Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andreasson, Jörgen
    The University of Gothenburg.
    Organizational preconditions and supportive resources for Swedish healthcare managers: Factors that contribute to or counteract changes: Factors that contribute to or counteract changes2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish Healthcare managers’ organizational preconditions and supportive resources are important for their ability to work with planned change in a sustainable way. This thesis further investigates these factors together with an output measure, healthcare process quality (HPQ).

    The overall aim was to investigate how healthcare managers’ organizational preconditions and support contribute to or counteract managers’ work with planned change in order to implement process development in a sustainable way. Specific aims were: to improve knowledge of managers’ views of and approaches to increasing their employees’ influence on and engagement in models for improving care processes (study I); to investigate relationships among managers’ organizational preconditions, support, and work to improve quality of care and HPQ over time (study II); to investigate whether managers’ coaching style, preconditions, implementation strategy, appraisal of change, and clinical autonomy are associated with HPQ (study III ); and to assess the influence of support from superiors, colleagues, external sources, subordinates, and private life on managers’ own health (study IV ).

    The data for Studies I – III came from five hospitals collected over a three-year period. The data were collected by means of interviews (Study I, qualitative analysis) and annual questionnaires (Studies II and III, quantitative and mixed-method analyses). The data for Study IV were based on questionnaires administered to first- and second-line managers in municipal care, twice during a two-year period.

    The results revealed that the healthcare managers were key actors in implementing planned change, but were dependent on their employees’ engagement in order to succeed. Managers’ appraisal of work with planned change became more positive with strong support from other managers, employees, and the organization as well as with long managerial experience. Support from private life and networks, as well as the managers’ attitudes towards their managerial role, predicted their own health. For new managers or managers with many employees, organizational support predicted their health-related sustainability. Managers practising a more distanced style of coaching (e.g., clearly delegating responsibility for implementation work to employees) were associated with better HPQ outcomes than were managers who were more involved in implementation. In conclusion, implementation of planned change are facilitated by, engaged managers, employees with knowledge of implementation work and of the healthcare system, as well as organizational structures that support the managers. Strong support from various sources as well as managerial experience are important for managers’ appraisal of work with planned change. Strong managerial support and a more delegated leadership style are both important factors related to higher estimated HPQ.

  • 2.
    Bátori, Veronika
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Fruit wastes to biomaterials: Development of biofilms and 3D objects in a circular economy system2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To address the current plastic pollution problem, the replacement of conventional plastics with bioplastics can be considered. Although the land use of crop cultivation for bioplastics is still negligible, there is an increasing interest in the utilisation of lignocellulosic waste products for the production of bioplastics. A latest trend in researching sources for bioplastic production focuses on the use of fruit and vegetable wastes because of their versatile polysaccharides. Among different fruit wastes, orange waste and apple pomace have been evaluated as raw materials in this thesis.

    The development of biofilms and 3D objects from the above-mentioned raw materials via the solution casting and compression moulding methods was investigated. Biocomposites are generally made from a bioplastic matrix and reinforcement, or a plastic reinforced with natural fibres. In the present study, pectin was used as a matrix, and cellulosic fibres wereused as reinforcement. Orange waste films had an opaque appearance with a yellowish colour and were very flexible, while the 3D objects had brown colour. The films had mechanical properties comparable with those of commodity plastics, such as 32 to 36 MPa tensile strength. The films were biodegradable under anaerobic conditions, and 3D objects showed good biodegradability in soil. Grafting of orange waste with maleic anhydride was performed in order to improve its properties, e.g. the hydrophilicity of the polysaccharides-based materials. Grafting reduced the density by 40 % and increased the hydrophobicity compared with unmodified orange waste. Further improvements included upgrading the film casting method and incorporating maleic anhydride in the recipe. The lowest amount of necessary maleic anhydride was determined (0.4 %), and the resulting films had a smoother and more uniform surface. The original methods were also applied to apple pomace in order to produce films and 3D objects. Films from apple pomace had an elongation of 55 %, a twofold increase compared to that of orange waste films containing maleic anhydride (28 %). Orange waste and apple pomace were also mixed for 3D object fabrication, achieving the highest strength of 5.8 MPa (ratio of 75 to 25, respectively) a threefold increase compared to that achieved with only orange waste alone (1.8 MPa).

    The results are promising‚ but further improvements, e.g. in respect to hydrophilicity and upscaling‚ are needed for orange waste and apple pomace to develop into raw materials for next-generation bioplastics.

  • 3.
    Bångsbo, Angela
    University of Gothenburg.
    Collaborative challenges in integrated care: Untangling the preconditions for collaboration and frail older people's participation2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Hernández, Niina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Does it really fit?: improve, find and evaluate garment fit2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Clothes affect everyone; we wear them for all occasions; they silently communicate on our behalf, and they can enhance our level of confidence and comfort. For the garment to be comfortable, the garment fit has to be appropriate. Appropriate for the intended function and in line with the wearer’s preferences. For the garment to end up as an approved garment in the customer’s wardrobe, it has to be improved and evaluated many times over. The final evaluation to pass is when the customer finds the garment, tries it on and asks: Does it really fit? The common denominator for the studies included in this thesis is garment fit; the goal is to investigate some methods to improve, find and evaluate garment fit. To improve garment fit, two studies were done. One study is on improving garment fit with the help of a systematic model, based on anthropometric and garment numerical data; this is explored with the help of an experimental set up. The second study is on improving garment fit for the unique figure by offering made-to-measure garments, which is investigated with a structure of action research. An experimental strategy is used to find garments that fit, where the size and fit correspondence is compared between virtual and real garments. To tie everything together, variables for garment fit evaluation are identified with the help of a structured literature review and then analysed within each study. The result shows that the theoretical garment fit improves by using the systematic model. Both the overall accommodation for the target group increased as well as the fit value. The garment fit is improved for the unique figure; this is achieved through complex body measurements, invasive pattern modifications and garment make-up for fit evaluation. The accuracy for size selection based on virtual garments exceeded the one based on the more traditional key measurements. The variables involved in the garment fit evaluation can be divided into five areas: influencing factors, evaluations focus, resources, evaluators or fitting sessions.

  • 5.
    Lindberg, Ulla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Exploring barriers to energy efficiency in supermarkets2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy efficiency activities in sections of grocery stores for chilled groceries are subject to particular challenges as this is a complex indoor environment given that the goal of store owners is to offer consumers chilled groceries of high quality in a comfortable environment while at the same time trying to reduce energy use. Consequently, it is important to maintain the right temperature in the right place and to be aware of the consumers’ shopping situation. The way chilled groceries are displayed, the form of refrigeration, the building size, and business and merchandising practices may differ between retail stores, impacting energy efficiency. Finding a balance between being energy effective and efficient, i.e., doing the right things or doing things right, is therefore important. This particular environment, where consumers interact with store staff, other consumers, chilled groceries, and other environmental factors, is a surprisingly unexplored part of retail, especially when it comes to consumers’ behaviors and perceptions. This thesis is multidisciplinary, and the research has been broadened from studying measured and perceived comfort parameters in supermarkets to incorporating qualitative studies with a clearer and deeper interest in consumers’ perceptions and behaviors. In this thesis, findings from the cold environment of chilled food display cabinets, either with doors or without, are discussed and tangible commodities are used to illustrate how ‘details’ such as doors on cabinets matter to consumers. The consumers are of the main interest since they make up the businesses. The aim of this thesis is to gain knowledge of how to improve energy efficiency and the store layout for chilled groceries by adding consumer insights. Four specific papers contribute to this thesis’ aim of overcoming specific challenges faced by retail grocery stores as regards energy efficiency. The results show how details such as doors can affect consumers’ perceptions and behaviors. The details that matter concern how consumers perceive and behave in relation to having doors or no doors on cabinets, with different forms of approach or avoidance behavior in terms of accessibility, both beneficial and problematic. Moreover, the results also show that knowledge of how to provide service to the consumer, in particular in the foodscape and with doors on cabinets, can affect the store’s energy use in a positive way and contribute toward more sustainable and energy efficient retail grocery stores. By elaborating these results in relation to “foodscape”, this thesis contributes to research on servicescape. The thesis also contributes to research on in-store energy efficiency in relation to four challenges that retail grocery stores face: building design, retail context, consumer insights, and management. The perspectives of the consumers may help to overcome barriers to energy efficiency, aid in the design of a functional foodscape and facilitate technology change for sustainable and efficient energy use in supermarket buildings.

  • 6.
    Malm, Veronica
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Functional Textile Coatings Containing Flake-shaped Fillers: investigations on selected optical and electrical properties2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis investigates the manufacturing and characterisation of functionalised textile coatings containing different types of flake-shaped fillers with angle-dependent colour-changing and electrically conductive properties, respectively. Common benefits of these types of flakes are their high aspect ratio, which offers low filler loading with high functional performance. However, when applied on flexible fabric, their impact on the mechanical properties and durability leads to that a trade-off between, for example, flexural rigidity and functional performance need to be taken into account. Both experimental studies, with different functional approaches, explore how formulation additives e.g. rheology modifiers and cross-linker and knife coating parameters e.g. gap height and speed influence the formulation viscosity, which in turn strongly influences the amount of solids deposited on the fabric, and the functional performance.

    Multilayered mica pigments can provide an angle-dependent colour change based on the phenomenon of interference, and has great potential in application within the textile design and product authentication fields. However, optimal conditions for intense colour-changing effects using these types of flake-shaped pigments depend on a plane-parallel orientation to a flat substrate. The pigment orientation is challenged by textile substrates, which have a textured surface due to the cross-sectional shape of the fibre, the yarn composition and fabric construction. In addition, the semi-transparent nature of these types of pigments means that the substrate colour highly influences the colour-changing effects.

    Metal flake-shaped fillers for high electrical conductivity applications are particularly advantageous for reliable power and signal transferring interconnections in the field of electronic textiles. As the conductivity depends on the electron transport between the metal flakes, the challenge is to establish and maintain the three-dimensional network of contacting surfaces between flakes. Although the network is held together and adhered to the substrate by an insulating polymer film matrix, it is highly sensitive to dimensional impact upon different

  • 7. Nord, Tora
    Arbete som rättighet eller skyldighet: Föreställningar om arbetsmarknadsfrånvaro i välfärdsstaten2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    By analysing how changes in social security systems are motivated, how they are implemented and what consequences they entail for the individual, this dissertation shows how ideological shifts within the Swedish work strategy are put into practice. The findings presented stress that the responsibility for exiting unemployment and/or sick leave has become increasingly a matter for the individual to handle on their own. This is done mainly by lowering the degree of economic and social support to individuals whilst being labour market absent, but also by neglecting investment in long-term efforts aiming to tackle the challenges of labour market absence. Instead, the political strategy is characterised by reducing labour market absence through increasing the supervision and control of individuals living on welfare allowance. The essence of this logic can be summarised by the idea that the individual must be disciplined, activated and, above all, compliant. Combined with a threat of economic sanctions, the individual is steered towards a flexible unemployed individual with the “right” attitude, thus more easily matching today’s pickier labour market. Where work in Sweden previously was a matter of the individual’s right, focus has shifted towards the obligation—in a more unconditional manner—to stand at the disposal of labour market needs and adjust to the demands placed there. This means that the essence of work in the Swedish welfare state has ultimately been transferred towards a more distinct disciplinary domain.

  • 8.
    Souza Filho, Pedro
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Fungi-based biorefinery model for food industry waste: progress toward a circular economy2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The food industry, one of the most important industrial sectors worldwide, generates large amounts of biodegradable waste with high organic load. In recent years, the traditional management methods to treat this waste (e.g., landfilling) have been considered not suitable because they do not exploit the potential of the waste material. Alternatively, valorization of food industry waste via a biorefinery model using filamentous fungi is considered to represent an attractive strategy because it minimizes the negative impacts while recovering the nutrients and energy of the waste, in accordance with the concept of the circular economy.

    In this thesis, four food processing wastes were utilized as case studies: potato protein liquor (PPL, the soluble fraction of potato starch production waste), the peels wasted during orange juice production, the starchy byproduct of pea protein processes, and the wastewater of a wheat-starch plant. Rhizopus oryzae, a zygomycetous filamentous fungus, was grown with these wastes as a substrate, yielding biomass containing 43% (w/w) protein together with 51% removal of the chemical oxygen demand when cultivated in tenfold-diluted PPL. Moreover, protein-rich biomass was produced using the pea-processing byproduct (55%) and wheat-starch wastewater (51%). In contrast, cultivation in orange peel extract yielded a biomass rich in lipids (20%). The use of PPL was also studied in terms of the economy of fungal cultivation. The biotreatment was found to require only 46% of the capital investment necessary for treating PPL by the traditional strategy (application as fertilizer). In comparison, the ascomycetous fungus Aspergillus oryzae yielded superior results compared to those of R. oryzae when grown in the starchy residues. The high protein content of the fungal biomass encouraged the investigation of its use for bioplastic production. The addition of 20% fungal biomass in a pectin matrix increased the tensile yield of the film and reduced the elongation at break. Moreover, a positive effect on water vapor permeability of the film was also observed.

    These results indicate the ability of the filamentous fungi to convert resources wasted by the food industry into new products with positive impacts on the economy and the environment.

  • 9.
    Söderholm, Jonas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Borrowing and lending tools: The materiality of x-lending libraries2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Libraries lend an expanding array of items: bikes, clothes, seeds, and tools, to name a few. In correspondence with this development, the library as concept is increasingly connected with current sharing trends. At the same time, the library is expected to still be about books, literature, and reading, to deal in information and documents. The library is regarded as a well-established and predictable institution of integrity. These intriguing dynamics of responsiveness and stability provide the inspiration for this work.

    The thesis presents a case study of tool lending libraries. The aim is to explore what is introduced here as x-lending libraries: the idea of libraries based on the types of materials borrowed and lent. Findings show that patrons, staff, and managers experience their tool lending library as immediately and locally relevant to their community, rather than related to long-term global concerns. In their experience, the tool lending library is also decidedly different from other libraries. Seemingly, what is borrowed and lent is important to understanding the role different libraries play in their communities. In other words, material matters.

    The work concludes with proposing a theoretical concept for how different values involved in library borrowing and lending can be understood, again in the community context.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf