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  • 1. Agrawal, Tarun Kumar
    et al.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Classification of traceability information in textile and clothing supply chain: A Delphi-based approach2018Ingår i: EurOMA 2018 Proceedings, 2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The study explores empirically the need and requirement of traceability system in Textile and Clothing (T&C) supply chain. A Delphi based survey was conducted with 28 supply chain experts (industry professionals and academicians) to collect qualitative and quantitative data in order to identify and prioritize various factors that influence traceability adoption in T&C supply chains. Based on these factors the study further explores, classifies and suggests information that can be recorded and shared for a complete traceability among T&C supply chain actors, both business-to-business and business-to-customers.  

  • 2.
    Agrawal, Tarun Kumar
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Exploring secured traceability systems for implementation in textile and clothing supply chain2018Ingår i: Proceeding TIWC conference 2018, 2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Information asymmetry and security are major challenges in multi-tier supply chains. Textile and clothing (T&C) supply chain is one such example significantly affected by these problems. Due to its complex and diverse nature, involved actors find it difficult to connect and secure each supply chain links. Exploiting this situation, a parallel counterfeit market is flourishing and gaining serious momentum. Due to this, T&C industries are suffering huge economic losses and job cuts. Additionally, owing to its opaque and untraceable supply chain, T&C industries have become a world of unethical practices. Secured traceability is an effective tool that has potentials to address these issues and make the T&C supply chain transparent and secured. It is a useful mechanism to track and trace products’ history, know about the manufacturing conditions and at the same time secure it from counterfeits and attacks targeting intellectual properties. In this context, the study conduct survey of supply chain experts to explore and rank the key technological requirements (based on the specific nature of the textile product) and traceability information that can be recorded and secured by a secured traceability system. Further, based on the findings of the survey a review of the literature was conducted to explore state of the art technologies to propose a primary secured traceability structure for the T&C supply chain.

  • 3.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Med pedagogik och teologi som kamp för tro och mod2018Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 4.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Pedagogik är teologi: Ett panelsamtal2018Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 5.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Religionsunterricht in Schweden: Religionsdidaktik und Religionspädagogik2018Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 6.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Samtal om skolavslutningar i kyrkan och spelet om religion i svensk skola2018Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad handlar debatten om de svenska skolavslutningarna egentligen om? Vilka kolliderande perspektiv och ställningstaganden ligger bakom konflikterna? En ny studie av detta tidigare outforskade ämne ger svar.

  • 7.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Schulabslussfeiern in der Kirche: Konflikten über Religion und Tradition in dem Schwedisches Schulsystem2018Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 8.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Skolmyndigheters riktlinjer för religiös pluralism idag och igår: Skolverkets nuvarande riktlinjer och 1967 års riktlinjer från Skolöverstyrelsen2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 9.
    Aldrin, Viktor
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    The conflict over religious practice in Swedish schools: The Church of Sweden and its struggle to redefine its Lutheran confession in a secular state2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A vital aspect of the Church of Sweden is its Lutheran confession and its emphasis on the Two regiments doctrine - an equal interest of working together in the Nation state of Sweden. According to Casanova (2014), the Nordic countries have experienced a secularism where religion has merged with the state and become a department. At the end of the 20th century, state and church separated, and the Church of Sweden became a "free" denomination. in the public schools, this separation has led to a conflict between the church and state. Thus, the distribution of rights according to the Lutheran doctrine is no longer valid. The state discards the Church of Sweden's "spiritual regiment" for the society, considering its religious practices as illegal within the school system. Ecclesiastical debates have begun on a new Lutheran identity formation within the church - that of a church of a minority in a postsecular context. The aim of this paper is to examine this identity formation and, the conflict over religious practices in the schools. New results from the research project "End of term ceremonies held in churches and the debate on the role of religion in Swedish schools", will be presented.

  • 10.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Gabre, Marita
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Dehre, Andreas
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Maurin Söderholm, Hanna
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Simulation in Virtual World to Promote Communication2018Ingår i: Pre-hospital care- Education and training of ambulance professionals, Noordwijkerhout, The Netherlands, 2018Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Communication between ambulance professionals and patients is essential for understanding the patient's lifeworld (Wireklint Sundström & Dahlberg 2010). Simultaneously, communication is challenging to teach and learn within the framework of specific courses. However, simulation in virtual worlds can support the development of new skills such as communication (Combs, Sokolowski & Banks 2016).

     

    Aim

    The aim of this work was to design a simulation-based platform for communication training among ambulance nurse students (ANS).

     

    Methods

    A qualitative action research approach was used (Coghlan & Casey 2001). Second Life® (SL) was selected since it was an existing virtual world. SL is a web-based flexible three-dimensional platform that allows customization. Interaction and communication with other virtual people can be done through avatars in real time (Hodge, Collins & Giordano 2011). Three ANS and five teachers participated, none of the participants had prior experience of SL. Observations and interviews were used as data and analysed using thematic analysis.

     

    Results

    The participants’ experiences generated three themes:

     

    Understanding the virtual world

    It was easy to interact and communicate with other virtual people. However, it took time to feel comfortable to navigate in SL.

     

    Technological challenges

    One challenge was related to audio-visual problems e.g. not compatible headset, interfering echoes and that the image was distorted at times, which made it difficult to act and move the avatar. Another challenge was associated with the 3D modelling e.g. the capability to use of coordinates, positioning, object dimensioning and the fact that accidental deletions could not be restored. A third challenges that influenced the communication was the difficulty of visualizing clinically relevant care measures such as diagnostic examinations or drug treatment. Finally, there was a challenge to customize the avatars to look like ambulance professionals or a severely ill patient.

     

    Learning through avatars

    Learning through avatars requires that the participants take responsibility for delivering a convincing performance.  Immersion was limited since actions do not take place from a first-person viewpoint. There is a need that the scenario is based on realistic conditions e.g. interiors, equipment, clothing, avatar appearance and behaviour.

     

    Conclusion

    The present system is not suitable for training of medical assessment. Teachers who are considering using virtual worlds in the training for future ambulance professionals should note that an appropriate design is crucial for how the simulation is experienced.  

  • 11.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Gabre, Marita
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Dehre, Andreas
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Maurin Söderholm, Hanna
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Simulation in Virtual World to Promote Communication2018Ingår i: Pre-hospital care- Education and training of ambulance professionals, Noordwijkerhout, The Netherlands, 2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Communication between ambulance professionals and patients is essential for understanding the patient's lifeworld (Wireklint Sundström & Dahlberg 2010). Simultaneously, communication is challenging to teach and learn within the framework of specific courses. However, simulation in virtual worlds can support the development of new skills such as communication (Combs, Sokolowski & Banks 2016).

     

    Aim

    The aim of this work was to design a simulation-based platform for communication training among ambulance nurse students (ANS).

     

    Methods

    A qualitative action research approach was used (Coghlan & Casey 2001). Second Life® (SL) was selected since it was an existing virtual world. SL is a web-based flexible three-dimensional platform that allows customization. Interaction and communication with other virtual people can be done through avatars in real time (Hodge, Collins & Giordano 2011). Three ANS and five teachers participated, none of the participants had prior experience of SL. Observations and interviews were used as data and analysed using thematic analysis.

     

    Results

    The participants’ experiences generated three themes:

     

    Understanding the virtual world

    It was easy to interact and communicate with other virtual people. However, it took time to feel comfortable to navigate in SL.

     

    Technological challenges

    One challenge was related to audio-visual problems e.g. not compatible headset, interfering echoes and that the image was distorted at times, which made it difficult to act and move the avatar. Another challenge was associated with the 3D modelling e.g. the capability to use of coordinates, positioning, object dimensioning and the fact that accidental deletions could not be restored. A third challenges that influenced the communication was the difficulty of visualizing clinically relevant care measures such as diagnostic examinations or drug treatment. Finally, there was a challenge to customize the avatars to look like ambulance professionals or a severely ill patient.

     

    Learning through avatars

    Learning through avatars requires that the participants take responsibility for delivering a convincing performance.  Immersion was limited since actions do not take place from a first-person viewpoint. There is a need that the scenario is based on realistic conditions e.g. interiors, equipment, clothing, avatar appearance and behaviour.

     

    Conclusion

    The present system is not suitable for training of medical assessment. Teachers who are considering using virtual worlds in the training for future ambulance professionals should note that an appropriate design is crucial for how the simulation is experienced.  

  • 12.
    Andersson, Ulf
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Bremer, Anders
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Falchenberg, Åsa
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Evidence-based guidelines for comprehensive assessment in pre-hospital and hospital emergency care2018Ingår i: 3rd Global Conference on Emergency Nursing & Trauma Care, Noordwijkerhout, October 4-6, 2018, 2018Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 13.
    Angervall, Petra
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Doctoral supervision for career competition? Negotiating Social Capital in Research education.2018Ingår i: The Peaceful University: aspirations for academic futures, compassion, generosity, imagination and creation / [ed] Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University, 2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Academic policy in Europe currently emphasizes efficiency and high performance along with ‘flexible entrepreneurialism’ and creativity in ways that can appear to be both contradictive and double edged on several levels in academic institutions (Ball, 2012; Bendix Petersen, 2009). The present paper relates to this aspect of higher education policy. It is based on a study with 52 research students on different doctoral programs in Education Sciences at six Swedish universities and asks questions about how these doctoral students understand, cope with and challenge different demands in their research education and what kind of relationship they have with their research supervisors. Supervisors constitute institutional and relational social capital in a double sense and are vital for how the research students' bond and link resources in research education (Putnam, 2001). As the data and analysis shows, in fact the students create directions and legitimacy in different practises (Nahapiet and Ghoshal, 1998) depending on the kind of social capital they have or gain access to: institutional or relational, individual-competitive or collective-horizontal and their social capital is thus related to what they can share collectively, such as in conferences, seminars and teaching. These activities help them to develop exchange and bonding value and form bridges between interests and networks; either horizontal or more vertical ones (e.g. influential contacts). Depending on the ‘academic value’ of the social capital of a research supervisor we see that these research students get access to specific and more or less ‘advantageous’ paths. Also, it appears as if social capital is unevenly shared and distributed between groups and individuals and is specifically related to gender (Moren Cross and Lin, 2008). This creates unequal conditions for men and women research students in research education.

  • 14.
    Beach, Dennis
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Developments toward a Marxist Critical Ethnography.2018Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    In its most characteristic form ethnography is usually described as participant observation that involves objectively; and without any political interests in changing the course of history by either affecting the unfolding of events or influencing peoples understanding and self-understanding; participating in people’s lives, watching what happens, listening to what is said, asking questions and then writing about that which you believe to be most interesting for another specified group. From a critical ethnographic perspective, in today’s presentation I will challenge some of these ideas….

    In the presentation I will support the commitment toward participation, interaction and learning from informants in their everyday lives as important. Participant observation and involvement is important as it allows research(ers) to get up close to sites of practice and interaction in order to generate a first-hand experience based account of what is involved in and is understood to shape day to day activities, experiences and understandings. It allows learning from communities of practice on a daily basis in other words, as class cultures with unique, self-valorizing, and expressive (symbolic) properties and it allows exploration of how meaning and action can be understood in association with self-reflection within wider historical structural forces and in terms of their local concrete lived and spoken characteristics. However, whilst admitting to the value of participant observation in ethnography, I want to point out at the same time that the history of ethnography as socio-cultural participant observation is not a wholly innocent one and that ethnographic research also shows a multiplicity of forms of praxis, some of which take serious issue with ideas such as researcher impartiality and neutrality, by making a claim instead for a commitment toward engagement, empathy, critique and feedback in the interests of social and educational transformation.

  • 15.
    Beach, Dennis
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    The myth of Swedish educational equity from historical ethnographic and regional/spatial analytical perspectives2018Ingår i: Educació i desenvolupament rural als segles xix-xx-xxi / [ed] Núria Llevot and Jaume Sanuy, Lleida, 2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is widely regarded as one of the most egalitarian societies in the world, not the least with respect to education access and school inclusion, but this presentation will suggest that there are high levels of social injustice and inequality within the Swedish education system and educational politics, historically and regionally, and that levels of inequality have also risen in recent years, following the introduction of principles of market governance. Examples will be given to illustrate these inequalities with respect to different curricula and geographic spaces and in terms of identified factors of inequity such as race, gender and dis/abilities. The special situation in rural areas will be included in the analysis which has been historically contextualized and links closely with work related to the production of a recent book manuscript that aims to develop a coherent and symmetrical theoretical and empirically grounded argument about historical inequality in Sweden’s education system.

  • 16.
    Beach, Dennis
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Vigo Arrazola, Maria Begoña
    Significados de la escuela rural desde la investigación. Representaciones compartidas entre España y Suecia en la segunda parte del siglo xx y primeros años del siglo XXI (pp. 225-236)2018Ingår i: Educació i desenvolupament rural als segles xix-xx-xxi / [ed] Núria Llevot y Jaume Sanuy, 2018, s. 225-236Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to give an account of the meanings have been attributed to the rural school in two educational systems characterized by rurality such as Sweden and Spain, between the second part of the 20th century and the first years of the 21st century. The analysis is made taking the literature about the subject and a meta-ethnographic study based on different research projects in both countries as well as in its publications. It highlights a representation of the rural school’s value by reinforcing the relevance of the space for its understanding.

  • 17.
    Bengtsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Bhadani, Kanishk
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Asbjörnsson, Gauti
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Evertsson, Magnus
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Hulthén, Erik
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Comparative Study of Optimization Schemes in Mineral Processing Simulations2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Modelling and simulations for mineral processing plants have been successful in replicating and predicting predefined scenarios of an operating plant. However, there is a need to explore and increase the potential of such simulations to make them attractive for users. One of the tools to increase the attractiveness of the simulations is through applying optimization schemes. Optimization schemes, applied on mineral processing simulations, can identify non-intuitive solutions for a given problem. The problem definition itself is subjective in nature and is dependent on the purpose of the operating plant.The scope of this paper is to demonstrate two optimization schemes: Multi-Objective Optimization (MOO) using a Genetic Algorithm (GA) and Multi-Disciplinary Optimization (MDO) using an Individual Discipline Feasible (IDF) approach. A two stage coarse comminution plant is used as a case plant to demonstrate the applicability of the two optimization schemes. The two schemes are compared based on the problem formulations, types of result and computation time. Results show that the two optimization schemes are suitable in generating solutions to a defined problem and both schemes can be used together to produce complementary results.

  • 18.
    Bergmann, Helena
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    "The very shadow of an insect's wing": Hartley Coleridge's obervations of the niceties of a life in ecological harmony2018Ingår i: "The very shadow of an insect's wing":: Hartley Coleridge's Observations of the Niceties of a Life in Ecological Harmony, 2018, s. 1-12Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The poet Hartley Coleridge (1796-1849) was marginalised  for a long time while  trying to develop his artistry under the shadow of his father, the great Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834). He did not really gain recognition until at the beginning of the 21st century, in our own era of ecological awareness. Now, his poetry has been received as a pertinent combining of "the trivialand the monumental". His sensitive, minute recordings of hardly perceivable bucolic and sylvan scenes have earned him a reputation as a "miniaturist" and foreshadower of the current awakening to the precarious fragility of nature.

  • 19.
    Bergnehr, Disa
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Adapted fathering for new times – refugee men’s caring and domestic practices during resettlement2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper explores Middle Eastern men’s narratives on everyday family life and fatherhood in Sweden. The analysis is based on individual interviews and diary notes. Swedish society differs from Middle Eastern societies in many respects; it offers comprehensive rights to extensive social welfare benefits, but also demands that newly arrived migrants participate in language studies, accept trainee positions, and actively search for employment. These requirements apply to mothers as well as fathers. Life in Sweden is challenging for refugees; many face long-term unemployment and welfare dependence. The present analysis shows how Syrian and Iraqi fathers’ downward social mobility, with radically changed material and financial means, influences their caring and domestic practices. In part, they take on ‘female’ duties and share chores with their spouse more equally. The study illuminates that fathering is dynamic and prone to change; (migrant) men adjust their strategies to provide the best possible circumstances and future prospects for their children. This challenges the notion that (migrant) fathering and masculinity are fixed. 

  • 20. Bhadani, Kanishk
    et al.
    Asbjörnsson, Gauti
    Hulthén, Erik
    Bengtsson, Magnus
    Evertsson, Magnus
    Application of Multi-Disciplinary Optimization Architectures in Mineral Processing Simulations2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Optimization is a pivotal point in distinguishing the competitiveness between industries that are developing, designing and operating products and processes. Mineral processing is an industry which operates various sub-processes and produces one or several products. The sub-processes involved are dynamic in nature and differs in discipline of operation. These dynamic sub-processes are sequentially integrated forming a mineral processing system. Currently, the developed simulations for the mineral processing systems have the potential to be used to design, operate and control mineral processing plants to an increased extent, but need broader optimization strategies to integrate multiple sub-processes involved.<br />The scope of this research is to demonstrate application of multi-disciplinary optimization (MDO) architectures into a mineral processing simulation. A case study consisting of two sub-processes of comminution and classification circuits to produce aggregate products is used to demonstrate the application of MDO architectures. The MDO architectures are compared based on problem formulation, computational resources required and validity of the results. The optimization results using MDO architectures can be used to illustrate trade-offs between different sub-processes within the considered scope. The application of MDO architectures can facilitate the linking mathematical models of various disciplines such as comminution, and liberation in mineral processing simulation.

  • 21.
    Billmayer, Jakob
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Choose us, we are so different!: Free schools’ self-descriptions and positioning on the Swedish school marke2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the beginning of the 1990‘s, Swedish parents have had the possibility of choosing schools for their children freely by taking publicly funded school vouchers to the chosen school. At the same time free schools started to develop, competing for the pupils and the school vouchers. Even though the free schools are a part of the school system, obligated to follow the same laws and curricula as the public schools, they describe themselves as something else, something “outside the system inside the system”.

    The aim of the paper is to identify, analyze and discuss the different strategies of inclusion/exclusion in the educational system that are used in the self-descriptions of the free schools. The paper is theoretically and methodologically informed by Luhmann’s (2002)⁠ social theory, which allows to study how social systems (the free schools) describe – and establish – themselves in relation to other systems and society. To describe and analyze the different ways of differentiation, economical theory is used. Porter’s (1980)

    generic strategies for reaching competitive advantage and Mintzberg’s (1996)⁠ strategies for differentiation are used as analytical framework.

    The data for the study is based on official information that can be found on the three largest free schools‘ websites including introductions, welcoming words, presentation of the staff, teacher recruitment sites, statistics etc etc.

    The data is analyzed using semantic-analysis (Andersen 2003)⁠ which allows to study and discuss how meaning is made inside social systems and how they construct and relate to their environment .

    It will be discussed and compared how the different free schools describe themselves on the one hand as legitimate and worthy parts of the Swedish educational system at the same time as they – for reasons of competition and marketing – differentiate themselves from other players.

    The introduction of the free schools have been a major reform in Sweden which impact has not yet been studied intensively. Educational research has had more focus on the marketisation of the school system, than the free schools in their own right. This study is to be understood as a first step in a forthcoming larger study about free schools in Sweden and their impact on the educational system and society.

    References

    Andersen, Niels Åkerstrøm. 2003. Discursive Analytical Strategies - Understanding Foucault, Koselleck, Laclau, Luhmann. Bristol: The Policy Press.

    Luhmann, Niklas. 2002. Einführung in die Systemtheorie. Herausgegeben von Dirk Baecker. Heidelberg: Carl Auer.

    Mintzberg, Henry, Joseph Lampel, James Brian Quinn, und Sumantra Ghoshal. 1996. The Strategy Process: Concepts, Contexts, Cases. Harlow: Pearson Education.

    Porter, Michael E. 1980. Competetive Strategy - Thechniques for Analyzing Industries and Competitors. New York: Free Press.

  • 22.
    Billmayer, Jakob
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Day, Stephen Paul
    University of the West of Scotland.
    Visions and Voices: Scientific Literacy and Room for Autonomy in the Scottish and Swedish Science Curriculum.2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Curriculum making operates at the institutional, programmatic and classroom level (Doyle, 1992a 1992b). The institutional level, represented by curriculum policy at the interface between schooling, culture and society is typified by what is valued by society and desirable in socio-cultural terms. Day and Bryce (2013) argue that the curriculum policy vision (rationale) statements represent Institutional level curriculum making. The programmatic level is contained within documents and materials for use by schools to orient classroom activities. Day and Bryce (2013) further suggest that these documents represent the policy image. Curriculum making at this level transforms the institutional curriculum into school subjects which are framed by a set of arguments that rationalise the selection and arrangement of content and the translation of content for school and classroom use (Doyle, 1992b). This paper critically examines the extent to which Scottish and Swedish Science curriculum documentation supports meaningful curriculum making.

    Two competing visions of scientific literacy (SL) can be identified within most science curricular documents. Vision I SL, looks inward and relates to the discipline of science itself, e.g. its products and processes. Vision II SL looks outward at situations in which science has a role and relates to the situations in which science demonstrably plays a role in human affairs. These two visions of SL are used as a framework for analysing the Scottish and Swedish science curricula.

    A textual discourse analysis of Scottish and Swedish Science curricular policy documents relating to the primary and lower secondary school phase of education was performed. First, all relevant science curriculum documents relating to the Scottish and Swedish curriculum were identified and shared. Second, the authors read and analysed the orientation of the science curricula. Third, the authors read and identified the common and contrasting features of each country’s science curriculum and established the extent to which vision each curriculum attended.

    Analysis indicates structural similarities between the two countries science curricula in terms of breadth and range of content areas covered. They differ in terms of content detail; specificity of language and explicit orientation. They also differ substantially in the emergent voices and room for teacher autonomy. The Swedish science curriculum is more specific in its use of language with the Scottish being more vague. Both countries curricula have a clear orientation statement but the Scottish curriculum is orientated towards developing students as scientifically literate citizens with skills, competencies and knowledge whereas the Swedish curriculum is oriented towards students’ accumulation of scientific knowledge. The Scottish curriculum emphasizes scientific literacy more strongly than the Swedish, whereas both orientate mainly towards a Vision I SL.

    References.

    Day, S. P., and Bryce, T.G.K, (2013) Curriculum for Excellence Science: Vision or Confusion? Scottish Educational Review, 45 (1), 53-66.

    Doyle, W. (1992a). Curriculum and pedagogy. In P.W. Jackson (Ed.), Handbook of research on curriculum. New York: Macmillan.

    Doyle, W. (1992b). Constructing curriculum in the classroom. In F.K. Oser, A. Dick, & J. Patry (Eds), Effective and responsible teaching: The new syntheses. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publisher.

  • 23.
    Biswas, Tuser
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Yu, Junchun
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Nierstrasz, Vincent
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Functionalization of textiles with enzymes by inkjet printing2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The catalytic activity of the enzymes can be introduced to textile surfaces for bio-sensing applications by immobilizing them through a resource-efficient deposition method such as inkjet printing [1]. Contrary to conventional dispensing methods, drop-on-demand inkjet printing can provide with high precision deposition of these enzymes along with flexibility for small-scale production [2]. To the best of our knowledge, studies on the inkjetting of enzymes are limited and often uses a modified/adapted commercial paper printer for jetting [3]. Additionally, the effect of ink formulation and printing condition variables on the activity of enzyme are not well explored. Many of such variables suggested for jetting of proteins [4] includes e.g. ink rheology, operating temperature, drop size retention, and the shear force acting on the ink. In our research effect of these variables are studied using a digital inkjet printer (Xennia Carnelian) with a Sapphire QS10 piezo-electric print head (Fujifilm Dimatix, USA). Lysozyme is used as a model enzyme for printing due to its well-known structure and catalytic mechanism. Effect of temperature and shear force development within the print head on lysozyme activity is investigated. Additionally, pre-treatment of the fabric to improve ink adhesion through various surface activation processes are studied. Finally, remaining activity of the printed enzymes over washing is evaluated to ensure the fastness property.

    Acknowledgment

    This research project is funded by University of Borås, Sweden.

    References

    [1]     Li J, Rossignol F, Macdonald J. Inkjet printing for biosensor fabrication: combining chemistry and technology for advanced manufacturing. Lab on a Chip 2015;15(12):2538-2558.

    [2]     Nierstrasz V, Yu J, Seipel S. Towards more flexible, sustainable and energy-efficient textile functionalization processes: Digital inkjet in functional and smart textile production. In: 9th Aachen-Dresden International Textile Conference 2015; 2015.

    [3]     Yamazoe H. Fabrication of protein micropatterns using a functional substrate with convertible protein-adsorption surface properties. J Biomed Mater Res A 2012;100(2):362-9.

    [4]     Delaney JT, Smith PJ, Schubert US. Inkjet printing of proteins. Soft Matter 2009;5(24):4866-4877.

  • 24.
    Bågander, Linnea
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Cuttlefish - another body2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    CUTTLEFISH – Another body 

     

    This work aims to explore other types of preforming bodies. Bodies extending themselves into material and creating expressions based on the body in a dialogue with materials expression. Through this aiming to remove connotations associated with the body through this create for the audience an experience of freedom of imagination. 

    Fashion design involves an aesthetics that is based the body as form and is often changed in form according to norms, trends and ideals, shaping by “artificially changing the body’s silhouette and sometimes altering its natural structure” (Koda, 2012). Further, the alterations of dress affect how the body behaves and moves by restricting, enhancing (Bugg, 2006) and enabling movements through both physical and psychological means. In Cuttlefish, the body is instead altered in movement qualities and through this as form. 

    The visual removal of the body, contributed to experienced new bodies, it became something that the viewer can relate to on an emotional level as they became new personas and identities. Audience experience a large vary of emotions and personal associations many of them concerning identity; who we are and how we exist together. 

     

     

    CUTTLEFISH credits:

    Choreographer: Nicole NeidertCast: Linn Ragnarsson, Viktoria Andersson, Anton BorgströmCostume design: Linnea BåganderSound design: Elize ArvefjordLight design: Ulrich Ruchlinski 

    Premier: September 26th 2017 Falkhallen, Falkenberg, Sweden 

    Additional performances:Byteatern Kalmar, KonserthusteaterKarlskrona, SPIRA Jönköping, Region Teatern Växjö, Skånes Dans Teater Malmö.

  • 25.
    Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Disa, Bergnehr
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Affectionate touch and care: Embodied intimacy, compassion and control in early childhood education2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 26.
    Cronholm, Stefan
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Göbel, Hannes
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Guidelines Supporting the Formulation of Design Principles2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Design principles represent design knowledge and constitute a prescriptive component that is included in design theory. In design science research, the formulation of generalised and intelligible design principles that can be reused in new contexts is regarded as an important outcome. Our study has revealed that existing design principles vary in terms of structure, content, and level of abstraction. This variation and inconsistency may obstruct the reusability of the design principles. The purpose of this study is to suggest support for the formulation of design principles. In order to enhance the support for the formulation of design principles, we have suggested three guidelines, which are based on analyses of theoretical statements, existing guidelines, and existing design principles. The guidelines are illustrated by using material from a design science research project.

  • 27.
    Cronholm, Stefan
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Romare, Sören
    Sofigate.
    Principles for Good Enough IT Service Management2018Ingår i: 14thEuropean Conference on Management Leadership and Governance (ECMLG), Utrecht, The Netherlands, Oct 18-19., 2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    To manage IT services continues to be a challenging process for many organizations. IT service providers are under constant pressure to deliver IT services both at a low cost and high quality, in order to maximize benefits and value for their customers. Obviously, IT service providers find that solving this equation is almost impossible. Thus, there is a need to find new principles or guidance which support satisficing and acceptable IT service delivery. Improvement of IT services delivery are often related to the concept of IT Service Management (ITSM). ITSM focuses on service delivery and can be regarded as an umbrella term including frameworks, models, and methodologies. Our review of the ITSM literature has revealed that best practices and standards have been considered as expensive to implement and maintain, have caused high expectations that are seldom fulfilled, are viewed as too complex, and have high learning thresholds which mean that learning is time-consuming. The purpose of this paper is to suggest principles concerning good enough IT service management which should be seen as a complement to established best practices and standards such as ITIL or ISO/IEC 20000 IT Service Management Standard. Our study has generated four principles: 1) focus on core processes, 2) design for co-creation of value, 3) recognize situation-specific attributes, and 4) avoid over-engineering. The purpose of the principles is to support the assessment of IT service delivery and to promote service management, with respect to costs, effort, and customer value. The principles have been implemented in a digital tool for the assessment and management of IT service delivery. The tool has been used to test and verify the principles in real empirical settings. The principles have also been collaboratively formulated by service practitioners and researchers. We claim that the principles advance theory concerning service management, by providing normative knowledge with respect to the concept of good enough. 

  • 28.
    Dahl, Tor Arne
    et al.
    Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway.
    Dahlström, Mats
    Doracic, Alen
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Maceviciute, Elena
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Scandinavian cooperation in teaching a joint Master’s course on e-books2018Ingår i: The Future of Education in Information Science: Proceedings from FEIS – International EINFOSE Symposium 10–11 September 2018 Pisa, Italy / [ed] Tatjana Aparac-Jelušić, Vittore Casarosa, and Elena Macevičiūtė, Osijek, Croatia, 2018, s. 35-45Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the paper is to share the experience of collaboration among Scandinavian iSchools in creating and implementing a joint course. The authors explore their own activity and documentation produced in relation to the collaboration around the development and implementation of the advanced course on ebooks. The results of the collaboration are expressed in terms of new experience, knowledge, and implementation of a new course on the advanced level for library and information science students. The results of the paper generalize these experiences and present the challenges and lessons learned in the process of collaboration. The paper presents a workable administrative model for cross-national joint courses. In addition, it outlines design and teaching methods for a Master’s course on e-books for library and information science students. A joint course with a shared syllabus and cross-national teacher teams gives added value to the students by getting the best out of the combined expertise. Administrative details should be implemented locally at the collaborating universities rather than try to standardise everything.

  • 29.
    Darcy, Laura
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Meeting the social needs of young children with cancer: – a transdisciplinary implementation of research results.2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Young children are increasingly surviving their cancer and their experiences of living with cancer are crucial to providing evidence based care. Their own experiences of everyday life with cancer were elicitated by interview shortly after diagnosis and six, 12, 18 and 36 months later (2011-2015). Qualitative analyses of the results described the child living with cancer over a three year period as a child apart, striving to live an everyday life. A strong sense of loneliness, isolation, feeling left out and feeling different persisted throughout the study. Emerging issues of survivorship, such as the child’s social needs, were revealed that need to be addressed as young children learn to live an everyday life with cancer and the effects of its treatment.

    Methods

    The present paper aims to describe the actions taken by the Child Life Specialist Department at a paediatric hospital in the West of Sweden based on these results.

    Results

    Child Life Specialists (CLS) play an integral role on the oncology team. Guidelines and working practise were developed to meet the child’s social needs. CLS are now present at visits made to preschool/schools together with the consultant oncology nurses and maintain contact with preschool/school personnel over time. Through brochures and meetings the CLS spreads information on the child’s social needs to surrounding municipalities and other CLS teams in Sweden.

     

    Conclusions

    The results of studies with young children with cancer need to be implemented and evaluated in clinical care. Traditionally, studies within nursing are disseminated to and implemented by nursing staff. The present study shows how other disciplines can be involved in the dissemination and implementation of nursing study results- with the child and the child’s needs as the guiding point.

  • 30.
    Darcy, Laura
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Karlsson, Katarina
    Humanising Care for Sick Children in Hospital: – are we ready to meet the demands of The Convention on Human Rights of the Child (CHRC)?2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Nursing Care of children is complex and nurses need specific knowledge in meeting children to ensure high quality care. Caring for children based on their age, developmental stage and maturity can be a challenge for nurses and sets demands on care. When the CRC becomes law in Sweden 2020 children’s rights will be strengthened and we can expect repercussions in the quality of care delivered to children in need

     

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to investigate the degree to which nurses in paediatric hospital services work in compliance with the CRC.

     

    Method

    Nurses in paediatric services in Western Sweden answered a survey on if their work situation allowed them to give care to children in accordance with the CRC. Survey responses (n=69) were analysed with descriptive analysis. Personal interviews were performed with paediatric nurses (n=9) and analysed with a qualitative content analysis.

     

    Results

    Nurses working in paediatric services are well aware of children’s rights in health care and strive to meet children’s needs. However, a stressed working situation with lack of time and/or an environment that is not child friendly means that their caring is not always optimal. Children are not participatory to the degree nurses would wish then to be and the CRC stipulates they should.

     

    Conclusions

    Nurses working with children show competence in and knowledge of children’s needs. However thay are limited by their working environments. Clear guidelines and working tools such as time for reflection are suggestions of measures that need to be taken to ensure compliance with the upcoming demands of the CRC.

  • 31.
    Davoodi, Ali
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Evertsson, Magnus
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Hulthén, Erik
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Bengtsson, Magnus
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi. Chalmers University of Technology.
    The effect of different aperture shape and material of screen deck on screening efficiency2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Screening is a key unit operation for the large-scale separation of materials. There are a number of different machine parameters and variables which affect the process of screening. The Discrete Element Method (DEM) is a suitable method to analyze all parameters and variables. The main benefit of using DEM for simulating the screening process is that as a particle contact model it gives the possibility to track each particle in the flow and all collisions between particles and between particles and boundaries.<br />There are a number of different materials commonly used for screen media such as rubber and polyurethane which are used in modular systems as a panel and steel is usually used as steel wire mesh but sheet metal can also be used. This paper presents how different materials used in screen decks affect the screening process. The strength and elasticity has been examined in order to study how the aperture will change with different materials and also how different shapes of the aperture and the material of screen media affect the screening performance by analyzing different material flow.

  • 32.
    Day, Stephen Paul
    et al.
    University of the West of Scotland.
    Billmayer, Jakob
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Exploring Curriculum Making and Design within the Scottish and Swedish Science Curriculum2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Politicians, policymakers and educators across Europe recognise that Science, as a product of human endeavour, is deeply enmeshed within all aspects of the modern world. Increasingly, they view science as an important priority within educational and economic terms. However, this increased political attention on science has intensified recently considering the results of large scale transnational assessments of student attainment such as the OECD’s Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) where poorer than expected results, particularly in mathematics (numeracy) and science have sparked curricular reforms. Scotland and Sweden have recently undergone extensive educational reforms where the Science curriculum has also undergone reform.

    Deng (2011), citing Doyle (1992a; 1992b) suggests that curriculum making operates at three levels, the institutional, programmatic, and classroom, where each level is associated with distinct kinds of curriculum discourses. The institutional level is represented by curriculum policy at the interface between schooling, culture and society and is typified by what is desirable in socio-cultural terms and by what society deems valuable. The programmatic level is contained within curriculum documents and materials used by schools to orient classroom activities. It has suggested by Day and Bryce (2013) that the curriculum policy vision (or rationale) represents the Institutional level of curriculum making and that the documents which exemplify and outline the syllabus represent the policy image. Curriculum making at this level transforms the institutional curriculum into school subjects. As Doyle (1992b) suggests, school subjects are framed by a set of arguments that rationalise the selection and arrangement of content, in terms of knowledge, skills and dispositions and the translation of the content for school and classroom use. The programmatic curriculum embodies a theory of content that aligns with the institutional expectations and teaching activities. The classroom curriculum is characterised by the interaction of teachers with their students. However, classroom curriculum making necessarily involves teachers translating the programmatic curriculum into instructional events through a process of elaboration with the intention to make the content meaningful to students and connects with their experiences, capacities and interests.

    Scientific literacy is widely accepted as the central goal of science education for the 21st century and is a major aspect of the PISA Science assessment. Indeed, Roberts (2011) has argued that scientific literacy has had a strong impact on the discourse about curriculum policy, curriculum development, and assessment in contemporary school science education. This notwithstanding, what has been debated within the science education discourse is what should constitute the content for teaching and learning for the development of scientific literacy. Curriculum policy, Roberts (2011) argues, expresses the purpose for learning. Roberts (2007) characterises the current science education landscape as being mired in a struggle between two broad “visions” of the purposes for learning school science where on the one hand there is the discipline of science itself, the products, processes, and characteristics of the scientific enterprise (which he names Vision I). On the other, there are those situations in which science demonstrably plays a role in human affairs, including, but not limited to scientific thinking and activity (which he names Vision II). Using the Vision I - Vision II broad distinction, makes it possible to discuss and analyse competing meanings of scientific literacy without becoming embroiled in the debate as to how scientific literacy is defined.

    This paper aims to examine the extent to which the Scottish and Swedish Science curriculum share common features, reflect the stated aims of the curriculum, and orientate, focus and attend to the development of students as scientifically literate citizens by focusing on the institutional and programmatic level of curriculum making as outlined within major curricular documents from both countries.

    Method

    A textually oriented discourse analysis of the Scottish and Swedish Science curricular policy documents relating to the primary and lower secondary school phase of education was performed. First, all the relevant science curriculum documents relating to the Scottish Broad General Education phase and the Swedish Compulsory phase of the science curriculum where identified and shared. All documents where read and analysed in English, with the Swedish curricular documents having been published in English and cross checked with the Swedish version for translational issues. Second, the authors read, identified and analysed the science documents to assess how these documents orient the science curricula. Third, the authors identified the common and contrasting features of each countries science curriculum to establish the extent to which each curriculum attended to the orienting vision for the curriculum. Fourth, the texts where analysed to establish the dominant voice projected by each curriculum document, i.e. that of the policy maker, the teacher, the student.

    Expected Outcomes

    Analysis indicates that at the programmatic level of curriculum-making there are structural similarities between the Scottish and Swedish science curricula in terms of breadth and range of content areas. The main differences being in content detail, specificity of language and explicit orientation. Both science curricula have a clear orientation statement but the Scottish documents explicitly oriented the curriculum towards developing pupils as scientifically literate citizens with skills, competencies and knowledge whereas the Swedish curriculum is oriented more towards pupils’ accumulation of scientific knowledge. In fact, the Swedish science curriculum do not use the term scientific literacy explicitly at all. Both the Scottish and Swedish science curriculum are oriented towards a Vision I-like Scientific Literacy curriculum with elements of Vision II suggesting that at the programmatic level, each focuses heavily on science content knowledge and investigation and inquiry skills than on socio-scientific discussion. In terms of language specificity, the Swedish curriculum is more specific in its use of language, with the Scottish curriculum being more vague despite being more explicit in terms of content and advice to teachers than the Swedish curriculum. The predominant voice speaking within the Scottish Science Experiences and Outcomes is that of the pupil, with the use of terms such as “I can” “I have participated in”, whereas the Swedish Science curriculum documents are more neutral. The Swedish Science curriculum is less prescriptive, in terms of content and only indicates what the expectations for pupil attainment at different levels ought to be, with no indication of advocated pedagogy. By contrast, the Scottish Science principles and practice document – with the policy makers’ voice – details 12 developmental priorities for science teachers to focus on. The Science benchmarks sets out what pupils need to know and can do, at each level, to progress their learning within the curriculum.

    References

    Day, S. P., and Bryce, T.G.K, (2013) Curriculum for Excellence Science: Vision or Confusion? Scottish Educational Review, Doyle, W. (1992a). Curriculum and pedagogy. In P.W. Jackson (Ed.), Handbook of research on curriculum. New York: Macmillan. Doyle, W. (1992b). Constructing curriculum in the classroom. In F.K. Oser, A. Dick, & J. Patry (Eds), Effective and responsible teaching: The new syntheses. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publisher. Roberts, D. A. (2007) Scientific literacy/Science literacy. In S. K. Abell & N. G. Lederman (Eds.), Handbook of research on science education. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Roberts, D.A. (2011). Competing Visions of Scientific Literacy: The Influence of a Science Curriculum Policy Image. In C, Linder, L Östman, D.A. Roberts, P-O Wickman, G, Erickson, A MacKinnon (Eds.), Exploring the Landscape of Scientific Literacy. London: Routledge.

  • 33.
    Disa, Bergnehr
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Migrant children and parents’ strategies for achieving wellbeing during resettlement in Sweden2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explores how migrant, refugee children and parents contribute to and influence their own wellbeing and that of family members during resettlement in Sweden. The study starts from the notion that social and emotional wellbeing are relational, contextually formed, and subjectively experienced. Parents and children are equal contributors to influencing the wellbeing of the other. The study is based on individual interviews with parents and children from the Middle East. There is a reciprocal relationship between parent and child that emerges, where practices of love and caring, including helping out with chores and supporting each other in different ways, permeate everyday life. But there are also issues of concern and worry, particularly on the part of parents, about how the child’s present or future actions may stifle his/her chances of a better life, and about how contextual factors may restrain both parents’ and children’s aspirations for a better future, with negative implications for their wellbeing. Reforms must be put into practice that supports migrant children and parents in achieving their goals (i.e., employment, educational success, improved housing, increased wellbeing), and that acknowledge migrants as agents whose actions aim to improve their and their family members’ wellbeing and situation. 

  • 34.
    Disa, Bergnehr
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Henriksson Wahlström, Helena
    Uppsala universitet.
    Between “lone” and “solo”: Representations of single motherhood in Swedish newspapers2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden the public and political debate on lone mothers (Sv. ensamstående) has been more or less absent in the past 50 years. Due to available and subsidised childcare, most lone parents have paid employment, hence single mothers have not been depicted as moral and financial burdens on society. Furthermore, mainstream political discourses in Sweden favour the "gender neutral" term parent (förälder) over gendered terms like mother and father. Nonetheless, the single parent is strongly gendered statistically speaking, as the majority of children whose parents are separated reside exclusively or predominantly with the mother.

    Although not politically stigmatized, single mothers as a statistical category face particular adversities. Swedish research focuses on general disadvantages in health and private economy for lone mothers compared to partnered families, representing the group as particularly vulnerable and in need ofsupport. Interview studies show a more varied picture, but often centre on the mothers' relation to the social services, and/or their strategies to provide financially for their families, adding to the image of lone motherhood as problematic. Thus, the research typically depicts the lone mother family as troubled.

    The present paper analyses representations of single mothers in contemporary Sweden. It draws upon articles published in the four major daily newspapers, which are central in setting the national news agenda, hence impacting upon a Swedish "national imaginary". We focus on the years 2015-2017, a time characterized by high levels of single parenthood due to separation/divorce/never in relationship with other bio-parent, but also by dramatically increased migration as well as new legislation regarding single women's access to IVF treatment and what in English is sometimes termed "solo" motherhood. Given the growing ethnic diversity of the population, the growing visibility of sexual diversity and achieved rights for Lgbtq people, and the growing socioeconomic inequality in Sweden in the twenty- first century, we are interested in exploring what kinds of diversity we see in these representations in terms of class, sexuality and ethnicity. We investigate whether lone/single/solo mothers are represented as troubled or socially vulnerable, or whether other discourses of motherhood are activated in media representations. 

  • 35.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Kooroshnia, Marjan
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Landin, Hanna
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Silent colours: Designing for wellbeing using smart colours2018Ingår i: Proceedings of AIC 2018 Colour & Human Comfort, Lisbon, Portugal, 25-29 September 2018.: Lisbon, Portugal 25-29 September 2018, 2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    When used within textile printing, smart colours have expanded the design possibilities for textile patterns as relates to both motifs and, more importantly, uses. Smart colours suggest new functionalities and provide specific perceptions, reactions, and activities in terms of usage. At the same time, the need for peripheral information sources that are less intrusive than many of the everyday devices of the present has continuously been addressed to improve wellbeing, e.g. by making life more manageable and meaningful through the use of technology in everyday life. We aim to increase knowledge of the design qualities of smart colours, which is of use in relation to creating non- or less intrusive ways of displaying peripheral information. This paper focuses on the character of colour transition and discusses different colour-changing possibilities with regard to surface patterns; that is, from the perspectives of different levels of change and complexity and in relation to levels of intrusiveness and information comprehensibility. 

  • 36.
    Ericson, Jenny
    et al.
    Högskolan i Dalarna.
    Palmér, Lina
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Being thrown into a lottery: Mothers of preterm infants' experiences of breastfeeding support2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 37.
    Erikson, Martin G
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Beyond learning: Students’ Responsibility for their Knowledge2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The claim that students should take responsibility for their learning is challenged through the alternative claim that students should be expected to take responsibility for their knowledge. It is argued that students can reflect on responsibilities for knowledge and teachers can support this in an everyday academic discourse regardless of discipline, whereas responsibility for learning is difficult to grasp without an elaborate learning theory. Further, the suggested shift from learning to knowledge will widen the scope to issues beyond learning, explicating a more nuanced student role. Through the focus on knowledge, students’ responsibilities relates to educational purposes, and points to expectations on critical thinking as well as the students’ academic freedom. It also makes it possible to discuss the mutual responsibilities of students and teachers with the same conceptual framework. This can also support the notion of students as co-creators of knowledge.

  • 38.
    Eriksson, Anita
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Player-Koro, Catarina
    First-teachers in Mathematics - A study of the implementation and identification of specifically skilled mathematics teachers2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 39.
    Eriksson, Anita
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Player-Koro, Catarina
    The Re-forming of Teachers Professional Knowledge through the Swedish Career Services for Teachers  Reform2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 40.
    Eriksson, Catarina
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Michnik, Katarina
    Ökar internetanvändning oddsen för folkbiblioteksanvändning?2018Ingår i: Mötesplats Profession – Forskning hölls på Linnéuniversitetet i Växjö 22–23 oktober 2018, Växjö: Mötesplats Profession , 2018Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 41.
    Eriksson, Siw
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Sandsjö, Leif
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för vård, arbetsliv och välfärd.
    Karlsson, MariAnne
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Product Representations as Mediating Tools in the Development of New Medical Technology2018Ingår i: Design4Health - Fifth International Conference on Design4Health.: Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Design4Health, Sheffield, UK, 4–6 September 2018. / [ed] Kirsty Christer, Claire Craig & Dan Wolstenholme, 2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Involving users in the design process of new products and services is generally disputed as a prerequisite for fulfilling users' needs and requirements. The importance of user involvement has been argued also regarding the development of new medical technology. Collaboration between users and developers/designers is however not without problems due to differences in, e.g. background, training, perspective, and vocabulary. In order to address these differences, the need for different 'mediating tools' has been emphasized. One type of mediating tools is product representations (PRs). Earlier studies have most often focused on the type of PR that should be used in different phases of the development process in order to get input on different designs. This paper describes instead how and in what situations different PRs mediated communication and collaboration between professional users (medical experts) and designers in an innovation project targeting a solution for long-term monitoring of brain activity based on electroencephalographic (EEG) signals.

  • 42.
    Eutionnat-Diffo, Prisca
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Nierstrasz, Vincent
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Campagne, Christine
    Zeng, Xianyi
    Cayla, Aurelie
    Guan, Jinping
    Chen, Yan
    Correlation between heat transfer of polyester textiles and its adhesion with 3D-printed extruded thermoplastic filaments2018Ingår i: 18th AUTEX World Textile Conference, June 20-22, 2018, Istanbul, Turkey / [ed] IOP publishers, 2018, s. 118-121, artikel-id 3132Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    FDM technology used for printing functionalized layers on textiles brought new challenges such as the understanding and the improvement of the adhesion performance of the thermoplastic filaments on synthetic textile materials. In addition to the impact of printing parameters, the correlation between the heat transfer and structure of the textile material and the adhesion performance after varying printer platform temperature was an important parameter considered in this paper. A factorial design, using material density, direction, and structure and platform temperature as factors, was followed. 3D-printed materials made of PLA filaments deposited on polyester woven and knit materials were manufactured on a dual-head printer and their adhesion was measured according to DIN EN ISO 13937-2 and ISO 11339 and the heat transfer of the fabrics according to ASTM D4966-98, ISO 6330 and ISO 22007-2. The findings showed that the heat transfer and structure of textile materials affect the adhesion properties of the 3D-printed material.

  • 43.
    Francke, Helena
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Open Access Made Easy2018Konferensbidrag (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    Studies have shown a steady but slow uptake of open access to the scholarly literature over the past decade, with estimations that roughly 25 to 30 per cent of journal articles are available open access on publication. Funders and governments, especially in Europe, have taken various steps to support open access and to increase access to publications, including the recently announced cOAlition S, which is intended to significantly speed up the move towards full gold open access. As an interim solution, some consortia have signed offset agreements with publishers, for instance the Read & Publish agreement Springer Compact between Swedish Bibsam and Springer Nature (2016-2018). This talk will present findings from a survey with authors whose publications were covered through Springer Compact. What are their reactions to publishing open access in this way? What kind of support do they wish from their universities and libraries? What implications may their experiences, views and suggestions have for future initiatives and for library services?

  • 44.
    Francke, Helena
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Researcher attitudes to offset agreements for OA publishing2018Ingår i: The 13th Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing 2018, 2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish government has expressed an intention to move towards open access (OA) to publications based on publicly funded research in Sweden. As part of fulfilling this intention, the Bibsam Consortium, working on behalf of a number of Swedish universities, government agencies, and research institutes, has started to include OA in their negotiations with publishers. One consequence is that Bibsam has followed other international actors and entered into a number of offset agreements. The first of these agreements was Springer Compact, which runs from July 2016 to December 2018. The implementation and consequences of this agreement are being investigated at the request of Bibsam, and this presentation builds on findings from this investigation.

    Offset agreements are presented as one possible road ahead, a temporary one, in the transition towards OA to scholarly publications. A number of factors, including costs and the speed of flipping hybrid journals to full OA, will determine the success of such agreements. The attitudes of the researchers – the authors of the publications – are also key in determining the outcome. This presentation reports on findings from a questionnaire submitted by 375 first authors of articles covered by the Swedish Springer Compact agreement. It will present the authors’ attitudes to OA, to the Springer Compact agreement, and to future similar agreements.

    The study shows that only about one quarter of respondents knew about the agreement before submitting their work. A majority would not have paid article processing charges (APC) for their article had APCs not been covered by the agreement. Many are generally positive to OA publishing, however. When asked what they think about agreements such as Springer Compact, three quarters wrote in free-text answers that it is “good”, “very good” or “excellent”. Respondents express both appreciation of the easy process and a relief over not having to find funding for OA.

    Some respondents were more tentative, saying that they appreciate OA, but that their opinion about the agreement depends on the cost. Non-profit solutions to academic publishing or alternative methods to achieving OA were also mentioned as desirable. A small number of respondents would prefer the traditional subscription model. Yet, the vast majority of respondents say they would like to see similar agreements with other publishers.

    The answers to the questionnaire show that these researchers are very positive to having their work published OA if it is not associated with costs, limitations, or other hassles for the researcher. That is, if publishing remains no more problematic than in the subscription system, researchers see many benefits with OA. However, there is a minority which expresses ideological hesitation. From this, universities and funders can learn the value of facilitating OA publishing for the individual researcher, but also that many researchers will expect agreements to be economically feasible and that there is a potential to engaging researchers even more in the discussion of future solutions.

  • 45.
    Francke, Helena
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Ekman, Stefan
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Using Active Learning Classrooms in Building an Infrastructure for Access to Research Data2018Ingår i: The 13th Munin Conference on Scholarly Publishing 2018., 2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    As a central part of its work towards Open Science, Sweden is building an infrastructure for managing, storing, and providing access to research data. A vital component of this infrastructure will be functions at Swedish universities for supporting researchers with data access and management. To support these local functions, here referred to as Data Access Units (DAUs), a national network of DAUs from 28 universities is under formation.

    To assist in establishing DAUs and strengthening the network, the Swedish National Data Service and the University of Borås offer a joint professional development course to DAU staff. This course ran for the first time in spring 2018, with 21 participants from 12 universities. The course has three main objectives: to develop data management skills; to increase understanding of the institutional conditions for providing access to research data; and to strengthen the national network through interpersonal connections and collegial ties.

    The methodology chosen for the course is intended to promote collaboration between participants and to take into consideration their various types and levels of expertise and experience. This has resulted in a distance-learning course with four physical meetings, during which an Active Learning Classroom (ALC) methodology is used: participants work actively in groups with instructor-facilitated tasks. The ALC work is combined with significant use of collaborative work between meetings.

    Our presentation will show how ALC methodology can be used to support the establishment of DAUs and a DAU network. We will discuss some examples of course elements which contribute to the objectives. The discussion will be based on the facilitators’ analyses and on the participants’ answers to an evaluation questionnaire.

    • Participants found that they developed data management skills by working with cases as ALC exercises, and thought these skills would be directly applicable to their work in the DAU. Such ALC exercises were designed around for instance anonymising datasets and writing a data management plan for a potential study.
    • In addressing institutional conditions necessary for data access, we observed how task design and perceived relevance of a topic are important for how participants engage with various aspects of a task. For example, the ALC exercise on legal frameworks was easier to align with perceived DAU needs than the less focused and more abstract exercise on models and principles such as OAIS and FAIR.
    • A clear outcome of the course was a strengthening of the DAU network. Participants gained a sense of collegiality by working in different constellations during various ALC tasks. The social activities – breaks and meals – intentionally included in the course also allowed classroom discussions to flow into more informal spaces.

    The DAUs and their national network is a vital part of the Swedish infrastructure for Open Science concerning access to research data. The presentation will end with reflections on how ALC methodology can also be employed to strengthen data management and accessibility skills in other parts of the infrastructure, for instance with researchers

  • 46.
    Francke, Helena
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT. UiT The Arctic University of Norway.
    Lenstra, Noah
    University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
    Vårheim, Andreas
    UiT The Arctic University of Norway.
    Skare, Roswitha
    UiT The Arctic University of Norway.
    Digital Literacy and Social Inclusion in Public Libraries: A Review of Research2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The practices through which people manage and enrich their everyday lives rely increasingly on their ability to make use of digital and informational resources. In policy texts, physical and intellectual access to digital information has been framed as a problem of social inclusion to which the public library may be part of the solution (Thompson et al., 2014). In library research, there is some evidence that public libraries contribute positively in strengthening social capital and participation in society among its patrons (Johnson, 2010; Vårheim, 2014; Vårheim, Steinmo & Ide, 2008).

    The present study investigates how the work done by public libraries to support digital and information literacy and, thus, potentially digital and social inclusion, is portrayed in the literature.

    The literature review was based on publications from 2010-2017 collected through structured searches in the databases Web of Science, Scopus, and LISA. The publications were coded through qualitative content analysis (Altheide & Schneider, 2013) starting in the following analytical questions:

    • which public library services or activities are described;
    • which groups of patrons are intended beneficiaries;
    • which methods and theoretical approaches were used;
    • what were the main findings of the study;
    • which aspects of digital and information literacies are emphasized; which kinds of knowledge, perceptions and attitudes are these literacies intended to support?

    Many of the publications describe community projects in which public libraries play a leading role. Several studies address concepts such as digital inclusion and social capital, although few studies actually engage with them theoretically. The types of activities, outcomes, literacies, and beneficiaries vary greatly, but much work is focused on supporting literacies for active citizenship and employability.

    This literature review is a building block in constructing a theoretical framework and a research design for empirical studies of the development of digital and information literacy activities in public libraries and the possible implications for physical and digital community participation.

    References

    Altheide, D. L., & Schneider, C. J. (2013). Qualitative media analysis (2nd ed.). Los Angeles, CA: SAGE.

    Johnson, C. A. (2010). Do public libraries contribute to social capital? A preliminary investigation into the relationship. Library & Information Science Research, 32(2), 147–155.

    Thompson, K. M. et al. (2014). Digital literacy and digital inclusion: Information policy and the public library. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.

    Vårheim, A., Steinmo, S., & Ide, E. (2008). Do libraries matter? Public libraries and the creation of social capital. Journal of Documentation, 64(6), 877–892.

    Vårheim, A. (2014). Trust in libraries and trust in most people: Social capital creation in the public library. The Library Quarterly, 84(3), 258–277.

  • 47.
    Francke, Helena
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Lindelöw, Camilla
    Kungliga biblioteket.
    Olsson, Lisa
    Stockholms universitet.
    Author Perspectives on Research Visibility and Impact2018Ingår i: 23rd Nordic Workshop on Bibliometrics and Research Policy 2018: Book of abstracts / [ed] Marco Schirone, Björn Hammarfelt & Gustaf Nelhans, 2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The poster will present findings from a survey of 375 corresponding authors whose publications have beenpublished open access as part of the Springer Compact agreement between Bibsam and Springer Nature 2016-2018. In focus is how these authors reason about ways to make their research visible, how/if they themselves tryto track the attention gained by the publication, and what they think are good impact measures. The study thusadds to previous work on author attitudes and practices (e.g. Hammarfelt & Haddow, 2018; Tenopir et al., 2016)and can provide some input into the current work in Sweden on how to evaluate and assure high research quality(UKÄ, 2018).

    When asked about their arguments for publishing open access, a large proportion of respondents in freetextanswers indicated that open access is important because it increases a publication’s visibility, access to it,downloads and/or social and scientific impact. Consequently, it is interesting to investigate if open accesspublishing is the only way in which these authors try to find readers for their publication, or if they take furthersteps. Answers suggest researchers use general social media, academic networking sites, and more traditionaldigital channels to share their publications.

    Furthermore, the study asked which measures the authors think are the best ones for assessing the impactof their publications, and how they themselves find out how much attention their publications get. The responseswill be discussed in terms of traditional metrics, such as JIFs and citations, and altmetrics, such as how documentsare accessed or appraised (Haustein et al., 2016) through downloads or shares in social media. They will also berelated to more indirect forms of research evaluation, such as peer review and social impact.

    References

    Hammarfelt, B. & Haddow, G. (2018). Conflicting measures and values: How humanities scholars in Australia and Swedenuse and react to bibliometric indicators. JASIS&T, 69(7), 924-935.

    Haustein, S., Bowman, T. D. & Costas, R. (2016). Interpreting ‘altmetrics’: Viewing acts on social media through the lensof citation and social theories. In Sugimoto, C. R. (Ed.), Theories of informetrics and scholarly communication (pp. 372-405). Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton.

    Tenopir, C. et al. (2016). No scholar is an island: The impact of sharing in the work life of scholars. Learned Publishing, 30,5-17.

    UKÄ - Universitetskanslerämbetet (2018). Kvalitetssäkring av forskning: Rapportering av ett regeringsuppdrag. (Report2018:2) Stockholm: Universitetskanslerämbetet.

  • 48. Frisk, Matilda
    et al.
    Börjesson, Mats
    Herlitz, Johan
    Strömsöe, Anneli
    Outcome of exercise related Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest in correlation with localisation: Sports Arena vs Outside Arena2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
  • 49.
    Garrote Jurado, Ramon
    et al.
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för bibliotek, information, pedagogik och IT.
    Pettersson, Tomas
    A digital tool for improving enrolment and completion rate of Masters' Studies2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a project, funded by Erasmus +, Strategic Partnership and conducted in by three European universities from; Sweden, Spain and the UK, in cooperation with a software company. The project aims to remediate the problem of masters' students who do not get their degree within the allocated time or even drop out from universities. The underlying cause is identified as students that have the formal prerequisites to register for a master's programme may still lack crucial previous knowledge and/or abilities to manage the studies.

    The suggested solution was to develop learning resource modules for four different master's programmes in Europe and create a HTML5-platform to house them. The modules are intended to illustrate the different abilities and level of previous knowledge that applicants are supposed to bring into their studies by a suitable entry profile for the master's course identified by lecturers.

    The access modules provides potential students with a self-assessment test divided in twelve parts. A visualization of the level of the twelve different skills or field of knowledge are then compared to the suitable entry profile for the master's course. Whenever weak spots in the prospective students´ ability are identified, the students are presented with a series of learning interventions designed to remedy flaws in their ability.

    The authors argue that the use of similar access modules could improve enrolment, completion rate, time-to-degree and retention in a wide range of educations.

  • 50. Garrote Jurado, Ramon
    et al.
    Pettersson, Tomas
    Baghaei, Behnaz
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Persson, Anders
    Högskolan i Borås, Akademin för textil, teknik och ekonomi.
    Preparing for Masters´ Studies: A Web Based Tool For Self-Assessment and Knowledge Gap Mitigation2018Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a project, conducted by three European universities and a software company, funded by Erasmus +, Strategic Partnership. The project addresses the problem that sometime masters´ students do not get their degree within the allocated time, if at all. Apparently some students with the formal prerequisites to register for a master's programme still lacked the actual abilities to manage their studies.

    The solution was to design an online HTML5 platform to house self-assessment and learning resource modules for four different master's programmes in Europe. The modules were intended to illustrate the level and abilities that potential applicants were supposed to bring into their studies by a self-assessment test. In case lacking abilities were revealed, the modules offer learning resources to mitigate those gaps.

    The access modules provides potential students with a visualization of twelve different skills and knowledge as compared to those identified by lecturers as necessary for study on the master's course. If there are weak spots identified, the students are presented with a series of learning interventions designed to remedy their ability flaws.  

    The authors suggest that providing potential students with this kind of material can raise their awareness of what the programme really takes. In this way students with false expectations can be avoided and the ones who applies come better prepared, which the use of access modules potentially can leads to improved enrolment, completion rate, time-to-degree and retention in a wide range of academic programmes.

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