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  • 151.
    Imtiaz, Asaad
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Business Expansion of Apparel Brands: Accessing opportunities in Apparel/Retail sector in Pakistan2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The current study aims to investigate the feasibility of international apparel and footwear retailers to expand their business in Pakistan and compete with other brands. It also highlights the business opportunities in Pakistan apparel retail sector and the motivations of international brands behind expansions. This study was conducted with the help of interviews based on diamond model of Porter, and Hofsetede cultural dimensions. The open ended questions were delivered to the professionals electronically while interviews were conducted by telephone. Seven companies from Pakistan were selected for study purpose. Data was analyzed and assessed manually. The study revealed that there is a significant opportunity for international apparel retailers to launch their retail outlets in Pakistan along with some risks. International brands which are financially strong can tackle these risks. However it was concluded that the companies with less financial strength may find it difficult to go in a new market within 5 years. UK brands are already there and brands from other countries are also opening. Overall Pakistan retail sector is growing and people are becoming fashion conscious. This study provides information to International apparel brands which they can take into consideration while entering Pakistan's apparel retail market. It also gives an opportunity for assessment of market in the light of theoretical modules and shows a direction of getting better market share by launching.

  • 152.
    IYER, SWETA
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Nierstrasz, Vincent
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Photoluminescent textile using biobased riboflavin derivative (FMN)2018In: 18th AUTEX World Textile Conference, Istanbul, Turkey, Institute of Physics (IOP), 2018, p. 1-4, article id 3471Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Riboflavin derivative such as Flavin mononucleotide possesses distinctive biological and physicochemical properties such as photosensitivity, redox activity and fluorescence. Flavin mononucleotide widely known as FMN is a biomolecule having molecular formula as C17H20N4NaO9P and is produced from biobased riboflavin by enzymatic reaction in living organisms. In contrast to riboflavin which is sparingly soluble in water, FMN is highly water soluble due to the presence of an ionic phosphate group. The presence of isoalloxazine ring in FMN is responsible for its properties such as UV absorption and fluorescence. This study evaluates the potential use of Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) for production of photoluminescent textile.

  • 153.
    Jansen, Barbara
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Light Shell2009Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    LIGHT SHELL is an investigation into self lighting textile shells – textile spaces. A LIGHT SHELL aims to enrich its future architectural environment through lighting and being a sensual stimulation of everyday life which can be experienced through vision, touch and users being able to move inside. The exhibited prototypes visualize how a Light Shell could feel like. Integrated PMMA optical fibres allow bringing dynamic changing light into the architectural space as regenerating and relaxing stimuli for the body.

  • 154.
    Jansen, Barbara
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    rhythm exercise2014Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In BUILDING WITH TEXTILES, the TextielMuseum presents work by internationally renowned architects as well as interior projects that put textiles in the spotlight. Building with textiles and flexible materials has aesthetic, functional and environmental advantages. That is why textiles are now seen as the fifth key building material alongside steel, stone, concrete and wood. In addition, the development of interior textiles with special functions – from air purification to integrated light, images and sound – offers new possibilities to design smart and interactive interiors. BUILDING WITH TEXTILES is on show from 27 September 2014 until 25 January 2015. Follow us for the complete programme: www.textielmuseum.nl Rhythm exercise is a part of Barbara Jansen`s research work for her doctoral thesis which investigates the following research question: What does it mean, if time and change – constant movement – become part of the textile design expression? The research question has been investigated in a number of experiments which explore the visual effects of movement by using light integrated into textile structures as a medium. Thereby, the textile design pattern reveals its composition, not in one moment of time any more, but in fact over time. The practice based research work aims to create time-based textiles with an emphasis on developing aesthetics of movement – or to establish movement as an aesthetic moment in textile design. The exhibited artefacts use PMMA optical fibre technology in braided structures, activated by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and using a microcontroller as an interface to realize novel, light-emitting textiles.

  • 155.
    Jansen, Barbara
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    rhythm exercise_13in12011Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The exhibit is part of a series of experiments, named rhythm exercise, which explore new ways of designing with time-based parameters to create dynamic light-emitting textile structures. This series of experiments focuses on the creation of light sequences, which explore how different expressions of movement, rhythm, tempo, play and pause create dynamic tensions.

  • 156.
    Jansen, Barbara
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Carleklev, Jan
    Smith, Amanda (Curator)
    Hugain-Lacire, Nolwenn (Curator)
    Sinus 64 + blue2014Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sinus 64 + blue explores a relationship and dialog between sound and light and is a collaborative project carried out by composer and artist Jan Carleklev and textile design researcher Barbara Jansen. It is a practice based research project investigating on the borderline between art and design in order to explore new aesthetics and experiences. In Sinus 64 + blue, sound triggers and creates a dialog with the light embedded in a textile structure. The exhibited artefact uses PMMA optical fibre technology in a woven structure which is activated by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and uses a digital interface to realize a novel, light-emitting textile expression. Sinus 64 + blue is part of the research for Barbara Jansen`s doctoral thesis which investigates the following research question: What does it mean, if time and change – constant movement – become part of the textile design expression? The research question has been investigated in a number of experiments which explore the visual effects of movement by using light integrated into textile structures as a medium. Thereby, the textile design pattern reveals its composition, not in one moment of time any more, but in fact over time. In this collaborative project, sound has been used as a trigger to activate time-based light patterns, whereby it does not only stimulate patterns of light but in fact initiates a dialog between the two. (Jansen, 2013) Installation The Sinus 64 + blue installation is based on a light-emitting woven structure (1x1 m) in which PMMA optical fibres have been interlaced with paper yarn. The optical fibres are lit by RGB-LEDs (red, green and blue LEDs which are activated through additive colour mixing) and programmed via a digital interface. In the initial experiments, the woven structure was programmed to react to three different basic sound elements, each of which triggered one of the base light colours of the RGB-LEDs, red, green or blue. The dialog between single sine pitches and the three primary colours of light explore elementary aspects of the relationship between sound and light. Sound and light have been stripped down to their most basic elements, i.e. the use of single frequency sound waves (sine pitches) and the three primary colours red, green and blue. Sound element one was created by playing three individual sine waves together. The individual sounds are slightly detuned in relation to each other, but all are close to the center frequency 64 Hz. This approach is causing interference between the three sine waves (The Physics class room, N.D., Infoplease, N.D.). The interference creates unique rhythmic sonic structures, which lay a steady beat as a foundation for the sound-light composition. This sound element triggered blue, pulsating light over the whole textile structure. Sound element two was created through a sequence of sine waves starting at a frequency of 100 Hz and increasing to 440 Hz (playing a scale from lower to higher pitch) before starting over from 100 Hz again. This over and over increasing sound scale activated the red light, floating upwards and upwards the textile structure over and over again. Sound element three was a melodic sequence of single sine waves which covered a range of high and low frequencies. They set off the green light dancing and pulsating over the textile structure. In the continued work towards composing an exhibition piece, sound-light element two and three were further developed. Sound-light element two was altered to play sequences of increasing and decreasing sine pitch scales and the tones of the scales of the pure sine waves were modified to a filtered white noise in order to simulate the sound of wind. The initial colour of the red light was given a richer colour spectrum which shift and fade between red and pink. Sound-light element three, the green colour was made richer and altered by adding some blue to achieve a more subtle nuance of green. Nevertheless, three distinct sound-light patterns create an overall composition by utilizing a more prosperous sound and colour landscape. Let yourself be surprised what happens when one, two or all three of these sound-light elements appear simultaneously during the eight minute long time-based composition.

  • 157.
    Jansen, Barbara
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Ledendal, Marie
    Light and Shadow play: the sun as an aesthetic trigger for urban textiles2011Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The project investigates how the sun can be utilized to enhance aesthetics through textile surfaces in urban environments. The project explores the interplay of textiles as a sun-screening element within the outdoor public architectural space. What happens when we use the sun's heat and light to trigger a light and shadow play through a textile surface? What happens when designing with an unpre-dictable parameter – the sun – in relation to the predictability of the textile design processes? The exhibited objects; an interactive 3D model, two animation films and six storyboards, will summaries the research process and results. The interactive model is open for the audience to interact with via their own observations and explorations

  • 158.
    Jiong, Sun
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Billing, Erik
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Seoane, Fernando
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Karolinska Institutet.
    Zhou, Bo
    DFKI.
    Högberg, Dan
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Hemeren, Paul
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Categories of touch: Classifying human touch using a soft tactile sensor2017In: The robotic sense of touch: From sensing to understanding, workshop at the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 29 May, Singapore., 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 159.
    Johansson, Erik
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Ahlström, Peter
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    On Polyethylene Cable Failure, Electric Fields, Water Clusters and Ions2008In: Proceedings of the 100th Annual Meeting of the American Institute for Chemical Engineering, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 160. Johansson, Eva
    et al.
    Newson, Bill
    Blomfeldt, Thomas
    Cho, Sung-Woo
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Hedenqvist, Mikael
    Gällstedt, Mikael
    Kuktaite, Ramune
    Use of gluten for materials production2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 161. Johansson, Eva
    et al.
    Newson, William
    Blomfeldt, Thomas
    Türe, Hasan
    Rasheed, F.
    Cho, Sung-Woo
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Hedenqvist, Mikael
    Johansson, Therese
    Gällstedt, Mikael
    Kuktaite, Ramune
    Use of plant protein for materials production2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 162.
    Johansson, Evelina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kommunikation genom plaggskisser: En studie kring skisskommunikation mellan beställare och leverantör2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is a study that investigates how the communication in the developing process of a garment can be developed between a distributor and a supplier. The purpose is to investigate how large part of the quality assured and processed sketches can help improve the communicational issues and minimize the number of samples that are being transported between the buyer and the factory causing delays due to large distances. The study has been carried out in collaboration with a company that has been job initiator for the subject of the thesis. The main area in the method are based on a quality improving process to discover what a supplier as well as a distributor consider to be a distinct sketch. By using a survey as a data collection method, an evaluation of the fashion company`s sketches have been exercised. To reassure the quality of the sketches within the company and to investigate whether this can cause minor misunderstandings within the production department. In this study outlines of the inside of a blazer have been the focus as the company recently has experienced issues with these parts in the production of prototypes. The result is based on a comparison between two blazer prototypes that the factory has sent to the company as a first suggestion to manufacture the blazer. The conclusion highlights and evaluates the level of importance of the quality assured sketches versus the non-assured ones, and whether these are essential for the company`s desired quality and standard of the item or not. Thus, the conclusion also covers a discussion around how to fulfill the desired quality and standards of a blazer for the fashion company in question.

  • 163.
    Johansson, Matilda
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Repeated Stories: exploring storytelling for children in surface pattern design2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 credits / 18 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Repeated Stories is an exploratory project in textile design where the aim is to explore the design of storytelling patterns addressed to children. More precisely, the work examines how patterns can be designed as a tool to encourage curiosity and creativity among children. The work is practice-based, building on concrete experiments with a workshop character, where combinations of textile material, colour, printing techniques and scale are explored. The primary motive for this work is to take advantage of textile design expertise in a social context, to find new areas for competence in making repeats and patterns, and how a social value can be added to patterns. The result is an installation of three hanging textiles, meant for a public space, such as waiting room in a hospital. The work proposes an alternative approach to surface patterns by adding storytelling and give the patterns both a communicative and decorative function.

  • 164. Jose, T
    et al.
    Joseph, A
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Thomas, S
    Joseph, K
    Thermal and crystallization behavior of cotton: Polypropylene commingled composite systems2010In: Polymer Composites, ISSN 0272-8397, E-ISSN 1548-0569, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 1487-1494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Techniques like thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and polarized optical microscopy were used to study the thermal and crystallization behavior of cotton-polypropylene (PP) commingled composite system. Thermal analysis was used to understand the structure-property relationship and also to quantify the amount of moisture and volatiles, which causes the deterioration of the composite performance. Thermal stability of the composite was found be intermediate between that of PP and cotton fibers. Presence of treated reinforcements had increased the crystallinity of PP. Also, fibers act as heterogeneous nucleants and favor the early crystallization of PP in the composites. The crystallization and onset crystallization temperature values were increased by the presence of cotton fibers. The theories of heterogeneous nucleation and crystal growth kinetics were used to explain the growth of transcrystalline layer (TCL) of PP on cotton fibers. The interfacial free energy difference for nucleation of PP on fiber was found to be smaller compared with that in the bulk PP. This favors the formation and growth of TCL. The thickness of TCL and radius of the spherulites increase with the increase in the crystallization temperature. Fiber surface roughness and thermal stresses facilitate the growth of transcrystallinity on cotton fiber.

  • 165.
    Kadi, Nawar
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Peterson, Joel
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Holmudd, Olle
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Karnoub, Amer
    University of Aleppo.
    The Effect of Warp Tension on the Colour of Jacquard Fabric2017In: IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, 2017, Vol. 254, article id 082014Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this paper is to demonstrate the effect of warp tension on fabric colour for several types of weaves structures, and found a relationship between them. The image analyse technique used to determine the proportion of yarns colour appearance, the advantage of this techniques is the rapidity and reliability. The woven fabric samples are consisting of a polyester warp yarn with continuous filaments and density of 33 end/cm, a polypropylene weft yarn with a density of 24 pick/cm, and the warp tension ranged between 12-22 cN/tex. The experimental results demonstrated the effect of the warp tension on the colour of fabric, and this effect is related to several factors, where the large proportion of warp appearance leads to larger effect on fabric colour. The difference in the value of colour differences ΔEcmc is larger is in the range 16 to 20 cN/tex of warp tension. Using statistical methods, a mathematical model to calculate the amount of the colour difference ΔEcmc caused by the change in warp tension had been proposed.

  • 166.
    Kahoush, May
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. ENSAIT.
    Bio-functionalization of conductive textile materials with redox enzymes2017In: IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, 2017, Vol. 254, article id 112002Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, immobilization of oxidoreductase enzymes on electrically conductive materials has played an important role in the development of sustainable bio-technologies. Immobilization process allows the re-use of these bio-catalysts in their final applications.

    In this study, different methods of immobilizing redox enzymes on conductive textile materials were used to produce bio-functionalized electrodes. These electrodes can be used for bio-processes and bio-sensing in eco-designed applications in domains such as medicine and pollution control.

    However, the main challenge facing the stability and durability of these electrodes is the maintenance of the enzymatic activity after the immobilization. Hence, preventing the enzyme’s denaturation and leaching is a critical factor for the success of the immobilization processes. 

  • 167.
    Kalantar Mehrjerdi, Adib
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Adl-Zarrabi, Bijan
    Cho, Sung-Woo
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Mechanical and thermo-physical properties of high-density polyethylene modified with talc2013In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 129, no 4, p. 2128-2138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine the physical, mechanical, and thermo-physical properties of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) modified with talc. Different weight fractions of talc (up to 35 wt %) were compounded with an HDPE matrix containing 2.5 wt % of carbon black (CB) in a twin-screw compounder. The composites were then processed by injection moulding to obtain specimens for testing. The results indicate that CB causes a significant decrease in the toughness, while talc not only enhances the thermal conductivity and thermo-physical properties of the composites but can also play a role in compensating for the negative effects of CB on impact resistance. The experimental data show that the presence of CB reduces the impact resistance of HDPE by up to 34%, while addition of up to 8 wt % talc can return this value to close to that of pure HDPE. No significant effect on the composite tensile yield and fracture strength was observed for either component at all concentrations. The thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and specific density values of the composites increased almost linearly, but the increase in moisture absorption in the long term showed nonlinear behavior in the concentration range of the experiment.

  • 168.
    Kalantar Mehrjerdi, Adib
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Mechanical and morphological properties of talc filled high density polyethylene2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 169.
    Kapur, Jyoti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Smells: olfactive dimension in designing textile architecture2017Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Designing with non-visual attributes challenges ways of representation. This research explores methods for designing with invisible materiality within the research practice, as well as ways of representation through textiles when designing spaces. Exploring textiles and smells within a space, the research program investigates spatial interactions.

    This research focuses on designing embodied experiences using tangible materials as expressions of smells. Through the spatial installations and performances Sight of smell, Touch of smell, and Smell, space, and body movement, haptics were explored as one of the methods of interaction with smells through textiles.

    Through the sense of touch, this research also investigates ways of revealing, activating, and disseminating smells within a space. Smells were purposely added through the methods of dyeing, coating, and printing to the textile materials that did not inherently embody any smells, As a result, tactile surfaces create non-visual expressions of smell. Further ideas of research in this area would explore another perspective of designing with smells in spaces. As an example, by designing textiles being smell absorbers, dividers, and re ectors, could compliment the spatial concepts and deals with the already existing smells in a living environment.

    In this licentiate thesis thinking through the olfactive dimension to design textiles is not only novel for the textile design eld; but also, its proposal for application in the spatial design is quite unique, and o ers a new dimension for spatial design. 

  • 170.
    Karnoub, Amer
    et al.
    Aleppo University, Syria.
    Kadi, Nawar
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Azari, Zitouni
    ENIM, France.
    Using the expert system to analyze loom performance2017In: Journal of the Textile Institute, ISSN 0040-5000, E-ISSN 1754-2340, Vol. 108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 171.
    Khokar, Nandan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Development of Innovative 2D and 3D Fabric-forming Processes for Manufacturing Reinforcements for Composite Materials2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovative 2D and 3D fabric-forming methods have been developed in the last 20 years to practically overcome the inherent technical and economic limitations of traditional textile processes that are employed for manufacturing reinforcements, or pre-forms, for composites application. These developments include Tape-Weaving, Oblique Fabric-forming Technique, 3D-Weaving and Uniaxial Noobing. The working principles of these processes and the correspondingly producible 2D and 3D fabric architectures are fundamentally different from the existing ones. They open up new academic and industrial opportunities. This Paper presents these specifically developed processes and their products.

  • 172.
    Khokar, Nandan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Making The Uniaxial Noobing Process Industrially Relevant2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential of a non-woven 3D fabric-forming process, called uniaxial noobing, remains unexploited because it is mistaken for the 3D-weaving process as it imitates the weaving process in some ways. Its principle is technically different from that of weaving because the involved sets of yarns are not interlaced. The composite materials industry is beginning to be attracted to the 3D fabrics produced by the uniaxial noobing process because it fulfils three important conditions to advantageously enlarge the market. The foremost being it incorporates linear or crimp-less fibres/yarns oriented in the length, width and thickness directions of the 3D fabric to improve composite materials’ delamination resistance and mechanical performance. Next, it makes available individual 3D fabrics in required customised dimensions and object-like shapes for ease of handling and direct use, besides lowering production time and costs. Finally, such customised 3D fabrics are able to be developed quickly for prototyping and then manufactured in relatively very-small batch production cycles. This paper presents the necessary technical and practical aspects of this unique process to make it industrially relevant.

  • 173.
    Khokar, Nandan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Research and Entrepreneurship Opportunities in 3D Fabric Healthcare Products2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The barriers for entering the medical textiles market are rather strong as it is highly technically specialised and dominated by long established players. An approach for entering this market could be to consider the newly evolving 3D-weaving and uniaxial noobing processes as they produce entirely new 3D fabric structures compared with traditional 2D structures. They thus present completely fresh research and business opportunities for developing and marketing innovative 3D fabric based healthcare products.

  • 174.
    Kooroshnia, Marjan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    On textile printing with thermochromic inks2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis describes an exploration of the principles of applying leuco dye-based inks to textile design practice. The main motivation has been to explore the design properties and potentials of leuco dye-based thermochromic inks when printed on textiles in order to obtain an understanding and facilitate the design of dynamic surface patterns. The significance of this is related to the development of a methodology to assist designers in seeing possibilities, making informed decisions, and predicting colour transitions at different temperatures when designing a dynamic surface pattern.

    The research was conducted by undertaking a series of design experiments using leuco dye-based thermochromic inks, which resulted in various working methods and two pedagogical tools. This process offered the insight and depth of understanding required to design dynamic surface patterns, in that it highlighted the different colour-changing properties of leuco dye-based thermochromic inks, which have the potential to create a more complex and dynamic range of patterns on textiles than those that exist today. There is much to explore beyond the current design possibilities offered by thermochromic inks, and it is hoped that designers and researchers can apply the knowledge that has been obtained during the work of this thesis to their practical explorations so as to move towards new ways of thinking and designing, and further innovation in textile design.

  • 175. Krishnaprasad, R
    et al.
    Veena, N.R.
    Maria, H.J.
    Rajan, R
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Joseph, K
    Mechanical and thermal properties of bamboo microfibril reinforced polyhydroxybutyrate biocomposites2009In: Journal of environmental polymer degradation, ISSN 1064-7546, E-ISSN 1572-8900, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 109-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present investigation, microfibrils were extracted from raw bamboo and characterized using scanning electron microscope. Composites based on polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and bamboo microfibril were prepared with various microfibril loading. The mechanical and thermal properties of the resulting composites were measured. Tensile strength and impact strength of the composites were found to be increasing with increase in the loading of bamboo microfibrils, reached an optimum and thereafter decreased with further increase in microfibril loading. Percentage crystallinity was found to be increasing with increase in fibril loading. Thermal stability of the composite was higher than that of pure PHB. The composite could be developed further for various structural applications.

  • 176.
    Kristoffersen, Beatrice
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Woven neck labels made from Tencel2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today the majority of textile labels are made from 100% polyester. Nilörn, a global label company have already incorporated more sustainable materials into their product range offering bluesign® certified- and recycled polyester. In 2018 a label was developed made from Tencel weft and polyester warp. Tencel, which is a fiber made from wood pulp cellulose offers properties similar to both natural and man-made fibers. The aim for the work was to continue developing this product to make it even more sustainable. This work examines the possibilities to develop a producible, woven neck label with a Tencel weft and a warp made from natural materials. The new label would be compared to the other woven neck labels in the company's product range to see how the properties differ from each other. The development process started with sourcing factories with cotton loom machines. Once a factory was found the work could continue. By being part of the whole process from designing artwork to the actual production, a new label made from a cotton warp and Tencel weft was produced. Three other labels were made at the same time with the same design but in different materials. The finished labels were tested and compared to each other. Two different washing tests were done, and the colourfastness was examined after washing and ironing. A user test was also done to evaluate the feel of each of the labels. The results from the project show that a label made from natural materials is possible to produce in current production facilities, with certain limitations. Production time is slower, and materials are more expensive for this label. A washing procedure during production would be required for the label to pass the dimensional change test after washing, as the label has its initial shrinkage after the first wash. Another alternative would be to use another cotton warp which has been treated to prevent shrinkage, which would require to invest in a new warp. Users like the feel and look of the new label and prefer it to the normal polyester label due to its softness.

  • 177. Kumar, Hemanathan
    et al.
    Mahimaisenan, Pirabasenan
    Cho, Sung-Woo
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Adekunle, Kayode
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Casein films and its composites with regenerated cellulose fibre for packaging applications2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel approach in the production of protein based films and composites were performed, using the bovine milk protein casein and regenerated cellulose fibres (lyocell). The films were prepared by first dissolving the casein protein in an aqueous alkaline solution in the presence of glycerol as a plasticizer. Further the composite films were prepared by the addition of fibres on aqueous alkaline solution with casein. The casein films and composites were thereafter prepared by casting the solution mixture on Teflon coated glass plate and drying for 48 hr. The effects of glycerol content and lyocell fibre reinforcements on the mechanical, thermal and physiological properties of the casein films were characterized. The results revealed that the increase in the addition of glycerol content decreases the tensile strength, young’s modulus, thermal stability of the film and increases the elongation percentage. Tensile property and thermal stability of the films was improved by the increase in the addition of the fibre content with a gradual decrease in the elongation percentage. The casein film made of 20% glycerol and 20% fibre content showed the maximum tensile strength of 23.5 MPa, E-modulus of 1.5 GPa and glass transition temperature (Tg) of 67.1±1.5 ºC. The sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis indicated that there was no significant change in the molecular weight of the protein during sample preparation. The inter molecular networks have taken place in the casein films and composites, when analyzed under Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and proper bonding between fibres and protein was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  • 178.
    Kumar Ramamoorthy, Sunil
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kuzhanthaivelu, Gauthaman
    Bohlén, Martin
    Research Institutes of Sweden.
    Åkesson, Dan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Waste Management Option for Bioplastics Alongside Conventional Plastics2019In: IRC 2019 International Research Conference Proceedings, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bioplastics can be defined as polymers derived partly or completely from biomass. Bioplastics can be biodegradable such as polylactic acid (PLA) and polyhydroxyalkonoates (PHA); or non-biodegradable (biobased polyethylene (bio-PE), polypropylene (bio-PP), polyethylene terephthalate (bio-PET)). The usage of such bioplastics is expected to increase in the future due to new found interest in sustainable materials. At the same time, these plastics become a new type of waste in the recycling stream. Most countries do not have separate bioplastics collection for it to be recycled or composted. After a brief introduction of bioplastics such as PLA in UK, these plastics are once again replaced by conventional plastics by many establishments due to lack of commercial composting. Recycling companies fear the contamination of conventional plastic in the recycling stream and they said they would have to invest in expensive new equipment to separate bioplastics and recycle it separately. Bioplastics are seen as a threat to the recycling industry as bioplastics may degrade during the mechanical recycling process and the properties of the recycled plastics are seriously impacted. This project studies what happens when bioplastics contaminate conventional plastics.

    Three commonly used conventional plastics were selected for this study: polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). In order to simulate contamination, two biopolymers, either polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) or thermoplastic starch (TPS) were blended with the conventional polymers. The amount of bioplastics in conventional plastics was either 1% or 5%. The blended plastics were processed again to see the effect of degradation. Mechanical, thermal and morphological properties of these plastics were characterized.

     

    The results from contamination showed that the tensile strength and the modulus of PE was almost unaffected whereas the elongation is clearly reduced indicating the increase in brittleness of the plastic. Generally, it can be said that PP is slightly more sensitive to the contamination than PE. This can be explained by the fact that the melting point of PP is higher than for PE and as a consequence, the biopolymer will degrade more quickly. However, the reduction of the tensile properties for PP is relatively modest. It is also important to notice that when plastics are recovered, there will always be a contamination that will reduce the material properties. The reduction of the tensile properties is not necessary larger than if a non-biodegradable polymer would have contaminated PE or PP. The Charpy impact strength is generally a more sensitive test method towards contamination. Again, PE is relatively unaffected by the contamination but for PP there is a relatively large reduction of the impact properties already at 1% contamination.

    PET is polyester and it is by its very nature more sensitive to degradation than PE and PP. PET also have a much higher melting point than PE and PP and as a consequence the biopolymer will quickly degrade at the processing temperature of PET. As for the tensile strength, PET can tolerate 1% contamination without any reduction of the tensile strength. However, when the impact strength is examined, it is clear that already at 1% contamination, there is a strong reduction of the properties. It can also be seen that presence of TPS is more detrimental to PET than PHA is. This can be explained by the fact that TPS contain reactive hydroxyl groups that can react with the ester bond of PET. This will in other words lead to degradation of PET.

    The thermal properties show the change in the crystallinity. As a general conclusion, it can be said that the plastics become less crystalline when contaminated. The blends were also characterized by SEM. Biphasic morphology can be seen as the two polymers are not truly blendable which also contributes to reduced mechanical properties. Recycling of the contaminated polymer shows an increase in crystallinity. This means that when the polymers are processed, polymer degradation occur causing the polymer chains to gradually become shorter which will enhance the crystallization process.

    The study shows that PE is relatively robust againt contamination, while polypropylene (PP) is somewhat more sensitive and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) can be quite sensitive towards contamination.

  • 179.
    Kumar Ramamoorthy, Sunil
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Periyasamy, Aravin Prince
    Technical University Liberec, Liberec, Czech Republic.
    Lavate, Saatish Siddappa
    DKTE’s Textile Engineering Institute, Ichalkaranji, India.
    Eco-friendly Denim Processing2018In: Handbook of Ecomaterials / [ed] Leticia Myriam Torres Martínez, Springer Publishing Company, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The denim sector is booming worldwide, because of the spread of denim culture. All over the world it has brought with it a trend of fast-changing fashion. Denim washing has emerged as one of the important production routes toward meeting the fast-changing demands of the fashion market. There are huge ecological concerns, as this sector is enormous. Approximately 1500 gallons of water is needed to produce 1.5 pounds of cotton to make one pair of jeans. If this continues, soon it will pose a serious problem to drinking water supplies. It is therefore important to study the environmental impact of denim and find alternative processes. This chapter starts by describing the different types of denim washing techniques. In addition, it discusses the environmental impact of denim dry and wet washing techniques, and the importance of environmentally friendly washing techniques. It also describes the latest denim finishing technologies, comparing their impacts on the environment with those of the classic techniques. Further, the environmental aspects of auxiliaries and washing chemicals are reviewed, followed by a discussion of garment washing and finishing processes.

  • 180.
    Kumar Ramamoorthy, Sunil
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Periyasamy, Aravin Prince
    Technical University of Liberec, Liberec, Czech Republic.
    Rwawiire, Samson
    Busitema University, Tororo, Uganda.
    Zhao, Yan
    Soochow University, Suzhou, People’s Republic of China.
    Sustainable Wastewater Treatment Methods for Textile Industry2018In: Sustainable Innovations in Apparel Production / [ed] Subramanian Senthilkannan Muthu, Singapore: Springer Publishing Company, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All over the world, environmental considerations are now becoming vital factors during the selection of consumer goods which include textiles. According to the World Bank, 20% of water pollution globally is caused by textile processing, which means that these industries produce vast amounts of wastewater. Generally, these effluents contain high levels of suspended solids (SS), phosphates, dyes, salts, organo-pesticides, non-biodegradable organics, and heavy metals. Increase in water scarcity and environmental regulations has led to textile industries to seek for sustainable wastewater treatment methods which help to reduce their water footprint as well as reduce their operational costs. Therefore, sustainable wastewater treatment could be the best choice for the textile industries with respect to the current issues. So, it is important to discuss and champion awareness mechanisms which help to reduce the current issues with respect to the textile wastewater. Therefore, this chapter intends to discuss the various sustainable wastewater treatments, namely granular activated carbon (GAC), electrocoagulation (EC), ultrasonic treatment, an advanced oxidation process (AOP), ozonation, membrane biological reactor (MBR), and sequencing batch reactor (SBR).

  • 181.
    Kumar Ramamoorthy, Sunil
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Alagar, Ragunathan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Akhtar, Naeem
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    End of life textiles as reinforcements in biocomposites2017In: Journal of polymers and the environment, ISSN 1566-2543, E-ISSN 1572-8919, p. -12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A number of attempts have been made to recycle cotton/polyester blend woven fabrics after use; however, most of these fabrics are disposed of in landfills. Major part of these blend fabrics are not recycled due to complexity of the fibre arrangement and cannot be separated economically. This study shows that these discarded woven fabrics could be directly used as reinforcements in composites without fibre separation. Uniform alignment in the woven fabric provided consistent properties to the composites. The fabrics were reinforced by soybean-based-bioresins to produce biocomposites. The composites were analysed for mechanical, thermal, viscoelastic and morphological properties. Porosity and wettability of the composites were also evaluated. Results demonstrate that the tensile strength and modulus of over 100 and 10 MPa, respectively, can be obtained without any fibre treatment. Furthermore, impact strength over 70 kJ/m2 was obtained without any chemical treatment on fibres. The porosity of the composites produced was less than 9 vol%. Additionally, the fabrics were treated with alkali in order to improve the fibre–matrix interface and the composite properties were studied. From the economical perspective, these composites can be produced at a low cost as the major component is available for free or low cost.

  • 182.
    Kumar Ramamoorthy, Sunil
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Rajan, Rathish
    Tampere University of Technology.
    Rainosalo, Egidija
    Centria University of Applied Sciences.
    Thomas, Selvin
    Yanbu Industrial College and Advanced Materials Laboratory.
    Zavasnik, Janez
    Jožef Stefan Institute.
    Vuorinen, Jyrki
    Tampere University of Technology.
    Mechanical, thermal, and burning properties of viscose fabric composites: Influence of epoxy resin modification2018In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 135, no 36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of epoxy resin modification by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) on various properties of warp knitted viscose fabric is reported in this study. Dynamic mechanical, impact resistance, flexural, thermal properties, and burning behavior of the epoxy/viscose fabric composites are studied with respect to varying content of silane coupling agent. The results obtained forAPTES-modified epoxy resin based composites reinforced with unmodified viscose fabric composites are compared to unmodified epoxy resin based composites reinforced with APTES-modified viscose fabric. The dynamic mechanical behavior of the APTES-modified resin based composites indicates improved interfacial adhesion. The composites prepared from modified epoxy resin exhibited a twofold increase in impact resistance. The improved adhesion between the fiber and modified resin was also visible from the scanning electron microscope analysis of the impact fracture surface. There was less influence of resin modification on the flexural properties of the composites. The 5% APTES modification induced early degradation of composites compared to all other compo-sites. The burning rate of all the composites under study is rated to be satisfactory for use in automotive interior applications.

  • 183.
    Kumar Ramamoorthy, Sunil
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Åkesson, Dan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Rajan, Rathish
    Tampere University.
    Periyasamy, Aravin Prince
    Technical University of Liberec.
    Mechanical performance of biofibers and their corresponding composites2019In: Mechanical and Physical Testing of Biocomposites, Fibre-Reinforced Composites and Hybrid Composites / [ed] Mohammad Jawaid, Mohamed Thariq, Naheed Saba, Woodhead Publishing Limited, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on mechanical performance of biofibers such as flax, hemp, and sisal and their effect on mechanical performance when they are reinforced in thermoset and thermoplastic polymers. The aim of this chapter is to present an overview of the mechanical characterization of the biofibers and their corresponding composites. The mechanical characterization includes tensile, flexural, impact, compressive, shear, toughness, hardness, brittleness, ductility, creep, fatigue, and dynamic mechanical analyses. Detailed studies of each test have been widely reported and an overview is important to relate the studies. Studies pertaining to the topics are cited. The most common materials used in biocomposites are biofibers (also called natural fibers) and petroleum-based polymers such polypropylene. The use of renewable materials in biocomposites has increased in the past couple of decades owing to extensive research on cellulosic fibers and biopolymers based on starch or vegetable oil. Today, research is focused on reinforcing natural fibers in petroleum-based polymers. However, the emphasis is shifting toward the amount of renewable materials in biocomposites, which has led to the use of biopolymers instead of petroleum-based polymers in composites. The mechanical properties of some renewable resource-based composites are comparable to commercially available nonrenewable composites.

    Several plant biofibers have been reinforced in thermoplastics or thermosets to manufacture biocomposites because of their specific properties. The Young's modulus of commonly used biofibers such as hemp and flax could be over 50 GPa and therefore they could be good alternatives to glass fibers in several applications. The good mechanical properties of these biofibers influence the composites' mechanical performance when reinforced in polymers. It is important to understand the mechanical performance of these biofibers and biocomposites in a working environment. A detailed discussion about the mechanical performance of commonly used biofibers and composites is provided in this chapter.

  • 184.
    Kumar, Vijay
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Haspel, Henrik
    MTA-SZTE “Lendület” Porous Nanocomposites Research Group, Rerrich Bela ter 1., Szeged, Hungary; Department of Applied and Environmental Chemistry, University of Szeged, Rerrich Bela ter 1., Szeged, Hungary.
    Nagy, Krisztina
    MTA-SZTE “Lendület” Porous Nanocomposites Research Group, Rerrich Bela ter 1., Szeged, Hungary; Department of Applied and Environmental Chemistry, University of Szeged, Rerrich Bela ter 1., Szeged, Hungary.
    Rawal, Amit
    Department of Textile Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi, India.
    Kukovecz, Akos
    MTA-SZTE “Lendület” Porous Nanocomposites Research Group, Rerrich Bela ter 1., Szeged, Hungary; Department of Applied and Environmental Chemistry, University of Szeged, Rerrich Bela ter 1., Szeged, Hungary.
    Leveraging compressive stresses to attenuate the electrical resistivity of buckypaper2016In: Carbon, ISSN 0008-6223, E-ISSN 1873-3891, Vol. 110, p. 62-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Buckypaper (BP) is a planar film that consists of random network of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) held together by weak van der Waals interactions at tube-tube junctions. Although individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess remarkable electrical properties, the electrical resistance of pristine BP is usually too high for practical applications. However, the electrical resistivity of BP can be attenuated by applying modest compressive stresses. Herein, we report an analytical model for predicting the electrical resistivity of BP under defined level of compressive strain. The predictive piezoresistive model of BP was developed by formulating a direct relationship with the structural parameters, physical and electrical properties of CNTs. The basis of the piezoresistive model relied upon the geometrical probability approach in combination with classical Hertzian contact mechanics and constriction resistance techniques. A comparison has been made between the theoretical and experimental results of electrical resistivity of BPs with varying densities. A reasonably good quantitative agreement was obtained between the theory and experiments. The main source of error was caused by the uncertainty in the measurement of the initial BP thickness. Through theoretical modeling, the initial volume fraction of CNTs was found to be one of the key parameters that modulated the piezoresistive behavior of BP.

  • 185.
    Kumar, Vijay
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Soochow University; GEMTEX; Université Lille.
    Koehl, Ludovic
    GEMTEX; Université Lille.
    Zeng, Xianyi Zeng
    GEMTEX; Université Lille.
    Ekwall, Daniel
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Hanken School of Economics.
    Coded yarn based tag for tracking textile supply chain2017In: Journal of manufacturing systems, ISSN 0278-6125, E-ISSN 1878-6642, Vol. 42, p. 124-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traceability has gained considerable attention to facilitate monitored production, product recall, safety and reverse supply chain activities, in recent years. Traceability in manufacturing and distribution involves the use of tracking tags which are attached to the products; consequently, the products are tracked by recording the identity of attached tracking tags in the supply chain. In this context, this paper introduces a new yarn coding-based tracking tag which is fully integrated into textile for tracking the textile supply chain. The new tracking tag involves the use of special yarns which act as information carrier and basic unit of the tracking tag. An implementation scenario is discussed to use the designed tracking tag to monitor the production and authentication purposes. Real prototypes of the fully integrated coded yarn based textile tags are demonstrated in woven and knitted structures and analysed under the effect of washing treatments to simulate realistic conditions. Further, an image pattern recognition based algorithm has been introduced and analysed to extract the information encoded in the tag using coded yarns.

  • 186.
    Kumar, Vijay
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Rao, P.V. Kameswara
    Department of Textile Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India.
    Rawal, Amit
    Department of Textile Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India.
    Amplification of electrolyte uptake in the absorptive glass mat (AGM)separator for valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) batteries2017In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 341, p. 19-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Absorptive glass mat (AGM) separators are widely used for valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) batteries due to their remarkable fiber and structural characteristics. Discharge performance and recharge effectiveness of VRLA batteries essentially rely on the distribution and saturation levels of the electrolyte within the AGM separator. Herein, we report an analytical model for predicting the wicking characteristics of AGM battery separators under unconfined and confined states. The model of wicking behavior of AGM is based upon Fries and Dreyer's approach that included the effect of gravity component which was neglected in classic Lucas-Washburn's model. In addition, the predictive model of wicking accounted for realistic structural characteristics of AGM via orientation averaging approach. For wicking under confined state, the structural parameters have been updated under defined level of compressive stresses based upon the constitutive equation derived for a planar network of fibers in AGM under transverse loading conditions. A comparison has been made between the theoretical models and experimental results of wicking behavior under unconfined and confined states. Most importantly, the presented work has highlighted the questionable validity of classic Lucas-Washburn model for predicting the wicking characteristics of AGM separator over longer time duration.

  • 187.
    Kumar, Vijay
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Rawal, Amit
    Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India.
    Elastic Moduli of Electrospun Mats: Importance of Fiber Curvature and Specimen Dimensions2017In: Journal of The Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, ISSN 1751-6161, E-ISSN 1878-0180, Vol. 72, p. 6-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Success of tissue engineering relies on the architecture and properties of porous scaffolds. Electrospun nonwoven scaffolds in the form of mats are unique materials due to large surface area to volume ratio, high porosity, versatility in surface functionalities and excellent mechanical properties. Maneuvering the mechanical behavior ofthe electrospun mat is a major challenge both from theoretical and experimental perspectives. Herein, we report a two-dimensional (2D) analytical model of normalized elastic moduli of electrospun mats by formulating a relationship with the governing fiber and structural parameters. The analytical model of normalized mat modulush as also accounted for fiber curvature in the form of sinusoidal curve along with the specimen dimensions considered during the uniaxial tensile test. A comparison has been made between the magnitudes of normalized matmodulus obtained through predictive modeling and the experimental results adapted from the literature. In general, a good agreement has been found between the theoretical and experimental results of normalized moduli ofthe electrospun mats. An interplay of some of the governing parameters has been analyzed through parametric analysis. Through theoretical modeling, the normalized amplitude of fiber crimp via fiber diameter along withthe aspect ratio of specimen dimensions are observed to be the dominant factors responsible for modulating thenormalized mat modulus.

  • 188.
    Landin, Hanna
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    A Wall Hanging as an Organic Interface2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We are developing a dynamic textile wall hanging as an interface to the atmosphere of a room. Atmospheres are elusive. An atmosphere is the result of an ongoing negotiation between the activities in the room and the expression of the material objects, the lighting, the temperature, and the boundaries of the room [4, 8]. The wall hanging will play an active part in that ongoing negotiation. The activities in the room will influence how the textile wall hanging changes structure, form, color, as well as the pace with which it happens, and the activities in the room may in turn be influenced by the expression of the wall hanging.

  • 189.
    Larsson, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Vellesalu, Ann
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Zethraeus, Adrian
    Carlsson, Jan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Feasibility of servitization: Transforming fashion value chains to circularity through service innovation2019Report (Other academic)
  • 190. Lasich, Matthew
    et al.
    Mohammadi, Amir H.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Vrabec, Jadran
    Ramjugernath, Deresh
    On the application of binary correction factors in lattice distortion calculations for methane clathrate hydrate2014In: Philosophical Magazine, ISSN 1460-6992, Vol. 94, no 9, p. 974-990Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lattice distortion theory of Zele and co-workers is an attractive method for amending calculated phase equilibria of clathrate hydrates, since only two molecular computations are required. The perturbation energy between the empty and loaded clathrate hydrate lattice is the quantity of interest. The effect of binary correction factors applied to the Lorentz and Berthelot com- bining rules for the intermolecular interaction between gas and water particles is investigated. There are clear trends for the perturbation energy and lattice constant in terms of the binary correction factors, although there is signi fi cant sensitivity to the force fi eld parameterization of the gas species.

  • 191. Lasich, Matthew
    et al.
    Mohammadi, Amir H.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Vrabec, Jadran
    Ramjugernath, Deresh
    Phase equilibria of methane clathrate hydrate from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations2014In: Fluid Phase Equilibria, ISSN 0378-3812, E-ISSN 1879-0224, Vol. 369, p. 47-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The determination of conditions at which clathrate hydrates are thermodynamically stable is important in applications such as offshore gas exploitation and energy storage. Adsorbed gas molecules occupy different cavity types within the hydrate lattice and this plays a significant role in the thermodynamic stability of clathrate hydrates. The occupancy of cavities in the hydrate lattice can be studied by undertaking Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations. Such simulations were performed in this study for methane clathrate hydrate with several force fields. Langmuir-type adsorption isotherms were fitted to the results of the simulations. The use of a single type of adsorption site was validated for methane clathrate hydrate. The adsorption isotherms which were fitted to the results of the simulations were used to compute the clathrate hydrate phase equilibria, which compared favourably with results from the literature.

  • 192. Lee, Tae-Hyung
    et al.
    Jeon, Sera
    Kim, Hyun-Joong
    Cho, Sung-Woo
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Evaluation of mechanical properties and interfacial adhesion of PLA/Lyocell composite with silane coupling agent2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 193.
    Leon, Lorena Guldris
    et al.
    Dept. of Industrial and Materials Science, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Bengtsson, Magnus
    Dept. of Industrial and Materials Science, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Evertsson, Magnus
    Dept. of Industrial and Materials Science, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Analysis of the concentration in rare metal ores during compression crushing2018In: Minerals Engineering, ISSN 0892-6875, E-ISSN 1872-9444, Vol. 120, p. 7-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the increasing global demand for rare metals, there is a need for the development of fundamental predictive models to improve extraction processes. Comminution models commonly predict particle size reduction based on the compressive breakage behaviour; however, few of them include mineral concentration or mineral liberation at a coarse scale. This paper focuses on developing a model to predict the mineral concentration of rare metals as a function of the particle size distribution after a cycle of the compression crushing process. In this study, compressive breakage and geochemical analysis experiments were conducted on four different rare metal ores of tantalum and tungsten. The work is divided into two stages: the methodology of modelling particle size and modelling concentration by selecting a bimodal Weibull distribution for calibration. A novel model for simulating the concentration of rare metals as a function of the compression ratio is presented.

  • 194.
    Li, Cai
    et al.
    Cognitiona and Interaction Lab, School of Informatics, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Bredies, Katharina
    Design Research Lab Berlin.
    Lund, Anja
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Nierstrasz, Vincent
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Hemeren, Paul
    Cognition and Interaction Lab, School of Informatics, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Högberg, Dan
    School of Engineering Science, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    kNN based Numerical Hand Posture Recognition using a Smart Textile Glove2015In: Ambient 2015: The Fifth International Conference on Ambient Computing, Applications, Services and Technologies / [ed] Maarten Weyn, 2015, p. 36-41Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 195.
    Lindblad, Angelica
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Chu, Anny
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Manifestation och implementering av CSR: En studie om hur ett mindre företag kan använda CSR som instrumentför att stärka varumärket2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syfte: Syftet är att undersöka och analysera hur arbete med CSR (Corporate SocialResponsibility) och hållbarhet kan manifesteras och implementeras i ett mindre företag för attstärka företagets varumärke.

    Metod: Uppsatsen grundas i en kvalitativ metod för att eftersträva en holistisk- ochövergripande bild. Metoden är explorativ och utforskande och ger en djupare insikt ochförståelse för företagets tillvägagångssätt. Som utgångspunkt för sekundära källor harelektroniska och tryckta källor samt akademiska artiklar använts.

    Slutsats: Efter avslutade studier kan konstateras att genom företagets ståndpunkt i etik, moraloch värderingar i kombination med de praktiska handlingar de utför, manifesteras ochimplementeras CSR- och hållbarhetsarbete i verksamheten. Kundens medvetande ger styrkanoch det värdefulla i varumärket vilket leder till att dessa aktiviteter på ett omsorgsfullt ochgenuint sätt bör planeras och genomföras för att behålla och stärka företagetsvarumärkesimage.

  • 196.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    On the logic of pattern cutting: foundational cuts and approximations of the body2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fashion designers are presented with a range of principles for pattern cutting. However, the main body of these systems are predominately based on a quantified approximation of the body. As a consequence, the connection of existing models for pattern construction to the dynamic expression of the body and its biomechanical functions is problematic. This work explores and proposes an alternative model for pattern cutting that, unlike the existing models, takes as its point of origin the actual, variable body. Instead of a static matrix of a non-moving body, the proposed model for cutting garments is based on a qualitative approximation of the body, visualised through balance lines and key biomechanical points. The model is developed through concrete experiments by cutting and draping fabrics on live models. Hence, the research conducted here is basic research, aiming to identify fundamental principles in order to create alternative expression and functions.

  • 197.
    Lindström, Katarina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pretreatment of textile for a more gentle shredding process2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 198.
    Lindström, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kadi, Nawar
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Persson, Anders
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Utility of conditioner for reduced interfibre friction as predictor of gentler shredding2018In: Aachen-Dresden-Denkendorf International Textile Conference, Aachen, November 29-30 2018, 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 199. Lindström, Katarina
    et al.
    Ramamoorthy, Sunil Kumar
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Persson, Anders
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Reuse of Waste Textiles For Composite Production2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large amounts of cotton/PET textiles are wasted every year due to economically unfeasible separation of cotton and PET from waste textiles. These waste textiles were reused to form composites for technical applications and their properties were studied in this project. The waste textile, bed linen, used in this project comes from local hospital. The aim of this study is to produce composites from cotton/PET waste textiles and characterize by mechanical and thermal analysis. The effect of orientation of the fibers was studied and the processing parameters such as temperature, pressure and time of compression were optimized.

  • 200.
    Lindström, Katarina
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Sjöblom, Therése
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Persson, Anders
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kadi, Nawar
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Decreasing Inter-Fiber Friction With Lubricants For Efficient Mechanical Recycling Of Textiles2019In: Autex 19th World Textile Conference: Textiles at the Crossroads, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To decrease the environmental burden of the textile industry and at the same time reduce textile waste, the fibers of discarded textiles can be re-used into new yarns and fabrics. The shortening of fibers during mechanical shredding direct the use of the recovered fibers to low value products. With the use of a lubricant pre-treatment on cotton and polyester fabrics, we decreased the friction during shredding. The reduction in friction was shown with a developed inter-fiber friction test. Further, the pre-treatment was shown to give longer recovered fibers and eliminate melted areas in polyester material.

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