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  • 151.
    Kooroshnia, Marjan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Mask2011Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This collection of masks is designed give an aesthetic warning if the wearer is running a fever or the concentration of allergens in the air exceeds a certain threshold. The pattern printed with thermochromic ink changes color when the exhale exceeds 40°C. The collection comprise a series of different prints and three different shapes of masks: the traditional surgical style, a wrap-around-scarf, and a full-face sinus mask. The latter also senses temperature increases of the forehead as well as around the mouth. The idea is to create a stylish early-warning system at least for other people if not for the wearer.

  • 152.
    Kristensen Johnstone, Tonje
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Textile pattern and spatiality2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This PhD project investigates the relationships between textile patterns, scale and spatial contexts from the perspective of textile design. Against this background, the purpose is to answer the research questions “How can the designer get a better understanding of scale and size in designing textile patterns and what kind of functions and characteristics do different patterns have in spatial contexts?”. It is expected that this practical and methodical approach can offer insights of scale and size issues in designing textile patterns, and may be useful especially for the textile design community.

  • 153.
    Kristensen Johnstone, Tonje
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Textile pattern and spatiality2013Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This PhD project investigates the relationships between textile patterns, scale and spatial contexts from the perspective of textile design. In order to examine this area, a physical model in scale 1:10 was built to create a scenario for the design example. The design decisions were made to understand and to analyze what´s happening concerning scale and pattern. The patterns are tried methodically in six different scales and with the four most common repeat methods. This practical and methodical design example aims to share a systematic approach for a better understanding of scale and size in designing textile patterns and to find functions and characteristics among different patterns in spatial contexts.

  • 154.
    Kullenberg, Christopher
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet, Institutionen för filosofi, lingvistik och vetenskapsteori.
    Nelhans, Gustaf
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Measuring Welfare beyond GDP : 'Objective' and 'Subjective' Indicators in Sweden, 1968–20152017In: Valuation Studies, ISSN 2001-5992, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 7-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses a series of negotiations on how to measure welfare and quality of life in Sweden beyond economic indicators. It departs from a 2015 Government Official Report that advanced a strong recommendation to measure only ‘objective indicators’ of quality of life, rather than relying on what is referred to as ‘subjective indicators’ such as life satisfaction and happiness. The assertion of strictly ‘objective’ indicators falls back on a sociological perspective developed in the 1970s, which conceived of welfare as being measurable as ‘levels of living’, a framework that came to be called ‘the Scandinavian model of welfare research’. However, in the mid-2000s, objective indicators were challenged scientifically by the emerging field of happiness studies, which also found political advocates in Sweden who argued that subjective indicators should become an integral part of measuring welfare. This tension between ‘subjective’ and ‘objective’ measurements resulted in a controversy between several actors about what should count as a valuable measurement of welfare. As a consequence, we argue that the creation of such value meters is closely intertwined with how welfare is defined, and by what measures welfare should be carried through.

  • 155. Kuusk, K.
    et al.
    Tomico, O.
    Langereis, G.
    Wensveen, S.
    Crafting Smart Textiles: a meaningful way towards societal sustainability in the fashion field?2012In: Nordic Textile Journal, ISSN 1404-2487, Vol. 1, no 6-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart textiles with its vast range of possibilities provide a considerable opportunity for societal sustainability for the waste-oriented fashion industry. May the new textiles react to the environment, wearer, have a mind of its own or simply provoke and inspire people – it is a great tool for the transition from the product-oriented industry to the service-minded economy. Fashion field needs to mature and adapt to the new rules set by the user within today’s environment. While developing the new field of smart textiles, this paper stresses the importance of learning from traditional crafts and the value of craftsmanship. We start by introducing the importance of crafting and connecting it to the industrialized way of producing. Then, we ask whether we could merge valuable insights from both in order to develop the smart textiles area. Later, you will find an example project merging Quick Response (QR) codes with traditional embroidery that inspired a set of TechCrafts explorations in a form of student projects. In case of the embroidered QR codes, the link to technology is an add-on feature to textiles. In the other examples, craftsmanship technologies are used to create the textile substrate itself. These explorations are the input for a discussion about the role of craftsmanship and skills in developing materials with interactive properties that is held with relation to the possibilities for societal sustainability.

  • 156.
    Landahl, Karin
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    On form thinking in knitwear design2013Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate thesis presents and discusses experimental explorations in search for new methods of form-thinking within the knitwear design process. The position of textile knitting techniques is somewhat ambiguous. This is because they are not only concerned with creating the textile material, but also with the form of the garment as these two are created in the same process. Consequently, the common perception of form and material as two separate design parameters can be questioned when it comes to knitting. Instead, we may view it as a design process that has a single design parameter; a design process in which the notion of form provides the conceptual foundation. Through conducting a series of design experiments using knitting and crochet techniques, the notion of form was explored from the perspective of the way in which we make a garment. The outcome of the experiments showed that there are possibilities for development of alternative working methods in knitwear design by viewing form in terms of topological invariants rather than as abstract geometrical silhouettes. If such a notion, i.e. a notion of a more concrete geometry, were to be implemented in the design process for knitwear, it would provide another link between action and expression that could deepen our understanding of the design potential of knitting techniques and provide the field with new expressions and gestalts.

  • 157.
    Landin, Hanna
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Persson, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Electrical Burn-outs: a Technique to Design Knitted Dynamic Textile Patterns2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this practice-based experimental design research project a tablecloth reacting on external signals is designed. The tablecloth is connected to mobile phones and reacts to incoming calls and messages with burned out patterns. Due to the mobile phone activity, changes in colour and structure appear in the table-cloth. The tablecloth is a way to explore visual and tactile changes in a textile surface. It is also a way to investigate how our relation to mobile phones and mobile phone technology is affected by the way the phones are being expressed.

  • 158.
    Landin, Hanna
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Persson, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The burning tablecloth2009Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Imagine that the table is set and dinner is ready. It’s time to sit down and share the moment. That is what we do also in terms of sharing a one time pattern change in the tablecloth, and in terms of sharing each others’ mobile phone activity. Incoming phone calls and messages are not notified by the phones themselves, but through a burned out pattern in the tablecloth, in between our plates. The Burning Tablecloth serves as a design example of the design technique for irreversible patterns, expressing colour and structure-changes in a knitted textile. The Burning Tablecloth changes colour and structure according to mobile phone signals (calls and text messages) with burned out patterns and acts as a medium for raising questions about interactive tactile and visual expressions in textiles. The project is a design example of research into three fields, knitted circuits, textile patterns and peoples’ relation to computational technology. The tablecloth is knitted with cotton yarns and a heating wire in a Stoll flatbed knitting machine. The pattern that appears when using the tablecloth is built up as squares with the potential of becoming chess-patterned over the whole tablecloth surface. The table-cloth is connected to a microcontroller and various electronic components. The heating wire knitted in the table-cloth is the active material; when heated it is able to change the colour and structure of the table-cloth. The burning tablecloth reacts to mobile phone signals by getting warm so that colour and eventually structure changes is appearing in the tablecloth. The experiment demonstrates a design example where visual and tactile interactive properties are expressed in a tablecloth by mobile phone signals. Combined in a material structure, textile circuits are controlled by external stimuli adding an aesthetical value to the textile expression. With a foundation of experienced knowledge from latter experiments, the tablecloth shows an example developed by the design technique for irreversible patterns. The Burning Tablecloth also demonstrates how information can be expressed in an esthetical way through textiles, acting as an interactive colour and structure changing ambient textile display.

  • 159.
    Larsen, Ulrik Martin
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Choreographed Garment2011Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Conceptual movies focusing on the interaction between garment and choreography. The garment acts as choreographer.

  • 160.
    Larsen, Ulrik Martin
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Effect / Affect2011Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Performance at Ambience 2011

  • 161.
    Larsen, Ulrik Martin
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Performed Dress2011Other (Other academic)
  • 162.
    Larsen, Ulrik Martin
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Landahl, Karin
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Malmgren de Oliveira, Stefanie
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Dressed Integrity2012Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dressed–Integrity presents new logics of expression and functionality in dress and its relation to the body. As an aesthetic research program in dress it is about the fundamental relationship between form and material, between technique and expression. Through the development in art the program aims to challenge the institutions of craft through the appropriation of technology, and through the development science and epistemology the program aims to challenge the institutions of technology through the appropriation of art. The research program is therefore not an empirical research program that aims to introduce new theories about fashion. It is about developing foundational concepts and theoretical propositions of fashion design in and for itself as an academic field with an obvious integrity. As such the exhibition present a few examples of new techniques, methods, models and definitions of dress and its relation to the body, conducted by handful of PhD candidates within the research program in fashion design at the Swedish School of Textiles, Borås, Sweden.

  • 163.
    Larsson, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Mouwitz, Pia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Peterson, Joel
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Knit on Demand: mass customisation of knitted fashion products2009In: Nordic Textile Journal, ISSN 1404-2487Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s fashion market is characterized by short life cycles, low predictability and high impulse purchasing. Many fashion companies are responding to this by constantly introducing new collections. Zara, which is considered to be the leader of fashion are introducing as many as 211 new models per week. One of the drawbacks of Zara’s and others’ methods is the resulting overproduction; many garments have to be sold to reduced price or are thrown away. An average of one third of the collections is considered waste. It costs money for the fashion companies; it reduces the sell-through factor and wastes natural resources. Knit on Demand is a research project at the Swedish School of Textiles that aims to reduce the waste and increase the sell-through factor and service level. A local producer of knitwear and a retailer of tailored fashion in Stockholm also participate in the project. The purpose of the project is to test new methods of supply chain management and to analyse whether mass customization is applicable on knitwear. There are several benefits with mass customised garments: the customer receives a garment that is better suited to his or her needs, the producer does not have to make garments on forecast, and the environment and natural resources are spared because only what is bought by the end consumer is produced and shipped.

  • 164.
    Ledendal, Marie
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Ocean and Sea: design with chromatic smart materials2008In: The Nordic Textile Journal 2008, Special Edition Smart Textiles, p. 10-21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 165. Lendvai, Piroska
    et al.
    Declerck, Thierry
    Darányi, Sándor
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Malec, Scott
    Propp Revisited: Integration of Linguistic Markup into Structured Content Descriptors of Tales2010In: Proceedings of the Conference for Digital Humanities 2010, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metadata that serve as semantic markup, such as conceptual categories that describe the macrostructure of a plot in terms of actors and their mutual relationships, actions, and their ingredients annotated in folk narratives, are important additional resources of digital humanities research. Traditionally originating in structural analysis, in fairy tales they are called functions (Propp, 1968), whereas in myths – mythemes (Lévi-Strauss, 1955); a related, overarching type of content metadata is a folklore motif (Uther, 2004; Jason, 2000).In his influential study, Propp treated a corpus of tales in Afanas'ev's collection (Afanas'ev, 1945), establishing basic recurrent units of the plot ('functions'), such as Villainy, Liquidation of misfortune, Reward, or Test of Hero, and the combinations and sequences of elements employed to arrange them into moves.1 His aim was to describe the DNAlike structure of the magic tale sub-genre as a novel way to provide comparisons. As a start along the way to developing a story grammar, the Proppian model is relatively straightforward to formalize for computational semantic annotation, analysis, and generation of fairy tales. Our study describes an effort towards creating a comprehensive XML markup of fairy tales following Propp's functions, by an approach that integrates functional text annotation with grammatical markup in order to be used across text types, genres and languages. The Proppian fairy tale Markup Language (PftML) (Malec, 2001) is an annotation scheme that enables narrative function segmentation, based on hierarchically ordered textual content objects. We propose to extend PftML so that the scheme would additionally rely on linguistic information for the segmentation of texts into Proppian functions. Textual variation is an important phenomenon in folklore, it is thus beneficial to explicitly represent linguistic elements in computational resources that draw on this genre; current international initiatives also actively promote and aim to technically facilitate such integrated and standardized linguistic resources. We describe why and how explicit representation of grammatical phenomena in literary models can provide interdisciplinary benefits for the digital humanities research community. In two related fields of activities, we address the above as part of our ongoing activities in the CLARIN2 and AMICUS3 projects. CLARIN aims to contribute to humanities research by creating and recommending effective workflows using natural language processing tools and digital resources in scenarios where text-based research is conducted by humanities or social sciences scholars. AMICUS is interested in motif identification, in order to gain insight into higher-order correlations of functions and other content units in texts from the cultural heritage and scientific discourse domains. We expect significant synergies from their interaction with the PftML prototype.

  • 166. Lepik, Aira
    et al.
    Maceviciute, Elena
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Pakalna, Daina
    Les bibliothèques dans les pays baltes2013In: Les bibliothèques en Europe: organisation, projets, perspectives / [ed] Frédéric Blin, Éditions du Cercle de la Librairie , 2013, p. 155-179Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter focuses on the present situation (2012) of library systems in the Baltic countries (Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania)

  • 167.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Interpersonal relations in the context of a team meeting: in the light of the work of Heidegger and Merleau -­‐ Pontys philosophy2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 168.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Covers på Cocktail2011Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Covers på cocktail Liksom en samlingsskiva med covers på nittonhundratals hits har studenter från Textilhögskolan i Borås under ledning av Rickard Lindqvist satt samman en utställning med nytolkningar av klassiska klänningarna från Röhsskas samlingar. I slutet av augusti draperade studenter från Textilhögskolan i Borås replikor av klänningarna i Röhsskas Cocktail utställning. Dessa replikor har sedan legat till grund för ett utvecklings- och tolkningsarbete där studenterna har reproducerat klänningarna med en metodik jämförbar med att spela musikaliska covers. Att kopiera det man finner intressant ser jag som något högst nödvändigt för att en utveckling ska ske. Det kräver ett intresse, ett engagemang och en medvetenhet. Man undersöker originalet och vidareutvecklar det och samtidigt sin förmåga att se, utvärdera och skapa. En av modets grundessenser är att återskapa historien i perfekt samklang med nuet. Den perfekta kollektionen är en som upplevs som banbrytande och ny men där det samtidigt finns igenkänningsfaktorer och gemensamma referenser. Strävan efter originalitet från grunden och ignorans av historien är kanske den moderna mänsklighetens största misstag. Ska det till någon genuin progression inom modet och inte bara skapas nonsenskreationer måste dagens designers vara medvetna om historien och träna sin förmåga att se potentialen inom den.

  • 169.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Expressions through cutting2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A presentation of examples of cutting as design method.

  • 170.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Mörk kostym2012Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    If the expression of the body is the focal point, and how this expression is transformed by dressing it in fabric, a more reflective study of the body from a dressmakers perspective might be meaningful for the development of new design methods. “Mörk kostym 2012” aspires to both challenge and preserve the art of tailoring. Challenge tailoring methodologically in construction, hence propose an alternative view upon the body, meanwhile preserve it by utilizing traditional methods of making. The jacket and the trousers are two examples, using the “La coupe en un seul morceau” method developed by French costumier Genevieve Sevin-Doering, here a piece of fabric is sculptured into a garment on a living body, from which a new logic is extracted proposing an alternative way of approaching the body while cutting garments. The theory is visualised in a number of gravity and balance lines on the body to initiate the work of cutting, draping and fitting garments from and certain points proposing where on the body to address the foundational cuts. These garments are cut from one single piece of fabric however the number of pieces composing the garments are of less significance. The one-piece principal can be compared to a beautiful proof in mathematics, or the simplest equation explaining a series of experiments, the proof could be written differently, in any number of pieces, but the simplicity expresses the theory more clear.

  • 171.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    On the logic of pattern cutting: foundational cuts and approximations of the body2013Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fashion designers are presented with a range of different principles for pattern cutting and the interest in this area has grown rapidly over the past few years, both due to the publication of a number of works dealing with the subject in different ways and the fact that a growing number of designers emphasise cutting in their practices. Although a range of principles and concepts for pattern cutting are presented from different perspectives, the main body of these systems, traditional as well as contemporary, are predominately based on a quantified approximation of the body. As a consequence, the connection of existing models for pattern construction to the dynamic expression of the body or the biomechanic function of the body is problematic. This work explores and proposes an alternative model for pattern cutting that, unlike the existing models, takes as its point of origin the actual, variable body. As such, the research conducted here is basic research, aiming to identify fundamental principles in order to create alternative expression and functions. Instead of a static matrix of a non-moving body, the proposed model for cutting garments is based on a qualitative approximation of the body, visualised through balance lines and key biomechanic points. Based on some key principles found in the works by Geneviève Sevin-Doering, the proposed model for cutting is developed through concrete experiments by cutting and draping fabrics on live models. The result of a proposed model is an alternative principle for dressmaking that challenges the fundamental relationship between dress, pattern making and the body, opening up for new expressions in dress and functional possibilities for wearing.

  • 172.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The transformative cuts: new foundations in pattern cutting and approximations of the body2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fashion designers are presented with a range of different principles for pattern cutting, and interest in this area has grown rapidly over the past few years, due to both the publication of a number of works dealing with the subject in different ways, and the fact that a growing number of designers emphasise experimental pattern cutting in their practices. Although a range of principles and concepts for pattern cutting are presented from different per¬spectives, the main body of these systems, traditional as well as contemporary, are predominantly based on a quantified approximation of the body. As a consequence, the connection between existing theories for pattern construction and the dynamic expression and biomechanical func¬tion of the body are problematic. This work explores and proposes an alternative theory for pattern cutting, which unlike exist¬ing models takes as its point of origin the actual, variable body. As such, the research presented here is basic research. Instead of a static matrix of a non-moving body, the proposed model for cutting garments is based on a qualitative approximation of the body, visualised through balance lines and key biomechanical points. Based on some key principles found in works by Geneviève Sevin-Doering, the proposed model for cutting is developed through concrete experiments by cut¬ting and draping fabrics on live models. The proposed theory is an alternative principle for dressmaking, which challenges the fundamental relationship between dress, pattern making, and the body, opening up for new expressions in dress and functional possibilities for wearing.

  • 173.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Eklöf, Andreas
    Cuts2011Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cuts by Rickard Lindqvist and Andreas Eklöf The aim of the Cuts project is to merge print design and pattern cutting within the practise of fashion design. Working within a tradition of cutting with only one pattern piece, established by French costume designer Genevieve Sevin-Doering, the project developed out of a selection Rickard's pattern archive. Instead of seeing print design and pattern cutting as two separated activities the cutting pattern becomes the print, which then becomes the cutting template. A printed line replaces the cutting line and no fabric is cut away in the making of the garments. The printed patterns are exhibited in there own right alongside with the garments made out of them. The beauty in the lines of the cutting is as important any other line in the garment composition.

  • 174.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Eklöf, Andreas
    Cuts2011Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cuts by Rickard Lindqvist and Andreas Eklöf The aim of the Cuts project is to merge print design and pattern cutting within the practise of fashion design. Working within a tradition of cutting with only one pattern piece, established by French costume designer Genevieve Sevin-Doering, the project developed out of a selection Rickard's pattern archive. Instead of seeing print design and pattern cutting as two separated activities the cutting pattern becomes the print, which then becomes the cutting template. A printed line replaces the cutting line and no fabric is cut away in the making of the garments. The printed patterns are exhibited in there own right alongside with the garments made out of them. The beauty in the lines of the cutting is as important any other line in the garment composition.

  • 175.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Larsen, Ulrik Martin
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Landahl, Karin
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Research proposals: Phds in fashion design2009Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The starting point of three different research projects will be exhibited and the question " What is actually a cardigan?" will be discussed. Karin Landahl, Ulrik Martin Larsen and Rickard Lindqvist are PhD students in fashion design at the Swedish School of Textile. The research in fashion design at the school has its focus on practice based design research with special emphasis on the development of methods for professional and experimental fashion design. Karin Landahls main focus for the research-years ahead is the relation between form and materials sprung from a background in knitwear design. Ulrik Martin Larsens first research project will examine the distinctions between accessory and garment through the creation of objects that straddle the line between these two categories. Rickard Lindqvist has throughout his career worked with pattern cutting as creative method and aims to carry out research on pattern cutting as aesthetics.

  • 176.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Malmgren de Oliveira, Stefanie
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Vanishing realities2012Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With a belief that the core of fashion is to recreate the past in perfect congruence with the present together with a photo by Stefanie to set the mood we turned to Marcel Proust for guidance. In his novel In search of lost times Proust introduces the concept of involuntary memories. The taste of the Madeleine cookie evokes Swann’s involuntary memory of things that have vanished over times. How can we through fashion evoke involuntary memories? If the garments are vanishing into transparency will that evoke our involuntary memories of bodies and dresses. If only half a lapel is appearing will that evoke our involuntary memories of coats we used to wear? Isn’t a good piece of fashion one that reminds us of the past but at the same time gives us a feeling of being totally here now? Exploring the themes of form and memory through vanishing details and fabrics. This is carried out through the cuts in detail and silhouette and through the use of prints and ausbrenner treatment of the fabrics.

  • 177.
    Lindsköld, Linnéa
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Betydelsen av kvalitet: en studie av diskursen om statens stöd till ny, svensk skönlitteratur 1975-20092013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to explore the conceptions of aesthetic quality used in Swedish literature policy through a study of the discourse of the state support to new, Swedish fiction 1975-2009. This support scheme is a quality-based retrospective grant, introduced in 1975, aiming to guarantee the quality and versatility of book publishing. It is explored as an expression of cultural policy in a welfare policy setting, where the autonomy of the arts is a central concept. The quality of the book is the foremost criterion for the award of support and quality assessment is carried out by a work group consisting of authors, critics, librarians and researchers. The empirical part of the study analyses arguments concerning state support forwarded in the debate from political documents, articles in newspapers and trade press, debate books and also in six interviews with former members of the workgroups from the 1970s and the 2000s. A discourse policy analysis is used to examine the discourse of the support, how it is legitimized and the conceptions of aesthetic quality embedded in the discourse. The results show that for stakeholders state support is highly legitimate. The support is discursively connected to welfare politics and democracy, even though it is aimed at artifacts, not citizens. It is legitimized as being a support to book production, not for mediating literature. There has been a shift in the conception of quality, from being identified in a negative sense to a positive sense. A professional concept of quality as a driving force is used by the workgroup. The shift towards explicating quality can be seen as a way of protecting the concept of quality in a time where it is perceived as being under threat. The use of quality as the foremost criterion can be seen as resistance against shifts in cultural policy that are perceived as adaptations to market values or politicization. The results render visible the political aspects of the concept of quality in state support.

  • 178.
    Lindsköld, Linnéa
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Contradicting Cultural Policy: A comparative study of the cultural policy of the Nordic radical right.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Culture is a central concept for the Nordic radical right parties, but little research has been done on the cultural policy of the parties. This article is a comparative overview of the party programs of four Nordic radical right parties during the latest decade. It relates the cultural policies of the radical right to the predominantly welfare-based corporatist cultural policy of the Nordic countries. Through a discursive policy analysis two problem representations are found: That multiculturalism is seen as a threat against national culture and that public funding is seen as a threat against freedom. The parties share a common understanding of cultural policy, with minor differences. There is an underlying conflict in the discourse: While the parties argue that the political governance of art needs to be limited, they are, at the same time, deeply involved in how cultural expressions and cultural life should be defined.

  • 179.
    Lindsköld, Linnéa
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    En flerfaldig mångfald: Reflektioner kring mångfaldsbegreppet i svensk kulturpolitik 1972–20162017In: Vem får vara med?: Perspektiv på inkludering och integration i kulturlivet i de nordiska länderna / [ed] Kulturanalys Norden, Stockholm: Kulturanalys Norden , 2017, p. 61-74Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this chapter is to trace the conceptual history of diversity in Swedish cultural policy. Earlier research on diversity in cultural policy has mainly been devoted to ethnic understandings of the concept from 1995 and onwards. A longer perspective makes it possible to follow a cultural policy in transition. Cultural policy is conceptualised as a practice that reinforces certain values in a nation. The material consists of cultural policy documents published during the time period. Three overlapping understandings are found: diversity as variation (from 1972), ethnic diversity (from 1995) and an umbrella-concept (from 2007) including different social categories. The results reveal that the understanding of the concept has changed from being anti-commercialism to including private actors and 240 freedom of choice to achieve diversity. Another change has been a shift in focus from groups to individuals. Diversity may be seen as an outside goal, and a result of immigration policy and discrimination laws and not coming from inside the cultural field. However, it is mostly perceived as a positive concept, used to legitimate a cultural policy in liberal, heterogenic societies since the market cannot guarantee diversity by itself. A risk is that the concept will become too vague when it is used for many different aspects of cultural policy.

  • 180.
    Lund, Anja
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Nanotechnology for textile applications: or how to make something from nothing2008In: The Nordic Textile Journal 2008, Special Edition Smart Textiles, p. 116-125Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 181.
    Lundstedt, Lotta
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Notes on fashion designers´ way of working2009In: Nordic Textile Journal, ISSN 1404-2487Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 182. Lähdesmäki, Tuuli
    European Capitals of Culture as Cultural Meeting Places: Strategies of representing Cultural Diversity2010In: Nordisk kulturpolitisk tidskrift, ISSN 1403-3216, E-ISSN 2000-8325, no 1, p. 27-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Union nominates cities as European Capitals of Culture in order to highlight the richness and diversity of European cultures and the features they share, as well as to promote greater mutual acquaintance between European citizens. For the chosen cities, the nomination creates a possibility to promote the cultural identity, originality and diversity of the region and city. The empirical focus of the article is on three cities which were chosen as European Capitals of Culture for 2010 (Pécs in Hungary), and 2011 (Tallinn in Estonia and Turku in Finland). The cities utilize various strategies in emphasizing and representing their cultural diversity. All of the cities stress their location as a historical meeting place of different ethnicities and nationalities. Additionally, the cities stress their architecture as an expression of multicultural layers of the cities. In the cities, cultural diversity is related to the global imagery of popular culture, street culture and contemporary art. In addition, the cities stress the canon of Western art history as a base for common Europeanness compounded of various nationalities and regionalities. One essential strategy is to represent different minorities and their visual culture as signs of cultural diversity. Cultural diversity is a complex and political concept. Its definitions and representations inevitably involve power structures and production of cultural and political hierarchies. Hierarchies and political tension are bound to the concept even though it is often introduced as equal and anti-racist discourse.

  • 183.
    Maceviciute, Elena
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Nilsson, Skans Kersti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Cultural policy and legal issues2017In: Books on screens: players in the Swedish e-book market, Gothenburg: Nordicom, 2017, p. 61-73Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 184.
    Malec, S.
    et al.
    University of Texas (Austin).
    Darányi, Sándor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Widdows, D.
    Microsoft Bing.
    Cohen, T.
    University of Texas (Austin).
    Landing Propp in Interaction Space: First Steps Toward Scalable Open Domain Narrative Analysis With Predication-based Semantic Indexing2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we explore the possibility of applying high-dimensionalvector representations of concept-relation-concept triplets, which have been successfullyapplied to model a small set of relationship types in the biomedicaldomain, to the task of modeling folk tales. In doing so, our ultimate aim is todevelop representations of narratives through which their underlying structurecan be compared. The current paper describes our progress toward this aim, withemphasis on addressing the technical challenges involved in moving from therelatively constrained set of relations that have been extracted from biomedicaltext to the much larger set of unnormalized relations that have been extractedfrom the open domain. A toy example using graded vectors demonstrates that ourapproach will be feasible once more material will be added to the test collection.

  • 185.
    Martinez, Merisa
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Dillen, Wout
    University of Antwerp.
    Bleeker, Elli
    Huygens Institute (KNAW).
    Sichani, Anna-Maria
    University of Sussex.
    Kelly, Aodhán
    Delft University of Technology.
    Refining our conceptions of ‘access’ in digital scholarly editing: Reflections on a qualitative survey on inclusive design and dissemination.2019In: Variants - The Journal of the European Society for Textual Scholarship, ISSN 1573-3084, E-ISSN 1879-6095, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 41-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore layered conceptions of access and accessibility as they relate to the theory and praxis of digital scholarly editing. To do this, we designed and disseminated a qualitative survey on five key themes: dissemination; Open Access and licensing; access to code; web accessibility; and diversity. Throughout the article we engage in cultural criticism of the discipline by sharing results from the survey, identifying how the community talks about and performs access, and pinpointing where improvements in praxis could be made. In the final section of this paper we reflect on different ways to utilize the survey results when critically designing and disseminating digital scholarly editions, propose a call to action, and identify avenues of future research.

  • 186.
    Martinovski, Bilyana
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Traum, David
    Marsella, Stacy
    Rejection of empathy in negotiation2007In: Journal of Group Decision and Negotiation, ISSN 0926-2644, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 61-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trust is a crucial quality in the development of individuals and societies and empathy plays a key role in the formation of trust. Trust and empathy have growing importance in studies of negotiation. However, empathy can be rejected which complicates its role in negotiation. This paper presents a linguistic analysis of empathy by focusing on rejection of empathy in negotiation. Some of the rejections are due to failed recognition of the rejector's needs and desires whereas others have mainly strategic functions gaining momentum in the negotiation. In both cases, rejection of empathy is a phase in the negotiation not a breakdown.

  • 187.
    Mouwitz, Pia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Peterson, Joel
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Beyond mass customisation: Mass individualisation2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    For some years customers have been able to purchase mass customized garments on the Internet and “Design your own...” is very often used to attract the customer. Most of the products are standard products that the customer are allowed to change in a number of predetermined ways. Design however is something more than just choosing the colour or changing the length of the arms, it also involves changing the silouette and the whole expression of the garment. The idea is to create the basis for a new type of design and manufacturing that allows true own design for everybody.

  • 188.
    Nelhans, Gustaf
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Kullenberg, Christopher
    University of Gothenburg.
    Happiness as a Valuation of Nations: From Margin to Indicator2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper traces how subjective measures of welfare were transformed from a marginal issue in the social sciences to a valuation of welfare of nations. The co-production of social science and politics is analysed in a case study of negotiations of subjective and objective indicators in Sweden.

    Since the 1970s social scientists have strived towards finding a replacement for the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) as an indicator of welfare in nations. Over the years, various political actors have attempted to make such measurements comply with their ideas of what constitutes a good society. This paper traces the co-production of social scientific knowledge and the political process of attempting to establish a new standardized way of measuring welfare in Sweden.

    As GDP and other purely economic indicators have dominated how value is ascribed to nations, the various attempts of challenging this form of measurement have taken place at the margins of the social sciences. However, during the past two decades, the negotiations of finding alternative measures of welfare have dramatically moved forward their positions, entering mainstream science and politics.

    Drawing from a variety of source documents (political proposals, influential reports, mass media accounts and scientific literature), this article connects and analyses multiple modes of veridiction that are the subjects of controversies and negotiations in the construction of a proposed valuemeter of welfare in Sweden. As a result, we show how two major social scientific conceptions of welfare measurements, based either on subjective or objective indicators, relate (without being reduced) to political proposals.

  • 189. Niinimäki, Kirsi
    Proactive Fashion Design for Sustainable Consumption2012In: Nordic Textile Journal, ISSN 1404-2487, Vol. 1, p. 60-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a study that investigates product satisfaction in the context of clothing. The paper furthermore presents suggestions on how this knowledge can be used to create proactive fashion design for sustainable consumption. One of the main challenges in today’s consumer society is how to design products that encourage consumers to engage in more environmentally responsible behaviour, sustainable consumption. This paper opens the discussion on how to change current unsustainable consumption behaviour related to clothing through a visionary, far-sighted design approach. Designers can create future-oriented sustainable designs that can transform consumption patterns towards more sustainable ones. Design for sustainability can thus be a redirective practice that aims for sustainable consumption, and the ways in which fashion design can be a proactive process with this aim will be described. This article shows why emotional satisfaction and enhancing a product’s quality and other intrinsic characteristics are most important when attempting to extend the product’s lifetime. Furthermore, this paper shows that services can create an opportunity to extend the enjoyable use of a product and offer satisfaction to consumers in a sustainable manner.

  • 190.
    Nilsson, Linnéa
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Textile influence: exploring the role of textiles in the product design process2014Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Textile materials and textile design are a part of countless products in our surroundings, as well as of diverse design fields and industries, with very different material traditions and working methods. Textile materials and industry have undergone many changes during recent decades, in terms of how and where textiles are produced, and what textiles can be and do; in much the same way, the design practices that textiles are involved in have also developed. What these diverse and evolving design contexts in which textiles are involved in have in common is that textile materials and textile design decisions somehow meet the rest of the design during a design process. The aim of this thesis is to add to our understanding of the relationship between textiles and products in the design process, and to explore the roles that textile design plays when designing textile products, the roles they can come to play when textiles become more complex and offer new means of functionality and expressiveness, for example through smart textile technology. This thesis presents two types of result: Firstly, descriptions of textile product design processes that highlight the wide range of roles that textiles can play in the textile product design processes of today, accentuate how textile materials and design decisions can influence both what can be designed and the design process, and describe some of the additional complexities that come with designing and designing with smart textiles. These examples are presented in the appended papers, and are the outcome of an observation of students who were designing textile products and collaborative, practice-based design research projects. Secondly, this thesis presents a theoretical framework which aims to offer a broad perspective on the relationship between textile design and the product design process, with the intention of opening up for reflection on how we design, and can design, with textiles. The framework focuses on how textile design decisions and textile materials participate in the process, and to what degree they influence the development of the design; this includes methods, questions, etc. that can be used to explore and define this dynamic. One of the main points of the framework is the importance of the textile influence in textile product design processes; the specific qualities of textiles as a design material - the considerations, possibilities, and challenges, which influence both the design of the product and the process of designing it. This includes not only the textiles in the final design, but also the textiles that, in other ways, feature in this process.

  • 191.
    Nilsson, Skans Kersti
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Reading in a changing society: Some impact in the Swedish context2014In: Reading in changing society / [ed] Lauristin, Marju, Tartu: University of Tartu Press , 2014, p. 118-132Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 192.
    Nilsson, Skans Kersti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    The authors and e-books: Opinions and practice2017In: Books on screens: Players in the Swedish e-book market, Gothenburg: Nordicom, 2017, p. 75-91Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 193.
    Nordlund Andersson, Agneta
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Textiles as concept, material and industry2008In: The Nordic Textile Journal 2008, Special Edition Smart Textiles, p. 170-197Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 194.
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Hermeneutik2007Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hermeneutik är både en filosofi om förståelsens villkor och en benämning för en forskningsansats med tolkning som analysredskap. Inom ramen för en hermeneutisk forskningstradition söks emellertid inga sanningar i termer av ett orsak - verkan tänkande. Istället söks fruktbara sätt att förstå företeelser som kan vara svåra att hantera i vår vardagsförståelse. Forskningsfrågor som kan formuleras i termer av ”vad betyder den här företeelsen för den här gruppen av människor” lämpar sig ofta för en hermeneutisk forskningsansats. Vi människor använder emellertid alltid tolkningar för att orientera oss i tillvaron, det vi uppfattar som sanningar brukar helt enkelt vara de tolkningar som gäller i ett bestämt sammanhang, t.ex. det samhälle som vi växt upp i. Därför behöver vi skilja mellan vanliga vardagstolkningar och tolkningarna i en vetenskaplig studie. De sistnämnda är förstås aktuellt för empirisk hermeneutik, en humanvetenskapligt inriktad forskningsansats som kan tillämpas inom flera områden. Vanligast är den förmodligen inom samhälls- och vårdvetenskap. De forskningsfrågor som är aktuella för den här typen av studier kan inte besvaras med en orsaksförklarande metod som syftar till att förutsäga (predicera). Förklaringsnivån inom hermeneutiken handlar snarare om innebörder i texter, utsagor, handlingar och andra meningsskapande mänskliga aktiviteter. Hermeneutiken är dock inget nytt påfund. Begreppet myntades långt före den naturvetenskapliga revolutionen. Den tillämpade hermeneutiken har flera olika utgångspunkter och användningsområden. Låt oss därför, innan vi tar itu med frågan om hur man kan gå tillväga i empirisk hermeneutisk, ägna oss åt den historiska utvecklingen.

  • 195.
    Nässén, Kristina
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Kapitel 3. Deltagande observation2013In: Människan i vården. Etnografi, vård och drama. / [ed] Carola Skott, Carlssons bokförlag , 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Människan i vården - etnografi, vård och drama riktar sig till alla som söker en metod att undersöka och förändra specifika miljöer, inte minst inom vården. Boken beskriver tre metodologier, etnografi, hermeneutik och dramapedagogik. I första delen diskuteras etnografins teori och perspektiv medan dess andra del visar på den praktiska tillämpningen. Den tredje delen av boken tar upp vilken form av kunskap som kan erhållas genom etnografisk forskning och hur en lärande praktik kan utvecklas. Innehållet i boken rör sig mellan metodologi och fältarbete, deltagande observation, berättelse, etnografiskt skrivande och dramapedagogik i vårdmiljö. En viktig fråga är hur den subjektiva erfarenheten blir kroppsliggjord och hur den kan förstås i sitt sociala sammanhang. Författarna introducerar både teoretiskt och praktiskt, en förening mellan etnografi och dramapedagogik som de benämner etnografiskt drama.

  • 196. Ofek, Nir
    et al.
    Darányi, Sándor
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Rokach, Lior
    Linking Motif Sequences to Tale Types by Machine Learning2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract units of narrative content called motifs constitute sequences, also known as tale types. However whereas the dependency of tale types on the constituent motifs is clear, the strength of their bond has not been measured this far. Based on the observation that differences between such motif sequences are reminiscent of nucleotide and chromosome mutations in genetics, i.e., constitute “narrative DNA”, we used sequence mining methods from bioinformatics to learn more about the nature of tale types as a corpus. 94% of the Aarne-Thompson-Uther catalogue (2249 tale types in 7050 variants) was listed as individual motif strings based on the Thompson Motif Index, and scanned for similar subsequences. Next, using machine learning algorithms, we built and evaluated a classifier which predicts the tale type of a new motif sequence. Our findings indicate that, due to the size of the available samples, the classification model was best able to predict magic tales, novelles and jokes.

  • 197.
    Orlenius, Kennert
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Dialog och ungas delaktighet: exemplet Socialt hållbart Falköping2018In: Interkulturell dialog - teori och praktik / [ed] Rasoul Nejadmehr, Göteborg: Västra Götalandsregionen , 2018, 1, p. 227-249Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den nationella ungdomspolitiken betonar ungas delaktighet och att de ska ges reellt inflytande med möjlighet att kunna påverka samhällsutvecklingen. I Falköpings kommun har under de senaste åren bedrivits ett systematiskt arbete med denna inriktning. Mål 1 i kommunen är ”Ett socialt hållbart Falköping”. I kapitlet redovisas hur kommunen arbetar för att implementera sin policy i praktisk verksamhet med fokus på unga. Följeforskningen pekar på ett socialt innovativt arbete men också utmaningar för att främja alla ungas delaktighet och samhörighet.

  • 198. Oscarsson, Linda
    et al.
    Jacobsen Heimdahl, Elisabeth
    Lundell, Torbjörn
    Peterson, Joel
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Flat knitting of a light emitting textile with optical fibres2009In: AUTEX Research Journal, ISSN 1470-9589, E-ISSN 2300-0929, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 61-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knitted products have a flexibility that offers many attractive possibilities. Combined with technical fibres, this gives interesting and innovative possibilities. Many technical fibres and yarns has however properties such as high stiffness and brittleness which are difficult to process in the practice of weft knitting. This paper is about the experimental product development of a light radiating textile lamp in which optical fibres are used as the only illumination source. The lampshade is produced on an electronic flat knitting machine with special equipment suitable for the feeding of yarn with high stiffness. The work was divided in two parts: exploring the possibilities to knit the desired shape on one hand and experimenting about knitting with optical fibres as a weft insertion on the other hand. The method is an inductive approach; a literature survey, information from suppliers of knitting production equipment and experimental work on a flat knitting machine at The Swedish School of Textiles, Borås, Sweden. Results show that the diamond shaped structure can be knitted in one piece with transparent monofilament yarns. Furthermore it also shows that difficulties occur when knitting with stiff and brittle optical fibres therefore the paper ends with a discussion with suggestions of how to overcome these challenges.

  • 199.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Peterson, Joel
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Measuring QR in globalised apparel supply chains2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Substantial development has taken place, slowly, in the field of Quick Response (QR) since its evolution; however, the holistic view of it has been complex and fuzzy. The paper determines the dimensions and key elements of QR by identifying the essential virtues of a supply chain in a globalized environment and takes help of 3-dimensional concurrent engineering to develop a QR Practicability Tool-kit for future interpretation into a QR-rating model for measuring its adoption. The analysis is based on a critical review and synthesis from prior conceptual articles as a theoretical base. The work highlighted is expected to be beneficial for firms for developing value-added partnership (VAP), determining performance, re-configuring resources and aligning organizational activities.

  • 200.
    Pennlert, Julia
    et al.
    Umeå Universitet .
    Erixon, Per OlofUmeå Universitet .
    Digital Humaniora: Humaniora i en digital tid2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
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