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  • 1.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Lundberg, Lars
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality during CPR practice versus during a simulated life-saving event.2018In: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, ISSN 1080-3548, E-ISSN 2376-9130, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 652-655Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: As a part of the emergency medical services, the Swedish fire brigade can increase the survival rate in out-of-hospital cardiac arrests.

    AIM: To compare the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performed by firefighters at a routine CPR practice versus when involved in a simulated life-saving event.

    METHODS: In this study, 80 firefighters divided into two groups performed CPR according to guidelines: one group indoors during a routine training session; the other group outdoors during a smoke diving exercise wearing personal protective clothing and self-contained breathing apparatus. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data.

    RESULTS: The results showed a tendency for the outdoor group to perform CPR with better ventilation and compression quality, as compared to the indoor group. The ventilation of the manikin was not hampered by the firefighters wearing personal protective clothes and self-contained breathing apparatus, as the Swedish firefighters remove their facial mask and ventilate the patient with their mouth using a pocket mask.

    CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the results in both groups showed a high quality of CPR which can be related to the fire brigade training and education traditions. CPR training is regularly performed, which in turn helps to maintain CPR skills.

  • 2.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    Jönköping University .
    Lundberg, Lars
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Simulation as a means to develop firefighters as emergency care professionals.2018In: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics, ISSN 1080-3548, E-ISSN 2376-9130, p. 1-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the simulated emergency care performed by firefighters and their perception of simulation as an educational method.

    METHODS: This study had a mixed method with both a quantitative and a qualitative approach. Data were collected by simulation assessment, a questionnaire, and written comments. Descriptive analysis was conducted on the quantitative data whereas a qualitative content analysis was conducted on the qualitative data. Finally, a contingent analysis was used where a synthesis configured both the quantitative and the qualitative results into a narrative result.

    RESULTS: The cognitive workload that firefighters face during simulated emergency care is crucial for learning. In this study, the severity and complexity of the scenarios provided were higher than expected by the firefighters. Clearly stated conditions for the simulation and constructive feedback were considered positive for learning. Patient actors induced realism in the scenario, increasing the experience of stress, in comparison to a manikin.

    CONCLUSION: To simulate in a realistic on-scene environment increases firefighters' cognitive ability to critically analyze problems and manage emergency care. Simulation of emergency care developed the firefighters as professionals.

  • 3.
    Abelsson, Anna
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University.
    Lundberg, Lars
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Trauma Simulation in Prehospital Emergency Care.2018In: Journal of trauma nursing : the official journal of the Society of Trauma Nurses, ISSN 1078-7496, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 201-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Well-educated ambulance staff is a prerequisite for high-quality prehospital trauma care. The aim of this study was to examine how nurses in the ambulance service experienced participation in trauma simulation. Sixty-one nurses, working in an emergency ambulance service, performed simulated trauma care on four different occasions and afterward rated three statements on a 5-point Likert scale. A descriptive and inferential analysis was conducted. There are statistically significant increases between the pre- and posttests regarding all three statements: "I think simulation of severe trauma with manikins is realistic" (0.23 or 6% increase), "Simulation is a suitable method for learning severe trauma care" (1.3 or 38% increase), and "I am comfortable in the situation learning severe trauma care through simulation" (0.74 or 19% increase). With the experience of realism in simulation, participants become more motivated to learn and prepare for future events. If the participants instead feel uncomfortable during simulation training, they focus on their own feelings instead of learning. In a realistic simulated environment, participants are prepared to understand and manage the emergency care situation in clinical work. Participants learn during simulation when they are outside their comfort zone but without being uncomfortable or experiencing anxiety.

  • 4.
    Aghajani, M
    et al.
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Babol Noushirvani University of Technology.
    Rahimpour, A
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Babol Noushirvani University of Technology.
    Amani, H
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Babol Noushirvani University of Technology.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Rhamnolipid as new bio-agent for cleaning of ultrafiltration membrane fouled by whey2018In: Engineering in Life Sciences, ISSN 1618-0240, E-ISSN 1618-2863, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 272-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, rhamnolipid biosurfactant as an eco-friendly and biodegradable cleaning agent was produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria and was used to evaluate the chemical cleaning efficiency of whey fouled ultrafiltration membranes. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the successful synthesis of rhamnolipid. The produced rhamnolipid was compared to chemical cleaners including sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and Tween 20. Ultrafiltration membranes used for fouling and cleaning analysis were prepared using phase inversion via immersion precipitation technique. For studying the fouling mechanisms, Hermia's model adapted to cross-flow was used. From the fouling mechanism experiments, it was found that the complete blocking and cake formation were the dominant fouling mechanisms. The highest values of cleaning efficiency were achieved using rhamnolipid and NaOH as cleaning agents with the flux recovery of 100%, but with considering the low concentration of the rhamnolipid used in the cleaning solution compared to NaOH (0.3 versus 4 g/L for NaOH), its application is preferred. 

  • 5.
    Agrawal, Tarun Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. ENSAIT/GEMTEX.
    Campagne, Christine
    ENSAIT/GEMTEX, Roubaix, France.
    Koehl, Ludovic
    ENSAIT/GEMTEX, Roubaix, France.
    Development and characterisation of secured traceability tag for textile products by printing process2018In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product security is one of the major concerns in the textile industry. Every year, fashion brands suffer significant loss due to counterfeit products. Addressing this, the paper introduces a secured tag for traceability and security of textile products. The proposed tag is unclonable, which can be manufactured using conventional screen-printing process. Further, it can be read using a smartphone camera to authenticate the product and trace its history. Consequently, imparting additional functionality to the textile through surface modification. To validate its applicability, the study experimentally investigates the durability and readability of the developed secured tag using three different binders on polyester and cotton textiles substrates. A comparison is presented with an in-depth analysis of surfaces and binders interaction at different stages of the secured tag lifecycle, i.e. before print, after print, after wash and after abrasion cycles. The methodology and findings of the study can also be useful for other manufacturing domains dealing with the printing process.

  • 6.
    Agrawal, Tarun Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Koehl, Ludovic
    ENSAIT/GEMTEX, Roubaix, France.
    Campagne, Christine
    ENSAIT/GEMTEX, Roubaix, France.
    A secured tag for implementation of traceability in textile and clothing supply chain2018In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Textile and clothing industry is one of the oldest manufacturing industries and is a major contributor in the economic growth of developing countries. However, from past few decades, it has been criticised for its opaque, unsecured and untraceable nature of supply chain. Addressing these challenges, the paper proposes a system approach to introduce an item-centric secured traceability concept to monitor and control manufacturing processes and supply chain activities. In order to implement such secured traceability system, the paper describes the process for manufacturing, encoding and validating an innovative two-factor secured tag based on particle randomness that is printed on the surface of textile. Being micro-sized, the particles are easy to read and validate with pattern recognition. Further, as achieved through an uncontrolled manufacturing process, the randomness is unclonable to produce counterfeit tags. Furthermore, a sequence of experimental analyses has been conducted using various simulated scenarios to verify its applicability. A secured tag can be a low-cost and durable substitute for detachable, unsecured identifiers commercially available in the market.

  • 7. Agrawal, Tarun Kumar
    et al.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Classification of traceability information in textile and clothing supply chain: A Delphi-based approach2018In: EurOMA 2018 Proceedings, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study explores empirically the need and requirement of traceability system in Textile and Clothing (T&C) supply chain. A Delphi based survey was conducted with 28 supply chain experts (industry professionals and academicians) to collect qualitative and quantitative data in order to identify and prioritize various factors that influence traceability adoption in T&C supply chains. Based on these factors the study further explores, classifies and suggests information that can be recorded and shared for a complete traceability among T&C supply chain actors, both business-to-business and business-to-customers.  

  • 8.
    Agrawal, Tarun Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Exploring secured traceability systems for implementation in textile and clothing supply chain2018In: Proceeding TIWC conference 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information asymmetry and security are major challenges in multi-tier supply chains. Textile and clothing (T&C) supply chain is one such example significantly affected by these problems. Due to its complex and diverse nature, involved actors find it difficult to connect and secure each supply chain links. Exploiting this situation, a parallel counterfeit market is flourishing and gaining serious momentum. Due to this, T&C industries are suffering huge economic losses and job cuts. Additionally, owing to its opaque and untraceable supply chain, T&C industries have become a world of unethical practices. Secured traceability is an effective tool that has potentials to address these issues and make the T&C supply chain transparent and secured. It is a useful mechanism to track and trace products’ history, know about the manufacturing conditions and at the same time secure it from counterfeits and attacks targeting intellectual properties. In this context, the study conduct survey of supply chain experts to explore and rank the key technological requirements (based on the specific nature of the textile product) and traceability information that can be recorded and secured by a secured traceability system. Further, based on the findings of the survey a review of the literature was conducted to explore state of the art technologies to propose a primary secured traceability structure for the T&C supply chain.

  • 9.
    Agrawal, Tarun Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Sharma, Ajay
    Kumar, Vijay
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Blockchain-Based Secured Traceability System for Textile and Clothing Supply Chain2018In: Artificial Intelligence for Fashion Industry in the Big Data Era / [ed] Sébastien Thomassey, Xianyi Zeng, Singapore: Springer Publishing Company, 2018, p. 197-208Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Blockchain has emerged as a prominent and reliable solution that can enable and ensure secure information sharing over wide area networks. In an era of digitalisation, blockchain technology is finding wide applications in multiple fields including implementing traceability in the supply chain. In this direction, this chapter explores its potential application in implementing a blockchain-based traceability system for textile and clothing (T&C) supply chain. It examines the necessity and concept of a traceability system, followed by enlisting advantages of blockchain technology for implementing traceability. Further, a case-based example has been used to explain blockchain application in implementing traceability in T&C supply chain. Finally, it mentions the challenges and limitations of such blockchain-based traceability system that can be addressed through further research.

  • 10.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Bredda rekryteringen till kyrkans utbildningar2018In: Kyrkans tidning, ISSN 1651-405X, Vol. 16, p. 33-33Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Med pedagogik och teologi som kamp för tro och mod2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Mötesplatsen Norrbyhuset i Borås: Från krisinsats till plattform för demokrati2018In: Interkulturell dialo: Teori och praktik / [ed] Rasoul Nejadmehr, Göteborg: nordienT , 2018, p. 251-263Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Pedagogik är teologi: Ett panelsamtal2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Religionsunterricht in Schweden: Religionsdidaktik und Religionspädagogik2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Samtal om skolavslutningar i kyrkan och spelet om religion i svensk skola2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad handlar debatten om de svenska skolavslutningarna egentligen om? Vilka kolliderande perspektiv och ställningstaganden ligger bakom konflikterna? En ny studie av detta tidigare outforskade ämne ger svar.

  • 16.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Schulabslussfeiern in der Kirche: Konflikten über Religion und Tradition in dem Schwedisches Schulsystem2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT. Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Skolavslutningar i kyrkan och spelet om religion i svensk skola2018Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A highly debated subject in contemporary Sweden is the practice of end of term ceremonies being held in church buildings. The debate began in the 1990s but the practice as such can be traced back at least to the late eighteenth century. Critique of the ceremonies at a national level was probably initiated by a local prohibition in 1996 at Uddevala municipality – a decision intended to favour plurality (at first out of respect for secular Humanists, but later reinterpreted as out of respect for Muslims).

    This study was aimed at not only exploring the practice of end of term ceremonies held in churches, but also to investigate negotiations and re-negotiations of the role of religion in the Swedish compulsory school (Swedish: Grundskola) apart from the school subject of Religious Education, from the 1990s to 2016.

    A multitude of sources have been used for the study such as databases, minutes, policy documents, media debates, legislation (both political and ecclesiastical), guidelines and curricula. Previous research on the subject is almost non-existent, except for a number of studies regarding the shifting role of the Church of Sweden from state church to semi-independent church in the year 2000. The study is thereby intended not only as a contribution of facts concerning these ceremonies, but also as an interpretation of the facts presented.

    The results show a complex and vast practice of school ceremonies held in churches beyond the acceptance or prohibition of a particular ceremony. Conflicting facts, laws and policies are made visible and implicit diverse understandings emerge regarding the role of religion in society in general and in schools in particular. Hence, the study should not be seen as taking a position on either side of the debate about prohibition of the practice, but as an exploration of different standpoints regarding the role of the Church of Sweden in contemporary Sweden’s compulsory schools. An emerging aspect is the key function of schools in enabling pupils to understand the role of religion in society and what it means to live in a global community. End of term ceremonies held in churches are viewed as a game board where debates are set in motion and where different ideals clash, are negotiated and re-negotiated. Key features in these discussions concern the use of confessional ecclesiastical space in obligatory non-confessional education; church buildings as places of education; clerical roles when leading end of term ceremonies; pupils’ compulsory presence; religious symbols in education; attendance at religious activities; and hymns as possible means of discrimination.

    As far as the interpretation of the issues that have emerged in the study is concerned, three claims can be made.  Firstly, end of term ceremonies held in churches have fluctuated in number during the examined period of time; secondly, there is competition between the Swedish state’s school agencies and the Church of Sweden regarding the importance of religion for children; and thirdly, the concept of religion is interpreted in secular terms by the Swedish state’s school agencies, in conflict with the Church of Sweden’s religious understanding of the concept.

  • 18.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Skolmyndigheters riktlinjer för religiös pluralism idag och igår: Skolverkets nuvarande riktlinjer och 1967 års riktlinjer från Skolöverstyrelsen2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    The conflict over religious practice in Swedish schools: The Church of Sweden and its struggle to redefine its Lutheran confession in a secular state2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A vital aspect of the Church of Sweden is its Lutheran confession and its emphasis on the Two regiments doctrine - an equal interest of working together in the Nation state of Sweden. According to Casanova (2014), the Nordic countries have experienced a secularism where religion has merged with the state and become a department. At the end of the 20th century, state and church separated, and the Church of Sweden became a "free" denomination. in the public schools, this separation has led to a conflict between the church and state. Thus, the distribution of rights according to the Lutheran doctrine is no longer valid. The state discards the Church of Sweden's "spiritual regiment" for the society, considering its religious practices as illegal within the school system. Ecclesiastical debates have begun on a new Lutheran identity formation within the church - that of a church of a minority in a postsecular context. The aim of this paper is to examine this identity formation and, the conflict over religious practices in the schools. New results from the research project "End of term ceremonies held in churches and the debate on the role of religion in Swedish schools", will be presented.

  • 20.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT. Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Aldrin, Emilia
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Hur förmedlas kristendomen i läromedelstexter för gymnasieskolan?: En ideologikritisk analys2018In: Nordidactica: Journal of Humanities and Social Science Education, ISSN 2000-9879, Vol. 2, p. 23-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims at investigating how the image of the religion of Christianity is constructed in Swedish textbooks for the Upper Secondary School (gymnasieskolan), with a specific focus on the perspective from which the text considers the religion and how this perspective creates possibilities for and limitations of pupils’ identification. Introductions of Christianity through text and images were selected from six current textbooks; five printed and one digital. The method used for analysis was ideological text criticism with a combination of Linguistic and Theological perspectives. Three aspects were highlighted in the analysis: interest making strategies, demands of previous knowledge, and subject perspectives. The study showed that the examined texts did not express Christianity as the cultural norm as considered in previous research. Instead there seemed to be an ambivalence in the perspective from which the textbooks considered the religion. Demands of previous knowledge as well as subject positions varied highly both within and between textbooks.

  • 21.
    Allan, Julie
    et al.
    University of Birmingham, UK.
    Persson, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Social capital and trust for inclusion in school and society2018In: Education, Citizenship and Social Justice, ISSN 1746-1979, E-ISSN 1746-1987Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports on the outcomes for students who experienced a strongly inclusive learning environment as a means for all to succeed. This Swedish lower secondary school dramatically improved its results, and the article reports the outcomes from the students’ perspectives. Social capital, with its emphasis on relationships, was used to structure interviews with students who had since moved on to high schools across Sweden and was also used to analyse the interview data. Two elements of social capital that appeared to be strongly associated with the students’ success – trust and confidence – are discussed in depth. The article concludes with a consideration of the significance of the role of schools in cultivating trust and the risks associated with schools ignoring this obligation.

  • 22.
    Andersson, Elin
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Bohlin, Linda
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Fekete, Zoltán
    Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Prehospital Identification of Patients with a Final Hospital Diagnosis of Stroke.2018In: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, E-ISSN 1945-1938, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction the early phase of stroke, minutes are critical. Since the majority of patients with stroke are transported by the Emergency Medical Service (EMS), the early handling and decision making by the EMS clinician is important. Problem The study aim was to evaluate the frequency of a documented suspicion of stroke by the EMS nurse, and to investigate differences in the clinical signs of stroke and clinical assessment in the prehospital setting among patients with regard to if there was a documented suspicion of stroke on EMS arrival or not, in patients with a final hospital diagnosis of stroke.

    METHODS: The study had a retrospective observational design. Data were collected from reports on patients who were transported by the EMS and had a final diagnosis of stroke at a single hospital in western Sweden (630 beds) in 2015. The data sources were hospital and prehospital medical journals.

    RESULTS: In total, 454 patients were included. Among them, the EMS clinician suspected stroke in 52%. The findings and documentation on patients with a suspected stroke differed from the remaining patients as follows: a) More frequently documented symptoms from the face, legs/arms, and speech; b) More frequently assessments of neurology, face, arms/legs, speech, and eyes; c) More frequently addressed the major complaint with regard to time and place of onset, duration, localization, and radiation; d) Less frequently documented symptoms of headache, vertigo, and nausea; and e) More frequently had an electrocardiogram (ECG) recorded and plasma glucose sampled. In addition to the 52% of patients who had a documented initial suspicion of stroke, seven percent of the patients had an initial suspicion of transitory ischemic attack (TIA) by the EMS clinician, and a neurologist was approached in another 10%.

    CONCLUSION: Among 454 patients with a final diagnosis of stroke who were transported by the EMS, an initial suspicion of stroke was not documented in one-half of the cases. These patients differed from those in whom a suspicion of stroke was documented in terms of limited clinical signs of stroke, a less extensive clinical assessment, and fewer clinical investigations. Andersson E , Bohlin L , Herlitz J , Sundler AJ , Fekete Z , Andersson Hagiwara M . Prehospital identification of patients with a final hospital diagnosis of stroke.

  • 23.
    Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Brink, P
    Högskolan väst.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Hansson, P-O
    University of Gothenburg.
    A shorter system delay for haemorrhagic stroke than ischaemic stroke among patients who use emergency medical service.2018In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: We compare various aspects in the early chain of care among patients with haemorrhagic stroke and ischaemic stroke.

    MATERIALS & METHODS: The Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and nine emergency hospitals, each with a stroke unit, were included. All patients hospitalised with a first and a final diagnosis of stroke between 15 December 2010 and 15 April 2011 were included. The primary endpoint was the system delay (from call to the EMS until diagnosis). Secondary endpoints were: (i) use of the EMS, (ii) delay from symptom onset until call to the EMS; (iii) priority at the dispatch centre; (iv) priority by the EMS; and (v) suspicion of stroke by the EMS nurse and physician on admission to hospital.

    RESULTS: Of 1336 patients, 172 (13%) had a haemorrhagic stroke. The delay from call to the EMS until diagnosis was significantly shorter in haemorrhagic stroke. The patient's decision time was significantly shorter in haemorrhagic stroke. The priority level at the dispatch centre did not differ between the two groups, whereas the EMS nurse gave a significantly higher priority to patients with haemorrhage. There was no significant difference between groups with regard to the suspicion of stroke either by the EMS nurse or by the physician on admission to hospital.

    CONCLUSIONS: Patients with a haemorrhagic stroke differed from other stroke patients with a more frequent and rapid activation of EMS.

  • 24.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Axelsson, Christer
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Larsson, Anna
    Bremer, Anders
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    Bång, Angela
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ljungström, Lars
    The early chain of care in bacteraemia patients: Early suspicion, treatment and survivalin prehospital emergency care2018In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 0735-6757, E-ISSN 1532-8171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Bacteraemia is a first stage for patients risking conditions such as septic shock. The primary aim ofthis study is to describe factors in the early chain of care in bacteraemia, factors associated with increased chanceof survival during the subsequent 28 days after admission to hospital. Furthermore, the long-term outcome wasassessed.

    Methods: This study has a quantitative design based on data fromEmergencyMedical Services (EMS) and hospitalrecords.

    Results: In all, 961 patients were included in the study. Of these patients, 13.5% died during the first 28 days. TheEMS was more frequently used by non-survivors. Among patients who used the EMS, the suspicion of sepsis alreadyon scene was more frequent in survivors. Similarly, EMS personnel noted the ESS code “fever, infection”more frequently for survivors upon arriving on scene. The delay time fromcall to the EMS and admission to hospitaluntil start of antibiotics was similar in survivors and non-survivors. The five-year mortality rate was 50.8%.Five-year mortalitywas 62.6% among those who used the EMS and 29.5% among those who did not (p b 0.0001).

    Conclusion: This study shows that among patientswith bacteraemiawho used the EMS, an early suspicion of sepsisor fever/infection was associated with improved early survival whereas the delay time from call to the EMSand admission to hospital until start of treatment with antibiotics was not. 50.8% of all patients were deadafter five years.

  • 25.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Gabre, Marita
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Dehre, Andreas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Maurin Söderholm, Hanna
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Simulation in Virtual World to Promote Communication2018In: Pre-hospital care- Education and training of ambulance professionals, Noordwijkerhout, The Netherlands, 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Communication between ambulance professionals and patients is essential for understanding the patient's lifeworld (Wireklint Sundström & Dahlberg 2010). Simultaneously, communication is challenging to teach and learn within the framework of specific courses. However, simulation in virtual worlds can support the development of new skills such as communication (Combs, Sokolowski & Banks 2016).

     

    Aim

    The aim of this work was to design a simulation-based platform for communication training among ambulance nurse students (ANS).

     

    Methods

    A qualitative action research approach was used (Coghlan & Casey 2001). Second Life® (SL) was selected since it was an existing virtual world. SL is a web-based flexible three-dimensional platform that allows customization. Interaction and communication with other virtual people can be done through avatars in real time (Hodge, Collins & Giordano 2011). Three ANS and five teachers participated, none of the participants had prior experience of SL. Observations and interviews were used as data and analysed using thematic analysis.

     

    Results

    The participants’ experiences generated three themes:

     

    Understanding the virtual world

    It was easy to interact and communicate with other virtual people. However, it took time to feel comfortable to navigate in SL.

     

    Technological challenges

    One challenge was related to audio-visual problems e.g. not compatible headset, interfering echoes and that the image was distorted at times, which made it difficult to act and move the avatar. Another challenge was associated with the 3D modelling e.g. the capability to use of coordinates, positioning, object dimensioning and the fact that accidental deletions could not be restored. A third challenges that influenced the communication was the difficulty of visualizing clinically relevant care measures such as diagnostic examinations or drug treatment. Finally, there was a challenge to customize the avatars to look like ambulance professionals or a severely ill patient.

     

    Learning through avatars

    Learning through avatars requires that the participants take responsibility for delivering a convincing performance.  Immersion was limited since actions do not take place from a first-person viewpoint. There is a need that the scenario is based on realistic conditions e.g. interiors, equipment, clothing, avatar appearance and behaviour.

     

    Conclusion

    The present system is not suitable for training of medical assessment. Teachers who are considering using virtual worlds in the training for future ambulance professionals should note that an appropriate design is crucial for how the simulation is experienced.  

  • 26.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Gabre, Marita
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Dehre, Andreas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Maurin Söderholm, Hanna
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Simulation in Virtual World to Promote Communication2018In: Pre-hospital care- Education and training of ambulance professionals, Noordwijkerhout, The Netherlands, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Communication between ambulance professionals and patients is essential for understanding the patient's lifeworld (Wireklint Sundström & Dahlberg 2010). Simultaneously, communication is challenging to teach and learn within the framework of specific courses. However, simulation in virtual worlds can support the development of new skills such as communication (Combs, Sokolowski & Banks 2016).

     

    Aim

    The aim of this work was to design a simulation-based platform for communication training among ambulance nurse students (ANS).

     

    Methods

    A qualitative action research approach was used (Coghlan & Casey 2001). Second Life® (SL) was selected since it was an existing virtual world. SL is a web-based flexible three-dimensional platform that allows customization. Interaction and communication with other virtual people can be done through avatars in real time (Hodge, Collins & Giordano 2011). Three ANS and five teachers participated, none of the participants had prior experience of SL. Observations and interviews were used as data and analysed using thematic analysis.

     

    Results

    The participants’ experiences generated three themes:

     

    Understanding the virtual world

    It was easy to interact and communicate with other virtual people. However, it took time to feel comfortable to navigate in SL.

     

    Technological challenges

    One challenge was related to audio-visual problems e.g. not compatible headset, interfering echoes and that the image was distorted at times, which made it difficult to act and move the avatar. Another challenge was associated with the 3D modelling e.g. the capability to use of coordinates, positioning, object dimensioning and the fact that accidental deletions could not be restored. A third challenges that influenced the communication was the difficulty of visualizing clinically relevant care measures such as diagnostic examinations or drug treatment. Finally, there was a challenge to customize the avatars to look like ambulance professionals or a severely ill patient.

     

    Learning through avatars

    Learning through avatars requires that the participants take responsibility for delivering a convincing performance.  Immersion was limited since actions do not take place from a first-person viewpoint. There is a need that the scenario is based on realistic conditions e.g. interiors, equipment, clothing, avatar appearance and behaviour.

     

    Conclusion

    The present system is not suitable for training of medical assessment. Teachers who are considering using virtual worlds in the training for future ambulance professionals should note that an appropriate design is crucial for how the simulation is experienced.  

  • 27.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Andersson, Henrik
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Bremer, Anders
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Falchenberg, Åsa
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Evidence-based guidelines for comprehensive assessment in pre-hospital and hospital emergency care2018In: 3rd Global Conference on Emergency Nursing & Trauma Care, Noordwijkerhout, October 4-6, 2018, 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Andreasson, Jörgen
    The University of Gothenburg.
    Organizational preconditions and supportive resources for Swedish healthcare managers: Factors that contribute to or counteract changes: Factors that contribute to or counteract changes2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish Healthcare managers’ organizational preconditions and supportive resources are important for their ability to work with planned change in a sustainable way. This thesis further investigates these factors together with an output measure, healthcare process quality (HPQ).

    The overall aim was to investigate how healthcare managers’ organizational preconditions and support contribute to or counteract managers’ work with planned change in order to implement process development in a sustainable way. Specific aims were: to improve knowledge of managers’ views of and approaches to increasing their employees’ influence on and engagement in models for improving care processes (study I); to investigate relationships among managers’ organizational preconditions, support, and work to improve quality of care and HPQ over time (study II); to investigate whether managers’ coaching style, preconditions, implementation strategy, appraisal of change, and clinical autonomy are associated with HPQ (study III ); and to assess the influence of support from superiors, colleagues, external sources, subordinates, and private life on managers’ own health (study IV ).

    The data for Studies I – III came from five hospitals collected over a three-year period. The data were collected by means of interviews (Study I, qualitative analysis) and annual questionnaires (Studies II and III, quantitative and mixed-method analyses). The data for Study IV were based on questionnaires administered to first- and second-line managers in municipal care, twice during a two-year period.

    The results revealed that the healthcare managers were key actors in implementing planned change, but were dependent on their employees’ engagement in order to succeed. Managers’ appraisal of work with planned change became more positive with strong support from other managers, employees, and the organization as well as with long managerial experience. Support from private life and networks, as well as the managers’ attitudes towards their managerial role, predicted their own health. For new managers or managers with many employees, organizational support predicted their health-related sustainability. Managers practising a more distanced style of coaching (e.g., clearly delegating responsibility for implementation work to employees) were associated with better HPQ outcomes than were managers who were more involved in implementation. In conclusion, implementation of planned change are facilitated by, engaged managers, employees with knowledge of implementation work and of the healthcare system, as well as organizational structures that support the managers. Strong support from various sources as well as managerial experience are important for managers’ appraisal of work with planned change. Strong managerial support and a more delegated leadership style are both important factors related to higher estimated HPQ.

  • 29.
    Andreasson, Jörgen
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ljungar, Erik
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Linda, Ahlstrom
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Jonas, Hermansson
    Angered Hospital.
    Dellve, Lotta
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Professional Bureaucracy and Health Care Managers’ Planned Change Strategies: Governance in Swedish Health Care2018In: Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies, ISSN 2245-0157, E-ISSN 2245-0157, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 23-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To increase efficiency and quality, process development has been implemented in many Swedish hospitals. These hospitals are usually organized as professional bureaucracies in which health care managers have limited decision control. The new governance principles has been implemented without removing bureaucratic elements. This study analyzes how managers implement planned change in these professional bureaucracies, considering if managers coaching style, organizational preconditions, implementation strategy, appraisal of change and clinic autonomy, is associated with health care process quality (HPQ). The study is based on interviews with health care managers and longitudinal assessments of HPQ. The results revealed significant differences between coaching style, organizational preconditions, and HPQ over time. The conclusion is that leadership and preconditions is of importance for the health care manager’s ability to work with planned change, as that the health care managers understand how management methods, governance principles, and professional bureaucracies work in practice.

  • 30.
    Angervall, Petra
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Doctoral supervision for career competition? Negotiating Social Capital in Research education.2018In: The Peaceful University: aspirations for academic futures, compassion, generosity, imagination and creation / [ed] Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Academic policy in Europe currently emphasizes efficiency and high performance along with ‘flexible entrepreneurialism’ and creativity in ways that can appear to be both contradictive and double edged on several levels in academic institutions (Ball, 2012; Bendix Petersen, 2009). The present paper relates to this aspect of higher education policy. It is based on a study with 52 research students on different doctoral programs in Education Sciences at six Swedish universities and asks questions about how these doctoral students understand, cope with and challenge different demands in their research education and what kind of relationship they have with their research supervisors. Supervisors constitute institutional and relational social capital in a double sense and are vital for how the research students' bond and link resources in research education (Putnam, 2001). As the data and analysis shows, in fact the students create directions and legitimacy in different practises (Nahapiet and Ghoshal, 1998) depending on the kind of social capital they have or gain access to: institutional or relational, individual-competitive or collective-horizontal and their social capital is thus related to what they can share collectively, such as in conferences, seminars and teaching. These activities help them to develop exchange and bonding value and form bridges between interests and networks; either horizontal or more vertical ones (e.g. influential contacts). Depending on the ‘academic value’ of the social capital of a research supervisor we see that these research students get access to specific and more or less ‘advantageous’ paths. Also, it appears as if social capital is unevenly shared and distributed between groups and individuals and is specifically related to gender (Moren Cross and Lin, 2008). This creates unequal conditions for men and women research students in research education.

  • 31.
    Angervall, Petra
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Beach, Dennis
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT. University of Gothenburg.
    Akademins ”hemmafruar”: Om kvinnliga lektorers arbete i högskolans service- och tjänstesektor2018In: Universitet AB. Om kommodifiering, marknad och akademi / [ed] Marcus Agnafors, Göteborg: Diadalos , 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Angervall, Petra
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Beach, Dennis
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    The Exploitation of Academic Work: Women in Teaching at Swedish Universities2018In: Higher Education Policy, ISSN 0952-8733, E-ISSN 1740-3863, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study concerns some of the implications of the increasing commodification of the higher education sector. It tries to highlight how higher education institutions have developed in the late 2000s through the reform path that was introduced to transform programmes and employees into marketable products. New forms of governance that change institutional contexts and concrete practices accompany this change. Based on interviews with a group of female academic lecturers and teachers, we look in particular at how the work structure is organized and practised at Swedish universities. The results illustrate a greater division of labour and a fragmentation of academic work that can be explained by recent developments. More specifically, it appears as if female academics in teaching-intensive departments do work that serves the interests of others (often men), foremost in areas and practices such as research.

  • 33.
    Angervall, Petra
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Beach, Dennis
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT. University of Gothenburg.
    The Exploitation of Academic Work: Women in Teaching at Swedish Universities2018In: Higher Education Policy, ISSN 0952-8733, E-ISSN 1740-3863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study concerns some of the implications of the increasing commodification of the higher education sector. It tries to highlight how higher education institutions have developed in the late 2000s through the reform path that was introduced to transform programmes and employees into marketable products. New forms of governance that change institutional contexts and concrete practices accompany this change. Based on interviews with a group of female academic lecturers and teachers, we look in particular at how the work structure is organized and practised at Swedish universities. The results illustrate a greater division of labour and a fragmentation of academic work that can be explained by recent developments. More specifically, it appears as if female academics in teaching-intensive departments do work that serves the interests of others (often men), foremost in areas and practices such as research.

  • 34.
    Angervall, Petra
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Högskolan Väst.
    Silfver, Eva
    Umeå Universitet.
    Academic Career: On institutions, social capital and gender2018In: Higher Education Research and Development, ISSN 0729-4360, E-ISSN 1469-8366, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 1095-1108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During decades of change in the Western higher education sector, new ways of understanding academic work have reinforced notions of the impact of social capital. The present study investigates researchers’ experiences of their own career making within two areas of Education Sciences in Swedish higher education: Childhood Studies (CS) and Science Education (SE). The structure at the CS departments is collaborative and integrated; teaching and research are seen as an entity. This structure creates a coherent career path where members of the collective group jointly produce and accumulate social capital; it also appears to be related to discourses of femininity. In the SE departments, the career structure is strategic and differentiated; the two career paths work in parallel through a differentiation between teaching and research. This appears to be related to discourses of masculinity. In conclusion, our analysis shows how social capital and gender mutually create different ways of doing an academic career.

  • 35.
    Aparac-Jelušić, Tatjana
    et al.
    University of Osijek.
    Casarosa, VittoreUniversity of Pisa.Maceviciute, ElenaUniversity of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    The Future of Education in Information Science: Proceedings from FEIS – International EINFOSE Symposium 10–11 September 2018 Pisa, Italy2018Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Arja, Mina
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Akbar Mirzaei, Ali
    University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Zahedan 98135-674, Iran.
    Mahmood Davarpanah, Abdol
    University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Zahedan 98135-674, Iran.
    Masoud Barakati, Seyed
    University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Zahedan 98135-674, Iran.
    Mohsenzadeh, Abas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Atashi, Hossein
    University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Zahedan 98135-674, Iran.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    DFT studies of hydrocarbon combustion on metal surfaces2018In: Journal of Molecular Modeling, ISSN 1610-2940, E-ISSN 0948-5023, Vol. 24, p. 47-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37. Asadollahzadeh, Mohammadtaghi
    et al.
    Ghasemian, Ali
    Saraeian, Ahmadreza
    Resalati, Hossein
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Production of Fungal Biomass Protein by Filamentous Fungi Cultivation on Liquid Waste Streams from Pulping Process2018In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 5013-5031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to convert the spent liquors obtained from acidic sulfite and neutral sulfite semi-chemical (NSSC) pulping processes into protein-rich fungal biomass. Three filamentous fungi, Aspergillus oryzae, Mucor indicus, and Rhizopus oryzae, were cultivated on the diluted spent liquors in an airlift bioreactor with airflow of 0.85 vvm at 35 degrees C and pH 5.5. Maximum values of 10.17 g, 6.14 g, and 5.47 g of biomass per liter of spent liquor were achieved in the cultivation of A. oryzae, M. indicus, and R. oryzae on the spent sulfite liquor (SSL) diluted to 60%, respectively, while A. oryzae cultivation on the spent NSSC liquor (SNL) diluted to 50% resulted in the production of 3.27 g biomass per liter SNL. The fungal biomasses contained 407 g to 477 g of protein, 31 g to 114 g of fat, 56 g to 89 g of ash, and 297 g to 384 g of alkali-insoluble material (AIM) per kg of dry biomass. The amino acids, fatty acids, and mineral elements composition of the fungal biomasses corresponded to the composition of commercial protein sources especially soybean meal. Among the fungi examined, A. oryzae showed better performance to produce protein-rich fungal biomass during cultivation in the spent liquors.

  • 38.
    Astiani, D.
    et al.
    Faculty of Forestry, Universitas Tanjungpura.
    Curran, L. M.
    Burhanuddin,
    Faculty of Forestry, Universitas Tanjungpura.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Mujiman,
    Lembaga Landscape Livelihood Indonesia Pontianak.
    Hatta, M.
    Faculty of Forestry, Universitas Tanjungpura.
    Pamungkas, W.
    Faculty of Forestry, Universitas Tanjungpura.
    Gusmayanti, Evi
    Lembaga Landscape Livelihood Indonesia Pontianak.
    Fire-Driven Biomass And Peat Carbon Losses And Post-Fire Soil Co2 Emission In A West Kalimantan Peatland Forest2018In: Journal of Tropical Forest Science, ISSN 0128-1283, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 570-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Indonesian peatland forest is considered a huge sink of tropical carbon and thereby make significant contribution to global terrestrial carbon storage. However, landcover and landuse changes in this ecosystem have incurred a synergistic exposure to drought and wildfires. Deforestation and forest degradation through combustion and decomposition of forest biomass and soil carbon have become global issues because of their greenhouse gas contribution to global climate change. Thus fire-driven carbon losses in these peatlands have increased the need to evaluate the impacts of fire at a landscape scale. In 6-10 week dry periods from January to April 2014 and in January 2015, wildfires burnt peatland forest in Kubu Raya, West Kalimantan province (Indonesian Borneo). An assessment was conducted to provide more reliable estimates of the effects of fire on aboveground and soil carbon losses and their dynamics in the coastal peatlands of the province. Carbon loss from combustion of both aboveground biomass and peat soil was substantial. Moreover, CO2 emission from soil respiration at the burnt peat surface increased 46% over the first 9 months after the fire. This study clearly showed the magnitude of fire-driven carbon loss and the scale of CO2 emission to the atmosphere arising from fire in tropical peatland forest.

  • 39. Backlund, Per
    et al.
    Maurin Söderholm, Hanna
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Engström, Henrik
    Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lebram, Mikael
    Breaking Out of the Bubble Putting Simulation Into Context to Increase Immersion and Performance2018In: Simulation & Gaming, article id 1046878118772612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Simulation based training with full-size mannequins is a prominent means of training within the healthcare sector. Prehospital missions include all parts of the healthcare process which take place before a patient is handed over to the receiving hospital. This implies that the context for prehospital care is varied and potentially challenging or dangerous in several ways. In this article we present a study which explores immersion and performance by emergency medical services (EMS) professionals in in a training situation which takes the specifics of prehospital interventions into account.

    Methods: The study was carried out as a field experiment at an ambulance unit. The experiment was designed to compare the differences between two types of medical scenarios: basic and contextualized. We analyzed the levels of immersion throughout the scenarios and then team performance was evaluated by independent experts. Both analyses were made by observing video recordings from multiple camera angles with a custom made analysis tool.

    Results: Our results show that the contextualization of a medical scenario increases both immersion as measured by the Immersion Score Rating Instrument (ISRI) and team performance as measured by the Global Rating Scale (GRS). The overall ISRI score was higher in the contextualized condition as compared to the basic condition, with an average team wise difference of 2.94 (sd = 1.45). This difference is significant using a paired, two-tailed t-test (p<.001). The GRS score was higher for overall clinical performance in the contextualized scenario with an average team wise difference of 0.83 (sd = 0.83, p=.005).Conclusions. Full-size mannequin simulation based training for EMS professionals may be enhanced by contextualizing the medical scenarios. The main benefits are that the contextualized scenarios better take prehospital medical challenges into account and allow participants to perform better.

  • 40.
    Baldwin, Richard
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Apelgren, Britt-Marie
    University of Gothenburg.
    Can Do and Cannot Do – CEFR inspired examination and assessment in a Swedish higher education context2018In: Apples - Journal of Applied Language Studies., ISSN 1457-9863, Vol. 12, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus in this paper is on the introduction and implementation of learning outcomes based on the descriptors in the Common European Framework of References for Languages (CEFR). It discusses reaction to the introduction by teacher educators as well as the influence on teacher assessment practice in courses for prospective teachers of English as a foreign language. The paper presents some of the results from a case study concerning changes made in connection with the Bologna process in a department of education within a university college in Sweden. The results show that the adoption of the CEFR descriptors was contested and had a minimal influence on assessment practice. The aim of the paper is to explore possible reasons for the lack of influence, something that was not developed fully in the original case study.

  • 41.
    Beach, Dennis
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Developments toward a Marxist Critical Ethnography.2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In its most characteristic form ethnography is usually described as participant observation that involves objectively; and without any political interests in changing the course of history by either affecting the unfolding of events or influencing peoples understanding and self-understanding; participating in people’s lives, watching what happens, listening to what is said, asking questions and then writing about that which you believe to be most interesting for another specified group. From a critical ethnographic perspective, in today’s presentation I will challenge some of these ideas….

    In the presentation I will support the commitment toward participation, interaction and learning from informants in their everyday lives as important. Participant observation and involvement is important as it allows research(ers) to get up close to sites of practice and interaction in order to generate a first-hand experience based account of what is involved in and is understood to shape day to day activities, experiences and understandings. It allows learning from communities of practice on a daily basis in other words, as class cultures with unique, self-valorizing, and expressive (symbolic) properties and it allows exploration of how meaning and action can be understood in association with self-reflection within wider historical structural forces and in terms of their local concrete lived and spoken characteristics. However, whilst admitting to the value of participant observation in ethnography, I want to point out at the same time that the history of ethnography as socio-cultural participant observation is not a wholly innocent one and that ethnographic research also shows a multiplicity of forms of praxis, some of which take serious issue with ideas such as researcher impartiality and neutrality, by making a claim instead for a commitment toward engagement, empathy, critique and feedback in the interests of social and educational transformation.

  • 42.
    Beach, Dennis
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Die auswirkungen individualisierender tendensen im swedischen bildungssystem: Eine meta-etnographie2018In: Zeitschrift für Pädagogik, ISSN 0044-3247, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 198-214, article id 267300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a meta-analysis of ethnographic research about the impacts of individualisation policies in Swedish schools and higher education, this paper examines issues of inclusion and social class in the Swedish education system. After an introduction into changes in the Swedish education system and the method of meta-ethnography, we will characterise the meta-ethnographical analysis undertaken and present a discussion of its results. Tensions between claims of educational inclusion and tendencies of individualisation and privatisation are identified. Specific attention is drawn to issues of social class due to a further un-evening in the education system as a result of individualisation.

  • 43.
    Beach, Dennis
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Die auswirkungen individualisierender tendensen im swedischen bildungssystem: Eine meta-etnographie2018In: Zeitschrift für Pädagogik, ISSN 0044-3247Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Beach, Dennis
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Structural Injustices in Swedish Education: Academic Selection and Educational Inequalities2018Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While Sweden is often viewed as a benchmark for equality within education, this book examines this assumption in greater depth. The author argues that Sweden’s education system – even prior to the global spread of neoliberalism in education, meta-policies and privatization – was never particularly equal. Instead, what became apparent was a system that offered advantages to the upper social classes under a sheen of meritocracy and tolerable inequalities. Combining ethnographic and meta-ethnographic methodologies and analyses, the author examines the phenomenon of structural injustice in the Swedish education system both vertically and diachronically across a period of intensive transformation and reform. This revealing volume offers a mode of engagement that will be of value and interest to researchers and students of injustices within education, as well as policy makers and practitioners.

  • 45.
    Beach, Dennis
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Structural Injustices in Swedish Education: Academic Selection and Educational Inequalities2018Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this book is to explore aspects of education justice and equity in relation to an educational system that is generally considered fairer and more equitable than most others: that of Sweden. There are seriously good reasons for undertaking this project. The education system in Sweden does seem to be ostensibly open and inclusive (Gudmundsson 2013) with upwards of 85% of all child cohorts between the ages of 3 and 19 being included for 6 hours or more each weekday in some form of organised institutional education or day-care, regardless of their social class, gender or racial or ethnic heritage or any possible physical or mental disabilities. And as has been suggested by the OECD in relation to its education justice barometer, this is perhaps internationally remarkable. However, perhaps equally remarkable is the lack of impact the investments have had in terms of the creation of greater levels of class consciousness and significantly reduced gender disparities, racial and ethnic equality or social and material distributions of power in society at large.

  • 46.
    Beach, Dennis
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    The myth of Swedish educational equity from historical ethnographic and regional/spatial analytical perspectives2018In: Educació i desenvolupament rural als segles xix-xx-xxi / [ed] Núria Llevot and Jaume Sanuy, Lleida, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is widely regarded as one of the most egalitarian societies in the world, not the least with respect to education access and school inclusion, but this presentation will suggest that there are high levels of social injustice and inequality within the Swedish education system and educational politics, historically and regionally, and that levels of inequality have also risen in recent years, following the introduction of principles of market governance. Examples will be given to illustrate these inequalities with respect to different curricula and geographic spaces and in terms of identified factors of inequity such as race, gender and dis/abilities. The special situation in rural areas will be included in the analysis which has been historically contextualized and links closely with work related to the production of a recent book manuscript that aims to develop a coherent and symmetrical theoretical and empirically grounded argument about historical inequality in Sweden’s education system.

  • 47.
    Beach, Dennis
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Bagley, Carl
    Marques da Silva, Sofia
    Ethnography of Education: Thinking Forward, Looking Back2018In: The Wiley Handbook of Ethnography of Education / [ed] D. Beach, C. Bagley, and S. Marques da Silva, London and New York: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Beach, Dennis
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Bagley, Carl
    Marques da Silva, Sofia
    Introduction to The Wiley Handbook of Ethnography of Education2018In: The Wiley Handbook of Ethnography of Education, London and New York: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Beach, Dennis
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Bagley, CarlMarques da Silva, Sofia
    The Handbook of Ethnography of Education2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Beach, Dennis
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    From, Tuuli
    University of Helsinki.
    Johansson, Monica
    University of Gothenburg.
    Öhrn, Elisabet
    University of Gothenburg.
    Educational and spatial justice in rural and urban areas in three Nordic countries: a meta-ethnographic analysis2018In: Education Inquiry, ISSN 2000-4508, E-ISSN 2000-4508Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on a meta-ethnographic analysis of educational research from rural and urban areas in Finland, Norway and Sweden following the reorganisation of educational supply there in line with market policies. Edward Soja’s concept of spatial justice shapes the analysis. Using meta-ethnography, we try to present a contextualising narrative account of spatial justice and injustice in the education systems in the three countries. Thirty-one Nordic ethnographic publications (a mix of monographs, book chapters and articles) have been used in the meta-analysis. Just over half of them come from Sweden, and most are from urban education studies. The other half are relatively evenly divided between Norway and Finland. All were published between 2000 and 2017. Sweden represents an extreme position in relation to the new politics of education markets. Its promotion of school choice and schools-for-profit has attracted significant attention from ethnographic researchers in recent decades and is given particular attention in the article.

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