aim of this study is to uncover the meaning of being a caregiver in the technologically intense environment. Ten open-ended interviews with intensive care personnel comprise the data. A phenomenological analysis shows that ambiguity abounds in the setting. The act of responsibly reading and regulating instruments easily melds the patient and the machinery into one clinical picture. The fusion skews the balance between objective distance and interpersonal closeness. The exciting captivating lure of technological gadgets seduces the caregivers and lulls them into a fictive sense of security and safety. It is mind-boggling and heart-rending to juggle ‘moments’ of slavish mastery and security menaced by insecurity in the act of monitoring a machine while caring for a patient. Whenever the beleaguered caregiver splits technique from human touch, ambiguity decays into ambivalence. Caring and technology become polarized. Everyone loses. Caregiver competence wanes; patients suffer. The intensive care unit should be technologically sophisticated, but also build-in a disclosive space where solace, trust, and reassurance naturally happen. Caring professionals need to balance state-of-the-art technology with integrated and comprehensive care and harmonize the demands of subjectivity with objective signs.

  • 292. Almerud, S
    et al.
    Alapack, R.J.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö University.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Växjö University.
    Of vigilance and invisibility: being a patient in technologically intense environments2007In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 151-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Equipment and procedures developed during the past several decades have made the modern intensive care unit (ICU) the hospital’s most technologically advanced environment. In terms of patient care, are these advances unmitigated gains? This study aimed to develop a knowledge base of what it means to be critically ill or injured and cared for in technologically intense environments. A lifeworld perspective guided the investigation. Nine unstructured interviews with intensive care patients comprise its data. The qualitative picture uncovered by a phenomenological analysis shows that contradiction and ambivalence characterized the entire care episode. The threat of death overshadows everything and perforates the patient’s existence. Four inter-related constituents further elucidated the patients’ experiences: the confrontation with death, the encounter with forced dependency, an incomprehensible environment and the ambiguity of being an object of clinical vigilance but invisible at the personal level. Neglect of these issues lead to alienating ‘moments’ that compromised care. Fixed at the end of a one-eyed clinical gaze, patients described feeling marginalized, subjected to rituals of power, a stranger cared for by a stranger. The roar of technology silences the shifting needs of ill people, muffles the whispers of death and compromises the competence of the caregivers. This study challenges today’s caregiving system to develop double vision that would balance clinical competence with a holistic, integrated and comprehensive approach to care. Under such vision, subjectivity and objectivity would be equally honoured, and the broken bonds re-forged between techne, ‘the act of nursing’, and poesis, ‘the art of nursing’.

  • 293. Almqvist, Roland
    et al.
    Brorström, Björn
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Jonsson, Leif
    Montin, Stig
    Ramberg, Ulf
    Framgångsrik förändring: ett nationellt kommunforskningsprogram om hantering av förändrade förutsättningar och besvärliga situationer2009Report (Other academic)
  • 294. Almqvist-Tangen, Gerd
    et al.
    Ehde Andersson, Maria
    Frylmark, Astrid
    Succé genom samverkan: erfaranheter och resultat från projektet Språk-kedjan2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under åren augusti 2007 till augusti 2010 har projektet Språk-kedjan – en obruten kedja för alla barns tal- och språkutveckling pågått i Halland. Tanken bakom begreppet Språk-kedjan var att det ska finnas både en obruten språk- och vårdkedja i Halland. Vi ville finna metoder och samarbetsformer bland aktörer som på olika sätt har ansvar för förskolebarn i Halland. Vi ville ge dessa barn bra förutsättningar för att de ska behålla lusten till att utforska språket för att längre fram kunna utveckla god läs- och skrivkunnighet. När vi nu är inne på slutfasen av projektet kan vi konstaterat att det blivit mycket lyckosamt. Vi, som projektledare, ser det erfarenhets- och kompetensutbytet som skett mellan de olika professionerna i referensgruppen och alla de metoder och material som det resulterat i, som en av de största framgångarna med projektet. Detta paper kommer att bestå av tre delar: 1. Beskrivning av projektet, erfarenheter och resultat 2. Kort sammanfattning av utvärderingen 3. Kort sammanfattning på engelska

  • 295.
    Al-Mulla, S Y Yousif
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Modification of The Atomic Scattering Factor in Electric Field2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantum mechanical calculations of a modification of the X-ray scattering form factor of an atom/ion in an electric field using a three parameter wave function have been performed. These calculations are compared with the previous two parameter wave function calculations.

  • 296.
    Al-Mulla, S Y Yousif
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Shell Model Calculations for Alkali Halide Molecules2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 297.
    Al-Mulla, S Y Youssif
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Spin Dependent Exchange Scattering from Ferromagnetic Materials2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 298.
    Al-Mulla, Samir Yousif
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Low-energy electron scattering from copper2006In: European Physical Journal D: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, ISSN 1434-6060, E-ISSN 1434-6079, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 11-14Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 299.
    Al-Mulla, Samir Yousif
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Low-Energy electron scattering from Lithium and Potassium2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 300.
    Al-Mulla, S.Y.Yousif
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Jönsson, Lennart
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Elastic Scattering of electrons from Lithium and Potassium2012Conference paper (Other academic)
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