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  • 1. Aasa, M
    et al.
    Henriksson, MF
    Dellborg, M
    Grip, L
    Herlitz, Johan
    [external].
    Levin, L-Å
    Svensson, L
    Janzon, M
    Cost and health outcome of primary percutaneous coronary intervention versus thrombolysis in acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction-Results of the Swedish Early Decision reperfusion Study (SWEDES) trial.2010In: American Heart Journal, ISSN 0002-8703, E-ISSN 1097-6744, Vol. 160, no 2, 322-328 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In ST-elevation myocardial infarction, primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has a superior clinical outcome, but it may increase costs in comparison to thrombolysis. The aim of the study was to compare costs, clinical outcome, and quality-adjusted survival between primary PCI and thrombolysis. METHODS: Patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction were randomized to primary PCI with adjunctive enoxaparin and abciximab (n = 101), or to enoxaparin followed by reteplase (n = 104). Data on the use of health care resources, work loss, and health-related quality of life were collected during a 1-year period. Cost-effectiveness was determined by comparing costs and quality-adjusted survival. The joint distribution of incremental costs and quality-adjusted survival was analyzed using a nonparametric bootstrap approach. RESULTS: Clinical outcome did not differ significantly between the groups. Compared with the group treated with thrombolysis, the cost of interventions was higher in the PCI-treated group ($4,602 vs $3,807; P = .047), as well as the cost of drugs ($1,309 vs $1,202; P = .001), whereas the cost of hospitalization was lower ($7,344 vs $9,278; P = .025). The cost of investigations, outpatient care, and loss of production did not differ significantly between the 2 treatment arms. Total cost and quality-adjusted survival were $25,315 and 0.759 vs $27,819 and 0.728 (both not significant) for the primary PCI and thrombolysis groups, respectively. Based on the 1-year follow-up, bootstrap analysis revealed that in 80%, 88%, and 89% of the replications, the cost per health outcome gained for PCI will be <$0, $50,000, and $100,000 respectively. CONCLUSION: In a 1-year perspective, there was a tendency toward lower costs and better health outcome after primary PCI, resulting in costs for PCI in comparison to thrombolysis that will be below the conventional threshold for cost-effectiveness in 88% of bootstrap replications.

  • 2. Abdon, Nils Johan
    et al.
    Bergfeldt, Lennart
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Hjärtstopp utlöst av läkemedel kanske vanligare än vi tror2010In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 107, no 8, 521-525 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Abdon, NJ
    et al.
    Herlitz, J
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Andrersson, B
    Peripartumcardiomyopathi an often mised diagnosis2013In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 110, no 23-24, 1152-1154 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Peripartumkardiomyopati är en sällsynt form av hjärtsvikt. Diagnostiska kriterier är nytillkommen hjärtsvikt från sen graviditet och upp till fem månader efter förlossning, avsaknad av annan förklaring till hjärtsvikt och nedsatt systolisk vänsterkammarfunktion Orsaken till tillståndet tros vara omvandling av prolaktin till en kardiotoxisk variant. Terapin är den etablerade, men ACE-hämmare och ARB får inte ges till ammande mödrar. Hjärttransplantation har tillgripits. Maligna hjärtarytmier har krävt behandling med implanterbar defibrillator och pacemaker. Hämning av produktionen av prolaktin med bromokriptin har gett goda resultat i en liten studie. Resultaten har inte bekräftats.

  • 4. Adielsson, A
    et al.
    Hollenberg, J
    Karlsson, T
    Lindqvist, J
    Lundin, S
    Silfverstolpe, J
    Svensson, L
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Increase in survival and bystander CPR in out-of-hospital shockable arrhythmia: bystander CPR and female gender are predictors of improved outcome. Experiences from Sweden in an 18-year perspective2011In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 97, no 17, 1391-1396 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives In a national perspective, to describe survival among patients found in ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia witnessed by a bystander and with a presumed cardiac aetiology and answer two principal questions: (1) what are the changes over time? and (2) which are the factors of importance? Design Observational register study. Setting Sweden. Patients All patients included in the Swedish Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Register between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2009 who were found in bystander-witnessed ventricular fibrillation with a presumed cardiac aetiology. Interventions Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation. Main outcome measures Survival to 1 month. Results In all, 7187 patients fulfilled the set criteria. Age, place of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and gender did not change. Bystander CPR increased from 46% to 73%; 95% CI for OR 1.060 to 1.081 per year. The median delay from collapse to defibrillation increased from 12 min to 14 min (p for trend 0.0004). Early survival increased from 28% to 45% (95% CI 1.044 to 1.065) and survival to 1 month increased from 12% to 23% (95% CI 1.058 to 1.086). Strong predictors of early and late survival were a short interval from collapse to defibrillation, bystander CPR, female gender and OHCA outside the home. Conclusion In a long-term perspective in Sweden, survival to 1 month after ventricular fibrillation almost doubled. This was associated with a marked increase in bystander CPR. Strong predictors of outcome were a short delay to defibrillation, bystander CPR, female gender and place of collapse.

  • 5.
    Adielsson, Anna
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Aune, Solveig
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Ravn-Fischer, Annica
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Measurements of time intervals after in-hospital cardiac arrest give important information but can be further improved.2016In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Adielsson, Anna
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    University of Gothenburg.
    Aune, Solveig
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Lundin, Stefan
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Hirlekar, Geir
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ravn-Fischer, Annica
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    A 20-year perspective of in hospital cardiac arrest: Experiences from a university hospital with focus on wards with and without monitoring facilities.2016In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 216, 194-199 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Knowledge about change in the characteristics and outcome of in hospital cardiac arrests (IHCAs) is insufficient.

    AIM: To describe a 20year perspective of in hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) in wards with and without monitoring capabilities.

    SETTINGS: Sahlgrenska University Hospital (800 beds). The number of beds varied during the time of survey from 850-746 TIME: 1994-2013.

    METHODS: Retrospective registry study. Patients were assessed in four fiveyear intervals.

    INCLUSION CRITERIA: Witnessed and nonwitnessed IHCAs when cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was attempted.

    EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Age below 18years.

    RESULTS: In all, there were 2340 patients with IHCA during the time of the survey. 30-Day survival increased significantly in wards with monitoring facilities from 43.5% to 55.6% (p=0.002) for trend but not in wards without such facilities (p=0.003 for interaction between wards with/without monitoring facilities and time period). The CPC-score among survivors did not change significantly in any of the two types of wards. In wards with monitoring facilities there was a significant reduction of the delay time from collapse to start of CPR and an increase in the proportion of patients who were defibrillated before the arrival of the rescue team. In wards without such facilities there was a significant reduction of the delay from collapse to defibrillation. However, the latter observation corresponds to a marked decrease in the proportion of patients found in ventricular fibrillation.

    CONCLUSION: In a 20year perspective the treatment of in hospital cardiac arrest was characterised by a more rapid start of treatment. This was reflected in a significant increase in 30-day survival in wards with monitoring facilities. In wards without such facilities there was a decrease in patients found in ventricular fibrillation.

  • 7. Albertsson, P
    et al.
    Emanuelsson, H
    Karlsson, T
    Lamm, C
    Sandén, W
    Lagerberg, G
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Morbidity and use of medical resources in patients with chest pain and normal or near normal coronary arteries. Influences of the diagnostic angiogram1997In: American Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0002-9149, E-ISSN 1879-1913, Vol. 79, no 3, 299-304 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To evaluate morbidity and use of medical resources in patients with chest pain and normal or near-normal coronary angiograms: 2,639 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiograms due to chest pain were registered. Two years thereafter all patients who showed normal or near-normal coronary angiograms were approached with a questionnaire regarding hospitalization during the last 4 years (2 years before and 2 years after angiography). All medical files were also examined. Of the patients who underwent angiography, 163 (6%) had no significant stenoses, and of these, 113 showed complete normal angiograms and 50 showed mild (i.e. <50%) stenoses. During the 2 years before diagnostic angiogram, 66% of the patients were hospitalized compared with only 35% during 2 years after angiography (p <0.001). The reduction in hospitalization was due to curtailed utilization of medical resources for cardiac reasons; mean days in hospital was 6.6 days before angiography versus 2.8 days after (p <0.001). There were no significant differences in hospitalization when comparing patients with mild stenoses and completely normal angiograms. There were, furthermore, no differences between patients with positive or negative exercise tests. Thus, the need for hospitalization is significantly reduced after a diagnostic angiogram reveals normal or near-normal coronary arteries.

  • 8.
    Andersson Hagiwara, Magnus
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University.
    Strömsöe, Anneli
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Axelsson, Christer
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Kängström, Anna
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Patient safety and patient assessment in pre-hospital care: a study protocol2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 24, no 1, 1-7 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patient safety issues in pre-hospital care are poorly investigated. The aim of the planned study is to

    survey patient safety problems in pre-hospital care in Sweden.

    Methods/Design: The study is a retro-perspective structured medical record review based on the use of 11 screening

    criteria. Two instruments for structured medical record review are used: a trigger tool instrument designed for

    pre-hospital care and a newly development instrument designed to compare the pre-hospital assessment with

    the final hospital assessment. Three different ambulance organisations are participating in the study. Every month,

    one rater in each organisation randomly collects 30 medical records for review. With guidance from the review

    instrument, he/she independently reviews the record. Every month, the review team meet for a discussion of

    problematic reviews. The results will be analysed with descriptive statistics and logistic regression.

    Discussion: The findings will make an important contribution to knowledge about patient safety issues in prehospital

    care.

  • 9. Andréassob, A-Ch
    et al.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. [external].
    Bång, A
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. [external].
    Ekström, L
    Lindqvist, J
    Lundström, G
    Holmberg, S
    Characteristics and outcome among patients with a suspected in hospital cardiac arrest1998In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 39, no 1-2, 23-31 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe the characteristics and outcome among patients with a suspected in-hospital cardiac arrest. METHODS: All the patients who suffered from a suspected in-hospital cardiac arrest during a 14-months period, where the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) team was called, were recorded and described prospectively in terms of characteristics and outcome. RESULTS: There were 278 calls for the CPR team. Of these, 216 suffered a true cardiac arrest, 16 a respiratory arrest and 46 neither. The percentage of patients who were discharged alive from hospital was 42% for cardiac arrest patients, 62% for respiratory arrest and 87% for the remaining patients. Among patients with a cardiac arrest, those found in ventricular fibrillation/ventricular tachycardia had a survival rate of 64%, those found in asystole 24% and those found in pulseless electrical activity 10%. Among patients who were being monitored at the time of arrest, the survival rate was 52%, as compared with 27% for non-monitored patients (P= 0.001). Among survivors of cardiac arrest, a cerebral performance category (CPC) of 1 (no major deficit) was observed in 81% at discharge and in 82% on admission to hospital prior to the arrest. CONCLUSION: We conclude that, during a 14-month period at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Göteborg, almost half the patients with a cardiac arrest in which the CPR team was called were discharged from hospital. Among survivors, 81% had a CPC score of 1 at hospital discharge. Survival seems to be closely related to the relative effectiveness of the resuscitation organisation in different parts of the hospital.

  • 10. Aune, S
    et al.
    Eldh, M
    Engdahl, J
    Holmberg, S
    Lindqvist, J
    Svensson, L
    Oddby, E
    Herlitz, Johan
    [external].
    Improvement in the hospital organisation of CPR training and outcome after cardiac arrest in Sweden during a 10-year period2011In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, ISSN 0300-9572, Vol. 82, no 4, 431-435 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To describe (a) changes in the organisation of training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the treatment of cardiac arrest in hospital in Sweden and (b) the clinical achievement, i.e. survival and cerebral function, among survivors after in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) in Sweden. Methods Aspects of CPR training among health care providers (HCPs) and treatment of IHCA in Sweden were evaluated in 3 national surveys (1999, 2003 and 2008). Patients with IHCA are recorded in a National Register covering two thirds of Swedish hospitals. Results The proportion of hospitals with a CPR coordinator increased from 45% in 1999 to 93% in 2008. The majority of co-ordinators are nurses. The proportions of hospitals with local guidelines for acceptable delays from cardiac arrest to the start of CPR and defibrillation increased from 48% in 1999 to 88% in 2008. The proportion of hospitals using local defibrillation outside intensive care units prior to arrival of rescue team increased from 55% in 1999 to 86% in 2008. During the past 4 years in Sweden, survival to hospital discharge has been 29%. Among survivors, 93% have a cerebral performance category (CPC) score of I or II, indicating acceptable cerebral function. Conclusion During the last 10 years, there was a marked improvement in CPR training and treatment of IHCA in Sweden. During the past 4 years, survival after IHCA is high and the majority of survivors have acceptable cerebral function.

  • 11. Aune, S
    et al.
    Fredriksson, M
    Thorén, A-B
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. [external].
    In-hospital cardiac arrest--an Utstein style report of seven years experience from the Sahlgrenska University Hospital.2006In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 68, no 3, 351-358 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In-hospital cardiac arrest is one of the most stressful situations in modern medicine. Since 1997, there has been a uniform way of reporting - the Utstein guidelines for in-hospital cardiac arrest reporting.MATERIAL AND METHODS: We have studied all consecutive cardiac arrest in the Sahlgrenska University Hospital (SU) between 1994 and 2001 for who the rescue team was alerted in all 833 patients. The primary endpoint for this study was survival to discharge.RESULTS: Thirty-seven percent survived to hospital discharge. Among patients who were discharged alive, 86% were alive 1 year later. The survivors have a good cerebral outcome (94% among those who were discharged alive had cerebral performance category (CPC) score 1 or 2). The organization at SU is efficient; 80% of the cardiac arrest had CPR within 1 min. Time from cardiac arrest to first defibrillation is a median of 2 min. Almost two-thirds of the patients were admitted for cardiac related diagnoses.CONCLUSION: The current study is the largest single-centre study of in hospital cardiac arrest reported according to the Utstein guidelines. We report a high survival for in-hospital cardiac arrest. We have pointed out that a functional chain of survival, short intervals before the start of CPR and defibrillation are probably contributing factors for this.

  • 12. Aune, S
    et al.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. [external].
    Bång, A
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. [external].
    Characteristics of patients who die in hospital with no attempt at resuscitation.2005In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 65, no 3, 291-299 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics, cause of hospitalisation and symptoms prior to death in patients dying in hospital without resuscitation being started and the extent to which these decisions were documented. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients who died at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Goteborg, Sweden, in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was not attempted during a period of one year. RESULTS: Among 674 patients, 71% suffered respiratory insufficiency, 43% were unconscious and 32% had congestive heart failure during the 24h before death. In the vast majority of patients, the diagnosis on admission to hospital was the same as the primary cause of death. The cause of death was life-threatening organ failure, including malignancy (44%), cerebral lesion (10%) and acute coronary syndrome (10%). The prior decision of 'do not attempt resuscitation' (DNAR) was documented in the medical notes in 82%. In the remaining 119 patients (18%), only 16 died unexpectedly. In all these 16 cases, it was regarded retrospectively as ethically justifiable not to start CPR. CONCLUSION: In patients who died at a Swedish University Hospital, we did not find a single case in which it was regarded as unethical not to start CPR. The patient group studied here had a poor prognosis due to a severe deterioration in their condition. To support this, we also found a high degree of documentation of DNAR. The low rate of CPR attempts after in-hospital cardiac arrest appears to be justified.

  • 13. Aune, S
    et al.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Bång, Angela
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Characteristics of patients who die in hospital with no attempt at resuscitation2005In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 65, no 3, 291-299 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe the characteristics, cause of hospitalisation and symptoms prior to death in patients dying in hospital without resuscitation being started and the extent to which these decisions were documented. Materials and methods: All patients who died at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Göteborg, Sweden, in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was not attempted during a period of one year. Results: Among 674 patients, 71% suffered respiratory insufficiency, 43% were unconscious and 32% had congestive heart failure during the 24 h before death. In the vast majority of patients, the diagnosis on admission to hospital was the same as the primary cause of death. The cause of death was life-threatening organ failure, including malignancy (44%), cerebral lesion (10%) and acute coronary syndrome (10%). The prior decision of ‘do not attempt resuscitation’ (DNAR) was documented in the medical notes in 82%. In the remaining 119 patients (18%), only 16 died unexpectedly. In all these 16 cases, it was regarded retrospectively as ethically justifiable not to start CPR. Conclusion: In patients who died at a Swedish University Hospital, we did not find a single case in which it was regarded as unethical not to start CPR. The patient group studied here had a poor prognosis due to a severe deterioration in their condition. To support this, we also found a high degree of documentation of DNAR. The low rate of CPR attempts after in-hospital cardiac arrest appears to be justified.

  • 14. Aune, S
    et al.
    Karlsson, T
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Evaluation of 2 different instruments for exposing the chest in conjunction with a cardiac arrest2010In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 0735-6757, E-ISSN 1532-8171, Vol. 29, no 5, 549-553 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Time between onset of previous termcardiac arrestnext term and start of treatment is of ultimate importance for outcome. The length of time it takes to expose the previous termchestnext term in out-of-hospital previous termcardiac arrestnext term (OHCA) is not known. We aimed to compare the time from onset of OHCA until the time at which the previous termchestnext term was exposed using previous termanext term new device (S-CUT; ES Equipment, Gothenburg, Sweden) and previous termanext term pair of scissors. Methods In previous termanext term manikin study, the previous term2next term devices were compared in previous termanext term simulated previous termcardiac arrestnext term where the initial step was exposure of the previous termchest.next term The tests were performed using ambulance staff from 3 previous termdifferentnext term ambulance organizations in Western Sweden. Six previous termdifferentnext term types of clothing combinations were used. The primary choices of clothing for analyses were previous termanext term knitted sweater and shirt (indoors) and previous termanext term jacket with buttons, previous termanext term shirt, and previous termanext term college sweater (outdoors). Results The mean difference from onset of OHCA until the previous termchestnext term was exposed when S-CUT was compared with previous termanext term pair of scissors varied between 6 seconds (P = .006) and 63 seconds (P = .004; shorter with the S-CUT), depending on the type of clothing that was used. The mean differences for the clothing that was chosen for primary analyses were 23 and 63 seconds, respectively. Conclusion We found that previous termanext term new device (S-CUT) used for previous termexposing the chestnext term in OHCA was associated with previous termanext term marked shortening of procedure time as compared with previous termanext term pair of scissors.

  • 15.
    Axelsson, C
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. [external].
    Axelsson, Å
    Nestin, J
    Svensson, L
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. [external].
    Clinical consequences of the introduction of mechanical chest compression in the EMS system for treatment of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest-a pilot study.2006In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 71, no 1, 47-55 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To evaluate the outcome among patients suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) after the introduction of mechanical chest compression (MCC) compared with standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (SCPR) in two emergency medical service (EMS) systems. METHODS: The inclusion criterion was witnessed OHCA. The exclusion criteria were age < 18 years, the following judged etiologies behind OHCA: trauma, pregnancy, hypothermia, intoxication, hanging and drowning or return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) prior to the arrival of the advanced life support (ALS) unit. Two MCC devices were allocated during six-month periods between four ALS units for a period of two years (cluster randomisation). RESULTS: In all, 328 patients fulfilled the criteria for participation and 159 were allocated to the MCC tier (the device was used in 66% of cases) and 169 to the SCPR tier. In the MCC tier, 51% had ROSC (primary end-point) versus 51% in the SCPR tier. The corresponding values for hospital admission alive (secondary end-point) were 38% and 37% (NS). In the subset of patients in whom the device was used, the percentage who had ROSC was 49% versus 50% in a control group matched for age, initial rhythm, aetiology, bystander-/crew-witnessed status and delay to CPR. The percentage of patients discharged alive from hospital after OHCA was 8% versus 10% (NS) for all patients and 2% versus 4%, respectively (NS) for the patients in the subset (where the device was used and the matched control population). CONCLUSION: In this pilot study, the results did not support the hypothesis that the introduction of mechanical chest compression in OHCA improves outcome. However, there is room for further improvement in the use of the device. The hypothesis that this will improve outcome needs to be tested in further prospective trials

  • 16.
    Axelsson, C
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. [external].
    Axelsson, Å
    Svensson, L
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. [external].
    Characteristics and outcome among patients suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with the emphasis on availability for intervention trials.2007In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 75, no 3, 460-468 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe all patients treated for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) according to the Utstein criteria and their characteristics and outcome with emphasis on whether they were available for early intervention trials. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of a study where data were collected prospectively. SETTING: The Municipality of Göteborg/Mölndal in Sweden. PATIENTS: All patients suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the Municipality of Göteborg/Mölndal in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was attempted between May 2003 and May 2005. INTERVENTIONS: Part of the study cohort, i.e. patients with a witnessed, non-traumatic, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were distributed (cluster) to mechanical (LUCAS) or manual chest compression. RESULTS: The overall survival to discharge from hospital among the 508 patients was 8.5%. The corresponding value for non-cardiac cases was 5.1% and for cardiac cases if crew witnessed 16.1%, bystander witnessed 12.7% and non-witnessed 1.4%. Fifty-nine percent of the patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria for the trial and had no exclusion criteria and 9.7% of these survived to discharge. Ten percent of patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria but were excluded and 20.4% survived to discharge. Thirty-one percent of patients did not fulfil the inclusion criteria and 2.5% survived. Among patients included in the LUCAS group, many of the survivors, 10/13 (77%), experienced a rapid return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) before the application of the device. CONCLUSION: Among patients with OHCA in whom CPR was started 8.5% survived to hospital discharge and 59% were theoretically available for an early intervention trial. These patients have a different outcome compared with patients not available. However, among those available, the majority of survivors had a rapid ROSC before the application of the intervention (LUCAS). This raises concerns about the potential for early intervention trials to improve outcome after OHCA.

  • 17.
    Axelsson, C
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Borgström, J
    Karlsson, T
    Axelsson, Å
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Dispatch codes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest should be diagnosis related rather than symptom related2010In: European journal of emergency medicine, ISSN 0969-9546, E-ISSN 1473-5695, Vol. 17, no 5, 265-269 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe the characteristics and outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in relation to (i) whether OHCA was coded by the dispatcher as a diagnosis or as a symptom and (ii) the delay until the first unit was alerted at the dispatch centre. Methods: OHCA patients in Göteborg, during 17 months, excluding OHCA after calling the rescue team. Results: Among 250 cases, 20% were coded as a diagnosis (i.e. CA) with or without ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Dispatch codes for the remaining 200 patients (80%) were mostly symptom related (unconsciousness in 61%, codes related to breathing problems in 10%, other codes in 24% and missing in 5%). Patients in whom the dispatchers coded the call as CA had an earlier start to CPR after collapse (median 2 vs. 10 min; P<0.0001) and a higher rate of bystander CPR (86% vs. 42%; P<0.0001). Furthermore, they tended to have a higher rate of survival to hospital discharge (14.0% vs. 6.5%; P  = 0.09). The median delay until the first unit was alerted was 1.8 min. Survival to hospital discharge was 10.0% if the delay was below median and 6.7% if the delay was above median (P = 0.48). Conclusion: Patients with OHCA who were not coded by dispatchers as such had a long delay to the start of CPR and a low survival. Dispatching according to diagnosis, that is, CA seems to improve these parameters most likely reflecting a more optimal communication between the dispatcher and the caller as well as the rescue team.

  • 18.
    Axelsson, C
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Herrera, MJ
    Fredriksson, M
    Lindqvist, J
    Herlitz, J
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Implementation of mechanical chest compression in out-of-hospital carfdiac arrest in an emergency medical service system2013In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 0735-6757, E-ISSN 1532-8171, Vol. 31, no 8, 1196-1200 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study is to describe the outcome changes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in Gothenburg, Sweden, after introduction of mechanical chest compression (MCC). METHODS: Following introduction of MCC, 1183 OHCA patients were treated from November 1, 2007, to December 31, 2011 (period 2). They were compared with 1218 OHCA patients before MCC was introduced from January 1, 1998, to May 30, 2003 (period 1). Patients in period 2 were evaluated for survival in relation to MCC use. RESULTS: The percentage of patients admitted to hospital alive increased from 25.4% to 31.9% (P < .0001). Survival to 1 month increased from 7.1% to 10.7% (P = .002) from period 1 to period 2. The proportion of ventricular fibrillation/ventricular tachycardia decreased in period 2 (P = .002). However, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (P < .0001), crew-witnessed cases (P = .04), percutaneous coronary intervention (P < .0001), therapeutic hypothermia (P < .0001), and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator use (P = .01) increased, as did time from call to emergency medicine service arrival (P < .0001) and to defibrillation (P = .006). In period 2, 60% of OHCA patients were treated with MCC. The percentages admitted alive to hospital (MCC vs no MCC) were 28.6% and 36.1% (P = .008). Corresponding figures for survival to 1 month were 5.6% and 17.6% (P < .0001). In the MCC group, we found increase in the delay from collapse to defibrillation (P < .0001), greater use of adrenaline (P < .0001), and fewer crew-witnessed cases (P < .0001). CONCLUSION: Survival to 1 month after implementation of MCC was higher than before introduction. However, patients receiving MCC had low survival. Although case selection might play a role, results do not support a widespread use of MCC after OHCA.

  • 19.
    Axelsson, C
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Holmberg, S
    Axelsson, ÅB
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Passive leg raising during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: Does it improve circulation and outcome?2010In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 81, no 12, 1615-1620 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Passive leg raising (PLR), to augment the artificial circulation, was deleted from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines in 1992. Increases in end-tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2) during CPR have been associated with increased pulmonary blood flow reflecting cardiac output. Measurements of PETCO2 after PLR might therefore increase our understanding of its potential value in CPR. We also observed the alteration in PETCO2 in relation to the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and no ROSC. Methods and results The PETCO2 was measured, subsequent to intubation, in 126 patients suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), during 15min or until ROSC. Forty-four patients were selected by the study protocol to PLR 35cm; 21 patients received manual chest compressions and 23 mechanical compressions. The PLR was initiated during uninterrupted CPR, 5min from the start of PETCO2 measurements. During PLR, an increase in PETCO2 was found in all 44 patients within 15s (p=0.003), 45s (p=0.002) and 75s (p=0.0001). Survival to hospital discharge was 7% among patients with PLR and 1% among those without PLR (p=0.12). Among patients experiencing ROSC (60 of 126), we found a marked increase in PETCO2 1min before the detection of a palpable pulse. Conclusion Since PLR during CPR appears to increase PETCO2 after OHCA, larger studies are needed to evaluate its potential effects on survival. Further, the measurement of PETCO2 could help to minimise the hands-off periods and pulse checks.

  • 20.
    Axelsson, C
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Jimenez, M
    Herlitz, J
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    PCI de Lucs. A safety and feasibility study on a pathway to the cath lab for patients with OHCA2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Axelsson, C
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. [external].
    Karlsson, T
    Axelsson, ÅB
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. [external].
    Mechanical active compression-decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ACD-CPR) versus manual CPR according to pressure of end tidal carbon dioxide (P(ET)CO2) during CPR in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA).2009In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 80, no 10, 1099-1103 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: In animal and human studies, measuring the pressure of end tidal carbon dioxide (P(ET)CO2) has been shown to be a practical non-invasive method that correlates well with the pulmonary blood flow and cardiac output (CO) generated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This study aims to compare mechanical active compression-decompression (ACD) CPR with standard CPR according to P(ET)CO2 among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), during CPR and with standardised ventilation. METHODS: This prospective, on a cluster level, pseudo-randomised pilot trial took place in the Municipality of Göteborg. During a 2-year period, all patients aged >18 years suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) of presumed cardiac etiology were enrolled. The present analysis included only tracheally intubated patients in whom P(ET)CO2 was measured for 15 min or until the detection of a pulse-giving rhythm. RESULTS: In all, 126 patients participated in the evaluation, 64 patients in the mechanical chest compression group and 62 patients in the control group. The group receiving mechanical ACD-CPR obtained the significantly highest P(ET)CO2 values according to the average (p=0.04), initial (p=0.01) and minimum (p=0.01) values. We found no significant difference according to the maximum value between groups. CONCLUSION: In this hypothesis generating study mechanical ACD-CPR compared with manual CPR generated the highest initial, minimum and average value of P(ET)CO2. Whether these data can be repeated and furthermore be associated with an improved outcome after OHCA need to be confirmed in a large prospective randomised trial.

  • 22.
    Axelsson, Christer
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Bremer, Anders
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Hagiwara, Magnus
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Nationella regler krävs för ambulanssjukvård2011In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Ambulanssjukvården i Sverige saknar nationella riktlinjer. En konsekvens av detta är brister i tillgängligheten vilket fått allvarliga konsekvenser för flera personer under den senaste tiden. En av dem är Maximilian och hans mamma som blev påkörda på trottoaren av en 23-årig förare som hade tappat kontrollen över sin bil. Det tog nästan en timme innan pojken flögs till sjukhus med helikopter från olycksplatsen på Tjörn utanför Stenungsund. Maximilian blev bara tio veckor.

  • 23.
    Axelsson, Christer
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Bremer, Anders
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Hagiwara, Magnus
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Englund, Lotta
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Så skapas världens bästa ambulanssjukvård2011In: Göteborgsposten, ISSN 1103-9345Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Tiden från larm till dess att ambulans kommer har ökat dramatiskt de senaste tio åren i Västra Götaland. Samtidigt bedöms allt fler i behov av snabb utryckning. Kompetens finns att råda bot på detta – om den tillåts styra utvecklingen, skriver bland andra professor Johan Herlitz.

  • 24.
    Axelsson, Christer
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Claesson, Andreas
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Engdahl, J
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Hollenberg, J
    Lindqvist, J
    Rosenqvist, M
    Svensson, L
    Outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest witnessed by EMS: changes over time and factors of importance for outcome in Sweden.2012In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 83, no 10, 1253-1258 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Among patients who survive after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), a large proportion are recruited from cases witnessed by the Emergency Medical Service (EMS), since the conditions for success are most optimal in this subset. Aim To evaluate outcome after EMS-witnessed OHCA in a 20-year perspective in Sweden, with the emphasis on changes over time and factors of importance. Methods All patients included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Register from 1990 to 2009 were included. Results There were 48,349 patients and 13.5% of them were EMS witnessed. There was a successive increase in EMS-witnessed OHCA from 8.5% in 1992 to 16.9% in 2009 (p for trend < 0.0001). Among EMS-witnessed OHCA, the survival to one month increased from 13.9% in 1992 to 21.8% in 2009 (p for trend < 0.0001). Among EMS-witnessed OHCA, 51% were found in ventricular fibrillation, which was higher than in bystander-witnessed OHCA, despite a lower proportion with a presumed cardiac aetiology in the EMS-witnessed group. Among EMS-witnessed OHCA overall, 16.0% survived to one month, which was significantly higher than among bystander-witnessed OHCA. Independent predictors of a favourable outcome were: (1) initial rhythm ventricular fibrillation; (2) cardiac aetiology; (3) OHCA outside home and (4) decreasing age. Conclusion In Sweden, in a 20-year perspective, there was a successive increase in the proportion of EMS-witnessed OHCA. Among these patients, survival to one month increased over time. EMS-witnessed OHCA had a higher survival than bystander-witnessed OHCA. Independent predictors of an increased chance of survival were initial rhythm, aetiology, place and age.

  • 25.
    Axelsson, Christer
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Karlsson, Anders
    Sjöberg, Henrik
    Jiménez-Herrera, Maria
    Bång, Angela
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Jonsson, Anders
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Bremer, Anders
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Andersson, Henrik
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Gellerstedt, Martin
    Ljungström, Lars
    The Early Chain of Care in Patients with Bacteraemia with the Emphasis on the Prehospital Setting2016In: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, E-ISSN 1945-1938, Vol. 31, no 3, 1-6 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:  There is a lack of knowledge  about the early phase of severe infection. This reportdescribes the early chain of care in bacteraemia as follows:  (a) compare patients who were and were not transported by the Emergency Medical Services (EMS); (b) describe various aspects of the EMS chain; and (c) describe factors of importance for the delay to the start ofintravenous antibiotics. It was hypothesized that, for patients with suspected sepsis judged by the EMS clinician, the delay until the onset of antibiotic treatment would be shorter.

    Basic Procedures: All  patients  in the Municipality of Gothenburg  (Sweden) with apositive blood culture, when assessed at the Laboratory of Bacteriology in the Municipality of Gothenburg, from February 1 through April 30, 2012 took part in the survey.

    Main Findings/Results:  In all, 696 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Their mean agewas 76 years and 52% were men. Of all patients, 308 (44%) had been in contact with the EMS and/or the emergency department (ED). Of these 308 patients, 232 (75%) were transported by the EMS and 188 (61%) had “true pathogens” in blood cultures. Patients who were transported by the EMS were older, included more men, and suffered from more severe symptoms  and signs.The EMS nurse  suspected sepsis in only six percent of the cases. These patients had a delay from arrival at hospital until the start of antibiotics of one hour and 19 minutes  versus three hours and 21 minutes among the remaining patients (P = .0006). The corresponding figures for cases with “true pathogens” were one hour and19 minutes  versus three hours and 15 minutes  (P = .009).

    Conclusion:  Among patients with bacteraemia, 75% used the EMS, and these patients were older, included more men, and suffered from more severe symptoms  and signs. The EMS nurse  suspected sepsis in six percent of cases. Regardless  of whether or not patients with true pathogens  were isolated,  a suspicion of sepsis by the EMS clinician at thescene was associated with a shorter delay to the start of antibiotic treatment.

  • 26.
    Axelsson, Christer
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Holmen, Johan
    Herreira, Maria
    Canardo, Guillermo
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    PCI De Lucs.: A clinical pathway directly to the PCI lab in out of hospital cardiac arrest2016In: American Heart Association, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In Sweden, the ambulance response time from call to arrival is 11 minutes in patients with an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, there is a small group of OHCA patients (20%) in whom this delay is minimized, namely those that occur minutes before or after the arrival of the ambulance. Despite CPR and/or defibrillation within one minute, only 20% survive to hospital discharge. The objective was therefore to determine whether a pathway with direct transportation to the cath lab, using mechanical chest compression (LUCAS), could improve survival in this selected group.

    Aim: To describe characteristics, feasibility and outcome among a selected group of OHCA patients transported directly to the cath lab by the ambulance in a new pathway

    Method: A prospective observational study from November 2013 to November 2015

    Inclusion criteria: 1. Crew-witnessed cardiac arrest (CA) of cardiac origin or CA immediately defibrillated to return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) by public access. 2. CA occurring two to three minutes before ambulance arrival where the patient had immediate bystander CPR of high quality. 4. CA occurring two to three minutes before ambulance arrival where the patient was still breathing at ambulance arrival.

    Exclusion criteria: Non-cardiac origin CA or high physiologic age (hospice patients)

    Result: Sixty-four patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and 14 were excluded. Of the remaining 50 patients, 25 were transported with mechanical CPR to the cath lab. The time from CA to hospital was a median of 38 minutes. Survival to 30 days was 38% among all patients, 47% among VF (N=34) and 12% (N=25) among those who were transported with mechanical CPR.

    Conclusion: The pathway appears safe and feasible, but the inclusion criteria need to be less complex. The vast majority of survivors were found in the VF population. There were survivors (12%) among patients transported with ongoing CPR (N=25) directly to the cath lab by the ambulance.

  • 27.
    Axelsson, Christer
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Karlsson, Thomas
    Pande, Katarina
    Wigertz, Kristin
    Örtenwall, Per
    Nordanstig, Joakim
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    A description of the prehospital phase of aortic dissection in terms of early suspicion and treatment.2015In: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, E-ISSN 1945-1938, Vol. 30, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Aortic dissection is difficult to detect in the early phase due to a variety of symptoms. This report describes the prehospital setting of aortic dissection in terms of symptoms, treatment, and suspicion by the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) staff.

    BASIC PROCEDURES: All patients in the Municipality of Gothenburg, Sweden, who, in 2010 and 2011, had a hospital discharge diagnosis of aortic dissection (international classification of disease (ICD) I 71,0) were included. The exclusion criteria were: age<18 years of age and having a planned operation. This was a retrospective, descriptive study based on patient records. In the statistical analyses, Fisher's exact test and the Mann-Whitney U test were used for analyses of dichotomous and continuous/ordered variables.

    MAIN FINDINGS: Of 92 patients, 78% were transported to the hospital by the EMS. The most common symptom was pain (94%). Pain was intensive or very intensive in 89% of patients, with no significant difference in relation to the use of the EMS. Only 47% of those using the EMS were given pain relief with narcotic analgesics. Only 12% were free from pain on admission to the hospital. A suspicion of aortic dissection was reported by the EMS staff in only 17% of cases. The most common preliminary diagnosis at the dispatch center (31%) and by EMS clinicians (52%) was chest pain or angina pectoris. In all, 79% of patients were discharged alive from the hospital (75% of those that used the EMS and 95% of those that did not).

    CONCLUSION: Among patients who were hospitalized due to aortic dissection in Gothenburg, 78% used the EMS. Despite severe pain in the majority of patients, fewer than half received narcotic analgesics, and only 12% were free from pain on admission to the hospital. In fewer than one-in-five patients was a suspicion of aortic dissection reported by the EMS staff.

  • 28. Axelsson, Å
    et al.
    Stibrant Sunnerhagen, K
    Herlitz, J
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Comparision of respondents and non-respondents in a follow-upsurvey after cardiac arrest2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29. Axelsson, ÅB
    et al.
    Herlitz, Johan
    [external].
    Holmberg, S
    Thorén, A-B
    A nationwide survey of CPR training in Sweden: foreign born and unemployed are not reached by training programmes.2006In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 70, no 1, 90-97 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To determine the number of CPR trained adults in Sweden, and the willingness of the non-trained population to attend a CPR course. An additional purpose was to investigate differences related to sex, age, residential area, socio-economic classification and country of origin. METHODS: Five thousand adults in Sweden were surveyed, which yielded 3167 valid responses, a response rate of 63%. The sample was selected at random and stratified to correlate to the geographic distribution of the population. RESULTS: The mean (S.D.) age was 46 (16) years, 54% of the respondents were females and 11% were people of foreign origin. Forty-five percent had participated in some form of CPR training. Younger respondents, those living in rural areas, those born in Sweden, employees, students and military conscripts were trained more frequently in CPR. Of the respondents with no CPR training, 50% expressed a willingness to attend a course. The most common reason for not being trained in CPR was that the respondent did not know such courses existed or that they did not know where to go for training. CONCLUSION: Somewhere between 30 and 45% of the adult population of Sweden had participated in CPR training. Half of the non-trained population was willing to learn CPR but frequently did not know that such courses existed or where they were held. Elderly people, people of foreign origin, or those not included in the workforce were less likely to have participated in CPR training.

  • 30. Axelsson, Åsa B
    et al.
    Sunnerhagen, Katharina S
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Representativity and co-morbidity: Two factors of importance when reporting health status among survivors of cardiac arrest.2016In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 101, 44-49 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Reports on differences between respondents and non-respondents of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survivors are sparse. This study compares respondents with non-respondents in a follow-up study of a consecutive sample of OHCA survivors and describes the relation between respondents' self-reported morbidity and health.

    METHODS/DESIGN: Questionnaires were administered within 12 months after the OHCA. The study population was adult patients who had survived an OHCA during 2008 to 2011, with a cerebral performance score of ≤2 at discharge. The patients were identified through the Swedish registry of OHCA. The Self-administered comorbidity questionnaire and EQ VAS (Euroqol questionnaire visual analogue scale) was used to measure morbidity and health status.

    RESULTS: Of 298 survivors, 224 were eligible for the study and 127 responded. Mean time from cardiac arrest (CA) to follow up was 178 days. Comparing the 127 respondents with the 97 lost to follow-up and non-respondents, no significant differences were found in terms of age, sex, factors at resuscitation and in-hospital interventions. The EQ VAS median was 75 (25th,75th percentile 60,80)). Self-rated health differed between respondents reporting 0-2 conditions (n=68) and respondents reporting more than two (n=43), median EQ VAS 78 (68,90) and 65 (50,80)), respectively; p-value 0.0001.

    CONCLUSIONS: Despite a limited response rate, representativeness in terms of patient characteristics among survivors of OHCA with an acceptable cerebral function is achievable. A considerable proportion of the survivors lived with the burden of multi-morbidity which worsened health.

  • 31. Axelsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Sunnerhagen, Katrina
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Post-traumatic stress among survivors of out of hospital cardic arrest2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32. Beillon, Lena Marie
    et al.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Karlberg, Ingvar
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Does ambulance use differ between geographic areas? A survey of ambulance use in sparsely and densely populated areas2009In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 0735-6757, E-ISSN 1532-8171, Vol. 27, no 2, 202-211 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to analyze possible differences in the use of ambulance service between densely and sparsely populated areas. Methods: This study was designed as a 2-step consecutive study that included the ambulance service in 4 different areas with different geographical characteristics. A specific questionnaire was distributed to the enrolled ambulance services. Completion of one questionnaire was required for each ambulance mission, that is, I per patient, during the study periods. For calculations of P values, geographic area was treated as a 4-graded ordered variable, from the most densely populated to the most sparsely populated (ie, urban-suburban-rural-remote rural area). Statistical tests used were Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman rank statistic, when appropriate. All P values are 2 tailed and considered significant if below .01. Results: The medical status of the patients in the prehospital care situation was more often severe in the sparsely populated areas. In addition, drugs were more often used in the ambulances in these areas. In the sparsely populated areas, ambulance use was more frequently judged as the appropriate mode of transportation compared with the more densely populated areas. Conclusions: Our study suggests that the appropriateness of the use of ambulance is not optimal. Furthermore, our data suggest that geographical factors, that is, population density, is related to inappropriate use. Thus, strategies to improve the appropriateness of ambulance use should probably take geographical aspects into consideration. (C) 2009 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  • 33. Bengtson, A
    et al.
    Karlsson, T
    Hjalmarson, Å
    Herlitz, Johan
    [external].
    Cardiac complications during wait for coronary revascularization: How big a problem?1997In: Cardiology review, ISSN 1573-403X, Vol. 14, no 12, 55-58 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34. Bengtson, A
    et al.
    Karlsson, T
    Hjalmarson, Å
    Herlitz, Johan
    [external].
    Complications prior to revascularisation among patients waiting for coronary artery bypass grafting and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty1996In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 17, no 12, 1846-1851 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe the occurrence of death, development of acute myocardial infarction and need for hospitalization among patients on the waiting list for coronary artery bypass grafting and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All the patients on the waiting list for possible coronary revascularization in September 1990 in western Sweden. RESULTS: Of 718 patients waiting for either coronary artery bypass grafting or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, 15 (2.1%) died between the actual week in September 1990 and prior to revascularization and 12 (1.7%) developed a non-fatal acute myocardial infarction during the same period. All 15 patients who died before undergoing revascularization died a cardiac death. Death and/or the development of an acute myocardial infarction was significantly more frequent among the elderly, among patients with a low ejection fraction and among patients with a history of diabetes mellitus. In all, 29% required hospitalization prior to the procedure. The most common reason was symptoms of angina pectoris requiring hospitalization in 23% of the patients. CONCLUSION: Among patients on the waiting list before either coronary artery bypass grafting or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, 15 (2.1%) died prior to the procedure and 1.7% developed a non-fatal acute myocardial infarction. The risk of either death or developing an acute myocardial infarction was highest among patients in the older age groups, among patients with a history of diabetes mellitus and among patients with a lower ejection fraction.

  • 35. Bengtson, A
    et al.
    Karlsson, T
    Währborg, P
    Hjalmarson, Å
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. [external].
    Cardiovascular and psychosomatic symptoms among relatives of patients waiting for possible coronary1996In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 25, no 6, 438-443 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the consequences for close family members of patients on a waiting list for possible coronary revascularization. BACKGROUND: An increasing number of patients with symptomatic ischemic heart disease require evaluation for possible revascularization. Many of these patients must wait a long time before receiving treatment. The negative consequences of this long wait for patients and their relatives have not been satisfactorily evaluated previously. DESIGN: Cross-sectional descriptive study. SETTING: All hospital in Southwestern Sweden. STUDY POPULATION: One hundred relatives of patients referred for possible revascularization and a sex- and age-matched reference group. The convenience sample consisted of 85% (n = 76) women and 15% (n = 13) men. OUTCOME MEASURES: Frequency of cardiovascular and psychosomatic symptoms. EVALUATION: One hundred relatives and 100 members of the control group were sent a questionnaire to evaluate their clinical condition; working situation; use of tobacco, alcohol and sedatives; and cardiovascular and psychosomatic symptoms. RESULTS: Family members had a significantly higher frequency of anxiety, depression, and irritability compared with the control group. Furthermore, family members reported sleeping disorders, including difficulty waking, tiredness due to lack of sleep, and restless sleep, more frequently than did the control group. CONCLUSION: Close family members of patients waiting for coronary revascularization have particular difficulties, and these difficulties should receive more attention.

  • 36. Bengtsson, A
    et al.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. [external].
    Karlsson, T
    Brandrup-Wognsen, G
    Hjalmarson, Å
    The appropriateness of performing coronary angiography and coronary artery revascularization in a Swedish population1994In: Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), ISSN 0098-7484, E-ISSN 1538-3598, Vol. 271, no 16, 1260-1265 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. —To evaluate the appropriateness of performing coronary angiography and revascularization in a Swedish population. Design. —Prospective population study of questionnaires and medical records. Setting. —All the hospitals in southwestern Sweden that perform coronary angiography and revascularization. Patients. —Random sample of 831 patients (with chronic stable angina) on the waiting list for coronary angiography or revascularization in southwestern Sweden in September 1990. Main Outcome Measure. —Percentage of patients referred for coronary angiography or revascularization for appropriate, uncertain, or inappropriate indications. Results. —Of the patients referred for angiography, 89% were classified as appropriate, 9% as uncertain, and 2% as inappropriate. The percentages are similar for patients referred for coronary artery bypass graft surgery and for angioplasty (91% and 86%, respectively, classified as appropriate). The majority of patients had chest pain rated as Canadian Cardiovascular Society classes II through IV (93%), despite maximum anti-ischemic therapy in 90% of these patients. Conclusions. —Few patients were referred for coronary angiography or revascularization for inappropriate or uncertain indications. The percentage of these patients who are from southwestern Sweden is similar to the percentage recently reported from New York State.

  • 37. Bengtsson, A
    et al.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. [external].
    Karlsson, T
    Hjalmarson, Å
    The epidemiology of a coronary waiting list. A description of all patients1994In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, ISSN 0954-6820, Vol. 235, no 3, 263-269 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Keywords: cardiac symptoms; chest pain; coronary revascularization; delay; ischaemic heart disease; nervous reactions; waiting list Abstract. Objectives. To describe the characteristics and the severity of symptoms amongst patients on the waiting list for possible coronary revascularization. Design. All the patients were sent a postal questionnaire for symptom evaluation. Setting. All hospitals in western Sweden. Subjects. All patients in western Sweden on the waiting list in September 1990, who had been referred for coronary angiography or revascularization (n = 904) and a sex- and age-matched reference group (n = 809). Results. More than half of the patients had daily attacks of chest pain, whereas 16% reported less than one attack per week or no pain at all. However, other symptoms such as dyspnoea, tachycardia and nervous reactions were also common and 25% of all patients used sedatives. A long waiting time for a given procedure was not associated with more pain but with more nervous symptoms such as restlessness and insomnia (P < 0.0001) and greater use of sedatives and cigarettes (P < 0.05). Conclusions. We conclude that a long waiting time for possible coronary revascularization is associated with more nervous symptoms but not with more pain.

  • 38. Bengtsson, A
    et al.
    Karlsson, T
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. [external].
    On the waiting list for possible coronary revascularisation. Symptoms relief during the first year and association between quality of life and the very long-term mortality risk2008In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 123, no 3, 271-276 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe: a/ the improvement in quality of life (QoL) among patients on the waiting list for coronary revascularisation and b/ the association between QoL and very long-term mortality. PATIENTS: All patients on the waiting list for possible coronary revascularisation in western Sweden during one week in September 1990. METHODS: QoL was assessed at the start of the survey and one year later among patients who both were and were not revascularised. Survival data were gathered for the subsequent 14 years. RESULTS: From the start, 883 patients were evaluated in the survey. Among patients who were revascularised, an improvement was seen in all the aspects of QoL that were studied during the first year as compared with patients who were not revascularised, in whom only minor changes in QoL were seen during the first year. After one year, there were seven aspects of QoL which were significantly associated with the risk of death during the subsequent 14 years, when adjusting for age, sex, previous history and extent of coronary artery disease. They were: tiredness (OR=1.4), weakness (OR=1.5), lack of energy (OR=1.5), inability to react (OR=1.7), use of sedatives (OR=3.2), dyspnea when dressing (OR=2.1) and chest pain when dressing (OR=1.9). CONCLUSION: Among patients on the waiting list for possible coronary revascularisation, there was a marked improvement in QoL among those who were revascularised. In a variety of aspects of QoL, an association with the very long-term risk of death was observed.

  • 39. Bengtsson, I
    et al.
    Karlson, B
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Haglid Evander, M
    Währborg, P
    A 14-year follow-up study of chest pain patients including stress hormones and mental stress at index event2012In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 154, no 3, 306-311 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Knowledge of long-term outcome in chest pain patients is limited. We reinvestigated patients who 14 years earlier had visited the emergency department due to chest pain, and were discharged without hospitalization. Extensive examinations were made at that time on 484 patients including full medical history, exercise test, a battery of stress questions and stress hormone sampling. Methods From a previously conducted chest pain study patients still alive after 14 years were approached. Hospitalization or deaths with a diagnosis of ischemic heart disease or cerebrovascular disease were used as end point. Results During the follow-up period 24 patients had died with a diagnosis of ischemic heart or cerebrovascular disease, and 50 patients had been given such a diagnosis at hospital discharge. Age (OR 1.12, CI 1.06–1.19), previous history of angina pectoris (OR 9.69, CI 2.06–71.61), pathological ECG at emergency department visit (OR 3.27, CI 1.23–8.67), hypertension (OR 5.03, CI 1.90–13.76), smoking (OR 3.04, CI 1.26–7.63) and lipid lowering medication (OR 14.9, CI 1.60–152.77) were all associated with future ischemic heart or cerebrovascular events. Noradrenalin levels were higher in the event group than in the non-event group, mean (SD) 2.44 (1.02) nmol/L versus 1.90 (0.75) nmol/L. When noradrenalin was included in the regression model high maximal exercise capacity was protective of an event (OR 0.986, CI 0.975–0.997). Conclusion In chest pain patients previous history of angina pectoris, hypertension, smoking, pathological ECG at primary examination, and age were the main risk factors associated with future cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events.

  • 40. Berggren, H
    et al.
    Ekroth, R
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Hjalmarson, Å
    Schlossman, D
    Waldenström, A
    Waldenström, J
    William Olsson, C
    Myocardial Protective Effect of Maintained Beta-Blockade in Aorto-Coronary Bypass Surgery1983In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 17, no 1, 29-32 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twenty-nine patients were randomly allocated to two groups before undergoing aorto-coronary bypass surgery. In one group the beta-blocking medication was withdrawn three days preoperatively, and in the other group it was maintained. The patients in the latter group were additionally given 100 mg metoprolol per os two hours before surgery. The degree of myocardial injury, as judged from cumulated activity of S-CK B, was less when the beta-blockade was maintained.

  • 41. Berglin Blohm, M
    et al.
    Hartford, M
    Karlson, BW
    Luepker, RV
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. [external].
    An evaluation of the results of media and educational campaigns designed to shorten the time taken by patients with acute myocardial infarction to decide to go to hospital1996In: Heart, ISSN 1355-6037, E-ISSN 1468-201X, Vol. 76, no 5, 430-434 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the benefits and pitfalls of educational campaigns designed to reduce the delay between the onset of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and its treatment. METHODS: All seven educational campaigns reported between 1982 and 1994 were evaluated. RESULTS: The impact on delay time ranged from a reduction of patient decision time by 35% to no reduction. One study reported a sustained reduction that resulted in the delay time being halved during the three years after the campaign. The use of ambulances did not increase. Only one study reported that survival was unaffected. There was a temporary increase in the numbers of patients admitted to the emergency department with non-cardiac chest pain in the initial phase of educational campaigns. CONCLUSION: The challenge of shortening the delay between the onset of infarction and the start of treatment remains. The campaigns so far have not been proved to be worthwhile and it is not certain that further campaigns will do better. New media campaigns should be run to establish whether a different type of message is more likely to change the behaviour of people in this life-threatening situation.

  • 42. Berglin Blohm, M
    et al.
    Hartford, M
    Karlsson, T
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. [external].
    Factors associated with prehospital and in-hospital delay time in acute myocardial infarction: a 6-year experience1998In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 243, no 3, 243-250 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To explore factors associated with delay time prior to hospital admission and in hospital amongst acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients with particular emphasis on the delay time to the administration of thrombolytic therapy. METHODS: During a 6-year period we prospectively computerized pre-hospital and in-hospital time intervals for AMI patients admitted to the coronary care unit (CCU) direct from the emergency department (ED) or via paramedics, at Sahlgrenska Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. RESULTS: Pre-hospital delay: independent predictors of a prolonged delay were increased age (P = 0.0007), female sex (P = 0.02) and a history of hypertension (P = 0.03). For AMI patients who received thrombolytic treatment and the only independent predictor of a prolonged delay was increased age (P = 0.005). In-hospital delay: for all AMI patients independent predictors of a prolonged delay were prolonged pre-hospital delay (P < 0.0001), increased age (P = 0.03) and a history of angina (P = 0.002), hypertension (P = 0.01) and diabetes (P = 0.01). For thrombolytic treated AMI patients independent predictors of a prolonged delay were prolonged pre-hospital delay (P < 0.0001), female sex (P = 0.02) and a history of diabetes (P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: Risk factors for both pre-hospital and hospital delay time could in AMI be defined although slightly different. Two factors appeared for both, i.e. increasing age and a history of hypertension.

  • 43. Berglin Blohm, M
    et al.
    Nilsson, G
    Karlsson, T
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. [external].
    The possibility of influencing components of hospital delay time within emergency departments among patients with ST-elevation in the initial electrocardiogram1998In: European journal of emergency medicine, ISSN 0969-9546, E-ISSN 1473-5695, Vol. 5, no 3, 289-296 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe the possibility of influencing components of hospital delay time within the emergency department (ED) among patients with ST-elevation on the initial electrocardiogram (ECG). Nurses recorded seven patient time points: (1) ED admission; (2) ECG recording; (3) decision by nurse/ED physician; (4) cardiologist ED arrival; (5) decision of coronary care unit (CCU) admission; (6) ED departure; (7) CCU arrival. After special training in ECG, nurses in the ED were subsequently delegated to send patients directly to the CCU if showing ST-elevation on the admission ECG without contacting either the physician in ED or the cardiologist on call (intervention). Delay times between hospital admission and admission to the CCU were evaluated during the 9 months prior to and during the 6 months after the start of this intervention. Fifty patients (66% men) participated in the first study during 3 months (prior to intervention). Patients with suspected or confirmed acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in the ED had a median delay time from ED arrival to CCU arrival of 55.5 minutes (34.5 minutes for patients with confirmed AMI; ST elevation on admission). Time interval from decision to admit to CCU and ED departure was an average of 31% of the total delay. A mean of 21% of total delay occurred between ED decision to cardiologist arrival, and 19% during the time interval from cardiologist ED arrival until decision to CCU admission. Among patients receiving thrombolysis, the median delay time from hospital admission to CCU admission was reduced from 40 minutes during the 9 months prior to start of the intervention (nurses sending patients directly to the CCU) to 22 minutes during the 6 months thereafter (p = 0.02). The largest proportion of hospital delay components for acute coronary syndrome patients occurred between the cardiologist's decision to admit to the CCU and departure from the ED, and the interval following the decision by the nurse or physician to the cardiologist ED arrival. When nurses were delegated to transfer patients with ST-elevation on admission directly to the CCU without contacting a physician, the delay time from ED admission to CCU admission was reduced by nearly 50%.

  • 44. Berglind, L
    et al.
    Karlsson, T
    Hirlekar, G
    Albertsson, P
    Herlitz, J
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ravn-Fischer, A
    Delay and inequality in treatment of the elderly with suspected acute coronary syndrome2014In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 176, no 3, 946-950 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to determine differences between elderly patients (≥80 years) and younger patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) regarding delay times before diagnostic tests and treatments. METHODS: All patients with chest pain who were admitted to a hospital in the Gothenburg area were included consecutively over a 3-month period. They were divided into an elderly group (≥80 years) and a reference group (<80 years). Previous medical history, ECG findings, treatments, diagnostic tests, and delay times were registered. RESULTS: Altogether, 2588 patients were included (478 elderly and 2110 reference). There were no significant differences in delay time to hospital ward admission, to first medical therapy with aspirin, or to investigation with coronary angiography (CA) between the two groups. The elderly patients had a significantly shorter median time from first medical contact to first ECG (12 vs. 14 min, p=0.002) but after adjustment for confounding factors, especially mode of transport, the opposite was found to be the case (p=0.002). Elderly hospitalized patients with ACS were less often investigated with CA (44% vs. 89%, p<0.0001) and received less medical treatment with P2Y12 antagonists and lipid lowering drugs. CONCLUSIONS: Elderly individuals with chest pain could not be shown to have a delay to hospital admission compared to their younger counterparts. Nevertheless, higher age was associated with a longer time to first ECG. The elderly patients received less active therapy, and fear of age-related side effects might explain this difference.

  • 45. Blohm, M
    et al.
    Hartford, M
    Karlson, BW
    Karlsson, T
    Herlitz, Johan
    [external].
    A media campaign aiming at reducing delay times and increasing the use of ambulance in AMI1994In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, ISSN 0735-6757, E-ISSN 1532-8171, ISSN 0735-6757, Vol. 12, no 3, 315-318 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To improve the prognosis in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) if treatment by early instituting treatment, we initiated a media campaign during 1 year with the intention to reduce delay times and increase ambulance use in patients with acute chest pain. This article describes the outcome during 3 years after the campaign was finished. The median delay time in patients with AMI was reduced from 3 hours 0 min before the campaign to 2 hours 20 minutes during the year of the campaign (P < .001). The median delay time remained at a similar level (2 hours 20 min) during the 3 years after the campaign. Ambulance use was not affected during or after the campaign. It can be concluded that a media campaign resulted in a reduction of delay times not only during the campaign, but also during 3 years after its pertormance, whereas ambulance use was not affected.

  • 46. Blohm, M
    et al.
    Herlitz, Johan
    [external].
    Hartford, M
    Karlson, BW
    Risenfors, M
    Luepker, RV
    Sjölin, M
    Holmberg, S
    Consequences of a media campaign focusing on delay in acute myocardial infarction1992In: American Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0002-9149, E-ISSN 1879-1913, ISSN 0002-914, Vol. 69, no 4, 411-413 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47. Blohm, M
    et al.
    Herlitz, Johan
    [external].
    Hartford, M
    Karlsson, BW
    Holmberg, S
    Schröder, U
    Larsson, E
    Mediakampanj om råd vid bröstsmärtor har stor genomslagskraft i befolkningen1989In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 86, no 32-33, 2695-2696 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48. Blohm, M
    et al.
    Herlitz, Johan
    [external].
    Schröder, U
    Hartford, M
    Karlsson, BW
    Risenfors, M
    Larsson, E
    Luepker, R
    Wennerblom, B
    Holmberg, S
    Reaction to a media campaign focusing on delay in acute myocardial infarction1991In: Heart & Lung, ISSN 0147-9563, E-ISSN 1527-3288, Vol. 20, no 6, 661-666 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A media campaign conducted to reduce delay time and to increase the use of ambulance transport in acute myocardial infarction was performed in an urban area with about half a million inhabitants during 1 year. The main message was that chest pain lasting more than 15 minutes might indicate acute myocardial infarction; dial 90,000 immediately for ambulance transport to the hospital. The target population was the general public. After 6 and 12 months 400 and 610 randomly chosen persons, respectively, were contacted by telephone to evaluate the reaction of the general public to the campaign. Of these, 60% and 71%, respectively, had heard of the campaign, and all parts of the message were spontaneously remembered by 15% and 19%, respectively. The reaction to the campaign was generally positive. Among all patients admitted to the coronary care unit of one of the two city hospitals, 65% were aware of the campaign and 31% of them were of the opinion that they came to the hospital faster because of the campaign. In conclusion, a media campaign aimed at reducing patient delay time in acute myocardial infarction was shown to reach a majority of people in the community and patients with ischemic heart disease. The reaction was positive and about one fifth of interviewed people spontaneously remembered the total message.

  • 49. Blomberg, S
    et al.
    Curelaru, I
    Emanuelsson, H
    Herlitz, Johan
    [external].
    Pontén, J
    Ricksten, S-E
    Thoracic epidural anaesthesia in patients with unstable angina pectoris1989In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 10, no 5, 437-444 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of high thoracic epidural anaesthesia with intermittent epidural bolus injections of bupivacaine (2.5 or 5 mg ml-1) was studied in 28 patients with unstable angina pectoris. The majority of the patients had a history of previous acute myocardial infarction(s) and/or angina pectoris and severe coronary artery disease. All patients were treated wth nitroglycerin infusion for gt;24 h and were included in the study if they had chest pain, not caused by acute myocardial infarction, at bed rest or recurrent anginal pain at rest < 2 days after infarction. 4.4 ± 0.3 ml of bupivacaine induced a blockade of the upper seven sympathetic segments ( Th1-7) for 98 ± 9min. Heart rate decreased significantly from 70 ± 3 to 64 ± 3 beats min-1 while blood pressure was unaffected by thoracic epidural anaesthesia. In 27 patients (96%) the anaesthesia induced complete analgesia. Nitroglycerin infusion was discontinued definitely within 3 h in 26 patients (93%) and pain was thereafter controlled by means of thoracic epidural anaesthesia as the sole treatment in 23 patients (82%) and as the major treatment in 25 patients (89%). Twenty-one patients (75%) were fully mobilized and stabilized. Treatment with thoracic epidural anaesthesia lasted for 6.0 ± 1.1 days. The number of daily epidural injections decreased significantly with time from 2.7 ±0.3 the first day to 0.9 ± 0.3 the fourth day (P>0.01, n = 19). Two patients developed acute myocardial infarction during the anaesthesia treatment period, and one of these patients died. Exercise stress testing was performed on eight patients three to five days after the start of thoracic epidural anaesthesia. At a comparable workload, ST-segment depression was significantly (P>0.05) less pronounced during anaesthesia ( − 0.6 ± 0.1 mm) compared with control ( − 1.3 ± 0.2mm). The respective heart rate values were 95 ± 7 and 107 ± 7 beats min -1 (P > 0.05), while systolic or diastolic blood pressure did not differ between the two conditions. We conclude that blockade of cardiac sympathetic afferents and efferents by means of thoracic epidural anaesthesia can effectively treat pain and stabilize patients with unstable angina pectoris refractory to medical treatment. Furthermore, thoracic epidural anaesthesia attenuates stress-induced myocardial ischaemia; thus, it may be an efficient supplementary treatment for the control of pain and for stabilizing patients with unstable angina pectoris during diagnostic procedures and prior to coronary surgery or angioplasty.

  • 50. Bohm, K
    et al.
    Rosenqvist, M
    Herlitz, Johan
    [external].
    Hollenberg, J
    Svensson, L
    Survival is similar after standard treatment and chest compression only in out-of-hospital bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation.2007In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 116, no 25, 2908-2912 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: We sought to compare the 1-month survival rates among patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who had been given bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in relation to whether they had received standard CPR with chest compression plus mouth-to-mouth ventilation or chest compression only. METHODS AND RESULTS: All patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who received bystander CPR and who were reported to the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Register between 1990 and 2005 were included. Crew-witnessed cases were excluded. Among 11,275 patients, 73% (n=8209) received standard CPR, and 10% (n=1145) received chest compression only. There was no significant difference in 1-month survival between patients who received standard CPR (1-month survival=7.2%) and those who received chest compression only (1-month survival=6.7%). CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who received bystander CPR, there was no significant difference in 1-month survival between a standard CPR program with chest compression plus mouth-to-mouth ventilation and a simplified version of CPR with chest compression only.

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