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  • 151.
    Rajan, Rathish
    et al.
    Tampere University of Technology.
    Rainosalo, Egidija
    Centria University of Applied Sciences.
    Thomas, Selvin
    Royal Commission Yanbu Colleges and Institutes.
    Kumar Ramamoorthy, Sunil
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Vuorinen, Jyrki
    Tampere University of Technology.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Zavasnik, Janez
    Jožef Stefan Institute.
    Modification of epoxy resin by silane-coupling agent to improve tensile properties of viscose fabric composites2018In: Polymer Bulletin, ISSN 0170-0839, E-ISSN 1436-2449, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 167-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The modification of epoxy resin by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) to improve the tensile properties of warp knitted viscose fabric composites is reported in this study. The study evaluates the efficiency of modification methods adopted to modify the epoxy resin and the influence of the resin modification on various properties of the cured castings. The influence of matrix resin modification on the tensile properties of viscose fabric composite is compared to those prepared from chemically modified fibre. The efficiency of the modification was determined through titration method to determine the epoxide content of epoxy resin, viscosity measurement and FTIR. The effect of APTES modification on various properties of cured castings is studied through differential scanning calorimeter, contact angle measurement and tensile testing. The addition of APTES into the epoxy resin decreased the epoxide content in the resin as evident from the titration method. The tensile strength of cured castings decreased after the resin modification. The tensile strength and elongation at break of the viscose fabric composites prepared from modified resin, increased up to 14 and 41%, respectively. The improved adhesion of APTES-modified epoxy resin to the viscose fibre is confirmed from SEM analysis of tensile fracture surface.

  • 152. Rajan, Rathish
    et al.
    Riihivuori, Johanna
    Rainosalo, Egidija
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Järvelä, Pentti
    Effect of viscose fabric modification on the mechanical and water absorption properties of composites prepared through vacuum infusion2014In: Journal of reinforced plastics and composites (Print), ISSN 0731-6844, E-ISSN 1530-7964, Vol. 33, no 15, p. 1416-1429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Viscose fabric-reinforced unsaturated polyester composites were successfully prepared through vacuum infusion process. Unidirectional viscose fabric was modified by two different organosilane coupling agents and by acetylation treatment. The main objective was to study the influence of fabric treatment on the mechanical and water absorption properties of the composites. Flexural, tensile and impact properties of composites were studied. The results from mechanical testing of composites pointed out that 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane treatment increased the flexural and impact strengths of the composites with respect to untreated fabric composite. The impact strength of 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane-treated fabric composites almost doubled compared to the value of untreated fabric composite. Among all the composites under study, those with fabrics treated by 2 vol% 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane in ethanol/water (95:5) solution exhibited significant improvement in water uptake resistance. An unsaturated polyester gelcoat and topcoat were applied as the outer surface on the composites with untreated fabric. This was done in order to investigate the visual surface appearance and evaluate the gelcoat and topcoat effect on water absorption after accelerated water immersion test. The regenerated cellulose fibre as reinforcement shows high potential to be used as an alternative for natural bast fibres, especially, when toughness of material matters. Chemical treatment of regenerated cellulose fibres could result in improvement in properties of polymer composites, considering that the appropriate treatment method is selected for the corresponding fibre–matrix system.

  • 153. Rajan, Rathish
    et al.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Järvelä, Pentti
    Lactic acid polymers: synthesis, properties & applications2014In: Handbook of Green Materials, Vol. 5. Biobased composite materials: their processing, properties and industrial applications / [ed] Kristiina Oksman, Aji P. Mathew, Alexander Bismarck, Orlando Rojas, Mohini Sain, World Scientific Publishing , 2014, p. 49-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 154.
    Ramamoorthy, S. K.
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Di, Q.
    Adekunle, K.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Skrifvars, M.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Effect of water absorption on mechanical properties of soybean oil thermosets reinforced with natural fibers2012In: Journal of reinforced plastics and composites (Print), ISSN 0731-6844, E-ISSN 1530-7964, Vol. 31, no 18, p. 1191-1200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural fiber composites are known to absorb more water than glass fiber reinforced composites. In this study, hybrid natural fiber composites were prepared by combining different fiber reinforcements, and both the water absorption and the mechanical properties were studied. Compression molding technique was used to manufacture composite laminates from a bio-based resin (acrylated epoxidized soybean oil) and natural fibers: non-woven and woven jute, non-woven regenerated cellulose mat (Lyocell and viscose), and woven glass fiber. The composite laminates were cured at 160–170 C and 40 bar, with a fiber content of 40 wt%. We investigated effect of pretreatment of regenerated cellulose fiber using 4% NaOH solution. The gravimetric water absorption was tested by exposure to water for 10 days. Specimens were cut from composites with laser-cutting technique according to ISO standards, and tested for tensile, flexural, and impact strength. To determine the influence of water absorption on the mechanical properties, specimens were immersed in distilled water for 10 days before testing. As a reference, dry specimens were tested. The results showed that water absorption was reduced by producing hybrid composites with jute fibers, glass fiber, and Lyocell fiber. The tensile, flexural, and impact properties were improved by inclusion of glass fiber and Lyocell in the composite. The tensile and flexural properties of natural fiber reinforced composites were mostly affected by the influence of water, but this was improved considerably by hybridization with glass and Lyocell fibers. The viscoelastic properties of the manufactured composites and hybrid composites were studied using dynamic mechanical thermal analysis.

  • 155.
    Ramamoorthy, Sunil Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bakare, Fatimat
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Herrmann, Rene
    Arcada University of Applied Science.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Performance of biocomposites from surface modified regenerated cellulose fibers and lactic acid thermoset bioresin2015In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of surface treatments, silane and alkali, on regenerated cellulose fibers was studied by using the treated fibers as reinforcement in lactic acid thermoset bioresin. The surface treatments were performed to improve the physico–chemical interactions at the fiber–matrix interface. Tensile, flexural and impact tests were used as indicator of the improvement of the interfacial strength. Furthermore, thermal conductivity, viscoelasticity measurements as well as microscopy images were made to characterize the fiber surface treatments and the effect on adhesion to the matrix. The results showed that silane treatment improved the mechanical properties of the composites as the silane molecule acts as link between the cellulose fiber and the resin (the fiber bonds with siloxane bridge while the resin bonds with organofunctional group of the bi-functional silane molecule) which gives molecular continuity in the interphase of the composite. Porosity volume decreased significantly on silane treatment due to improved interface and interlocking between fiber and matrix. Decrease in water absorption and increase in contact angle confirmed the change in the hydrophilicity of the composites. The storage modulus increased when the reinforcements were treated with silane whereas the damping intensity decreased for the same composites indicating a better adhesion between fiber and matrix on silane treatment. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that the thermal stability of the reinforcement altered after treatments. The resin curing was followed using differential scanning calorimetry and the necessity for post-curing was recommended. Finite element analysis was used to predict the thermal behavior of the composites and a non-destructive resonance analysis was performed to ratify the modulus obtained from tensile testing. The changes were also seen on composites reinforced with alkali treated fiber. Microscopy images confirmed the good adhesion between the silane treated fibers and the resin at the interface.

  • 156.
    Ramamoorthy, Sunil Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bakare, Fatimat Oluwatoyin
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Mechanical and thermal properties of the textile bio-composites: measurement and prediction2015In: , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 157.
    Ramamoorthy, Sunil Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Di, Qin
    Adekunle, Kayode
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Can the Outdoor Properties Of Natural Fiber Reinforced Bio-Based Composites Be Improved?2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural fiber composites are known to absorb more moisture than glass or carbon fiber reinforced composites. The hybrid natural fiber composites prepared in this study have relatively less moisture absorption than natural fiber composites. The composite laminates were manufactured by compression molding technique. A bio‐based resin known as acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) was used as a matrix, while jute fiber, regenerated cellulose fiber (Lyocell and viscose) and glass fiber were used as reinforcements. The composite laminates were prepared at temperature between 160‐170°C and pressure of 40 bar with natural fiber reinforcement between 30‐60 wt% of the fiber. Specimens were cut from the laminates with a laser cutting machine according to standard. The effect of pretreatment of natural fiber and regenerated cellulose fiber using 4% NaOH solution was investigated and discussed. The amount of water absorbed by the composites was determined by soaking the specimens in distilled water for 10 days. To see the influence of water absorption on mechanical properties of the composites, specimens were immersed in distilled water for 10 days before testing. Dry specimens were also tested for reference. Charpy Impact testing was performed on the composite laminates in order to calculate the energy absorbed by specimen during fracture. Water absorption behavior of the natural fiber composites was reduced by manufacturing hybrid composites with glass and Lyocell fibers. Tensile, flexural and impact properties of the natural fiber reinforced composites were improved by the inclusion of glass or Lyocell fiber. Tensile and flexural properties of natural fiber reinforced composites were affected largely by the influence of water and it could be improved by hybridization. Viscoelastic properties of the composites and hybrid composites were studied by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis.

  • 158.
    Ramamoorthy, Sunil Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Di, Qin
    Adekunle, Kayode
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Processing Of Non-Woven Lyocell Fabric And Mechanical Properties Of Non-Woven Fiber Reinforced Bio-Based Composites2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non‐woven Lyocell mats were made from the fibers by carding and needling process at Swerea IVF, Mölndal, Sweden. The carding was done first in order to align the clumps of fibers. And then needle punching was done to obtain compact and entangled fiber mat. The composites were made by compression molding technique at temperature between 160‐170°C and pressure of 40 bar with non‐woven Lyocell, jute and viscose fiber reinforcements. The hybrid bio‐based composites were produced in this study to improve the mechanical properties of the composites. Bio‐based thermoset resin known as acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) was used as matrix in the composites. Laser cutting technique was adopted to cut specimens from laminates according to standard. The dimensional stability of the composites was determined by soaking the composite specimens in water for 10 days. Tensile and flexural properties of the composites were determined before and after water uptake. Hybridizing the jute fiber with glass and Lyocell fibers reduced the water uptake. Mechanical properties of the non‐woven fiber reinforced composites were studied by tensile, flexural, impact tests. Viscoelastic properties were studied using dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). Tensile, flexural and impact properties of natural fiber composites were improved by hybridizing with Lyocell fiber.

  • 159.
    Ramamoorthy, Sunil Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Kundu, Chanchal Kumar
    Adekunle, Kayode
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Bashir, Tariq
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Biocomposites From Regenerated Cellulose Textile Fibers And Bio-Based Thermoset Matrix For Automotive Applications2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biocomposites were produced from regenerated cellulose fiber reinforcement and soybean based bio-matrix. Mechanical, thermal, viscoelastic and morphological results show the good potential of these composites to be used as structural materials in automotive industries. This article focuses on manufacturing and testing of these composites for engineering materials. Regenerated cellulose fibers such as Lyocell and viscose were reinforced in soybean based thermoset matrix to produce composites by compression molding. Hybrid composites were produced by mixing both these fibers at known ratio and the total fiber content in composite was between 40 and 60 weight %. In general, Lyocell based composites showed better tensile properties than viscose based composites. Composites consisting 60 weight % Lyocell and rest with matrix had tensile strength of 135 MPa and tensile modulus of 17 GPa. These composites also showed good flexural properties; flexural strength of 127 Mpa and flexural modulus of 7 GPa. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis showed that these composites had good viscoelastic properties. Viscose based composites had better percentage elongation during tensile test. These composites also showed relatively good impact and viscoelastic properties. Scanning electron microscope images showed that the composites had good fiber-matrix adhesion. Several efforts are made to produce sustainable biomaterials to replace synthetic materials due to inherent properties like renewable, biodegradable and low density. Biocomposites play significant role in sustainable materials which has already found applications in automotive and construction industries. Many researchers produced biocomposites from natural fiber and bio-based/synthetic matrix and it had found several applications. There are several disadvantages of using natural fiber in composites; quality variation, place dependent, plant maturity, harvesting method, high water absorption etc. These composites also give odor which has to be avoided in indoor automotive applications. These natural fibers can be replaced with lignocelluloses, agro mass and biomass to develop biocomposites as they are from natural origin. Lyocell and viscose are manmade regenerated cellulose fibers which is from natural origin has excellent properties. These fibers can be used as reinforcements to produce biocomposites which can overcome most of the above listed disadvantages of natural fibers. Many composites were made from natural fiber reinforcement and petroleum based synthetic matrix. Researchers have been finding ways to get matrix out of natural resources like soybean and linseed on chemical modifications. This article is focused on producing and testing sustainable material with regenerated cellulose and soybean based bio-matrix for automotive applications.

  • 160.
    Ramamoorthy, Sunil Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Kundu, Chanchal Kumar
    Adekunle, Kayode
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Bashir, Tariq
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Characterization Of Wood Based Fiber Reinforced Bio-Composites2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural fiber composites have got more focus in recent times due to their intrinsic properties such as lightweight, biodegradable, low cost etc. Several researchers have made bio-composites out of many natural fibers such as jute, flax, sisal. These composites have large market in Europe and North America where it is used in automobile and construction industry. A lot of research has been done to improve the properties such as surface modification of fiber, manufacturing hybrid composites. However, the natural fibers are dissimilar and vary largely due to many factors such as variety, harvest, maturity, climate etc. Apart from technical drawbacks, these fibers grow only in certain countries such as India and China. High demand raised the price of these fibers which increases the product price as well. Wood-based fibers such as Lyocell and Viscose was used to make composites in order to make less variation in products, decrease the dependency of natural fibers, promoting locally available fibers and encourage forest products as value-added products. Lyocell and viscose fibers have relatively less variation and high quality. Bio-composites were made by reinforcing wood-based fibers in soybean based thermoset matrix. Hybrid composites were prepared by mixing two different wood-based fibers in known ratio. The fiber content in the composites was between 40 and 60 weight%. Mechanical properties were characterized by tensile, flexural and impact tests. Lyocell and viscose based composites had better mechanical properties than jute fiber composites. Alkali treatment of Lyocell fibers improved the mechanical properties of the composites. The behaviour of wood-based fiber composites were studied under wet environment as well. In wet environment, the mechanical properties of wood-based fiber composites were superior to jute fiber composites. Lyocell based composites had tensile strength of 135 MPa and tensile modulus of 17 GPa. The composites had flexural strength of 127 MPa and flexural modulus of 7 GPa. Better percentage elongation was obtained when viscose fiber was reinforced in matrix. Viscose composites had better impact strength and viscoelastic properties. The change in properties in two different wood-based fibers (Lyocell and viscose) lies in the morphology of the fiber itself. Hybrid composites were produced and the effect of hybridization was clear in most of the cases. The properties were able to be tailored by making hybrid composites, by changing the amount of each fiber in the composites. The results (tensile and flexural) were competitive and fulfil the requirements of these composites to be used in several applications including automotive headliners, car door panel, construction door frame etc. The forest products such as wood fibers could be used in composites to produce environmentally friendly products and promote forest industry. Wood-based fibers such as Lyocell and Viscose was used to make composites in order to make less variation in products, decrease the dependency of natural fibers, promoting locally available fibers and encourage forest products. Bio-composites were made by reinforcing wood-based fibers in soybean based thermoset matrix. Hybrid composites were prepared by mixing two different wood-based fibers in known ratio. Mechanical properties were characterized by tensile, flexural and impact tests. Lyocell and viscose based composites had better mechanical properties than jute fiber composites. Alkali treatment of Lyocell fibers improved the mechanical properties of the composites. The behaviour of wood-based fiber composites were studied under wet environment as well. In wet environment, the mechanical properties of wood-based fiber composites were superior to jute fiber composites. Lyocell based composites had tensile strength of 135 MPa and tensile modulus of 17 GPa. The composites had flexural strength of 127 MPa and flexural modulus of 7 GPa. Viscose composites had better impact strength and viscoelastic properties. The result fulfils the requirements of these composites to be used in several applications including automotive headliners, car door panel etc. The forest products could be used in composites to produce environmentally friendly products and promote forest industry.

  • 161.
    Ramamoorthy, Sunil Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Kundu, Chanchal Kumar
    Adekunle, Kayode
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Bashir, Tariq
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Properties of green composites with regenerated cellulose fiber and soybean-based thermoset for technical applications2014In: Journal of reinforced plastics and composites (Print), ISSN 0731-6844, E-ISSN 1530-7964, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 193-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Composites were developed by reinforcing available non-woven Lyocell and viscose in acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO). Compression molding was used to make composites with 40–60 wt% fiber content. The fiber content comprises only Lyocell or viscose fiber, or mixture of these fibers in known ratio. Hybrid composites were made by a mixture of both the fibers in known ratio and it affects the properties. The effect of hybridization was evident in most tests which gives us an opportunity to tailor the properties according to requirement. Lyocell fiber reinforced composites with 60 wt% fiber content had a tensile strength and modulus of about 135 MPa and 17 GPa, respectively. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that the Lyocell fiber reinforced composites had good viscoelastic properties. The viscose fiber reinforced composites had the high percentage elongation and also showed relatively good impact strength and flexural modulus. Good fiber-matrix adhesion reflected in mechanical properties. SEM images were made to see the fiber-matrix compatibility.

  • 162.
    Ramamoorthy, Sunil Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Kundu, Chanchal Kumar
    Adekunle, Kayode
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Bashir, Tariq
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Regenerated Cellulose Fiber Reinforced Composites2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood pulp based regenerated cellulose fibers like Lyocell and viscose which are from natural origin have high and even quality; used to develop superior composites with good properties. In this project, Lyocell and viscose fibers were reinforced in chemically modified soybean based bio-matrix, acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) by compression molding technique. The composites are characterized for mechanical performance by tensile, flexural and impact tests, viscoelastic performance by dynamical mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and morphological analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In general, Lyocell composites had better tensile and flexural properties than viscose based composites. The same goes with elastic and viscous response of the composites. Hybrid composites were formed by fiber blending; on addition of Lyocell to viscose based composites improved the properties. The amount of Lyocell and viscose fibers used determined the properties of hybrid composites and the possibility of tailoring properties for specific application was seen. Hybrid composites showed better impact strength. Morphological analysis showed that the viscose composites had small fiber pull out whereas Lyocell composites had few pores. Hybrid composite analysis showed that they had uneven spreading of matrix; delamination occurred on constant heating and cooling. To overcome the above mentioned issue and to reduce the water absorption, surface modification of the fiber was done by alkali treatment and silane treatment. The effect of treatment is done through swelling, water absorption and morphological analysis tests. The properties could be increased on proper modification of the fibers. The results show the good potential of these composites to be used in automotives and construction industries.

  • 163.
    Ramamoorthy, Sunil Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Kundu, Chanchal Kumar
    Baghaei, Behnaz
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Adekunle, Kayode
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Bashir, Tariq
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Green Composites Based On Regenerated Cellulose Textile Fibers For Structural Composites2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Composites were manufactured from regenerated cellulose and biobased matrix by compression molding. The reinforcing materials used were Lyocell and viscose, while the matrix used was chemically modified soybean oil. Hybrid composites were prepared by mixing both the fibers. The total fiber content in the composites was between 40-60 weight %. Lyocell based composites had better tensile properties than viscose based composites; composites consisting 60 weight % Lyocell impregnated with matrix had tensile strength of 135 MPa and tensile modulus of 17 GPa. These composites also showed better flexural properties; flexural strength of 127 MPa and flexural modulus of 7 GPa. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis results showed that these composites had good viscoelastic properties. Viscose based composites had better percentage elongation; these composites also showed relatively good impact and viscoelastic properties. Hybrid composites showed good mechanical and viscoelastic properties. Scanning electron microscope images showed that the composites had good fiber-matrix adhesion.

  • 164.
    Ramamoorthy, Sunil Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Persson, Anders
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Reusing Textile Waste As Reinforcements In Composites2014In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 131, no 17, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyester (PET) has wide applications in textile industries as textile fiber and its share continues to grow. Substantial quantities of cotton/polyester blend fabrics are disposed every year due to technical challenges, which pose a big environmental and waste-dumping problem. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential of discarded cotton/PET fabrics as raw materials for composites. If their inherent reinforcement properties can be used in composites, an ecological footprint issue can be solved. In this study, we investigate three concepts for reuse of cotton/PET fabrics for composites: compression molding above the Tm of PETs, use of a matrix derived from renewable soybean oil, use of thermoplastic copolyester/polyester bi-component fibers as matrix. All three concepts have been explored to make them available for wider applications. The effects of processing parameters such as compression temperature, time and pressure are considered in all three cases. The third concept gives the most appealing properties, which combine good tensile properties with toughness; more than four times better tensile strength than the first concept; and 2.2 times better than the second concept.

  • 165.
    Ramamoorthy, Sunil Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    BIOCOMPOSITES FROM SURFACE MODIFIED REGENERATED CELLULOSE FIBERS AND LACTIC ACID THERMOSET BIORESIN2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract:

    Thermoset bioresin was synthesized from lactic acid and glycerol, and the resin was characterized for it to be used in composite applications. On the other hand, regenerated cellulose fibers were surface treated to improve the physico–chemical interactions at the fiber–matrix interface. The effect of surface treatments, silane and alkali, on regenerated cellulose fibers was studied by using the treated fibers as reinforcement in lactic acid thermoset bioresin. Mechanical tests were used as indicator of the improvement of the interfacial strength. Fiber surface treatments and the effect on adhesion to the matrix were characterized using microscopy images and thermal conductivity. Mechanical properties of the composites showed an increase when treated with silane as the bi-functional silane molecule acts as link between the regenerated cellulose fiber and the bioresin.

    Porosity volume decreased significantly on silane treatment due to improved interface and interlocking between fiber and matrix. Decrease in water absorption and increase in contact angle confirmed the change in the hydrophilicity of the composites. The storage modulus increased when the reinforcements were treated with silane whereas the damping intensity decreased for the same composites indicating a better adhesion between fiber and matrix on silane treatment. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that the thermal stability of the reinforcement altered after treatments. The resin curing was followed using differential scanning calorimetry and the necessity for post-curing was recommended. Finite element analysis was used to predict the thermal behavior of the composites and a non-destructive resonance analysis was performed to ratify the modulus obtained from tensile testing. The changes were also seen on composites reinforced with alkali treated fiber. Microscopy images confirmed the good adhesion between the silane treated fibers and the resin at the interface.

  • 166.
    Ramamoorthy, Sunil Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Thermoset Biocomposites From Cellulose-Based Fibers And Triglyceride Plant Oil: Properties And Improvement By Chemical Treatments2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 167.
    Ramamoorthy, Sunil Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Persson, Anders
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    A Review of Natural Fibers Used in Biocomposites: Plant, Animal and Regenerated Cellulose Fibers2015In: Polymer Reviews, ISSN 1558-3724, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 107-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural fibers today are a popular choice for applications in composite manufacturing. Based on the sustainability benefits, biofibers such as plant fibers are replacing synthetic fibers in composites. These fibers are used to manufacture several biocomposites. The chemical composition and properties of each of the fibers changes, which demands the detailed comparison of these fibers. The reinforcement potential of natural fibers and their properties have been described in numerous papers. Today, high performance biocomposites are produced from several years of research. Plant fibers, particularly bast and leaf, find applications in automotive industries. While most of the other fibers are explored in lab scales they have not yet found large-scale commercial applications. It is necessary to also consider other fibers such as ones made from seed (coir) and animals (chicken feather) as they are secondary or made from waste products. Few plant fibers such as bast fibers are often reviewed briefly but other plant and animal fibers are not discussed in detail. This review paper discusses all the six types of plant fibers such as bast, leaf, seed, straw, grass, and wood, together with animal fibers and regenerated cellulose fibers. Additionally, the review considers developments dealing with natural fibers and their composites. The fiber source, extraction, availability, type, composition, and mechanical properties are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of using each biofiber are discussed. Three fabric architectures such as nonwoven, woven and knitted have been briefly discussed. Finally, the paper presents the overview of the results from the composites made from each fiber with suitable references for in-depth studies.

  • 168.
    Ramamoorthy, Sunil Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Rissanen, Marja
    Effect of alkali and silane surface treatments on regenerated cellulose fibre type (Lyocell) intended for composites2014In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 22, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose fibres have significant importance and potential for polymer reinforcement. It is essential to modify the surface of the fibre to obtain good fibre-matrix interface. Surface treatments can increase surface roughness of the fibre, change its chemical composition and introduce new moieties that can effectively interlock with the matrix, resulting in good mechanical properties in the composites. This is mainly due to improved fibre-matrix adhesion. The treatments may also reduce the water absorption rate by converting part of the hydroxyl groups on the fibre surface into other functional groups. Chemical modification of the surface of a regenerated cellulose fibre of the Lyocell type was carried out by alkali and silane treatments, which significantly changed the properties of the Lyocell fibres. Three parameters were considered when the fibre surface treatment was done: concentration (2–15 wt%), temperature (25 and 50 C) and time (30 min–72 h). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used for chemical analysis and qualitative analysis of the cellulose crystallinity due to the surface treatments; subsequently, mechanical strength of the fibres was tested by tensile testing. Weight loss, moisture regain and swelling measurements were taken before and after treatments, which showed the obvious changes in fibre properties on treatment. Heat capacity of the fibres was measured for untreated and treated fibres, and thermal degradation of fibres was examined to see the stability of fibres at elevated temperatures. Wettability and surface energies were measured using dynamic contact angle method in three wetting mediums. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the morphological properties of the fibres.

  • 169.
    Ramamoorthy, Sunil Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Åkesson, Dan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Baghaei, Behnaz
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Preparation and Characterization of Biobased Thermoset Polymers from Renewable Resources and Their Use in Composites2017In: Handbook of Composites from Renewable Materials, Physico-Chemical and Mechanical Characterization / [ed] Vijay Kumar Thakur, Manju Kumari Thakur, Michael R. Kessler, Hoboken, New Jersey, USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2017, p. 425-457Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on physicochemical and mechanical characterization of compositesmade from renewable materials. Most common renewable materials used in composites arenatural fibers and polymers based on starch or vegetable oil. The extent of using renewablematerials in biocomposites has increased during the past decade due to extensive research oncellulosic fibers and biobased polymers. Earlier, the research was focused on using the naturalfibers as reinforcement in crude oil-based polymers such as polypropylene. Later, the emphasisshifted to increase the amount of renewable components in the biocomposites which led tothe introductionof biobased resins in the composites. The properties of some biocompositesare today comparable to the properties for commercially available nonrenewable composites.Several plant biofibers have been used as reinforcement in biobased thermoplastics or thermosetsto manufacture biocomposites. Material characterization is important to understand theperformance of these composites under specific environment. Detailed discussion about themechanical and physicochemical characterization is provided in this chapter. Physicochemicalcharacterization includes chemical composition, density, viscosity, molecular weight, meltingtemperature, crystallinity,morphology, wettability, surface tension, water binding capacity,electricalconductivity, flammability, thermal stability, and swelling. Mechanical characterizationincludes tensile, flexural, impact, compressive, shear, toughness, hardness, brittleness, ductility,creep, fatigue, and dynamic mechanical analysis.

  • 170.
    Santamala, Harri
    et al.
    Aalto University, School of Engineering, Department of Applied Mechanics.
    Livingston, R
    Aalto University, School of Engineering, Department of Applied Mechanics.
    Sixta, Herbert
    Aalto University, Aalto University, School of Chemistry, Department of Forest Products Technology.
    Hummel, M
    Aalto University, School of Chemistry, Department of Forest Products Technolog.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Saarela, Olli
    Aalto University, School of Engineering, Department of Applied Mechanics.
    Advantages of regenerated cellulose fibres as compared to flax fibres in the processability and mechanical performance of thermoset composites2016In: Composites Part A: Applied Science and Manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, Vol. 84, p. 377-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Man-made cellulosic fibres (MMCFs) have attracted widespread interest as the next generation of fibre reinforced composite. However, most studies focused entirely on their performance on single fibre level and little attention has been paid to their behaviour on a larger application scale. In this study, MMCFs were utilized as reinforcement in unidirectionally (UD) manufactured thermoset composites and compared to several commercial UD flax fibre products. Specimens were prepared using a vacuum bag based resin infusion technique and the respective laminates characterized in terms of void fraction and mechanical properties. MMCF laminates had comparable or better mechanical performance when compared to flax fibre laminates. Failure mechanisms of MMCF laminates were noted to differ from those of flax-reinforced laminates. The results demonstrate the potential of MMCFs as a viable alternative to glass fibre for reinforcement on a larger scale of UD laminates. These results were utilized in the Biofore biomaterial demonstration vehicle.

  • 171.
    Seoane, Fernando
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Ferreira, Javier
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Marquez, Juan Carlos
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Conductive Polymer Films as Textrodes for Biopotential Sensing2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: After several years of progresses in textile technology and wearable measurement instrumentation, applications of wearable textile-electronics systems are arising providing a stable background for commercial applications. So far, the available commercial solutions are centered on fitness applications and mostly based in the acquisition of heart rate through Textile Electrodes (Textrodes) based on metallic threads or on conductive rubber compounds. Methods and Materials: In this work a novel material approach is presented to produce Textrodes for acquisition of Electrocardiographic (ECG) signals using a conductive polypropylene (PP1386 from Premix, Finland) polymer material. The polymer was film extruded into thin films, and used as such in the Textrode. Conductive Polymer Films (CPF) have been used to produce Textrodes, and its measurement performance has been compared with the ECG signals obtained with commercial Textrode fabrics and conventional Ag/AgCl electrodes. In order to set up the same measurement conditions, a chest strap tailored to host the testing electrodes has been used. Results: The close resemblance of the ECG acquired with the textile fabric electrodes, the Ag/AgCl electrodes and the PP1386 CPF electrodes suggest that the Polymer Electrodes PP1386 are a feasible alternative to the current textile fabrics that use silver thread as conductive material and also to conductive rubber material. Discussion & Conclusion: The availability of the Conductive Polymer Electrode PP1386 in a film form allows the manufacturing of electrodes by conventional textile processes, like lamination or sewing, therefore facilitating the transition from lab prototyping to industrial manufacturing. Replacing the traditional silver thread as conductive element in the fabrication of Textrodes will definitely reduce the material cost per Textrode. Biocompatibility issues and manufacturability issues must be addressed but the exhibited functional performance is showing encouraging results.

  • 172.
    Seoane, Fernando
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Soroudi, Azadeh
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Abtahi, Farhad
    KTH, Medicinsk teknik.
    Lu, Ke
    KTH-School of Technology and Health.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Printed Electronics Enabling a Textile-friendly Interconnection between Wearable Measurement Instrumentation & Sensorized Garments2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 173.
    Skrifvars, M.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Development of regenerated cellulose reinforcement fabrics and their use in structural composites2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 174.
    Skrifvars, M.
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Ramamoorthy, Sunil Kumar
    Baghaei, Behnaz
    Development of regenerated cellulose reinforcements and their use in structural composites for automotive applications2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 175.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Biopolymers and green polymers: the materials for sustainable textiles?2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 176.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Conductive textile fibres for smart textiles: novel concepts and applications2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 177.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Development of functional fibres for textiles and composites2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 178.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Development of natural fibre composites for automotive applications2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 179.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Development of regenerated cellulose reinforcement fabrics and their use in structural composites2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 180.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Natural fibers for structural composite applications: concepts and opportunities2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 181.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Natural fibres for structural composites - concepts and opportunities2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 182.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Polymerteknikens mångsidiga nytta2009In: Vetenskap för profession, ISSN 1654-6520, Vol. 10, p. 83-88Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 183.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Preparation of conductive viscose fibres by vapour deposition polymerisation of polythiophene2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 184.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Research on funcional fibres at University of Borås2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 185.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Structural composites from cellulose reinforcements: material concepts and production strategies2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 186.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Adekunle, Kayode
    Processing of Lyocell fiber mat: An alternative renewable reinforcement in composite manufacturing2015In: Green and Sustainable Chemistry, ISSN 2160-6951, E-ISSN 2160-696X, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 47-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The carding of the Lyocell cellulose fiber was done with a cylindrical cross lap machine supplied by Cormatex Prato, Italy. Several mats were made by carding and needle punching in order to have a compact and well entangled mat suitable for reinforcement. The speed of the cross lap machine, the frequency of needle punching, the number of times the mat goes through needle punching, the feeding rate of the carded fiber and the depth of needle penetration determined the level of entanglement of the Lyocell fiber which ultimately increased the mechanical properties of the fiber. The good mechanical properties of the carded Lyocell fiber made it a renewable and environmentally friendly alternative as reinforcement in composite manufacturing. Compared with other jute fiber reinforced composites, the mechanical properties of the resulting Lyocell composites were found to be better. Regenerated cellulose fiber (Lyocell) composites were environmentally friendly and the mechanical properties were comparable to those of natural fibers.

  • 187.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ansari, Farhan
    Berglund, Lars
    Nanostructured biocomposites based on unsaturated polyester resin and a cellulose nanofiber network2015In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 117, p. 298-306Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 188.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Baghaei, Behnaz
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Kumar Ramamoorthy, Sunil
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Berglin, Lena
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Development of hybrid natural fibre reinforcements for structural composites: Concepts and opportunities2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 189.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Baghaei, Behnaz
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Kumar Ramamoorthy, Sunil
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Rajan, Rathish
    Berglin, Lena
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Regenerated cellulose fibres for structural composites2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 190.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Baghaei, Behnaz
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Rissanen, Marja
    Tampere University of Technology.
    Ramamoorthy, Sunil Kumar
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Mechanical and thermal characterization of compression moulded polylactic acid natural fiber composites reinforced with hemp and Lyocell fibers2014In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 131, no 15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 191.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bakare, Fatimat
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Åkesson, Dan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bashir, Tariq
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ingman, Petri
    University of Turku.
    Srivastava, Rajiv
    Indian Institute of Technology Delhi.
    Synthesis and characterisation of unsaturated lactic acid based thermoset bio-resins2015In: European Polymer Journal, ISSN 0014-3057, E-ISSN 1873-1945, Vol. 67, no June 2015, p. 570-582Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 192.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Cho, Sung-Woo
    Hemanathan, Kumar
    Mahimaisenen, Pirabasenan
    Adekunle, Kayode
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Regenerated cellulose fibre reinforced case in films: Effect of plasticizer and fibre content2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 193.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Dhakal, Hom
    Advanced Polymer and Composites (APC) Research Group, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, UK.
    Åkesson, Dan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Zhang, Z
    Advanced Polymer and Composites (APC) Research Group, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, UK.
    Hybrid composites and biocomposites: concepts, opportunities and research challenges2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 194.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Esmaeili, Nima
    Bakare, Fatimat Oluwatoyin
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Afshar, Shahrzad
    Åkesson, Dan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Mechanical properties for bio-based thermoset composites made from lactic acid, glycerol and viscose fibers2015In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 603-613Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 195.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kalantar, Adib
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Mechanical and thermophysical characterization of high density polyethylene composites reinforced with talk particles2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 196.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Mabille, Colinne
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Wojno, Sylvia
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Åkesson, Dan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Dhakal, Hom
    University of Portsmouth.
    Zhang, Zhongyi
    University of Portsmouth.
    Resin transfer moulding processing of biocomposites from warp knitted and carded cellulose reinforcements2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 197.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Jit
    Department of Textile Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi, India.
    Srivastava, Rajiv K
    Department of Textile Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi, India.
    Nandan, Bhanu
    Department of Textile Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi, India.
    Electrospun composite matrices from tenside-free poly(caprolactone)-grafted acrylic acid/hydroxyapatite oil-in-water emulsions2017In: Journal of Materials Science, ISSN 0022-2461, E-ISSN 1573-4803, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 2254-2262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Composite matrices of poly(ε-caprolactone)-grafted acrylic acid (PCL-g-AA) and hydroxyapatite (HA) were prepared via electrospinning of oil-in-water emulsions. Grafting of varying amounts of AA on PCL was carried out in a twin-screw compounder using benzoyl peroxide as an initiator under inert atmosphere. A solution of PCL-g-AA in toluene, containing HA, comprised the oil phase of the emulsion, while the aqueous phase contained poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as a template polymer. No emulsifier was used in making such emulsions which were found to be stable for more than a month at room temperature. Secondary interactions of AA group of PCL-g-AA with HA and PVA at the oil–water interface provided stability to the emulsion. Uniform composite fibrous matrices were produced from the resultant emulsions under controlled electrospinning conditions. The composite matrices, thus developed using minimal organic solvent, are free from emulsifiers and have high potential to be used in applications including tissue engineering

  • 198.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Persson, Maria
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Cho, Sung-Woo
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Resorbable porous scaffolds fabricated via melt spinning and weaving of the fibres: novel means for engineering bone tissues2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 199.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Rajan, Rathish
    Joseph, Kuruvilla
    Assessing thermal characteristics of polyhydroxybutyrate based composites reinforced with different natural fibres2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 200.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Rajan, Rathish
    Technology Centre Ketek Ltd.
    Rahkonen, Mirva
    Technology Centre Ketek Ltd.
    Rainosalo, Egidija
    Technology Centre Ketek Ltd.
    Modification of epoxy resin and its influence on tensile properties of viscose fabric composite2015In: ICCM20 Programme and book of abstracts, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
12345 151 - 200 of 242
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