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  • 1. Brown, Shannon
    et al.
    Ortiz-Catalan, Max
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Petersson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Rödby, Kristian
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Seoane, Fernando
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi. KTH-School of Technology and Health.
    Intarsia-sensorized band and textrodes for real-time myoelectric pattern recognition2016Inngår i: Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC), 2016 IEEE 38th Annual International Conference of the, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) , 2016, s. 6074-6077Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface Electromyography (sEMG) has applications in prosthetics, diagnostics and neuromuscular rehabilitation. Self-adhesive Ag/AgCl are the electrodes preferentially used to capture sEMG in short-term studies, however their long-term application is limited. In this study we designed and evaluated a fully integrated smart textile band with electrical connecting tracks knitted with intarsia techniques and knitted textile electrodes. Real-time myoelectric pattern recognition for motor volition and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were used to compare its sensing performance versus the conventional Ag-AgCl electrodes. After a comprehending measurement and performance comparison of the sEMG recordings, no significant differences were found between the textile and the Ag-AgCl electrodes in SNR and prediction accuracy obtained from pattern recognition classifiers.

  • 2. Brown, Shannon
    et al.
    Ortiz-Catalan, Max
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Petersson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi. Högskolan i Borås.
    Rödby, Kristian
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Seoane, Fernando
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi. KTH-School of Technology and Health.
    Intarsia-Sensorized Band and Textrodes for the Acquisition of Myoelectric Signals2016Inngår i: The Second International Conference on Smart Portable, Wearable, Implantable and Disability-oriented Devices and Systems, International Academy, Research and Industry Association (IARIA) , 2016, s. 14-19, artikkel-id 2_10_80013Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface Electromyography (sEMG) has applications in prosthetics, diagnostics and neuromuscular rehabilitation, and has been an increasing area of study. This study attempts to use a fully integrated smart textile band with electrical connecting tracks knitted with intarsia techniques to evaluate the quality of sEMG acquired by knitted textile electrodes. Myoelectric pattern recognition for motor volition and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were used to compare its sensing performance versus the conventional Ag-AgCl electrodes. Overall no significant differences were found between the textile and the Ag-AgCl electrodes in SNR and prediction accuracy obtained from pattern recognition classifiers. On average the textile electrodes produced a high prediction accuracy, >97% across all movements, which is equivalent to the accuracy obtained with conventional gel electrodes (Ag-AgCl). Furthermore the SNR for the Maximum Voluntary Contraction did not differ considerably between the textile and the Ag-AgCl electrodes.

  • 3.
    Ekwall, Daniel
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Ottosson, T.
    Peterson, J.
    Svensson, E.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Adding custumer demand information: a method for increasing the "sell-though factor" in fast fashion2006Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 4.
    Guo, Li
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Qureshi, Waqas
    Kalantar Mehrjerdi, Adib
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Berglin, Lena
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Knitted Wearable Stretch Sensor for Breathing Monitoring Application2011Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 5.
    Jain, Sheenam
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Sundström, Malin
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Mass Customized Fashion: Importance of Data Sharing in the Supply Chain2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The presence of mass customization (MC) in the fashion industry was recognized a long time ago, but still, has not reached its full potential. Surprisingly, MC is still confused with mass produced ready-to-wear fashion (Fiore, Lee, & Kunz, 2004). MC is a production strategy to generate individual uniqueness at low cost, where globalization and technological improvements, has made the fashion industry even more competitive (De Raeve, Cools, De Smedt, & Bossaer, 2012). In our contemporary fashion retail world with an expanding supply from omni-channel retailers and e-tailers, the market for fashion has become overwhelming, and might become a serious threat to sustainability if the industry keeps on producing to an overheated market (Claudio, 2007). With an overflow of fashion products, retail strategies are changing, embracing motivational drivers such as individualization of shopping in terms of services, often illustrated as curated retailing[1] (Sebald & Jacob, 2018). This phenomenon could be seen as mass customization of services, where retailers are trying to tailor both online and offline shopping experience to every unique customer with the help of personal shoppers and/or advices, combined with individual offerings and campaigns (price, delivery costs, brands, and customer happenings). But where can we identify true MC with promising ideas, contributing to a more sustainable fashion industry?

    Today, individualized offering in terms of garment’s style, fit and color can be found on many online mass customization stores, with limited reach to physical stores mainly because e-channel makes information collection and order processing faster and easier (Li, Huang, Cheng, & Ji, 2015). For instance, the Swedish online retailer Tailor Store AB, started offering mass-customized shirts for men in the year 2003 (“Tailor Store: One Size Only – Yours. Skräddarsydda skjortor.,” n.d.). This online fashion retailer has an interactive online product configurator that allows the customer to tailor the shirt according to individual needs and wants. People can change the style, fabric and fit by interacting with their online product configurator. However, a configurator like that increases the complexity of production processes (Mukherjee, 2017) and affects the objective of low costs. Many operations still require manual work like adapting the standard size pattern to the newly obtained measurements, adjusting the production plan, as every garment is unique in some way. This becomes a hindrance to achieve cost-efficiency and hence is an unresolved issue from the industry point of view (Zancul, Durao, Rocha, & Silva, 2016). Due to the need of manual work described above, the so called mass customization can’t really be seen as “mass” produced. In addition, another company called Unmade (“Home | Unmade,” n.d.), realized a business opportunity in this regard. It introduced an online platform that connects the customer and manufacturer by transforming customer needs into production ready information. With this platform they combined the roles of various supply chain actors to provide a common solution for several participators.  

    It can be inferred from the above instance that every actor in the fashion supply chain holds a certain type of end-user data. It is not certain, however, that there is an effective mechanism of information sharing within the fashion chain, even if many agrees upon the promising future for MC. MC requires an integrated supply chain to facilitate seamless information flow. This can provide additional data that can be utilized for designing an efficient MC Service and in turn enhancing customer experience (Grieco et al., 2017).

     

    Purpose & Research Question

    Currently, the major reason for disintegration in the MC supply chain is due to competition. Because of which the manufacturer offer standardized garments through retailers and customized garments through their online channel (Li et al., 2015). We believe that the fashion industry is ready to seek joint ventures among its various actors to innovate the processes that can facilitate mass customization. There is a need for the actors to recognize the value of data they possess for the development of the fashion industry as a whole. In this regard, the aim of this paper is to address the following research question:

    What kind of data is available in the fashion supply chain and what are the barriers that restrict various actors to share this data and work together to cater to the mass customization business model?

     

    Design/methodology/approach

    We plan to present a Swedish case study based on interviews with various stakeholders (fashion designers, textile designers, fabric manufacturers, garment manufacturers, merchandisers, logistics & operations manager, and retailer) in the supply chain of a mass customization company.

    Findings

    We hope to present a case indicating that the promising idea with mass customization does not have to mean the downfall of the retail stores. In fact, the phenomenon should provide retailers with an opportunity to make use of the upcoming digital technologies, internet of things (IoT) and big data analytics for providing high-value services and unique experiences that drive the customers to the stores. Our ambition is to identify opportunities with data sharing and joint ventures with the common goal of designing a customer-centric supply chain that offers a completely customized purchasing experience, truly transforming the fashion retail industry.

    Preliminary findings from projects performed by one of the authors, supports the idea that data in the fashion supply chain is crucial in understanding customer behavior and knowing their preferences. Handling this big data smartly can give answers to umpteen questions related to but not restricted to most promising customer attribution channels and technologies (Shao & Li, n.d.). This data cannot only help in personalization but also target offers at point of sale and other touchpoints (any point of interaction with the customers), blending their offline and online presence (Meyer & Schwager, 2007).

    The most common type of data collected by the retailers is the customer’s purchase history, which does not help to comprehend each customer’s interests and preferences. The data collected by the retailers is of utmost importance as it is collected directly from the customer. However, the type of data that the retailers are gathering is not sufficient. According to a Forrester study, over 60% of the customers are willing to provide information directly to the retailers by filling short surveys or questionnaires. However, only 39% retailers are actually practicing this. In addition, the kind of information asked is not the ones customer actually would like to share (Murray & Consulting, 2017). The end aim should be an on-demand supply chain where it’s not just customization. Customization requires active participation from all the actors in the supply chain, so it is also the ability to re-stock the shops more efficiently and respond to trends quicker.

    [1] ”Curated retailing combines convenient online shopping with personal consultation service to provide a more personalized online experience through curated product selections, orientation and decision aids, and tailor-made solutions based on the customer's preferences” (Sebald & Jacob, 2018, p 189).

     

  • 6.
    Kadi, Nawar
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Holmudd, Olle
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Karnoub, Amer
    University of Aleppo.
    The Effect of Warp Tension on the Colour of Jacquard Fabric2017Inngår i: IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, 2017, Vol. 254, artikkel-id 082014Konferansepaper (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this paper is to demonstrate the effect of warp tension on fabric colour for several types of weaves structures, and found a relationship between them. The image analyse technique used to determine the proportion of yarns colour appearance, the advantage of this techniques is the rapidity and reliability. The woven fabric samples are consisting of a polyester warp yarn with continuous filaments and density of 33 end/cm, a polypropylene weft yarn with a density of 24 pick/cm, and the warp tension ranged between 12-22 cN/tex. The experimental results demonstrated the effect of the warp tension on the colour of fabric, and this effect is related to several factors, where the large proportion of warp appearance leads to larger effect on fabric colour. The difference in the value of colour differences ΔEcmc is larger is in the range 16 to 20 cN/tex of warp tension. Using statistical methods, a mathematical model to calculate the amount of the colour difference ΔEcmc caused by the change in warp tension had been proposed.

  • 7.
    Karnoub, Amer
    et al.
    Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Aleppo.
    Kadi, Nawar
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Holmudd, Olle
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    The Effect of Warp Tension on the Colour of Jacquard Fabric Made with Different Weaves Structures2017Inngår i: IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, ISSN 1757-8981, E-ISSN 1757-899X, Vol. 254Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this paper is to demonstrate the effect of warp tension on fabric colour for several types of weaves structures, and found a relationship between them. The image analyse technique used to determine the proportion of yarns colour appearance, the advantage of this techniques is the rapidity and reliability. The woven fabric samples are consisting of a polyester warp yarn with continuous filaments and density of 33 end/cm, a polypropylene weft yarn with a density of 24 pick/cm, and the warp tension ranged between 12-22 cN/tex. The experimental results demonstrated the effect of the warp tension on the colour of fabric, and this effect is related to several factors, where the large proportion of warp appearance leads to larger effect on fabric colour. The difference in the value of colour differences ΔEcmc is larger is in the range 16 to 20 cN/tex of warp tension. Using statistical methods, a mathematical model to calculate the amount of the colour difference ΔEcmc caused by the change in warp tension had been proposed.

  • 8.
    Larsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Mouwitz, Pia
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Knit on Demand: mass customisation of knitted fashion products2009Inngår i: Nordic Textile Journal, ISSN 1404-2487Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s fashion market is characterized by short life cycles, low predictability and high impulse purchasing. Many fashion companies are responding to this by constantly introducing new collections. Zara, which is considered to be the leader of fashion are introducing as many as 211 new models per week. One of the drawbacks of Zara’s and others’ methods is the resulting overproduction; many garments have to be sold to reduced price or are thrown away. An average of one third of the collections is considered waste. It costs money for the fashion companies; it reduces the sell-through factor and wastes natural resources. Knit on Demand is a research project at the Swedish School of Textiles that aims to reduce the waste and increase the sell-through factor and service level. A local producer of knitwear and a retailer of tailored fashion in Stockholm also participate in the project. The purpose of the project is to test new methods of supply chain management and to analyse whether mass customization is applicable on knitwear. There are several benefits with mass customised garments: the customer receives a garment that is better suited to his or her needs, the producer does not have to make garments on forecast, and the environment and natural resources are spared because only what is bought by the end consumer is produced and shipped.

  • 9.
    Larsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Evaluation of risks in a supply chain for customised knitwear2011Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of this paper It is generally accepted that short lead-times, postponement of processes and production close to the market decrease risk in supply chains. Knit-on-demand is a research project at the Swedish School of Textiles in collaboration with a knitwear manufacturer and a fashion retailer. In the project a business concept for mass customised knitwear has been developed and tested. This paper presents an evaluation of a risk analysis performed in 2007 on the Knit on Demand project. The evaluation in 2011 is made to conclude whether risks decreased with the mass customisation concept and if the expected results were the same as the outcome. Methodology The case study method is used and sources of evidence are interviews, documents, and value stream mapping. The data from the case studies are then converged in a “What-if” analysis. Findings The evaluation revealed how the risk level changes in a supply chain when introducing a mass customisation concept for fashion garments. Practical implications The concept was tested in its business environment for one year and four months. The tools developed for managing supply chain complexity and -risk in the Knit on Demand project are applicable to conventional knitwear production as well.

  • 10.
    Larsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Carlsson, Jan
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Andersson, Peter
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Knit On Demand: Simulation of an agile production and shop model for fashion products2007Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In fashion business customer demand is changing due to fashion trends and new designs. Time from customer demand to customer demand fulfillment is essential for company’s ability to compete in the fashion retailing business. During the last 20 years there has been a dramatic technical development in the production of flat knitted garments. This has made it possible to rationalize design and production in a way that it’s possible to make a knitted garment ready made directly in the knitting machine, with a minimum of after coming processes. Objective of this paper is to present a design, production and shop model for the “Knit on Demand” concept and show of how this new production technology could be implemented in a fast fashion logistics system. A business model with the knitting machines and production equipment located in the store is presented. The customer takes part in the design process and garments are customized to fulfill actual demand. Aim is to present a lead time simulation of design- and production processes involved in the shop concept. Result is a model with starting point in customer demand and final point in demand fulfillment. Simulation shows that the customer could have an own designed garment in 2-5 hours. Simulation of the developed shop model is done in the software tool AutoMod. Methodology for this paper is based on a research project of the Knit on demand concept idea at the University College of Borås, literature research and discussions with suppliers of knitting production equipment.

  • 11.
    Larsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Mattila, Heikki
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    The Knit on Demand Supply Chain2012Inngår i: AUTEX Research Journal, ISSN 1470-9589, E-ISSN 2300-0929, Vol. 12, nr 3, s. 67-75Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    As customers’ tastes become more differentiated, so must companies’ offerings evolve. The demand for variety may soon become unmanageable, and several companies are addressing this trend by adopting a system of mass customisation. One project, Knit on Demand, has been conducted by the Swedish School of Textiles in close collaboration with a knitting company and a retailer of tailored fashion in Stockholm. Production and sales of customised products pose logistical challenges for the companies involved, including the one-piece flow through almost the entire supply chain and the demand for short lead times in an otherwise slow environment, adding to the cost of manufacturing mass customised garments. Customisation has logistical benefits such as minimized inventory; hence, high inventory turnover and the possibility of fast response to meet customer demand. The Knit on Demand concept can be considered as leagile because it comprises both lean and agile components. It is lean in the manufacturing stage upstream and agile downstream to better respond to customer demand on the market.

  • 12.
    Larsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Mouwitz, Pia
    One-piece fashion, summary of Knit on Demand2010Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Knit on Demand is a research project at the Swedish School of Textiles in collaboration with Ivanhoe AB and SOMconcept AB. The purpose of the project is to test new production methods for knitwear that could strongly influence the fashion industry's need for agility. In autumn 2009 sales started in Stockholm. The project stands on three legs; design, knitting technology and logistics and the purpose of the paper is to describe the Knit on Demand project from these three perspectives. Designing the garments and the system was the most time consuming part of the project since the products had to be fashionable, manufacturable and preferably not to expensive so a few trade offs hade to be made. Look was however considered essential since fashion always comes first. For knitting a combination of fully fashion and cut and sew are used so that the garments keep some of the fully fashion advantages but remains easily customisable. Logistics becomes a little bit more complicated because of the unique garments but the logistic costs does still not make up more than 3-5 percent of the sales price of a garment. Return rates are below one percent, which is rather interesting to further analysis.

  • 13.
    Mouwitz, Pia
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Larsson, Jonas
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Beyond mass customisation: Mass individualisation2009Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    For some years customers have been able to purchase mass customized garments on the Internet and “Design your own...” is very often used to attract the customer. Most of the products are standard products that the customer are allowed to change in a number of predetermined ways. Design however is something more than just choosing the colour or changing the length of the arms, it also involves changing the silouette and the whole expression of the garment. The idea is to create the basis for a new type of design and manufacturing that allows true own design for everybody.

  • 14. Oscarsson, Linda
    et al.
    Jacobsen Heimdahl, Elisabeth
    Lundell, Torbjörn
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Development of a diamond shaped light radiating textile: an experimental flat knitting process with optical fibres2008Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is about the experimental product development of a light radiating textile lamp in which optical fibres are used as the only illumination source. The assigning company is GloFab, a company located in Stockholm, which designs different kinds of light radiating textile products. The paper is based on the work of a research project which had an inductive approach; the project consisted of a literature survey and experimental work on a flat knitting machine located in the knitting laboratory at the Swedish School of Textiles, in Borås, Sweden. The aim with the research project was to explore the possibilities to produce a knitted lampshade integrating optical fibres, shaped as a diamond with a hexagon basis (see Figure 1). This was done on an electronic flat knitting machine with special equipment suitable for the feeding of yarn with high stiffness. This is interesting for GloFab because it gives possibilities to industrialize the production process and by doing so reach a wider market. In a broader perspective it is relevant to study how new materials can be used in traditional textile processes. The product development consists of two parts: exploring the possibilities to knit the desired shape on one hand and experiments about knitting with optical fibres as a weft insertion on the other hand.

  • 15. Oscarsson, Linda
    et al.
    Jacobsen Heimdahl, Elisabeth
    Lundell, Torbjörn
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Flat knitting of a light emitting textile with optical fibres2009Inngår i: AUTEX Research Journal, ISSN 1470-9589, E-ISSN 2300-0929, Vol. 9, nr 2, s. 61-65Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Knitted products have a flexibility that offers many attractive possibilities. Combined with technical fibres, this gives interesting and innovative possibilities. Many technical fibres and yarns has however properties such as high stiffness and brittleness which are difficult to process in the practice of weft knitting. This paper is about the experimental product development of a light radiating textile lamp in which optical fibres are used as the only illumination source. The lampshade is produced on an electronic flat knitting machine with special equipment suitable for the feeding of yarn with high stiffness. The work was divided in two parts: exploring the possibilities to knit the desired shape on one hand and experimenting about knitting with optical fibres as a weft insertion on the other hand. The method is an inductive approach; a literature survey, information from suppliers of knitting production equipment and experimental work on a flat knitting machine at The Swedish School of Textiles, Borås, Sweden. Results show that the diamond shaped structure can be knitted in one piece with transparent monofilament yarns. Furthermore it also shows that difficulties occur when knitting with stiff and brittle optical fibres therefore the paper ends with a discussion with suggestions of how to overcome these challenges.

  • 16.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Measuring QR in globalised apparel supply chains2009Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Substantial development has taken place, slowly, in the field of Quick Response (QR) since its evolution; however, the holistic view of it has been complex and fuzzy. The paper determines the dimensions and key elements of QR by identifying the essential virtues of a supply chain in a globalized environment and takes help of 3-dimensional concurrent engineering to develop a QR Practicability Tool-kit for future interpretation into a QR-rating model for measuring its adoption. The analysis is based on a critical review and synthesis from prior conceptual articles as a theoretical base. The work highlighted is expected to be beneficial for firms for developing value-added partnership (VAP), determining performance, re-configuring resources and aligning organizational activities.

  • 17.
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Customisation and fashion Logistics Effects of Flat Knitted Fashion Products Using Complete Garment Technology SAMAND' OR - A Case Study2016Inngår i: Journal of Textile Science & Engineering, ISSN 2165-8064, Vol. 6, nr 1, s. 1-8Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the identified problems in the textile and fashion business of today is that much of the garments that are bought must be sold in the stores at discounted prices, which results in poor results such as, low sell-through percentage, stock-turnover and lost-sales. The study in this article suggests that a combination of mass customisation (MC), complete garment knitting technology and supply chain management can show an alternative way to overcome this drawback for customised knitted products. Fernie and Azuma [1] state that one direction for the fashion industry may be to reconsider the option of more domestic manufacturing in the future. For many years the trend in the textile and fashion business has been to source production in low-income countries in order to maximise gross profit margins for the company. Can domestic production combined with MC be an option for the future to be successful in fashion retailing?

     

    Supply Chain Management (SCM) is now seen as a broader concept of manufacturing and retailing than earlier views that limited it to individual companies. In a chain for textiles and apparel, all parts must be synchronised and able to adapt to demands on the market. This is especially crucial for the types of products that fashion represents shown in the study of Bruce & Daly et al. [2]. Nowadays research shows that SCM focuses on relationships between those in the supply chain [3,4]. SCM takes a wide view of configurations, which Gattorna [5] defines as “any combination of processes, functions, activities, relationships and pathways along which products, services, information and financial transactions move in and between enterprises, in both di

  • 18.
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Customisation of Fashion Products Using Complete Garment Technology2012Doktoravhandling, monografi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Complete garment knitting technology is a method of producing knitted products, generally fashion garments, ready-made directly in the knitting machine without additional operations such as cutting and sewing. This makes it possible to manufacture a knitted fashion garment with fewer processes then with conventional production methods. In the fashion business customer demand is always changing due to fashion trends, so to be able to manufacture and deliver products rapidly is important. Mass customisation is a customer co-design process of products and services that tries to meets the needs of an individual customer’s demand for certain product features. In the fashion business this means that the customer can order a garment with a customised style, colour, size, and other personal preferences. The principal objective of this dissertation was to examine if and how complete garment technology can be applied to the customisation of knitted fashion products. It was pursued through several independent studies in knitting technology, mass customisation, and fashion logistics against a theoretical frame of reference in these areas. The papers in this thesis present various examples of how knitted fashion garments can be customised and integrated into fashion retailing concepts. The starting point of the research was the Knit-on-Demand research project conducted at the Swedish School of Textiles in collaboration with a knitting manufacturing and retailing company. The aim was to develop a shop concept built on the complete garment technology where a garment could be customised, produced, and delivered as quickly as possible. This initial idea failed due to the expense of investing in complete garment knitting technology, and so other avenues of research had to be found. The Knit-on-Demand project continued, using a business model similar to the complete garment concept but with the retail store and the production unit situated in different locations. The overall research question addressed in this thesis is: How can complete garment knitting technology be applied in a retail concept for customised garments? This question is then divided in two problems: What are the fashion logistics effects of combining complete garment technology and mass customisation? How does the co-design process function in the customisation of knitted fashion garments? The following is a qualitative study based on five research articles applying different research methodologies: case studies, simulations, and interviews. The empirical context is the area of mass customisation of fashion products and knitting technology, more specifically called complete garment knitting production technology. No prior studies describing mass customisation of complete garment knitting technology in combination with fashion logistics were found in the literature. The main contribution of this study is the demonstration that complete garment knitting technology can be applied in the customisation of fashion products. It also illustrates the importance of the co-design process between the company and the customer through which a knitted garment can be customised, produced, and delivered to the customer in three to five hours. The process of co-design and manufacture of a customised complete fashion product is examined, and the advantages and disadvantages associated with customisation of knitted garments are identified and described.

  • 19.
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Distanstextil i trikå/Spacer fabrics in knitting: En produkt för framtiden/ A product for the future1999Inngår i: Nordic Textile Journal, ISSN 1404-2487Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    As machinery and processes in the field of textiles are developed, opportunities for new pro-ducts are also opening up. The manufacture of textiles for various technical uses is a type of manufacturing which has increased in the last few years. This paper presents a type of textile, spacer fabrics, which can be manufactured in many different ways for many different uses. The term spacer fabrics is defined, and different types of manufacturing methods in knitting technology, are described. The paper deals with the manufacture of spacer fabrics on warp, flat and circular knitting machines. Types of application and examples of products are described.

  • 20.
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Domestic Supply2014Inngår i: Knitting International, ISSN 0266-8394, nr 7, s. 28-29Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    In common with other developed nations, Japan is seeing a resurgence in domestically produced knitwear, allowing manufacturers to respond quickly to specific customer requirements. Joel Peterson profiles one family company capitalising on this demand

  • 21.
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Flat knitting of optical fibres2009Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an experimental research in the areas of knitting technology and optical fibres. The aim is to explore the possibilities to knit stiff monofilament optical fibres in flat knitting machines. The yarns used were transparent monofilament of polyester and optical fibres of PMMA (Polymethyl Metacrylate). Result shows that a hexagon shaped flat knitted prototype can be produced but also difficulties to knit monofilament yarn with optical fibres. The optical fibres was put into the structure in straight angles as weft insertion, to avoid bending and breakage of the monofilaments. Another problem was the take down device on the knitting machine but a solution of this is presented in the paper.

  • 22.
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Mass customisation finds favour2008Inngår i: Knitting International, ISSN 0266-8394, Vol. 114, nr 1361, s. 36-37Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    As higher end customers seek something a little different from commodity knitwear, mass customisation is a growing phenomenon. One third of all garments produced in today’s international fashion industry are not sold to the full price, having to be marked down. This is the result of long lead times in the garment industry due to increasing numbers of retailers sourcing products from countries in the Far East where manufacturing costs are lower. Why not do as many other business sectors do, first sell the product to the customer and then start production? This concept is not new and in industries such as the car industry has been a reality for years. Wajima Kohsan Ltd opened in 1995 Factory Boutique Shima in Wakayama, Japan, and this article shows how this shop operates. This is an example of mass customisation in the fashion business of knitted garments.

  • 23.
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Mass customising of knitted fashion garments Factory Boutique Shima: case study2008Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The Japanese knitting machine manufacturing company Shima Seiki presented in 1995 the first WholeGarment® knitting machine that could produce a flat knitted garment ready made directly in the knitting machine. With this technique a knitted garment could be manufactured without time consuming after coming processes such as cutting and sewing. In 1995 Wajima Kohsan Ltd. opened its first Factory Boutique Shima in Japan, a shop for on-demand production of customized knitted garments. Here can the customer be a co-designer and customise an own garment to fulfil personal taste in style, material, pattern and colour. Also in the shop are a printing system and embroidery machine, offering even further personalisation of the garment. Objective with this paper is to give an example of how the complete garment knitting technology could be used for mass customisation of knitted products. This is done by a case study of the Factory Boutique Shima business- and production concept. The method used is a case study with an inductive aproach based on a company visit and interviews. This case examines how Factory Boutique operates and describes the concept of design, sales and production of customised flat knitted garments.

  • 24.
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    The Co-design Process in Mass Customization of Complete Garment Knitted Fashion Products2016Inngår i: Journal of Textile Science & Engineering, E-ISSN 2165-8064, Vol. 6, nr 4, s. 1-8Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Complete garment knitting technology is a method of producing products, generally fashion garments, readymade directly in the knitting machine without operations such as cutting and sewing. This makes it possible to manufacture a fashion garment with fewer processes then with conventional methods. Mass customisation is a customer co-design process of products and that tries to meets the needs of an individual customer's demand. The customer can order a garment with a customised style, colour, size, and other personal preferences. Co-design is a collaborative process between the customer, the retailer, and the manufacturer by which a product is customised to fulfil the customer's requirements. This paper is based on the results of a doctoral thesis. The process of codesign and manufacture of a customised complete fashion product is examined. Research was conducted by a retail concept simulation and three case studies. A cross-case analysis was done to analyse the data. The main findings are a description of two kinds of retail concepts for knitted customized fashion products. A knitted garment can be customized, produced, and delivered to the customer in three to five hours. In the Co-design process two kinds of interactions are feasible between the company and the customer: manual or digital co-design. A manual process has advantages such as: high service level for customers, no requirement of advanced technical equipment. However, manual co-design is labour intensive, a shop assistant can only serve one client at a time. It is also only pplicable to brick-and-mortar stores and not transferable to the Internet. Digital codesign, on the other hand, encourages customers to do the customisation on their own, without the aid of sales personnel and little risk of queues. Moreover, this technique is ideal for the Internet. Disadvantages to date have included limited design options and problem of taking body measurements.

  • 25.
    Peterson, Joel
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Total Knit Fashion2008Inngår i: Knitting International, ISSN 0266-8394, Vol. 114, nr 1361, s. 37-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    Total Knit fashion is a flat knitting manufacturing company in one of the suburbs the city of Osaka. Managing Director Kushiura tells us that the Osaka area has been one of the main districts for knitted products in Japan and most companies used to mass produce low price garments for retail chains in Osaka, Tokyo and other big cities in Japan. Five years ago Total Knit Company decided to change the production from cut & sew and fully fashion to complete garment production in order to be more efficient and to be able to compete on the market. Now the company has 35 modern Shima Seiki Whole garment machines in house for the production of women wear for the domestic market mainly retail shops in the Tokyo area. The gauge range of the knitting machines are 5 to 15 with 17 of the machines in 12 gauge. This article shows an example of a fashion manufacturing company from Japan with complete garment production.

  • 26.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Carlsson, Jan
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Bratt, Magnus
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Smart textiles for knitted products: Prototype factory2009Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a concept of collaboration between industry, university and research institutes in the area of Smart Textiles in Sweden. The concept idea of a laboratory and Prototype Factory at The Swedish School of Textiles for development of Smart Textiles in knitting is presented. The result presented shows a concept where Smart Textiles can be developed and knitted in a prototype factory and a development laboratory. Companies, researchers and others with product ideas in the area of Smart Textiles can here get a first prototype and help to continue to make a ready made product for the market.

  • 27.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Ekwall, Daniel
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Production and business methods in the integral knitting supply chain2008Inngår i: Fibre2fashion.comArtikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last 20 years there has been a dramatic technical development of machines and software in the production of knitted fashion garments. This development has made it possible to rationalise design and production of knitted garments so that today it is possible to make a knitted garment, almost ready made, directly in the knitting machine, with a minimum of processes, such as cutting and sewing. The objective of this paper is to explain and give examples of how this new knitting production technology could be implemented in a fast fashion logistic system. The method for this paper is an inductive approach based on a literature survey. The new technical achievements have not meant the great breakthrough that was expected. Why? Many companies moved their production to development countries where the costs ofproduction, mainly labour costs are lower than in western countries. Another reason is that it is not enough to invest in new machinery and then use the machines in the same production system as before. To gain the benefits of this technique the production processes in the company have to be changed and adapted to these new conditions. The lack of knowledge in supply chain design and a one-sided perspective on production costs, instead of a customer orientated one, is one explanation. This, in a business (fashion) where the demand is changing dayby- day and the short time to market is vital to a company’s ability to be competitive. This article describes the integral and complete garment knitting techniques and the advantages that they open up, both from a logistics and a technical point of view. An integral knitted whole garment technology, implemented and adjusted to the production and business system in a company, can reduce lead times dramatically and respond quickly to the rapidly changing fashion market.

  • 28.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Hjelm, Josefine
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Eckard, Alexandra
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Morikawa, Hideaki
    Shinshu University.
    TEST OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF KNITTED FABRICS MADE OF PAPER YARN2016Inngår i: AUTEX 2016, 8-10 June 2016, Ljubljana, Slovenia. / [ed] Barbara Simoncic, Ljubljana, 2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Consumption of cotton and oil-based fibres types is a major problem because it needs the help of fertilizers and toxic pesticides to grow in many places. It is urgent to find less environmentally damaging alternative yarns for the manufacture of clothing and other textile products. This study investigates and gives information about textile fabrics of paper yarn made from Manila hemp. Knitted structures made of paper yarn; cotton and viscose are tested and compared. Also, a tensile strength test of the yarns is performed. The paper yarn has low shrinkage and no tendencies to pilling, great characteristics for fabrics to be used in the textile- and clothing industry. The handleability / knittability: a problem that has to be solved if the paper yarn is going to be used in the textile industry to a high extent in the future. Also, the high stiffness and hard grip of the paper yarn fabric must be solved

  • 29.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Kåhed, Linda
    Johannesson, Frida
    Supply chain model for flat knitted fashion products2008Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This study sets out to focus on the fashion clothing and retailing supply chain with objective to identify describe and develop a model of the different processes involved in the supply chain of flat knitted garments [1]. In the customer demand fulfilment process for fashion products lead time is an important factor and has an impact of fashion logistics key success factors such as Sell Through, Lost Sales and Customer Service Level [2]. The model developed and described of the supply chain is for a branded manufacturing fashion company and the aim of the paper is to identify and understand the role of lead time and Sell-Through factor in sourcing, design and production in a fashion logistics context. This paper is done as a case study of the Swedish fashion company J.Lindeberg. Flat knitted fashion products can be produced in three different production systems: Cut & sew, fully fashion and complete garment production. This study focus on the traditionally cut & sew and fully fashion production sourcing and production system. The result is a general model with starting point in customer demand and the final point in customer demand fulfilment with focus on the order fulfilment process and different sub processes here involved. The model describes the different processes involved in sourcing, product development, production and transportation of the physical product but also the required information for each process. The method used in this work is based on a literature survey, information from suppliers of knitting production equipment and a case study of a branded manufacturing fashion company. The paper draws conclusions about the impact of different processes and sub processes in the model with value added- and non value added activities with focus on lead times and Sell-Through factor and customer service level.

  • 30.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Larsson, Jonas
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    A Multiple Choice System for Designing Knitted Fashion Garments2007Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last 20 years there has been a dramatic technical development in the production of flat knitted fashion garments. This has made it possible to rationalize design and production of knitted products in a way that it’s possible to make a knitted garment ready made directly in the knitting machine, with a minimum of after coming processes. Starting point is a business model with the knitting machines located in the store. The customer takes an active part in the design process and garments are customized to fulfill actual demand. The objective of this paper is to develop a model for a “multiple choice” design system. The objective is also to combine the complete garment knitting technology with the area of mass customization and show how this could be implemented in the business of fashion products. The result is an overview of the area of mass customization, complete garment knitting technology and the Knit On Demand business concept. A multiple-choice system where the customer selects style, pattern, size, color and other features of the garment in order to customize the product is presented. Methodology for this paper is an inductive approach based on a literature survey and research project at the University College of Borås.

  • 31.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Larsson, Jonas
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Agent Based Modeling in a Fashion Demand Chains2007Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation tools for understanding logistics and create explanations for logistics operations are often developed under a state of stability, equilibrium and linearity whereas logistics are considered non-linear and complex. Agent based modelling provides the opportunity to build rigorous computer simulations of non-equilibrium systems and unlike other simulation methods, no agent has full knowledge about the system it operates in and the agents act on heuristics rather than on rationality, much like customers and firms in the real world. In the last twenty years the development in knitting technology has made it possible to produce entire garments in one piece with no need for time-consuming cutting and sewing processes afterwards. This gives new opportunities to produce knitted garments closer to the customer and hence being able to respond faster to shifts in demand for knitwear. Agent Based Modelling will provide an excellent opportunity to simulate a demand chain of the kind where the customer designs the garment and the garment is produced instantly. The aim is to create and present an agent-based model for the logistics operations in the Knit On Demand research project. The simulation will not only help to gain insight about the dynamics and emergent behaviours in a textile demand chain but also in demand chain management as a whole, as well as providing a base to test theoretical frameworks.

  • 32.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Larsson, Jonas
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Textile Challenges 1/08 Mass Customization & Innovation in Retailing.2008Annet (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of seminars called Textile Challenges provide the industry as well as public institutions with the latest news from research and development within a broad range of subjects. From fashion logistics to design management to value driven processes, these seminars form meeting-points where discussion between academy and the business world can be taken to a fruitful level. Today’s business world faces a series of challenges for the future. New customer behaviour with internet shopping and the possibility for people to get another shopping experience then before. Mass customization, in marketing, manufacturing, and management, is the use of flexible computer-aided manufacturing systems to produce custom output. The challenge is to let the customer take an active part of the design and development of the product. New retailing concepts where modern computer equipment give the customer an interactive and positive shopping experience.

  • 33.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Larsson, Jonas
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Carlsson, Jan
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Andersson, Peter
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan.
    Knit on demand: development and simulation of a production and shop model for customised knitted garments2008Inngår i: International Journal of Fashion Design, Technology and Education, ISSN 1754-3266, Vol. 1, nr 2, s. 89-99Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of computer technology and the Internet has made mass customisation of products more common in fashion design of today. Development in production of knitted garments has made it possible to make garments ready made, directly in the knitting machine. The objective of this article is to present a design, production and shop model for the ‘‘Knit on Demand’’ concept and to show how the complete garment knitting technology could be used for customised products. A business model with production equipment located in store is presented. Customers are involved in the design process and garments are customised to fulfil actual demand. A lead time simulation of design and production processes in the shop concept is presented. Simulation in the software tool AutoModTM shows that the customer could have a self-designed garment in two to five hours.

  • 34.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Larsson, Jonas
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Mujanovic, Malik
    Mattila, Heikki
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Mass customisation of flat knitted fashion products: simulation of the co-design process2011Inngår i: Autex Research Journal, Vol. 11, nr 1, s. 6-13Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1995, the Japanese manufacturer Shima Seiki introduced the first complete garment knitting machine capable of producing a ready-made flat knitted article under the trade name WholeGarment. Recently, the company also developed a co-design software tool, Ordermade WholeGarment®, for the customisation of knitted fashion garments. Factory Boutique Shima, their retail shop for on-demand production of customised knitted garments, makes it possible for clients to modify a knitted garment according to personal taste in style, colour, pattern and size. This study examines how such a process streamlines the interaction between customer and shop personnel, while expediting the programming of the knitting machine. In comparing the manual co-design process with the Ordermade WholeGarment® system, we used a computer simulation to analyse the efficiency and lead times of each concept. The case study method was employed with an inductive approach based on company visits and interviews.

  • 35.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Larsson, Jonas
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Co-design tool for customised knitwear2009Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a mass customisation co-design tool for knitted fashion garments, and how this tool could reduce time both in programming of the knitting machine, and in the co-design process between the customer and the company. Initial results in this paper shows that it is possibly to customise and design the fashion product with much less help than before from a shop assistant. Customer information is transformed and transferred into program code automatically, and the garment can be knitted without time consuming programming of the knitting machine. The work is based on literature study, company visits and interviews

  • 36.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Mattila, Heikki
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Mass customisation of knitted fashion garments: Factory Boutique Shima – a case study2010Inngår i: International Journal of Mass Customisation, ISSN 1742-4208, Vol. 3, nr 3, s. 247-258Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Complete garment knitting technology makes it possible to produce a ready-made flat-knitted garment directly on the knitting machine without time-consuming post-knitting processes such as cutting and sewing. Factory Boutique Shima in Japan, a shop for on-demand production of customised knitted garments, uses a complete garment technology for customisation. Here, a customer can be a codesigner and customise a garment in accordance with his/her personal taste in style, material, pattern and colour. The aim of this paper is to present an example of how complete garment knitting technology has been used for mass customisation of knitted products by studying Factory Boutique Shimas's design and production concept. The method employed is an inductive approach based on company visits and interviews.

  • 37.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Vegborn, Ellinor
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Andersson, Carl-Håkan
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Knittability of fibres with high stiffeness2000Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Knitting techniques and machinery are extensively used for the production of textile products for garmet and industrial use. Knitting is also gaining importance for composite materials performing. Basically two principles are in use [1-3]. i) Weft knitting gives structures of for example traditional sweaters types suitable for structures taking impact loads. ii) Warp knitting gives the traditional tricot structures and the non crimped insert yarn DOS-fabrics extensively used for composite materials fabrication. In the knitting process do hooked needles pick up yarns and form closed loops. The stability of the loop formation depends on the bending of the fibres and type of friction on the needles during the different stages of the knitting process. The characteristics of static friction when the yarn is drawn by the needles into the machine, sliding friction in the loop formation and release after loop formation are of vital importance for the final product. The complexity of the yarn behaviour, the far from ideal mechanical and tribological behaviour of the fibres are mastered by many knitters. The history of knitting indicate the same kind of phenomena as indicated by the history of the steam engine: ”Science owes more to the steam engine than the steam engine owes to science”, lord Kelvin. The knitting process has however been modelled from first principles using models for friction of fibres on positively curved surfaces and simultaneous plastic deformation. A method and fixtures based on earlier work by Andersson et.al adopted for tests of the stress build up in fibres on knitting needles in order to study the knitting process in a tensile testing machine have been developed [3-5]. Monofilaments and high modulus multifilament yarns known for giving difficulties in knitting process have been studied with respect to : – Static friction – Bending radius of the fibre during the process – Adhesion to needle at the end contact – Sliding friction Plain knitted fabrics and symmetric spacer fabrics have been produced of monofilament and multifilament nylon, PET and aramides. Analysis of fabrics in compression is going on.

  • 38.
    Peterson, Joel
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Vegborn, Ellinor
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Andersson, Carl-Håkan
    Högskolan i Borås, Institutionen Textilhögskolan.
    Knittability of fibres with high stiffness2000Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Knitting techniques and machinery are extensively used for the production of textile products for garmet and industrial use. Knitting is also gaining importance for composite materials performing. Basically two principles are in use. i) Weft knitting gives structures of for example traditional sweaters types suitable for structures taking impact loads. ii) Warp knitting gives the traditional tricot structures and the non crimped insert yarn DOS-fabrics extensively used for composite materials fabrication. In the knitting process do hooked needles pick up yarns and form closed loops. The stability of the loop formation depends on the bending of the fibres and type of friction on the needles during the different stages of the knitting process. The characteristics of static friction when the yarn is drawn by the needles into the machine, sliding friction in the loop formation and release after loop formation are of vital importance for the final product. The complexity of the yarn behaviour, the far from ideal mechanical and tribological behaviour of the fibres are mastered by many knitters. The history of knitting indicate the same kind of phenomena as indicated by the history of the steam engine: ”Science owes more to the steam engine than the steam engine owes to science”, lord Kelvin. The knitting process has however been modelled from first principles using models for friction of fibres on positively curved surfaces and simultaneous plastic deformation. A method and fixtures based on earlier work by Andersson et.al adopted for tests of the stress build up in fibres on knitting needles in order to study the knitting process in a tensile testing machine have been developed. Monofilaments and high modulus multifilament yarns known for giving difficulties in knitting process have been studied with respect to : – Static friction – Bending radius of the fibre during the process – Adhesion to needle at the end contact – Sliding friction Plain knitted fabrics and symmetric spacer fabrics have been produced of monofilament and multifilament nylon, PET and aramides. Analysis of fabrics in compression is going on.

1 - 38 of 38
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  • asciidoc
  • rtf