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  • 101. Eson Bodin, Ulla
    BERGAKUNGEN: rekonstruktion av John Bauers balett2008Other (Other academic)
  • 102. Eson Bodin, Ulla
    body2007Other (Other academic)
  • 103. Eson Bodin, Ulla
    Couleurs sur corps2008Other (Other academic)
  • 104. Eson Bodin, Ulla
    Hommage á Sonia Delaunay2008Other (Other academic)
  • 105. Eson Bodin, Ulla
    Stickspår2007Other (Other academic)
  • 106. Eson Bodin, Ulla
    Textile & Space2008Other (Other academic)
  • 107.
    Eson Bodin, Ulla
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Sandvik, Folke
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Cullus: from idea to patent2008In: The Nordic Textile Journal 2008, Special Edition Smart Textiles, p. 30-51Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 108.
    Foss Lindblad, Rita
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    The Imagined Real of Sweden: Utopias with/out hopes2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 109.
    Frenander, Anders
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Debattens vågor: Om politisk-ideologiska frågor i efterkrigstidens svenska kulturdebatt1999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 110.
    Frenander, Anders
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Vad vill Kulturutredningen? Anföranden vid seminarium arrangerat av Centrum för kulturpolitisk forskning den 11 mars 20092009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 111.
    Frenander, Anders
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Vad vill kulturutredningen: generella iakttagelser, målformuleringar och politisk tendens2009In: Vad vill Kulturutredningen? Anföranden vid seminarium arrangerat av Centrum för kulturpolitisk forskning den 11 mars 2009, p. 4-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 112. Fridlund, Mats
    et al.
    Nelhans, Gustaf
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Engineering the War on Terrorism: The 9/11-effect on engineering research, 1989-20132014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Some research has argued that recent history can be partly characterized by an ongoing switch within technology from the innovations of a military-industrial-academic complex centered on the Cold War threat of nuclear annihilation to a homeland security-industrial-academic complex shaped by perceived needs to develop new technologies to combat a new existential threat from terrorist attacks (Mike Davis 2001). In line with this the proposed study is a beginning towards a history of technology of the 21st century ‘War on Terrorism’ through a study of how terrorism has shaped technology in the form of engineering research. In this the paper builds upon and extends research within history of technology that since the 1990s has devoted an increasing interest to the effect of the Cold War on engineering research and technological development. Some stellar examples are Donald MacKenzie’s Inventing Accuracy (1990), Stuart Leslie’s The Cold War and American Science (1993), Gabrielle Hecht’s The Radiance of France (1998) and Janet Abbate’s Inventing the Internet (1999). As a start towards such a contemporary history of technology of terrorism we will provide quantitative estimates and qualitative examples of how research in the engineering sciences during 1989-2013 have shifted towards increasingly addressing issues related to terrorism. In this we continue and extend previous research (Fridlund & Nelhans 2011; Moreno 2012) that demonstrated the existence of a ‘9/11-effect’ on research through more in-depth detailed and qualitative historical research going beyond our previous primarily quantitative study. Our study use two distinct sets of material. The first pertains to engineering research in the form of a bibliometric study of published scientific articles identified in Thomson Reuters Science Citation Index and the Conference Proceedings Citation Index between the years 1989 and 2013 of about almost 2.000 items within the research area of ‘Engineering’ having the term *terroris* within its title, abstract or author generated keywords. These publications will be bibliometrically mapped according to topical properties, (bibliographic coupling at the journal level) where papers citing similar sources will be clustered more closely together in the visualization, thus suggesting papers having more in common than other papers citing different literatures, that are not found close to the cluster. The resulting visualizations will be investigated both quantitatively and qualitatively, where key publications identified in a specific cluster in the visualization will be selected for close readings to elucidate the qualitative historical effects of the 9/11-effect on engineering research.

  • 113.
    Goldsmith, David
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The Worn, The Torn, The Wearable: textile recycling in Union Square2012In: Nordic Textile Journal, ISSN 1404-2487, Vol. 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This narrative focuses on one aspect of the growing phenomenon of textile recycling: the act of “getting rid of” one’s no longer wanted clothing. The story here derives from many visits to Wearable Collections, a business that collects apparel (as well as towels, sheets, shoes, and other textiles) with an “inlet” at the popular Union Square Greenmarket in Manhattan. Over several months, I watched hundreds of individuals drop off thousands of kilos of materials for recycling and talked with many of them about what they were doing and why they were doing it. This investigation was undertaken for two purposes. On one hand, it was a device for practicing a variety of ethnographic field methods to support my current Ph.D. action research with enterprises aiming to build more sustainable fashion systems. On the other hand, it was a means to gain knowledge of what is happening with textile recycling in New York City. The pages that follow have been excerpted from a longer and broader account. The term textile recycling is used here broadly. It encompasses upcycling (for example, making a dress from old dresses, or producing yarn from trimmings from garment manufacturing); downcycling (such as shredding worn out textiles for insulation); practices such as selling, swapping, or giving away; and any other ways of reusing or repurposing that saves — or at least delays — textiles from being buried in landfills or otherwise wasted.

  • 114. Graves Petersen, M
    et al.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Jacob, R
    Introduction to Double Special Issue on The Aesthetics of Interaction2008In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 15, no 3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 115.
    Gunn, Maja
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Enqvist, Annika
    Exclude Me In: Queer, Bakhtin and the Carnivalesque2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 116.
    Guo, Li
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Berglin, Lena
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Mattila, Heikki
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Improvement of Electro-Mechanical Properties of Strain Sensors made of elastic-conductive hybrid yarns2012In: Textile research journal, ISSN 0040-5175, E-ISSN 1746-7748, Vol. 82, no 19, p. 1937-1947Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fabric-based strain sensors have been developed using different technologies, among which flat knitting is one of the most effective and economical methods. However, knitted strain sensors are not often used in practical applications because the sensors usually exhibit large elastic hysteresis when they are deformed and subjected to stress during application. One possible approach to overcome these shortcomings is to introduce elastic properties at the yarn level by combining the conductive materials with elastic materials. In this paper, we demostrate a hybrid yarn made of a conductive yarn that winds around an elastic core yarn in a direct twisting device. The electro-mechanical properties of strain sensors knitted from the hybrid yarns were tested in order to characterize the sensors. This study consisted of two stages: the yarn preparation and the sensor characterization. In the first stage, two kinds of elastic core components (polyamide/Lycra and polyamide) and two kinds of conductive winding yarns (Bekinox BK50/1 and Bekinox BK50/2) were selected for twisting. The twisting was done with a constant twisting speed and four different numbers of twists. Mechanical properties, that is, the tenacity, force at break and elongation at break, were tested in order to determine the optimal parameters for producing the hybrid yarns. The results indicated that among the tested yarns those with a polyamide core and Bekinox BK50/1 winding yarns at 450 twist/meter and with a polyamide/Lycra core and Bekinox BK 50/2 winding yarns at 600 twist/meter had the best properties. These were thus selected as the materials for producing knitted strain sensors. In the second stage, electro-mechanical properties of the knitted strain sensors were determined under tensile stress and multi-cyclic tensile stress. The results show that the hybrid yarns can effectively enhance the

  • 117.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Design Process: Design Rationale: The Affective Diary, Critique on Design Case in: Gulz, A. et. al.2008In: Proceedings of the 5th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, Lund, Sweden, 20-22 October, 2008, ACM Conference Proceedings Series, ACM Press 2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 118.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    On the foundations of interaction design aesthetics: Revisiting the notions of form and expression2011In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 73-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Form and expression are basic notions in design aesthetics and design aesthetics education. This is something firmly rooted in architecture, product design, industrial design, fashion design and so forth, but how should we understand these notions in interaction design? There is a need here to fill a gap in the foundations of interaction design. This paper revisits “form” and “expression” to discuss the interpretation of these concepts in the context of interaction design aesthetics. The paper provides a general foundational discussion and considers the implications of relating interaction design to design aesthetics at a fundamental level, rather than to notions from behavioral and social science as is usual in the area of Human Computer Interaction.

  • 119.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Sex modedesigners2008Other (Other academic)
  • 120.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Smart Textiles: Strategic Issues and the Role of Experimental Design2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 121.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    textile interaction design2008In: The Nordic Textile Journal 2008, Special Edition Smart Textiles, p. 104-115Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 122.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The all important difference… Concepts of creativity in fashion design2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Central to models and methodology in industrial design is the idea that we handle a problem in the design process; we solve a problem given in the brief. This does not make sense in fashion design. What is then the basic creative turn in fashion design all about? We suggest replacing “solving a problem” by “introducing a difference” as a central notion for explaining the creative turn in fashion design.We sketch a more precise model of this as a background for a general discussion about how we frame and explain creativity through methods and techniques of systematic artistic work.

  • 123.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The all-important difference… concepts of creativity in the fashion design process2009In: Nordic Textile Journal, ISSN 1404-2487Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 124.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The design research text and the poetics of foundational definitions2010In: ArtMonitor, ISSN 1653-9958, no No 8, p. 109-118Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 125.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    de Freitas, Nancy
    Editorial: Where Art, Technology and Design Meet2012In: Studies in Material Thinking, ISSN 1177-6234, Vol. Vol 7, p. 03-06Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    With a foundation in artistic practice, the Ambience´11 conference was organised as a meeting place where researchers from digital architecture, smart textiles, new media art and interaction design communities could come together to discuss and share ideas on the new expressional crossroads of art and technology and to take new ideas back to their own communities. As post modernism slowly fades away, a new interest in the expressional possibilities of constructions, techniques and materials, as well as the craftsmanship of artistic work, is becoming more and more visible in artistic practices. It is like revisiting “free” modernistic experimentation not bound by the utopian systems and dogmas targeted by post modernistic critique.

  • 126.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Lundstedt, Lotta
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Modedesign: samtal med Ann-Sofie Back - Ann-Sofie Back, Åsa Göransson - Blank, Astrid Olsson - Fifth Avenue Shoe Repair, Karl-Wilhelm Björk - Velour, Rickard Lindqvist - Rickard Lindqvist, Sandra Backlund - Sandra Backlund2008Book (Other academic)
  • 127.
    Hallnäs, Lars
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Walkenström, PernillaUniversity of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.Wasling, Lennart
    Ambience08, Proceedings: Smart Textiles- Technology and Design2008Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 128.
    Hellström, Annika
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Landin, HannaUniversity of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.Worbin, LindaUniversity of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Ambience'11 Exhibition2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In art and design practices, materials and technology are means of expression as well as sources of inspiration. On the other hand, in technical development processes art and design provide meaning, direction and expressions of functionality. In some sense this duality of perspectives is what defines the loci where art, design and technology meet. Over the past ten years, the Swedish School of Textiles have taken part in the ongoing discussion on how practice-based research can further develop our understanding of the expressiveness inherent in new materials and new technology. In this context it is clear that art, design and technology meet in the lab and in the workshop. However, for discussions across borders between the perspectives of art, design and technology we need meeting places outside of the labs and the workshops as well. The Ambience exhibition is an exercise in building such a meeting place, but also an exercise in providing conference space for interaction between artistic practice and theory. As designers and artists working within a research setting, we often work in parallel with writing, presenting conference papers and exhibiting in different arenas. It is then only natural to include two ways of presenting results at a conference for artistic research; to let paper presentations and exhibition interact to create wider perspectives and deeper understanding. All exhibition contributions have been subject to a peer review process similar to the review process paper submissions are subjected to. And just as for paper submissions, reviews focus on originality and skills with respect to both results and presentation. This exhibition is the first in the series of Ambience conferences. The conference is organized by the University of Borås in cooperation with Tampere University of Technology and is a part of the Smart Textiles Initiative – www.smarttextiles.se In this catalogue you will find images, artist statements and/or project descriptions presenting the works displayed at the exhibition. Welcome to the Ambience´11 exhibition!

  • 129.
    Hellström, Martin
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Skickligt sångspel om trasig Bulerbyidyll2012In: Borås Tidning, ISSN 1103-9132Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 130.
    Holfve Sabel, Mary-Anne
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Modified Attitudes Towards School, Teacher And Peers Are Found In Networks Of Mixed Ethnicity2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 131.
    Holfve Sabel, Mary-Anne
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Orlenius, Kennert
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Gaini, Firouz
    Norwegian Centre for Child Research (NOSEB) Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Ethical Attitudes Among Young People In Late Modernity2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 132.
    Hultgren, Frances
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Johansson, Barbro
    Rum för de yngsta: Barns och föräldrars delaktighet i kulturverksamheter2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Runtom i Sverige pågår regelbundet aktiviteter där barn och föräldrar bjuds in för att ta del av berättelser, sång, musik, dans, rim och ramsor och annat som omfattas av begreppet ”kultur”. Ett återkommande utgångspunkt i verksamheterna är att besökarna ska vara ”delaktiga”. Men vad är denna delaktighet egentligen och hur uppnår vi den? Boken är resultatet av ett forskningsprojekt, som började med följeforskning av projektet Barnens kulturrum i Borås, och som sedan fortsatte till andra platser i och utanför staden där barn, rum, kultur och delaktighet på olika sätt aktualiserades. Syftet med studien var att undersöka hur ett kulturrum för barn, byggt på barns och föräldrars delaktighet, kan förverkligas. Frågor som diskuteras är t.ex.: Hur kan delaktighet förstås från olika perspektiv och vilka praktiska konsekvenser får olika synsätt på delaktighet.

    Rikliga empiriska exempel från bibliotek, förskolor och museer illustrerar mångfalden av kulturaktiviteter. Barns lek i institutionsmiljö studeras också och vi ser hur leken kan skapa ”mellanrum” och ”flyktlinjer” för barnen, de vuxna, rummet och tingen. Delaktighetsbegreppet problematiseras genomgående i relation till nationell och internationell forskning och en modell för delaktighet presenteras. Modellen beskriver hur ett kulturrum för barn kan verka för inkludering, ge inspiration och involvera och utmana besökarna. I förlängningen anas ett kulturrum för barn som fungerar som ett forum för aktivt medborgarskap i samhället.

  • 133.
    Jansen, Barbara
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Composing over time, temporal patterns: in Textile Design2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The work presented in this thesis investigates through practice a new field of textile design exploring the visual effects of moving light as a continuous time-based medium. Thereby, the textile design pattern reveals its composition, not in one moment of time any more, but in fact over time. The thesis consist of four parts: a solo exhibition at the Textile Museum in Borås from 17th February- 28th March 2015, five posters, an interactive thesis including 48 films (download file) and present thesis book. The artefacts displayed in the thesis show a varying range of examples which explore aesthetical possibilities of how light can be integrated as an active part into textile structures, ranging from weaving to braiding techniques, both hand crafted, as well as industrial produced. Thereby three main groups of experiments: colour flow, rhythm exercise, sound_light experiment explore and discuss a range of different time-based expressions. Thus define and establish relevant new design variables and notions, whilst working with time-based design processes. In the following descriptions of these experiments two forms of writing have been used to describe the experiments. One is purely descriptive, neutral form to describe the experiments as such, whereas text titled Research Diary Notes includes reflections and personal comments on the experiences during work on the experiments. The interactive thesis and the exhibited artefacts are an invitation to view new textiles expressions and are an initial guide on the road toward future time-based design works, particularly in the area of light emitting textiles.

  • 134.
    Jansen, Barbara
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Composing over time, temporal patterns: in Textile Design2013Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The work presented in this thesis is a first attempt investigating a new field, exploring the visual effects of movement using light as a continuous time-based medium. Composing over time, temporal patterns - in Textile Design is a practice based research project that investigates the following research question: What does it mean, if time and change – constant movement – becomes part of the textile design expression? The research question has been investigated in a number of experiments that explore the visual effects of movement using light integrated into textile structures as a medium. Thereby, the textile design pattern reveals its composition, not in one moment of time any more, but in fact over time. This thesis aims to create time-based textiles with an emphasis on developing aesthetics of movement – or to establish movement as an aesthetic moment in textile design. Two distinct groups of experiments, colour flow and rhythm exercise, explore a range of different time-based expressions. The experiments have been displayed and explored using woven and braided textile structures which have been construct mainly through the integration of PMMA optical fibres. Through the design processes a first platform and understanding about time as a design material has been developed, which allows composing time-based patterns in light design. New design variables, notions and tools have been defined and established. The achieved new expressions will hopefully lead to discussions on and envisioning of future textiles, opening up the general perception of what textiles are supposed to be like, to show, to express etc., i.e. expands notions of what it means to read a piece of textile work.

  • 135.
    Jansen, Barbara
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Light Shell2009Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    LIGHT SHELL is an investigation into self lighting textile shells – textile spaces. A LIGHT SHELL aims to enrich its future architectural environment through lighting and being a sensual stimulation of everyday life which can be experienced through vision, touch and users being able to move inside. The exhibited prototypes visualize how a Light Shell could feel like. Integrated PMMA optical fibres allow bringing dynamic changing light into the architectural space as regenerating and relaxing stimuli for the body.

  • 136.
    Jansen, Barbara
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Light Textiles2008In: The Nordic Textile Journal 2008, Special Edition Smart Textiles, p. 52-63Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Light textiles Is a research work which focuses on the development of light textiles based on the integration of optical fibres into textile structures. The aim is to create textile light designs which offer big light surfaces that have an even all over and strong light effect. Finally they could be used as big movable light screens in a space either private or public.

  • 137.
    Jansen, Barbara
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    rhythm exercise2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT I am a textile designer working in the area of light-emitting textiles. My research interest focuses on the exploration of new aesthetics within cloth investigating the visual effects of movement using light as a continuous, time-based medium. The exhibited artefacts use PMMA optical fibre technology in braided structures, activated by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and using a microcontroller as an interface to realize novel, light-emitting textiles. Rhythm exercise is a part of the research for my doctoral thesis which investigates the following research question: What does it mean, if time and change – constant movement – become part of the textile design expression? The research question has been investigated in a number of experiments which explore the visual effects of movement by using light integrated into textile structures as a medium. Thereby, the textile design pattern reveals its composition, not in one moment of time any more, but in fact over time. My practice based research work aims to create time-based textiles with an emphasis on developing aesthetics of movement – or to establish movement as an aesthetic moment in textile design. (Jansen, 2013) Context With the beginning of the era of Smart Textiles, the textile designer is challenged with a range of materials which are characterized by their ability to change expressional and functional properties. These materials respond to environmental stimuli, user interaction and pre-programmed parameters and visualize their responses to the viewer. They open up opportunities to explore new material behaviours and designing with novel and complex aesthetics (Berzina, 2011, Krogh, N.D., Layne, N.D., Taylor, 2010, Wingfield, N.D.). The availability of these new materials changes the conditions of conventional textile design; a textile pattern expression is no longer static, it once had one face, one gestalt or expression, whereas now it can show different expressions, a definite or indefinite number of times. (Jansen, 2013, page 7) Installation Rhythm exercise is an installation based on eight braided structures, displayed in three steel frames. The current exhibition displays parts of this installation. The three-dimensional braided artefacts are each based on thirteen lengths of optical fibres. They are lit by LEDs and programmed to create moving patterns of white light using a microcontroller digital interface. They have been designed to show different qualities of lighting interplay using varying rhythms and speeds. The different braids are created in identical braiding structures and with equal amount of lengths of optical fibres, thirteen per braid. The braided structures have, however, been connected to different numbers of LEDs; braid one has been connected to one light source, braids two to five have been connected to two light sources per braid and, finally, braids six to eight to thirteen light sources per braid. This allows displaying an increasing complexity of moving light patterns inside the braided structures. The installation shows a glimpse of new design possibilities and the potential for creative explorations in the field of light-emitting textiles.

  • 138.
    Jansen, Barbara
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    rhythm exercise2014Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In BUILDING WITH TEXTILES, the TextielMuseum presents work by internationally renowned architects as well as interior projects that put textiles in the spotlight. Building with textiles and flexible materials has aesthetic, functional and environmental advantages. That is why textiles are now seen as the fifth key building material alongside steel, stone, concrete and wood. In addition, the development of interior textiles with special functions – from air purification to integrated light, images and sound – offers new possibilities to design smart and interactive interiors. BUILDING WITH TEXTILES is on show from 27 September 2014 until 25 January 2015. Follow us for the complete programme: www.textielmuseum.nl Rhythm exercise is a part of Barbara Jansen`s research work for her doctoral thesis which investigates the following research question: What does it mean, if time and change – constant movement – become part of the textile design expression? The research question has been investigated in a number of experiments which explore the visual effects of movement by using light integrated into textile structures as a medium. Thereby, the textile design pattern reveals its composition, not in one moment of time any more, but in fact over time. The practice based research work aims to create time-based textiles with an emphasis on developing aesthetics of movement – or to establish movement as an aesthetic moment in textile design. The exhibited artefacts use PMMA optical fibre technology in braided structures, activated by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and using a microcontroller as an interface to realize novel, light-emitting textiles.

  • 139.
    Jansen, Barbara
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Textile Light Design2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What happens if light transforms into an integrated active part of a textile surface? The field of Smart Textiles is characterized by the use of a new generation of materials, which no longer have static expressions. They change their performance and expression in a given context through outer stimuli, introducing new dimensions in design and generating a change in design practice. This paper discusses examples of light emitting textile design research, which explore aesthetic-, functional, and conceptual opportunities of PMMA optical fibres in textile applications. The outcome is a range of samples which explore how materials and different textile structures affect light intensity and quality, how to achieve patterns incorporating lighting and not lighting, and 3dimensional lighting surfaces. Light emitting models also stand for visualisation of different concept ideas; incorporating the use of sunlight as a renewable energy source or for dynamic lighting. Keywords: textile design, Smart Textiles, dynamic light, PMMA optical fibres

  • 140.
    Jansen, Barbara
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Carleklev, Jan
    Smith, Amanda (Curator)
    Hugain-Lacire, Nolwenn (Curator)
    Sinus 64 + blue2014Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sinus 64 + blue explores a relationship and dialog between sound and light and is a collaborative project carried out by composer and artist Jan Carleklev and textile design researcher Barbara Jansen. It is a practice based research project investigating on the borderline between art and design in order to explore new aesthetics and experiences. In Sinus 64 + blue, sound triggers and creates a dialog with the light embedded in a textile structure. The exhibited artefact uses PMMA optical fibre technology in a woven structure which is activated by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and uses a digital interface to realize a novel, light-emitting textile expression. Sinus 64 + blue is part of the research for Barbara Jansen`s doctoral thesis which investigates the following research question: What does it mean, if time and change – constant movement – become part of the textile design expression? The research question has been investigated in a number of experiments which explore the visual effects of movement by using light integrated into textile structures as a medium. Thereby, the textile design pattern reveals its composition, not in one moment of time any more, but in fact over time. In this collaborative project, sound has been used as a trigger to activate time-based light patterns, whereby it does not only stimulate patterns of light but in fact initiates a dialog between the two. (Jansen, 2013) Installation The Sinus 64 + blue installation is based on a light-emitting woven structure (1x1 m) in which PMMA optical fibres have been interlaced with paper yarn. The optical fibres are lit by RGB-LEDs (red, green and blue LEDs which are activated through additive colour mixing) and programmed via a digital interface. In the initial experiments, the woven structure was programmed to react to three different basic sound elements, each of which triggered one of the base light colours of the RGB-LEDs, red, green or blue. The dialog between single sine pitches and the three primary colours of light explore elementary aspects of the relationship between sound and light. Sound and light have been stripped down to their most basic elements, i.e. the use of single frequency sound waves (sine pitches) and the three primary colours red, green and blue. Sound element one was created by playing three individual sine waves together. The individual sounds are slightly detuned in relation to each other, but all are close to the center frequency 64 Hz. This approach is causing interference between the three sine waves (The Physics class room, N.D., Infoplease, N.D.). The interference creates unique rhythmic sonic structures, which lay a steady beat as a foundation for the sound-light composition. This sound element triggered blue, pulsating light over the whole textile structure. Sound element two was created through a sequence of sine waves starting at a frequency of 100 Hz and increasing to 440 Hz (playing a scale from lower to higher pitch) before starting over from 100 Hz again. This over and over increasing sound scale activated the red light, floating upwards and upwards the textile structure over and over again. Sound element three was a melodic sequence of single sine waves which covered a range of high and low frequencies. They set off the green light dancing and pulsating over the textile structure. In the continued work towards composing an exhibition piece, sound-light element two and three were further developed. Sound-light element two was altered to play sequences of increasing and decreasing sine pitch scales and the tones of the scales of the pure sine waves were modified to a filtered white noise in order to simulate the sound of wind. The initial colour of the red light was given a richer colour spectrum which shift and fade between red and pink. Sound-light element three, the green colour was made richer and altered by adding some blue to achieve a more subtle nuance of green. Nevertheless, three distinct sound-light patterns create an overall composition by utilizing a more prosperous sound and colour landscape. Let yourself be surprised what happens when one, two or all three of these sound-light elements appear simultaneously during the eight minute long time-based composition.

  • 141.
    Johannisson, Jenny
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Sundeen, Johan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Erikson, Martin G.
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Sundeen, Johan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Johannisson, Jenny
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Vetenskap på tvären: akademiska värden, friheter och gränser2013In: Vetenskap för profession, ISSN 1654-6520, no 26, p. 11-19Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Texten utgör en inledning till antologin Vetenskap på tvären; den tredje volymen som dokumenterar seminarieserien Från Högskolan i Borås till Humboldt. Texten sätter den tredje seminarieseriens innehåll i förhållande till de två tidigare, diskuterar i korthet några aspekter på begreppet och företeelsen tvärvetenskap samt introducerar de nio övriga uppsatser som ingår i volymen.

  • 142.
    Johansson, Barbro
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Hultgren, Frances
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Taking part or taking over? Children’s participation in culture consumption2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper uses the concept of participation as an analytical framework for analysing the ways that preschool children make use of the space, artefacts and people that cultural activities afford them and the subjectivities that are thus produced. Using ethnographic methods children’s and their caregivers’ perspectives on three cultural activities are sought and explored. In the analysis participation emerges as a situated mode of action exercised in events by the children. The results are related to research on childhood, participation and empowerment.

  • 143.
    Jonsson, Anders
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lundberg, Kristina
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Sandman, Lars
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Kjellström, Sofia
    Experiences of Swedish military medical personnel in combat zones: adapting to competing loyalties2014In: Military medicine, ISSN 0026-4075, E-ISSN 1930-613X, Vol. 8, no 179, p. 821-826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this qualitative study is to explore the Swedish military personnel's experience of what it means to perform a caring role in a combat zone. This study assesses the challenges faced by military medical personnel in the context of a combat zone. METHODS: The design was descriptive with a qualitative inductive approach. Twenty military medical personnel (physicians, nurses, and combat lifesavers) were interviewed individually. They had been involved in international military operations between 2009 and 2012. This study was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: The analysis produced four categories: being in a primarily noncaring organization, caring in emotionally charged relationships, lacking an open dialog about expectations of killing and having to prioritize scarce resources. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that medical personnel easily adapt to a military setting. They care but also perform other tasks when they are in a combat zone. The medical personnel want to give care to host nation but use drugs they can spare.

  • 144.
    Jul, Lene
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Adding Values2008In: The Nordic Textile Journal 2008, Special Edition Smart Textiles, p. 146-157Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 145.
    Kooroshnia, Marjan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Creating diverse colour-changing effects on textiles2015Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With the technological progress of materials science, the palette of colours with which to print on textiles has expanded beyond those with previously known properties and expressions to a new generation, with more advanced functionality and expressive properties. This new range of colours is characterised by their ability when printed on textiles to change colour in relation to external factors and internal programmes; for example, leuco dye-based thermochromic inks generally change colour in response to temperature fluctuations. This research explores the design properties and potentials of leuco dye-based thermochromic inks printed on textiles, with regard to creating a wider range of colour-changing effects for textile applications. The significance of this for textile design is related to the development of a methodology for designing dynamic surface patterns. The research was conducted by creating a series of design experiments using leuco dye-based thermochromic inks, which resulted in different recipes and methods, along with a pedagogical tool. The results highlighted the diverse colour-changing properties of leuco dye-based thermochromic inks, which have the potential to create more complex patterns on textiles. The outcome of this research proposes a foundation for textile designers with which to approach new ways of thinking and designing.

  • 146.
    Kooroshnia, Marjan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Dash2010Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This art piece installation intents to provoke people to think about life and death through the fallen wings of butterflies. The different sizes of butterfly wings symbolizes the variety of people living in our society. And just like human beings, the butterfly wings gain energy when touched by people. The energy is transformed into a brief flutter and a change of color into brighter warmer tones. The wings will not live forever. They will eventually fall to the ground, but as they decay new life begins and for each wing a flower will begin to sprout. The research aim of this project is to explore possible expressions of smart textile principles. The technology used in this project is thermochromatic ink and motors.

  • 147.
    Kooroshnia, Marjan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Demonstrating color transistions of leuco dye-based thermochromic inks as a teaching approach in textile and fashion design2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although there are a lot of interest concerning the use of leuco dye-based thermochromic inks in Textile and Fashion Design, there is still a lack of teaching approach to help students arrive at a better understanding of the color transitions of leuco dye thermochromic inks. This paper aims to share a systematic approach for teaching the behavior of leuco dye-based thermochromic inks to students in Textile and Fashion Design. Printed color-swatches and exercises were used as the central part of the approach. Through the approach it was described what printed color-swatches were and how to use them effectively to make color transitions understandable. The approach has been applied in several workshops at both Bachelor and Master level. The samples made by the students in the exercises clearly revealed that the approach created opportunities for students to craft an understanding of using leuco dye thermochromic inks through experimentation and individual exploration. Ultimately, this approach plays a fundamental role in the design process, the creation and the development of dynamic patterns.

  • 148.
    Kooroshnia, Marjan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Dreaming vase2013Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dreaming vase is an object exemplifying my practice-based research project aiming to explore the creative design potential of mixing photoluminescent pigment with conventional textile pigment pastes in textile printing. The object is a two layer glass vase, inlaid with a printed surface-pattern that creates a two phase pattern; a pattern that can demonstrate an identical form at daylight as well as at darkness but with two different expressions. The Dreaming vase displays the development of dynamic surface-patterns, and the use of photoluminescent pigment in printing surface-patterns as it adds an extra quality to the object by emitting light without using any electricity.

  • 149.
    Kooroshnia, Marjan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Leuco Dye-based thermochromic inks: recipes as a guide for designing textile surfaces2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although there has been some research on the use of leuco dye-based thermochromic inks in textile and fashion design, there is still a lack of research on how these inks can be used on textiles to create complex and dynamic patterns through textile printing. This paper provides information on the properties of leuco dye-pased thermochromic inks to facilitate the understanding and designing of dynamic surface-patterns, and demonstrates the color transitions of thermochromic inks at different temperatures. A practice-based design method was chosen to investigate two different reversible and water-based blue inks with activation temperatures of 27°C and 15°C. The result showed scales comprising the recipes that were used as a guide for designing textile surfaces. This paper contributes by making the color-changing process understandable and demonstrating the actual effects of leuco dye-based thermochromic inks at different temperatures for textile and fashion design. This facilitates designers to achieve more advanced textile surface patterns.

  • 150.
    Kooroshnia, Marjan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Mask2011Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This collection of masks is designed give an aesthetic warning if the wearer is running a fever or the concentration of allergens in the air exceeds a certain threshold. The pattern printed with thermochromic ink changes color when the exhale exceeds 40°C. The collection comprise a series of different prints and three different shapes of masks: the traditional surgical style, a wrap-around-scarf, and a full-face sinus mask. The latter also senses temperature increases of the forehead as well as around the mouth. The idea is to create a stylish early-warning system at least for other people if not for the wearer.

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