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  • 1.
    Hagberg, Johan
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Kjellberg, Hans
    Who performs marketing? Dimensions of agential variation in market practice2010In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 1028-1037Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, there has been a renewed academic interest in marketing practice. To capture the practical performance of marketing, however, a re-conceptualization of marketing practitioners is needed. To this end we explore how to characterize those who perform marketing. Working abductively by combining previous ideas on the constitution of economic agents with two longitudinal case studies of Swedish retail trade, we identify general dimensions of agential variation in three areas: in the constitution of agents, i.e. in how agents are put together/what agents are made of; in their programs of actions, i.e. the motives, interests and/or functions ascribed to agents; and in their capacities, i.e. in what market agents are capable of. We then trace implications of the observed heterogeneity of market practitioners for marketing.

  • 2.
    Salomonson, Nicklas
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Åberg, Annika
    Karlstad University.
    Allwood, Jens
    University of Gothenburg.
    Communicative skills that support value creation: A study of B2B interactions between customers and customer service representatives2012In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 145-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although interaction has been acknowledged as central in value creation there is still a lack of empirical studies on how value creation is accomplished in practice, and in particular how communicative skills support customers' value creation. The purpose of this paper is therefore to generate a deeper understanding of how customer service representatives' communicative skills in conversations with customers support customers' value creation. We argue that value creating processes correspond to customers' roles as “feelers”, “thinkers” and “doers”. Accordingly, value creation involves three interdependent elements, an emotional, a cognitive and a behavioral. Based on a qualitative research design, drawing on an empirical study of 80 telephone conversations between customers and customer service representatives in a business-to-business context, the paper demonstrates three communicative skills that are essential in supporting customers' value creation: attentiveness, perceptiveness and responsiveness. The findings show how employees, by means of these communicative skills support customers' value creation. Attentiveness supports cognitive elements of the customers' value creating processes, whereas perceptiveness supports value creation in terms of cognitive, behavioral and emotional aspects. Finally, responsiveness supports the customer's cognitive as well as behavioral value creation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Salomonson et al 2012 Communicative skills that support value creation
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