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  • 1.
    Börjesson, Annica
    et al.
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden;Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Faculty of Caring Science, Worklife and Social Welfare, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Dahl, Marja-Liisa
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekström, Lena
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lehtihet, Mikael
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vicente, Veronica
    The ambulance medical service in Stockholm (AISAB), Academic EMS Stockholm and Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lived experiences of closeness to a person using Anabolic androgenic steroids a next of kin perspective2023In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 19, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are used for their aesthetic and performance-enhancing effects and are associated with physical and psychological side effects. Behavioural changes/side effects as mood swings, aggressiveness, depression, potency problems, anxiety, and emotional coldness have been reported by next of kin to people using AAS.

    Methods: This phenomenological study is based on the reflective lifeworld research approach. Interviews were conducted with twelve next of kin about their experiences of living close to persons using AAS.

    Results: Next of kin to persons using AAS are particularly vulnerable because they experience little opportunity to influence their situation. Their given and safe context is lost, and their lives are circumscribed by feelings of insecurity, fear, powerlessness, and grief. Feelings of loneliness develop when their problems are not noticed by others and support is lacking from family and society.

    Conclusions: Our research adds important knowledge on how the use of AAS affects next of kin. Understanding is required to approach the lifeworld of next of kin with flexibility and empathy in their difficulties and vulnerability. Healthcare professionals and other concerned professions need to be aware of next of kin existential needs to be able to meet and support them in their life situation.

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  • 2.
    Palmér, Lina
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Fridh, Isabell
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Caring Science With a Focus on Existential Issues in a Caring Context: A Research Area Inspired by Existential Philosophy2022In: International journal for human caring, ISSN 1091-5710, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines and exemplifies how existential philosophy can provide a deeper understanding of existential issues in a caring context. Existential philosophy, including lifeworld theory, is treated both as an epistemology for the development of research methods and inspiration for analysis and discussions in caring science research. The significance of the lifeworld is also highlighted as a guide to perform and enable caring and caring didactics, along with short descriptions where existential philosophy has previously influenced the development of caring science. The concept of existential caring science is suggested as a research area for research on existential and meaning-oriented phenomena.

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  • 3.
    Palmér, Lina
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Karlsson, Katarina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Pre-Understanding: A Threat to Validity in Qualitative Caring Science Research?2022In: International journal for human caring, ISSN 1091-5710, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is devoted to reflections on how to prevent pre-understanding from influencing the research process and jeopardizing the validity of a study. Influences from preunderstanding exemplified from empirical lifeworld-led caring science research. Finally, there is a discussion of preunderstanding as a natural attitude and therefore also an important part of the lifeworld. It is concluded that validity requires a self-critical approach. It is suggested that a descriptive analysis, where the findings are fairly close to the data, involves a less problematic approach than research, which requires special attention to pre-understanding in connection with different levels of interpretation.

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  • 4.
    Sandvik, Ann-Helén
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ekebergh, MargarethaUniversity of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Studenthandledning i vårdande verksamhet: teoretiska utgångspunkter och didaktiska metoder2022Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Studenthandledning i vårdande verksamhet belyser studenthandledning ur både ett teoretiskt och ett praktiskt perspektiv. Utgångspunkten är en studenthandledning med en tydlig vårdvetenskaplig förankring som sammanflätar den vårdande kunskapen med studentens lärande i verksamhetsförlagd utbildning.

  • 5.
    Börjesson, A.
    et al.
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Dahl, M. -L
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekström, L.
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lehtihet, M.
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden;d Karolinska Institutet and are working at S: t Görans hospital.
    Vicente, V.
    The Ambulance Medical Service in Stockholm (AISAB), Academic EMS Stockholm and Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Men´s experiences of using anabolic androgenic steroids2021In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 1927490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are used by men for their aesthetic and performance-enhancing effects and are associated with risk for side effects. Our research aims to deepen knowledge and understanding of men´s experiences of using AAS. Method: This phenomenological study is based on the reflective lifeworld research approach. Lifeworld interviews were conducted with twelve men about their experiences of using AAS. Results: By using AAS, men strive towards a muscular, strong and athletic ideal. Self-imposed demands, self-discipline and performance accelerate male physical development. The perfect male body ideal thus attained is fragile from both an existential and a biological perspective. The perfect self-image can easily be shattered by adversity. A man’s very existence may be jeopardized if the use of AAS is revealed to others or if the body is let down by illness. Conclusions: Men´s use of AAS is a complex phenomenon. It partly concerns a traditional view of masculinity that is reflected in the community. It requires both broad and deep knowledge and understanding to be able to meet men using AAS in their problems and vulnerability; a meeting that is hampered by their low trust in healthcare, and by the fact that AAS are illegal. © 2021 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

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  • 6.
    Börjesson, Annica
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Dahl, Marja-Liisa
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ekström, Lena
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lehtihet, Mikael
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Vicente, Veronica
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Women's Experiences of Using Anabolic Androgenic Steroids2021In: Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, E-ISSN 2624-9367, Vol. 3, article id 656413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anabolic androgenic steroids are used by women to increase their muscle mass and because of their performance-enhancing effects. Despite permanent/high risk of side effects, knowledge is inadequate. Our aim has been to deepen understanding about women's use of anabolic androgenic steroids. This phenomenological study is based on the reflective lifeworld research (RLR) approach. Lifeworld interviews were conducted with 12 women, aged 21-56 years, about their experiences of using anabolic steroids. The results show that women experience a sense of pride when they successfully achieve their goals. This is the driving force, triggering tension between suffering and success. Our research adds important knowledge from a reflective lifeworld perspective and shows that women's use of anabolic androgenic steroids is a complex phenomenon. Understanding and knowledge are important in order to be able to meet and support women in their fears and difficulties.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Niklas
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Patient experiences of being cared for by nursing students in a psychiatric education unit2020In: Nordic Journal of Nursing Research, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 142-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients are vital for student learning. However, research has primarily focused on student nurse learning from a student or supervisor perspective; few studies have investigated patient perspectives. This study examines student care practice for patients in acute psychiatric day care. The aim was to describe patients’ experiences of care by student nurses in a psychiatric education unit, a collaboration between the clinic and academia. Data were collected through 17 lifeworld interviews with patients, of which 10 also included observations. Data have been analysed for meanings using reflective, lifeworld research (RLR). The findings reveal that the encounters involve an interactive process of giving and receiving, providing students with both health opportunities and risks. The findings can further be described by the following constituents: exposed and vulnerable; responsibility to support; the importance of accessibility; reciprocity; and engagement that evokes the desire to live a life with dignity. In a patient–student community, there are prerequisites for proper caring. Patient health seems to be positively affected when patients are involved in both their own care and student learning.

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  • 8.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    The interaction between learning and caring - the patient’s narrative as a foundation for lifeworld-led reflection inlearning and caring2020In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we present a knowledge approach to the interaction between learning and caring, which should play a significant role in the challenge of promoting sustainable healthcare. This knowledge approach requires awareness of the interactions between learning and caring in caring contexts. The intention is to present an exploration of knowledge and theory development based on research with a lifeworld perspective within caring science didactics. We are illuminating issues concerning reflection and learning encounters in a caring context, which include key concepts such as the patient’s narrative. A strategy for reflective learning and caring based on the lifeworld concept is presented. This strategy includes four main components: the encounter between general knowledge and the patient’s lived world, the patient’s narrative, caring relationship creation through interaction with the patient and reflection through supervision. All of these components are permeated by a reflective approach. We are also clarifying what it means to intertwine learning and caring in addition to how this process can be strengthened in caring practices to optimise patient care. Three components are particularly important in facilitating the intertwining of learning and caring in clinical practice, namely genuine meetings, sensitivity towards the patient’s narrative and reflection during interactions.

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  • 9.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Galvin, Kathleen
    University of Brighton.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Linnéuniveristetet.
    Using lifeworld philosophy in education to intertwine caring and learning: an illustration of two ways of learning how to care2019In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our general purpose is to show how a philosophically oriented theoretical foundation, drawn from a lifeworld perspective can serve as a coherent direction for caring practices in education. We argue that both caring and learning share the same ontological foundation and point to this intertwining from a philosophical perspective. We proceed by illustrating shared epistemological ground through some novel educational practices in the professional preparation of carers. Beginning in a phenomenologically oriented philosophical foundation, we will first unfold what this means in the practice of caring, and secondly what it means for education and learning to care in humanly sensitive ways. We then share some ways that may be valuable in supporting learning and health that provides a basis for an existential understanding. We argue that existential understanding may offer a way to bridge the categorisations in contemporary health care that flow from problematic dualisms such as mind and body, illness and well-being, theory and practice, caring and learning. Ways of overcoming such dualistic splits and new existential understandings are needed to pave the way for a care that is up to the task of responding to both human possibilities and vulnerabilities, within the complexity of existence. As such, we argue that caring and learning are to be understood as an intertwined phenomenon of pivotal importance in education of both sensible and sensitive carers. Lifeworld led didactics and reflection, which are seen as the core of learning, constitute an important educational strategy here.

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  • 10.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Att lära sig vårda - med hjälp av reflexion och handledning2018 (ed. 2:1)Book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Andersson, Niklas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Intertwining of caring and learning in care practices supported by a didactic approach2018In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, Vol. 31, no July, p. 95-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper highlights how caring and learning interact and become an intertwined phenomenon. The analysis of the research findings from two studies, in which the interaction between caring and learning in two educational units was investigated, has been guided by a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach grounded in a lifeworld-oriented phenomenology. The analysis procedure was concluded in a synthesis of the interaction between caring and learning in a Dedicated Educational Unit (DEU) and a didactic method inspired by a lifeworld educational perspective has been developed.

    The results show that through trust and genuine meetings between patients and students caring and learning can converge and be intertwined. Both students and patients take an active role in the health process as well as the learning process. In order to achieve an intertwining process qualified supervision, care managers who take responsibility for a caring and learning environment and a consensus between the nursing school and the healthcare organization is required.

    The didactic method that can support the intertwining of caring and learning consists of three themes; genuine meetings, sensitivity for the patient's story and reflection in interaction. These themes are tools for the supervision.

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    Accepterad artikel före publicering
  • 12.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Hur kan ”konsten att förstå patientens värld ” integreras i vården?2017In: Vägen till patientens värld och personcentrerad vård: att bli lyssnad på och förstådd / [ed] Dahlberg, K. & Ekman, I, Stockholm: Liber, 2017, p. 291-316Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ekebergh, M.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Hörberg, U.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för hälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    Managers' responsibility to support caring and learning in clinical education units2017In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7940, E-ISSN 2324-7959, Vol. 5, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Managers in clinical education units (CEUs) have the responsibility to facilitate evidence-based environments for both caring and learning. Promoting such environments might be challenging in times of financial constraints and organisation changes.

    Objective:The purpose of this study was to describe how managers experience their responsibility to support the caring and learning environments in CEUs. 

    Methods:The study method followed the principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) grounded in a phenomenological approach. The study was conducted at a hospital in Southern Sweden. Ten first- and second-line managers responsible for CEUs were interviewed. The interviews were conducted as reflective dialogues using an open, and bridled approach.

    Results:The results show that clinical education unit managers regard the responsibility to support caring and learning environments as a challenging experience, elucidated in three themes: (1) to have or to take responsibility; (2) cooperation that supports and challenges; and (3) bringing it all together— a daily struggle.

    Conclusions:In conclusion, the managers of CEUs need to be aware of the importance of common theoretical grounds for caring and learning. Caring and learning are more likely to be intertwined when responsibility is taken, when collaboration between actors is characterised by respect and when an awareness of the importance of reflection is present. Awareness of the importance of creating opportunities for reflection and mutual collaboration among the different actors involved could lead to improvements in nursing education and, therefore, improved patient care.

  • 14. Larsson, Margaretha
    et al.
    Sundler J, Annelie
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Björk, Maria
    Altering the Parenting Role: Parents’ Experience of Supporting the Health and Well-Being of Their Adolescent Girls. 2015In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 419-432Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Eskilsson, C.
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Hörberg, U.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för hälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    Ekebergh, M.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindberg, E.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Carlsson, G.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Caring and learning intertwined in supervision at a dedicated education unit ‒ a phenomenological study2015In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 753-764Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supervising student nurses in clinical praxis entails dealing with both caring and learning aspects. There is a dearth of research focusing on both the caring and learning aspects in supervision. The present study describes how caring and learning is intertwined in supervision. The study was performed with a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach and analyzed phenomenologically for meanings. Eight interviews were conducted with supervisors on an orthopedic-dedicated education unit. The findings reveal how supervisors constantly move in order to be either close to or standing back, adjusting to the students’ and the patients’ needs. This is described in more detail via the constituents: handling responsibility in constant movement, participating in a new and different way, coexisting with students creates meaning and development. The findings show that a reflective attitude in supervision , clear structure for daily activities, and a lifeworld-led didactics can promote a learning and caring environment. Supervisors’ demanding task requires pauses in order to maintain motivation among supervisors. A mutual link between supervisors, students and patients is crucial in order to create an environment where caring and learning are intertwined. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.

  • 16.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö. Institutionen för hälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    Patients' experiences of being cared for by student nurses2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background It is crucial for patients to be met by understanding in their vulnerability, to be treated by competence that ensure adequate care and met with an encouraging attitude to participate in their health process. They meet professional careers as well as students, but nevertheless the aim for caring is the same: to provide good and secure care for the patients, all in line with a caring science approach. A limit amount of studies illuminate patients’ experiences of receiving care from student nurses. Aim The aim was to describe how patients perceived being cared for by student nurses, in a clinical context Method The study has been performed with a Reflective Lifeworld Research approach founded on phenomenology. 11 lifeworld interviews were conducted with patients, recently discharged from an orthopedic Dedicated Education Unit. Data have been analyzed for meanings. Results Patients perceive that they are being carried along on the students' learning process like a journey together. This is characterized by a fluctuation between stable and unstable care from the students. Along this journey, patients are in need of a mutual invitation to participation, of genuine encounters, and essential support. Conclusion The patient-student-supervisor relationship is of importance for patients’ experience of being cared for by student nurses in a clinical setting. Genuine encounters between patient and student must be identified and can be stimulated by didactic support and reflection grounded in caring science with a lifeworld perspective. Supervisors have to support to both students and patients in order to create a safe environment in which caring and learning are intertwined. Students require patients in their learning process but patients’ vulnerability, need for participation, genuine encounters and essential support, must be taken into account.

  • 17. Berglund, Mia
    et al.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Reflektion i lärande och vård: en utmaning för sjuksköterskan2015Book (Other academic)
  • 18. Arman, Maria
    et al.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Teoretiska grunder för vårdande2015Book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö, Institutionen för hälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    The experiences of patients receiving care from nursing students at a Dedicatd Education Unit: A phenomenological study2015In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 353-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to describe how patients perceive being cared for by student nurses, in aclinical context in the form of a Dedicated Education Unit (DEU). The study has been performed with aReflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) approach grounded in phenomenology. Lifeworld interviews wereconducted with patients who had received care from student nurses on an orthopaedic DEU and datahave been analysed for meanings. The findings reveal how patients experience to be carried along as apart of the students' learning process. This is described in more detail via the constituents: a mutualinvitation to participate, the importance of genuine encounters, and essential support. Patients experienceboth a stable and a less stable care in a learning environment and it is thus essential for them to beinvited to be a part of both the students' learning process and their own health process. The findings alsohighlight the key role of the supervisors for patients' sense of security. Finally there are indications thatconcepts such as DEU with a lifeworld-led didactic, based on reflection on both the patients' stories andthe students' experiences, can create learning environments that support patients' health processes andalso students’ learning processes.

  • 20.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ekebergh, M.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Persson, E.
    Lunds Universitet, Medicinska Fakulteten.
    Hörberg, U.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för hälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    The importance of existential dimensions in the context of the presence of older patients at team meetings-in the light of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty's philosophy2015In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 10, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study is to explore interpersonal dimensions of the presence of older patients at team meetings. The theoretical foundation of the study is grounded in caring science and lifeworld phenomenology. The results from two empirical studies, that indicated the need for a more in-depth examination of the interpersonal relationships when an older patient is present at a team meeting, were further explicated by philosophical examination in the light of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty's philosophy. The empirical studies were performed in a hospital ward for older people, where the traditional rounds had been replaced by a team meeting, to which the patients were invited. The analysis of the general structure and philosophical examination followed the principles of reflective lifeworld research. The philosophical examination is presented in four meaning structures: mood as a force in existence; to exist in a world with others; loneliness in the presence of others; and the lived body as extending. In conclusion, professionals must consider patients' existential issues in the way they are expressed by the patients. Existence extends beyond the present situation. Accordingly, the team meeting must be seen in a larger context, including the patients' life as a whole, as well as the ontological and epistemological foundations on which healthcare is based. ©2015 E. Lindberg et al.

  • 21.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Caring and learning as intertwined- an educational curriculum challenge2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Caring and learning in clinical educational contexts is characterized by an encounter between lived experiences of the patient and the student’s knowledge and understanding. In other words, it is an encounter between two lifeworlds, which has the potential to create a fruitful tension to develop deep knowledge about the patient’s world that can give direction for practice. We will argue that a particular kind of Caring science knowledge becomes an important tool to support this caring and learning process where the goal is to intertwine lived experiences of health and illness with professional knowing and scientific knowledge. From this perspective is even caring and learning an intertwined phenomenon, and it is this intertwining that enables lifeworld led care. Aim This paper presents a study that illustrate how caring and learning is intertwined from the students’ view in an educational clinical context. Method/design The study was carried out using Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) with a phenomenological approach. Lifeworld interviews were conducted with students after their clinical placement on a Dedicated Education Unit (DEU). Result The result shows that the essential meaning of the intertwined phenomenon is a movement where caring and learning fall into place which appears in an atmosphere filled with appealing challenges, but has to be sensitive to the students’ readiness. The atmosphere depends on their sense of security and how they experience confirming and affirming responses. Encountering the patient means that the students can gain a sense of the whole and the theory falls into place. The results also highlight how the student, in this atmosphere, has a desire to find a new role in a personal style. Conclusions On the basis of this study a challenge to the curriculum is presented, that is, to develop didactics and supervision models that use a holistic approach and adopt a reflective attitude upon caring and learning as intertwined and not separated.

  • 22.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Dedicated Educational Unit: A Scandinavian model2014In: Clinical Learning and Teaching Innovations in Nursing: Dedicated Education Unites Building a Better Future. / [ed] Kay Edgecombe, Margaret Bowden, Springer , 2014, p. 123-130Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter gives a Swedish perspective of the Dedicated Education Unit as a learning environment where caring and learning are united in ‘reflective tutoring’ at the University of Borås. The author discusses the overall purpose and structure of the Borås Dedicated Education Units, their scientific and philosophical bases and their focus on patient-centred student learning, reflection and research. She explains the key tutoring roles within the Borås Dedicated Educational Units, the lifeworld perspective of caring science that forms a frame of reference for learning and tutoring there and strategies that affirm and clarify the fundamental principle that caring and learning are parallel and common phenomena. She also describes the challenge for Borås Dedicated Education Units to focus on active patient care development through research, reflects on what is needed for successful tutoring, explains how Dedicated Education Units contain rich possibilities for concretising caring theory into practice and outlines six themes that characterise a Dedicated Education Unit from the students’ and tutors’ perspectives. The chapter concludes with the results of research evaluating the effectiveness of the DEUs as student clinical learning environments and suggests strategies for future development of the Borås Dedicated Education Units.

  • 23. Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Holst, Hanna
    Andersson, Niklas
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lifeworld-led learning takes place in the encounter between Caring Science and the Lifeworld.2014In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7940, E-ISSN 2324-7959, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 107-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning in caring contexts could be illustrated as an encounter between the scientific knowledge of caring and the learner’s lifeworld. This encounter needs a support that has the potential to bring caring science to life and to start an intertwining process with the lifeworld that creates embodied knowledge. The aim of this article is to illustrate the meaning of this encounter with help of a theoretical foundation and two examples of research projects with a reflective lifeworld research approach (RLR) founded on phenomenology. Both examples describe the student nurses’ perspective. One illustrates promoting learning through lifeworld-led supervision in pairs of students. The other illustrates learning environments that bridges the gap between theory and practice. These two examples show how the intertwining of caring science theory with lived experience required a certain learning and caring atmosphere that is open and sensitive for the lifeworld. In conclusion, lifeworld-led learning is more than learning per se. Lifeworld theory as a basis for supporting students’ learning could provide both a broadened and deepened understanding of the meaning of learning and also a greater understanding of how to support students’ learning.

  • 24. Magnusson, Carl
    et al.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Jutengren, Göran
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Patientnärmre vård: En observationsstudie av sjuksköterskans tid för patientnära vård...PATIENTFOCUSED CARE: AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF REGISTERED NURSES’TIME FOR DIRECT PATIENT CARE2014In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 4-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25. Larsson, Margaretha
    et al.
    Björk, Maria
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Sundler J, Annelie
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Striving to make positive difference: School nurses’ experiences of promoting the health and well-being of adolecents girls’2014In: Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1059-8405, E-ISSN 1546-8364, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 358-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, school nurses are part of the School Health Service with the main objective of health promotion to support students’ health and attainment of educational goals. The aim in this phenomenological study was to illuminate the experiences of school nurses in promoting the health and well-being of adolescent girls. Seventeen school nurses were interviewed, both in groups and individually, to facilitate personal disclosure and expressions from their lived experiences. To achieve their goal of improving the health of adolescent girls, school nurses require flexibility in their approach and in endeavoring to make a positive difference they experience many challenges. This study concluded that school nurses can tactfully provide adolescent girls with knowledge and health guidance adjusted to individual needs and empowering the individual girl to participate in her own health process.

  • 26.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    A phenomenological study of being cared for in a critical care setting: The meanings of the patient room as a place of care.2013In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 234-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary Previous research highlights the impact of care and treatment in ICUs on the patient recovery process and wellbeing. However, little is known about how the interior design in the ICU settings may affect patients’ wellbeing. Objective The aim of this study is, by using a lifeworld perspective, to reveal the meanings of the ICU settings as a place of care. Design Nine patients from three ICUs in Sweden participated. Data were collected using photo-voice methodology and were analysed using a reflective lifeworld phenomenological approach. Results The ICU setting as a place of care for critically ill patients is a complex and multidimensional phenomenon. The place is constituted of patients, staff and technical equipment. The struggle for life and occurrences taking place there determine how the room is perceived. The tone and touch of caring together with interior design are fundamental for the room as lived. The room is experienced in various moods; a place of vulnerability, a place inbetween, a place of trust and security, a life-affirming place, a place of tenderness and care and an embodied place. Conclusion Promoting patients’ well-being and satisfaction of care involves integrating a good design and a caring attitude and paying attention to patients’ needs.

  • 27.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Karlsson, Ann-Christin
    Larsson Mauléon, Annika
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    An intraoperative caring model: the ’awake’ patient’s need for a genuine caring encounter2013In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7940, E-ISSN 2324-7959, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 23-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anaesthesia nursing care during regional anaesthesia is characterized by the encounter between the ‘awake’ patient’s own lifeworld and the nurse anaesthetist’s knowledge in theory and in practice. This study aims to present an intraoperative caring model from the patient’s perspective that will facilitate nurse anaesthetists’ (NA) practice to enhance and support the ‘awake’ patient’s intraoperative well-being during surgery under regional anaesthesia. The model is underpinned by a synthesis based on interviews with patients, a philosophical reflection using Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy, and video recordings from orthopaedic surgeries under regional anaesthesia. The model can be used as a tool to encounter awake patients’ existential needs in the intraoperative situation and to further enlighten NAs about the possible impact of their proximity, interaction and communication behaviour in the delivery of intraoperative nursing care. The model can help NAs to access, understand and learn through lived experiences, thereby deepening their professional caring skills. The model is a way to get research knowledge ready for use by NAs to reflect on what gaps need to be filled between what nurses know (research) and do (practice).

  • 28. Larsson, Margaretha
    et al.
    Sundler J, Annelie
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ekebergh, M
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Beyond Self-Rated Health: The Adolescent Girl's Lived Experience of Health in Sweden2013In: Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1059-8405, E-ISSN 1546-8364, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 71-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this phenomenological study was to describe the phenomenon of health as experienced by adolescent girls in Sweden. Fifteen adolescent girls were interviewed with a focus on what made them feel well in their everyday life. This study reveals that the adolescent girl's health is a complex phenomenon interwoven with their lives. Health arises in meaningful contexts, in an adolescent girl's relations to others as well as in her ability to manage her life. Health is shaped in their everyday life and can be understood as a mood of "being" well that involves actions and practices. The results show that it is important to meet these girls from an open approach in order to support and strengthen their health and well-being. The health of adolescent girls can be supported, and it is a challenge for professionals, particularly school nurses, who meet these girls in everyday life to improve their health.

  • 29.
    Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    How caring assessment is learnt: reflective writing on the examination of Specialist Ambulance Nurses in Sweden2013In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 271-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a research study that aims to describe and analyse how caring assessment is learnt in the Specialist Nursing, Prehospital Care Programme for educating specialist ambulance nurses. The study is based on a contextual and didactic model for learning. The focus was on the final course, Prehospital Emergency Care, with clinical studies and clinical practice amounting to 15 credits, plus one of two theoretical examinations. We are testing the model to explore what characterises the students’ learning when the model is applied. The informants were 37 students (registered nurses). Written data from all 37 examinations were analysed by means of the phenomenological Reflective lifeworld research approach. The results stress the significance of a didactic model constructed according to the specific circumstances prevailing in the learning context. With the help of the model an attitude of reflective awareness is adopted, showing that knowledge in caring science and medical science are equally valuable and, are applied simultaneously. Furthermore, the model generates knowledge that underlines the significance of the encounter with the patient in the care-giving context of the prehospital environment, in order for the student to be able to develop understanding and to learn caring assessment in prehospital emergency care. Thus the result reveals that it is the encounter with the patient that is most effective for the student’s learning process. Keywords: didactic model; reflections; reflective awareness; specialist ambulance nurses; nursing training

  • 30.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Hörberg, Ulrika
    Persson, Eva
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    It made me feel human. A phenomenological study on older patients´ experiences of participating in a Team meeting.2013In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 8, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focused on older patients participating in a team meeting (TM) in a hospital ward in Sweden. A process had taken place on the ward, in which the traditional round had developed into a TM and understanding what participating in a TM means for the older patient is necessary for the development of care that facilitates older patient's participation. The aim of this study was to describe the caring, as experienced by the older patients on a ward for older persons, with a specific focus on the team meeting. A reflective lifeworld research (RLR) design was used. Fifteen patients, 12 women and three men (mean age of 82 years) were interviewed while they were hospitalized in a hospital ward for older people. In the essential meaning of the phenomenon, the TM is described as being a part of a wider context of both caring and life. The need for hospitalization is an emotional struggle to overcome vulnerability and regain everyday freedom. The way in which the professionals are able to confirm vulnerability and create a caring relationship affects both the struggle for well-being and the possibilities for maintaining dignity. The essence is further explicated through its constituents; Vulnerability limits life; Life is left in the hands of someone else; Life is a whole and Space for existence. The result raises concern about how the care needs to be adjusted to older people's needs as lived bodies. The encounter between the carer and the patient needs to be developed in order to get away from the view of the patient as object. An expanded vision may open up for existential dimensions of what brings meaning to life. One way, as described by the patients, is via the patient's life stories, through which the patients can be seen as a whole human being.

  • 31.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Persson, Eva
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Older Patients’ Participation in Team Meetings: A phenomenological study from the nurses’ perspective2013In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the importance of patient participation is acknowledged in today's healthcare, many challenges remain before patient participation can become an integral part of care provision. The ward round has traditionally been the forum for crucial decisions about patient care, but often with limited possibilities for patient participation. As part of the process of improving patient participation, the round in the present study has been replaced by a team meeting (TM) to which the patient has been invited. The aim of this study is to highlight nurses' experiences of older patients' participation in TMs. The research process was guided by the principles of phenomenological reflective life world research. Data were collected in a Swedish hospital, in a ward specializing in older patients. Nine nurses, who had invited and planned for a patient to participate in TMs and/or had experienced TMs in which patients participated, were interviewed. The essential meaning of patient participation in the TM, as experienced by the nurses, is that patient participation can be supported by a safe relationship in which the patient can make his or her voice heard. Participation is challenged by the patients' vulnerability and by the subordinated role assigned to the patient. The essential meaning is further described by its constituents: "the need for a guide," "patient participation challenged by structures," and "creating space for the whole human being." In conclusion, the nurse plays a core role in guiding the patient in an unfamiliar situation. The meaning of patient participation in the TM needs to be discussed by professionals so that the patient perspective is present.

  • 32.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Karlsson, Ann-Christin
    Larsson Mauléon, Annika
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Patient-nurse anesthetist interaction during regional anesthesia and surgery based on video recordings2013In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 260-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to interpret and describe the patient-nurse anesthetist (NA) interaction during regional anesthesia. Design Video recordings conducted during orthopedic surgery at a surgical clinic in Sweden formed the basis for the study, in which three patients and three NAs participated. Methods A hermeneutic analysis was conducted on the data. Finding The findings of the analysis demonstrated that the NA was in either “present” presence or “absent” presence in the awake patient's visual field during surgery. The NA's professional actions at times dominated the patient's existential being in the intraoperative situation. The findings conveyed insights about the patient-NA interaction that open up possibilities for nurses to understand and reflect upon their own practice in an expanded way. Conclusions Using video recordings for reflections enables development of professional skills that positively influence the care quality for patients during regional anesthesia.

  • 33.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Student nurses’ experiences of how caring and learning is intertwined: A phenomenological study2013In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 82-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Clinical studies in nursing education ought to create conditions for the students to link theory to praxis. Previous research in this field focuses on the gap between theory and practice, learning environments, supervision and reflection connected to caring and learning. In addition there are studies that propose the concept of learning and caring as intertwined. The aim of this study is to describe how caring and learning is intertwined from a student perspective. Methods: The study was carried out using Reflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) with a phenomenological approach. Lifeworld interviews were conducted with students after their clinical placement on a Dedicated Education Unit (DEU). Results: The essential meaning is a movement where caring and learning fall into place which appears in an atmosphere filled with appealing challenges, but has to be sensitive to the students’ readiness. The atmosphere depends on their sense of security and how they experience confirming and affirming responses. Encountering the patient means that the students can gain a sense of the whole and the theory falls into place. The results also highlight how the student, in this atmosphere, has a desire to find a new role in a personal style. Conclusions: The study emphasizes the importance of supporting the students in understanding learning and caring as intertwined and not separated. A dualistic approach could harm the students’ aim to get the knowledge embodied. This holistic perspective requires a reflective attitude on caring and learning and has to be further developed in the didactics and supervision.

  • 34. Vicente, Veronica
    et al.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Castren, Maaret
    Sjöstrand, Fredrik
    Svensson, Leif
    Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Differentiating frailty in older people using the Swedish ambulance service: A retrospective audit2012In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 228-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The elderly population in Sweden is increasing. This will lead to an increased need for healthcare resources and put extra demands on healthcare professionals. Consequently, ambulance personnel will be faced with the challenge of meeting extra demands from increasing numbers of older people with complex and atypical clinical presentations. Therefore we highlight that great problems exist for ambulance personnel to understand and meet these patients’ care needs. Using a caring science approach, we apply the patient’s perspective, and the aim of this study is to identify and illuminate the conditions that affect elderly people assessed with the assessment category “general affected health condition”. Thus, we have analyzed the characteristics belonging to this specific condition. The method is a retrospective audit, involving a qualitative content analysis of a total of 88 emergency service records. The conclusion is that by using caring science, the concept of frailty which is based on a comprehensive understanding of human life can clarify the state of “general affected health condition”, as either illness or ill-health. This offers a new assessment category and outlines care and treatment that strengthen and support the health and wellbeing of the individual elderly person. Furthermore, the concept of frailty ought to be included in “The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems” (ICD-10).

  • 35. Karlsson, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Larsson Mauléon, Annika
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    "Is that my leg?" patients' experiences of being awake during regional anesthesia and surgery2012In: Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing, ISSN 1089-9472, E-ISSN 1532-8473, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 155-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most knee or hip replacement surgery is performed under regional anesthesia, when patients are awake. Previous research has primarily focused on patients' experiences during general anesthesia. The aim of this study was to uncover the meaning of being awake during regional anesthesia and surgery. Nine interviews with patients undergoing knee or hip replacement surgery comprise the data. The phenomenological analysis shows that being awake during surgery can be compared with walking a tightrope because of ambiguous feelings. Four interrelated constituents further elucidated the patients' experiences: balancing between proximity and distance in the operating theater, balancing between having control and being left out, my partly inaccessible body handled by others, and the significant role of the carer. Anesthesia providers and perioperative nurses need to understand the awake patients' intraoperative experiences to support and confirm them when they can no longer experience or have full access to their body.

  • 36. Karlsson, AC
    et al.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Larsson Mauléon, A
    Almerud Österberg, S
    Only a whisper away. A philosophical view of the awake patient's situation during regional anaesthetics and surgery.2012In: Nursing Philosophy, ISSN 1466-7681, E-ISSN 1466-769X, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 257-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the awake patient's intraoperative situation and experiences during regional anaesthetics and surgery are reflected upon by using the work of the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Merleau-Ponty's phenomenological idea of the body as being at the centre of the world highlights the patient's embodied position and bestows significance onto the body as a whole, as a lived body. A case, based on the findings from a previous interview study, is presented as a contextual starting point where a patient goes from having a familiar body recognized as her own to having a partially anaesthetized body experienced as an unknown object. The intraoperative caring space is described in this context as the mutual ground where the awake patient and the nurse anaesthetist (NA) can interact to create meaning. The NA can act as the patient's bodily extension to bridge the gap between the patient's experiences and the situation. This calls for the NA's proximity and genuine presence in order to meet and understand the patient's awake experiences. Learning from the patient's situatedness gives information that is valuable for NAs to share with patients who are less experienced with this contextual situation. The challenge for the NA is not to perform routine-based care, but to acknowledge every patient's lifeworld and uniqueness thus enabling the patient to move easily along the mind–body–world continuum. The core of intraoperative care is to provide support and promote well-being of awake patients in the intraoperative environment. The use of a philosophical perspective is relevant for nurses who work in an intraoperative setting where patients undergo regional anaesthetics. This study shows how nursing research using phenomenological philosophy can help uncover new meanings known only to the patients living the experience.

  • 37.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Patient safety in relation to the design of the patient rooms in Intensive Care Units: Staff’s lived experiences of their working environment in high technological settings2012Conference paper (Refereed)
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  • 38. Berglund, Mia
    et al.
    Sjögren, Reet
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Reflect and learn together: when two supervisors interact in the learning support process of nurse education2012In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 152-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim  To describe the importance of supervisors working together in supporting the learning process of nurse students through reflective caring science supervision. Background  A supervision model has been developed in order to meet the need for interweaving theory and practice. The model is characterized by learning reflection in caring science. A unique aspect of the present project was that the student groups were led by a teacher and a nurse. Method  Data were collected through interviews with the supervisors. The analysis was performed with a phenomenological approach. Results  The results showed that theory and practice can be made more tangible and interwoven by using two supervisors in a dual supervision. The essential structure is built on the constituents ‘Reflection as Learning Support’, ‘Interweaving Caring Science with the Patient’s Narrative’, ‘The Student as a Learning Subject’ and ‘The Learning Environment of Supervision’. Conclusion  The study concludes that supervision in pairs provides unique possibilities for interweaving and developing theory and practice. Implications for nursing management  The supervision model offers unique opportunities for cooperation, for the development of theory and practice and for the development of the professional roll of nurses and teachers.

  • 39.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Andersson, Niklas
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Holst, Hanna
    The encounter between Caring Science and the Lifeworld2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientific knowledge is characterized by abstract descriptions and structures which are not identical to the lived reality. Scientific knowledge cannot directly be applied on the lived existence, without being transformed and adjusted to the individual’s very complex lifeworld. Learning in caring contexts is an encounter between the scientific knowledge of caring and the learner’s lifeworld. This encounter needs a support that has the potential to bring caring science to life and to start an intertwining process with the lifeworld that creates embodied knowledge. Lifeworld didactics are built on an approach about learning as an individual process and that learning takes its point of departure in the learner’s previous experiences, which accompanies the learning process. The challenges within lifeworld didactics is to be open and sensitive to the learner’s lifeworld and with tact support the development of a reflective attitude in the learning process. Lifeworld didactics strategies are of crucial importance in different caring contexts. This paper presents three lifeworld led phenomenological research projects that have focused on acquiring caring science knowledge in caring contexts, more precisely it is the encounter between caring science and the lifeworld. The research is within the framework of lifeworld didactics, but the three projects each have a special focus. The first illustrates how the learning and caring processes merge and become an intertwined phenomenon in nursing students’ learning. The research is carried out in Dedicated Educational Units (DEU), within psychiatric and orthopedic care. Three perspectives are illustrated in the project; that of the students, the supervisors and the patients. The overall aim is to develop a supervision model that has the potential to support the students’ learning processes as well as the patients’ caring processes. The second illustrates how the concepts ‘patient perspective’ and ‘patient participation’ can be implemented in a clinical setting for elderly patients in order to improve the quality of care. This project is inspired by Participatory Action Research and is built on collaboration between the university and the health care services. The aim is to develop reflective educational material in terms of filmed drama episodes, based on the result of two studies about elderly patients’ participation in team meetings. The third illustrates the perspective of lifeworld didactics in two phenomenological studies that focus on Students` learning in an encounter with patients and Students` learning on the way to becoming professional - supported by supervision in pairs of students. The findings show patterns of essential meanings that have specific significance in the art of supporting students` learning in clinical education. These are; the significance of responsibility, its extent and shape in relation to the supervisor’s ability to adopt a reflective supervising attitude and to be supportive enough but at the same time to not assume the responsibility. The learning process shows to be a challenge for students, where safety in pairs of students has a great significance when coping with the challenge to learn and develop.

  • 40.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Horberg, Ulrica
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Holst, Hanna
    Andersson, Niklas
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    The Encounter between Caring Sciences and the Lifeworld: The Art of Making Knowledge Alive and Embodied2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientific knowledge is characterized by abstract descriptions and structures, which are not identical to the lived reality. Scientific knowledge cannot directly be applied on the lived existence, without being transformed and adjusted to the individual’s very complex lifeworld. Learning in caring contexts is an encounter between the scientific knowledge of caring and the learner’s lifeworld. This encounter needs a support that has the potential to bring caring science to life and to start an intertwining process with the lifeworld that creates embodied knowledge. Lifeworld didactics are built on an approach about learning as an individual process and that learning takes its point of departure in the learner’s previous experiences, which accompanies the learning process. The challenges within lifeworld didactics are to be open and sensitive to the learner’s lifeworld and with tact support the development of a reflective attitude in the learning process. Lifeworld didactics strategies are of crucial importance in different caring contexts. This symposium presents three lifeworld led phenomenological research projects that have focused on acquiring caring science knowledge in caring contexts, more precisely it is the encounter between caring science and the lifeworld. The research is within the framework of lifeworld didactics, but the three projects each have a special focus.

  • 41.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ekebergh, Margareta
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    The ICU patient room: Views and meanings as experienced by the next of kin: A phenomenological hermeneutical study2012In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 176-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rooms in Intensive Care Units are considered as high-tech environments and believed to affect recovery process and wellbeing of patients. Moreover, the design and interiors affect the interplay between the patient and the next of kin. Objective The aim of this study was to describe and interpret the meanings of the intensive care patient room as experienced by next of kin. Design Next of kin (n = 14) from two different intensive care units participated. Data were collected through photo-voice and analysed using aphenomenological hermeneutical method. Results Three major themes emerged; dwelling in the room and time, becoming at home and extension of the room. The results show that the room is perceived as a lived and extended place and space. The design, interiors and furnishing in the patient room are fundamental in shaping the next of kin's experiences in the room and affect wellbeing. Conclusions How intensive care patient rooms are designed, the place given to next of kin and the way they are received in the room are decisive for the support given to the loved one. Simple interventions can make the patient room a more healing environment.

  • 42. Larsson, Margaretha
    et al.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    The influence of living conditions on adolescent girls' health2012In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescence is described by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare as the healthiest period in life. However, adolescent girls differ in that they self-report that their health decreases with age. The aim of this hermeneutical study was to describe the meaning of living conditions in relation to adolescent girls’ health. Guided by principles of reflective lifeworld research, 15 interviews with adolescent girls were analysed. The result section consists of four narratives with their existential interpretations illustrating different ways of approaching living conditions and their meaning for health and well-being. The narratives are: Approaching everyday life in a balanced way—feeling harmonious; approaching everyday life with ambiguity—feeling confused; approaching everyday life as an intellectual project—striving for control; approaching everyday life as a struggle—feeling forlorn. In addition, a comprehensive understanding was developed by using the lifeworld dimensions: lived body, lived room, lived time, and lived relations. These dimensions may deepen the understanding of important parts of those living conditions which are meaningful for the girls’ health and well-being. By using the dimensions, complex living conditions have been explored and the meaning of different parts clarified. The girls’ thoughts and feelings are often ambiguous and sometimes contradictory, depending on the situation. The health of adolescent girls needs to be understood against the background of their experiences of living conditions. One way to support their health and well-being seems to be to supply them with forums where they can talk about their living conditions.

  • 43.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Tillämpning av vårdvetenskapliga begrepp i vårdandet.2012In: Vårdvetenskapliga begrepp i teori och praktik. / [ed] I L.Wiklund Gustin & I. Bergbom(red)., Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2012, 1, p. 487-502Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44. Elmqvist, Carina
    et al.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Trapped between doing and being: First provider´s experiences of ”front line” work2012In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 113-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common focus in research studies within the Emergency Department (ED) is physician patient relations, experiences of the triage model and nurses´ experiences of caring. Little has, however, been written about different first providers´ experiences of working on the “front line” at the ED. The aim of this study was to describe and understand experiences of being the first provider on the “front line” at the ED, as expressed by nurse assistants, registered nurses and physicians. A reflective lifeworld research approach was used in four different caring situations. The data consisted of eight open-ended interviews with first providers. The analysis showed that being the first provider on the “front line” at the ED entails a continuous movement between providing and responding through performing “life-saving” actions and at the same time create a good relationship with the patient and the next of kin. Five constituents further described the variations of the phenomenon. The readiness to save lives creates a perceived stress of time pressure and the first providers adopt different strategies to cope with the work. Instead of leaving the first providers to find their own way to cope with the complex situation, there are needs for a redesigning of the internal work process within ED organizations.

  • 45. Wiklund Gustin, Lena
    et al.
    Bergbom, Ingegerd
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Vårdvetenskapliga begrepp i teori och praktik2012Book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    A Learning Model for Nursing Students during Clinical Studies2011In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 384-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a research project where the aim was to develop a new model for learning support in nursing education that makes it possible for the student to encounter both the theoretical caring science structure and the patient’s lived experiences in his/her learning process. A reflective group supervision model was developed and tested. The supervision was lead by a teacher and a nurse and started in patient narratives that the students brought to the supervision sessions. The narratives were analyzed by using caring science concepts with the purpose of creating a unity of theory and lived experiences. Data has been collected and analyzed phenomenologically in order to develop knowledge of the students’ reflection and learning when using the supervision model. The result shows that the students have had good use of the theoretical concepts in creating a deeper understanding for the patient. They have learned to reflect more systematically and the learning situation has become more realistic to them as it is now carried out in a patient near context. In order to reach these results, however, demands the necessity of recognizing the students’ lifeworld in the supervision process.

  • 47.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Didaktik med livsvärlden som grund inom vård och omsorg2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Giving voice to loved ones: Using photo-voice as a data collection method in ICU2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is a place of care for the most critically ill patients. The ICU rooms are considered to be one of the most complicated rooms to design. Providing successful intensive care requires that human, technologies and spatial resources are integrated in a rigorous way. Research shows that being a patient or next-of-kin in ICU is a traumatic experience not only because of the illness but also because of one’s human existence is threatened. Literature suggests that the presence of next-of-kin and the design of ICU affect the patients’ recovery and wellbeing.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 49. Hörberg, Ulrica
    et al.
    Ozolins, Lise-Lotte
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Intertwining caring science, practice and caring education from a lifeworld perspective: two contextual examples2011In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 6, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes how caring science can be a helpful foundation for caring practice and what kind of learning support that can enable the transformation of caring science into practice. The lifeworld approach is fundamental for both caring and learning. This will be illustrated in two examples from research that show the potential for promoting health and wellbeing as well as the learning process. One example is from a caring context and the other is from a learning context. In this article, learning and caring are understood as parallel processes. We emphasize that learning cannot be separated from life and thus caring and education is intertwined with caring science and life. The examples illustrate how an understanding of the intertwining can be fruitful in different contexts. The challenge is to implant a lifeworld-based approach on caring and learning that can lead to strategies that in a more profound way have the potential to strengthen the person’s health and learning processes.

  • 50.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Andersson, Niklas
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Is caring and learning an intertwined Phenomenon?2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This research aims to deepen knowledge whether caring and learning are an intertwined phenomenon in Dedicated Educational Units (DEU). The context is psychiatric and orthopaedic care, and the research is based on caring science.

    The research question is this: What characterizes the relationship between caring and learning in a DEU? This will be illuminated from three perspectives; the student, supervisor and patient perspectives.

    The question for the student is this: What is it like to learn the nursing profession by caring for patients on a DEU? The question for the supervisor is this: What is it like to supervise nursing students on a DEU? And the final question is directed at the patient: What is it like to be cared for by nursing students in a DEU?

    The underpinning philosophical and theoretical perspectives are lifeworld theory, caring science and its didactics.

    The aim of this project is to develop a supervision model that views caring and learning as an intertwined concept with the potential to support students‟ learning processes as well as patients‟ caring processes.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 51.
    Margareta, Ekebergh
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Knowledge for Caring Science: Directions and Options2011Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 52. Galvin, K
    et al.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Todres, L
    Lifeworld Theory as a helpful foundation for Caring Science2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Patient safety in relation to the design of the patient room2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    he demographic changes in Western countries, with an aging population and medical and technological progresses, have meant an increased demand on treating multi-morbid patients in intensive care units (Rashid, 2006). Intensive care room is the core of all activities in providing care for the most critically ill patients. According to European Society of intensive Care Medicine, providing a safe and high quality care requires an integration of human, technological and spatial recourses. The patient rooms in ICU are usually crowded places, characterized by high prevalence of stressors such as high levels of sound and strong lighting and constant activity with a negative effect on the patients’ recovery process. Previous research indicates that the design of patient rooms in ICU can be one of the causes of developing ICU delirium (Dubois, Bergeron, Dumont, Dial och Skrobik 2001). Furthermore, it is highlighted that there is an increase risk of medical errors in ICU environment due to high levels of sound (Christensen, 2002). Patient safety means preventing suffering or damages of any kind, caused by the health care provider or due to milieu related factors. The design and interior of ICU can have an impact on the patient safety and treatment outcomes. The presentation will focus on how design and interior of ICU rooms can meet the demands of patient safety.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 54.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Photo-Voice as a Data Collection Method in ICU2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The demographic changes in Western countries, with an aging population and medical and technological progresses, have meant an increased demand on treating multi-morbid patients in intensive care units (Rashid, 2006). Intensive care room is the core of all activities in providing care for the most critically ill patients. According to European Society of intensive Care Medicine, providing a safe and high quality care requires an integration of human, technological and spatial recourses. The patient rooms in ICU are usually crowded places, characterized by high prevalence of stressors such as high levels of sound and strong lighting and constant activity with a negative effect on the patients’ recovery process. Previous research indicates that the design of patient rooms in ICU can be one of the causes of developing ICU delirium (Dubois, Bergeron, Dumont, Dial och Skrobik 2001). Furthermore, it is highlighted that there is an increase risk of medical errors in ICU environment due to high levels of sound (Christensen, 2002). Patient safety means preventing suffering or damages of any kind, caused by the health care provider or due to milieu related factors. The design and interior of ICU can have an impact on the patient safety and treatment outcomes. The presentation will focus on how design and interior of ICU rooms can meet the demands of patient safety.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 55.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    The ICU patient room: Views and meanings as experienced by the next of kin2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intensive care unit, ICU, is considered to be one the most complicated area for care of critically ill patients. The rooms in ICU are small and narrow and the high tech environment believes to affect patients and next-of-kin wellbeing. Previous research reveals that a large number of patients suffer from unreal experiences, often very traumatic during their stay in ICU. Unpleasant memories and risk of developing post traumatic stress after discharge from ICU is rather common. In this context next-of-kin play an important and crucial role for supporting the patient though the process of illness and recovery. Next-of-kin in ICU are considered to be a lifeline for patients. Furthermore, the design and interiors of ICU affect the interplay between the patient and the next-of-kin.

    Download (pdf)
    sammanfattning
  • 56. Elmqvist, C.
    et al.
    Brunt, D.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Being first on the scene of an accident: experiences of "doing" prehospital emergency care2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 266-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prehospital emergency care includes the care and treatment of patients prior to them reaching hospital. This is generally a field for the ambulance services, but in many cases firemen or police can be the ones to provide the first responses. The aim of this study was to describe and understand experiences of being the first responder on the scene of an accident, as described by policemen, firemen and ambulance staff. A lifeworld perspective was used in four different traumatic situations from southern Sweden. The data consisted of 13 unstructured interviews with first responders. The phenomenological analysis showed that experiences of being the first responder on the scene of an accident is expectations of doing a systematic course of action, dressed in the role of a hero, and at the same time being genuine in an interpersonal encounter. This entails a continuous movement between ‘being’ and ‘doing’. It is not a question of either – or, instead everything is to be understood in relation to each other at the same time. Five constituents further described the variations of the phenomenon; a feeling of security in the uncertainty, a distanced closeness to the injured person, one moment in an eternity, cross-border cooperation within distinct borders and a need to make the implicit explicit. This finding highlights the importance of using policemen and firemen in doing life support measures while waiting for the ambulance staff, and would in turn increase the importance of the relationship between the different professionals on the scene of an accident.

  • 57.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Developing a supervision model in clinical practice that emphasizes lifeworld as a basis for learning2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 58. Johansson, K.
    et al.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    A lifeworld phenomenological study of the experience of falling ill with diabetes2009In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 197-203Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Att lära sig vårda med hjälp av handledning2009Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den livsvärldsdidaktiska forskningen har fokus på hur lärandet kan optimeras med betoning på hur teoretisk praxisrelaterad kunskap kan sammanflätas med den lärandes livsvärld. Reflexionens betydelse i denna lärandeprocess är central i forskningen. Forskningen syftar till att utveckla lärandestöd, såsom handledning, som kan öka vårdstudenters och vårdares möjligheter att möta och förstå patientens värld. Detta är en grundförutsättning för god vård. Avsikten med denna bok, som bygger på resultat av just denna forskning, är att klargöra vad lärande innebär, dess villkor och förutsättningar men också hur lärande om och i vårdsammanhang kan stödjas ur ett livsvärldsdidaktiskt perspektiv. Nyckelfenomenen är reflexion och handledning.

  • 60.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Developing a Didactic Method that Emphasizes Lifeworld as a Basis for Learning2009In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 51-63Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Livsvärldsdidaktik på vårdvetenskaplig grund i sjuksköterske- och specialistutbildningar: utveckling av en handledningsmodell2009Report (Other academic)
  • 62. Almerud, S
    et al.
    Alapack, R.J.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö University.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Växjö University.
    Beleuguered by technology: Care in technologically intense environments2008In: Nursing Philosophy, ISSN 1466-7681, E-ISSN 1466-769X, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 55-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern technology has enabled the use of new forms of information in the care of critically ill patients. In intensive care units (ICUs), technology can simultaneously reduce the lived experience of illness and magnify the objective dimensions of patient care. The aim of this study, based upon two empirical studies, is to find from a philosophical point of view a more comprehensive understanding for the dominance of technology within intensive care. Along with caring for critically ill patients, technology is part of the ICU staff's everyday life. Both technology and caring relationships are of indispensable value. Tools are useful, but technology can never replace the closeness and empathy of the human touch. It is a question of harmonizing the demands of subjectivity with objective signs. The challenge for caregivers in ICU is to know when to heighten the importance of the objective and measurable dimensions provided by technology and when to magnify the patients’ lived experiences, and to live and deal with the ambiguity of the technical dimension of care and the human side of nursing.

  • 63. Galvin, Kathleen
    et al.
    Emami, Azita
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Rosser, Elisabeth
    Powell, Jane
    Bach, Shirley
    Edlund, Birgitta
    Bondas, Terese
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth
    Challenges for future caring science research: a response to Hallberg (2006)2008In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 971-974Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a direct and somewhat provocative editorial in IJNS (43) pp. 923–927, Hallberg (2006) raises several challenges for nursing research if it is to provide useful evidence for health-care practice in both the short and the long term. We wish to offer a response to Hallberg’s challenges and to add support to her general call. In particular we wish to consider the challenges she poses in the wider context of caring science rather than the more limited perspective of nursing science. In the spirit of constructive debate we counter some of the claims made and indicate some areas for future direction which embrace a more epistemologically sound view of knowledge generation, which is methodologically sensitive to different research questions. This direction we believe is at the heart of what caring and nursing science is about.

  • 64. Galvin, K
    et al.
    Emami, A
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Rosser, E
    Powell, J
    Bach, S
    Edlund, B
    Bondas, Terese
    Uhrenfeldt, L
    European Academy of Caring Science2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 65. Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Livsvärldspedagogik i sjuksköterskeutbildningen och specialistutbildningen- utveckling av en didaktisk metod som bejakar livsvärlden som grund i lärandet2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 66. Elmqvist, C
    et al.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    More than medical treatment: The patient’s first encounter with prehospital emergency care2008In: International Emergency Nursing, ISSN 1755-599X, E-ISSN 1878-013X, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 185-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common feature of emergency care services is the short, fragmented encounters with great demands for rapid treatment and efficiency. The aim of this study was to describe and understand the patient’s first encounter with prehospital emergency care as experienced by the patient and the first responders. A lifeworld perspective was used in four different traumatic situations. The data consisted of 18 unstructured interviews with patients and first responders. The phenomenological analysis showed that the concept of lifesaving means more than just upholding vital functions. The patient needs to retain his/her identity by means of a communicative contact, to be confirmed in the lived encounter and to recapitulate the elapsed time of the unexpected event in order to regain a state of equilibrium. Five constituents further described the variations of the patients’ first encounter; the encounter with the helpless injured body, the confirming existential encounter, the encounter while waiting, the lived encounter and the recapitulated encounter. This finding highlights the importance of a new understanding about empowering the patient with narratives throughout the whole caring process. There are also implications for educating personnel and students in emergency care about the first encounter with the patient in emergency care where the senses, the time and the narrative are essential elements that are unique for each person.

  • 67.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    The challange to enable the path from theory to parctice on the basis of a lifeworld perrspective in nursing education2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 68. Dahlberg, Karin
    et al.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    To use a method without being ruled by it: Learning supported by drama in the integration of theory with healthcare Practice2008In: Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology, ISSN 2079-7222, E-ISSN 1445-7377, Vol. 8, no special edition, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study reported in this paper focused on nursing students' learning and, in particular, their integration of caring science in theory and practice. An educational model incorporating educational drama was developed for implementation in three different teaching contexts within the nursing and midwifery study programmes at a Swedish college. A central aim was to understand the dynamics of educational drama in the healthcare context and its impact on learning and teaching. Using a phenomenological approach, seventeen students and six teachers were interviewed and their experience of drama as an educational method explored. The research findings illustrate the meaning of learning and teaching that is sensitive to students' lifeworld experiences. In order to be a successful method for closing the gap between caring science theory and practice, not only the educational drama, but teaching in general, must be anchored in the lived world of the students - that is, their experiences of health and care. While embodied reflection, as a key factor in integrating theory and practice, was shown to be well supported by educational drama, it was also found that "the method" tends too readily to take over and govern teaching and learning. The findings of this study further indicate how learning in practice and embodied reflection can be supported by the inclusion of well-chosen caring science theory to cast light on caring practice dilemmas.

  • 69.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Vårdvetenskapens didaktik2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Parallellt med uppbyggnaden av den vårdvetenskapliga forskarutbildningen vid Växjö universitet har utveckling och forskning av didaktiken inom vårdvetenskapen pågått. Med vårdvetenskaplig didaktik, avses lärandestöd i vårdkontexter i såväl utbildningar som kliniska verksamheter. Mer preciserat handlar det om hur lärandet kan stödjas för att optimera möjligheterna att stödja patienters hälsoprocesser i vårdandet. Av detta följer att vårdvetenskapens didaktik som kunskapsområde inbegriper lärandestöd för vårdstuderande av alla slag samt vårdpersonal, men också för patienter och deras närstående. I föreliggande sammanställning används främst begreppet student för den lärande, beroende på att den didaktik som här beskrivs härleds företrädesvis från vårdvetenskapliga utbildningssammanhang, så som sjuksköterskeutbildning.

  • 70. Almerud, S
    et al.
    Alapack, R.J.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö University.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Caught in an Artificial Split: A Phenomenological Study of Being a Caregiver in the Technologically Intense Environment2007In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 130-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A symbiotic relationship exists between technology and caring, however, technologically advanced environments challenge caregivers. The aim of this study is to uncover the meaning of being a caregiver in the technologically intense environment. Ten open-ended interviews with intensive care personnel comprise the data. A phenomenological analysis shows that ambiguity abounds in the setting. The act of responsibly reading and regulating instruments easily melds the patient and the machinery into one clinical picture. The fusion skews the balance between objective distance and interpersonal closeness. The exciting captivating lure of technological gadgets seduces the caregivers and lulls them into a fictive sense of security and safety. It is mind-boggling and heart-rending to juggle ‘moments’ of slavish mastery and security menaced by insecurity in the act of monitoring a machine while caring for a patient. Whenever the beleaguered caregiver splits technique from human touch, ambiguity decays into ambivalence. Caring and technology become polarized. Everyone loses. Caregiver competence wanes; patients suffer. The intensive care unit should be technologically sophisticated, but also build-in a disclosive space where solace, trust, and reassurance naturally happen. Caring professionals need to balance state-of-the-art technology with integrated and comprehensive care and harmonize the demands of subjectivity with objective signs.

  • 71.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Developing a Didactic Method that Emphasizes Lifeworld as a basis for learning2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The learning process for nursing students is characterised by the encounter between the student’s own lifeworld and scientific knowledge in theory and in practice. The aim is for the students to be able to gain sufficient knowledge so that they can understand the patient and the care context where the world of the patient is in focus. Didactics is needed in order to provide support for this meeting and create the conditions for a reflective process that strengthens the integration between the lifeworld and theoretical and practical knowledge. The purpose of the present project was to develop a supervision model which is able to meet these demands. Furthermore, we intended to develop a form of examination for the clinical training that makes it possible to assess the development of the student’s understanding of the patient’s own situation and needs. This project has been financially supported by the Council for the Renewal of Higher Education in Sweden.

  • 72.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Learning Caring Science Theory in Nursing Education2007In: Nursing Education Challenges in the 21st Century / [ed] Leana E Callara, New Jersey: Nova Science Publishers, Inc , 2007, p. 295-308Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lifeworld-based reflection and learning: a contribution to the reflective practice in nursing and nursing education2007In: Reflective Practice, ISSN 1462-3943, E-ISSN 1470-1103, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 331-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article illustrates the significance of reflection in nursing and nursing education. In this context reflection is often used as a method that has its roots in Schön's theory of developing knowledge in action through reflection. This approach to reflection is investigated by using the lifeworld theory. Three aspects are used to comprehend the meaning of reflection; the natural attitude, the reflective attitude and the open-minded attitude. These lead us to an understanding that reflection may never be objectified or reduced to a separate process. The article thus strongly refutes the idea that reflection has a technological function in relation to the learning of nursing and caring science knowledge. Describing reflection merely as an educational method or tool is, on this understanding, considered insufficient. A lifeworld perspective allows a new and deeper understanding of the role of reflection in nursing students' learning processes and also in students' abilities to integrate caring science theory with caring practice. This new understanding may have considerable implications for changes in nursing education.

  • 74.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Rees, K
    Galvin, K
    Petersson, B-O
    Lifeworld-led Education in Health and Social Care2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 75. Almerud, S
    et al.
    Alapack, R.J.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö University.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Växjö University.
    Of vigilance and invisibility: being a patient in technologically intense environments2007In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 151-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Equipment and procedures developed during the past several decades have made the modern intensive care unit (ICU) the hospital’s most technologically advanced environment. In terms of patient care, are these advances unmitigated gains? This study aimed to develop a knowledge base of what it means to be critically ill or injured and cared for in technologically intense environments. A lifeworld perspective guided the investigation. Nine unstructured interviews with intensive care patients comprise its data. The qualitative picture uncovered by a phenomenological analysis shows that contradiction and ambivalence characterized the entire care episode. The threat of death overshadows everything and perforates the patient’s existence. Four inter-related constituents further elucidated the patients’ experiences: the confrontation with death, the encounter with forced dependency, an incomprehensible environment and the ambiguity of being an object of clinical vigilance but invisible at the personal level. Neglect of these issues lead to alienating ‘moments’ that compromised care. Fixed at the end of a one-eyed clinical gaze, patients described feeling marginalized, subjected to rituals of power, a stranger cared for by a stranger. The roar of technology silences the shifting needs of ill people, muffles the whispers of death and compromises the competence of the caregivers. This study challenges today’s caregiving system to develop double vision that would balance clinical competence with a holistic, integrated and comprehensive approach to care. Under such vision, subjectivity and objectivity would be equally honoured, and the broken bonds re-forged between techne, ‘the act of nursing’, and poesis, ‘the art of nursing’.

  • 76.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Petersson, B-O
    Developing a didactic method that links the student’s lifeworld with caring science in theory and practice2006In: 4th International Research and Development Conference, Theory and Practice in nursing Education, County of Aarhus, DenmarkArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Dahlberg, H
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Patients longing for authentic personal care: A phenomenological study of violent encounters in psychiatric settings2006In: Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1353-0283, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 287-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on patients' violence against caregivers. Several studies show that violence and threats within the health care setting are an increasing problem. Encounters that become violent have been the issue of many debates but the phenomenon is still not fully understood. It is important to understand the course of events in violent encounters, both for the sake of the patients and the caregivers' well-being. The aim of this study was to describe the essence of violent encounters, as experienced by nine patients within psychiatric care. Guided by a phenomenological method, data were analyzed within a reflective lifeworld approach. The findings explicate violent encounters characterized by a tension between “authentic personal” and “detached impersonal” caring. “Authentic personal” patients are encountered in an undisguised, straightforward, and open way, and they sense unrestricted respect that caregivers would show another human being. In these encounters violence does not develop well. However, in caring that is “detached impersonal,” the encounters are experienced by the patients as uncontrolled and insecure. These encounters are full of risks and potential violence.

  • 78.
    Sundler J, Annelie
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    The Meaning of Well-being and Participation in the Process of Health and Care: Women’s experiences following a myocardial infarction.2006In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 100-108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 79.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Are you in control of the method or is the method in control of you?2005In: Nurse Educator, ISSN 0363-3624, E-ISSN 1538-9855, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 259-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The starting point for this article is the concept that there is a risk in slavishly adhering to one particular method in nursing education. With this approach in mind, the aim was to examine the use of an educational model with drama in relation to Gadamer's idea of method, as well as to discuss the conditions for lifeworld dialogues in learning encounters.

  • 80. Ekebergh, Margaretha
    et al.
    Petersson, B-O
    Developing a didactic method that emphasises lifeworld as a basis for learning2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 81.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Petersson, B-O
    Developing a didactic method that links the student’s lifeworld with caring science in theory and practice2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 82.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Määttä, Sylvia
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lärandet på en utbildningsvårdavdelning: att sammanbinda vårdvetenskaplig teori med vårdpraxis2005Report (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Caritativ didaktik i patientnära kontexter: konsten att stödja lärandet på en vårdvetenskaplig grund2004In: Vårdvetenskapens didaktik, Caritativ didaktik i vårdandets tjänst, ISSN 0786-3578, Vol. 9, p. 101-113Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 84. Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Didaktik med livsvärlden som grund inom vårdvetenskap2004In: Vårdforskning, ISSN 0786-3578, Vol. 9, p. 115-133Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    En grundstruktur med tre didaktiska teser för vårdvetenskapens didaktik2004In: Vårdforskning, ISSN 0786-3578, Vol. 9, p. 85-99Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 86.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lifeworld based learning and reflection2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 87.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lepp, Margret
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Reflective learning with Drama in Nursing Education: a Swedish attempt to overcome the theory praxis gap2004In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 622-628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is obvious that the gap between theory and praxis in nursing education affects the students’ ability to develop understanding and professional knowledge that stems both from theory and practice. Appropriate didactic methods are thus needed in nursing education. In a project we developed and practised a didactic model with the intention of encouraging a reflective attitude within the student, considering caring science in theory as well as in praxis. The didactic model, based on educational drama, was implemented during three terms of the nursing education programme. In this paper we present the educational model and its theoretical foundation. We also present the preliminary outcomes of the project.

  • 88.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Lepp, Margret
    Reflekterande handledning med dramapedagogik: en metod för integrering av vårdvetenskap i teori med vård303 praxis2004Report (Other academic)
  • 89.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ironside, P.M.
    Converging conversations from phenomenological pedagogies: Toward a science of health professions education2003In: Teaching the Practitioners of Care: New Pedagogies for the Health Professions, University of Wisconsin Press, 2003, p. 22-58Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 90.
    Sundler J, Annelie
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Living with experiences following a myocardial infarction.2003In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 229-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coronary heart disease is a major cause of sudden death and morbidity in the developed world, as well as a cause of great suffering. Research within this area has primarily focused symptoms, risk factors and treatment. The aim of this paper was to explore women's experiences following a myocardial infarction (MI). Eight women were interviewed; the interviews were audiotaped and transcribed into text and analysed using a phenomenological approach. To explore the meaning that is experienced in the lived world of the patient a method of reflective lifeworld research, based upon phenomenological epistemology has been used. The results indicate that the body is vital for the women in their lifeworlds. After a MI the patient's natural and unreflective relationship with the body and the lived world is interrupted. Uncertainty about life and death as well as the body is experienced as a suffering in the women's lifeworlds. In relation to this, the women's existence is characterised by an uncertainty and a loss of context. It is through reconciliation with their bodies and their illnesses that the women can achieve a sense of well-being and harmony in life. In that process the women can re-establish a natural relationship with their bodies and lifeworlds.

  • 91.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    The art of practicing a method without being directed by the method2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 92.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Reflection as learning from a lifeworld perspective2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 93. Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Handledning som ett vårddidaktiskt redskap i personlig: och yrkesmässig växt i sjuksköterskeutbildningen2000Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 94. Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Reflection as a tool to integrate theory and practice1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 95. Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Supervision as nursing education tool for personal and professional growth1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 96.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Handledning i yrkesmässig växt i sjuksköterskeutbildningen1998In: HYV – Handledning i yrkesmässig växt inom vården / [ed] Karin Dahlberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 1998Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Omvårdnadsdokumentationens referensram1996In: Konsten att dokumentera omvårdnad / [ed] Karin Dahlberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 1996Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 98.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Utveckling av ett dokumentationsinstrument för omvårdnad inom somatisk länssjukvård1996In: Konsten att dokumentera omvårdnad / [ed] Karin Dahlberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 1996Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 98 of 98
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