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  • 1.
    Mauléon, Christina
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Management and control: implications for safety. A study of the use of Indicators at Ringhals AB2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Safety is more than the management of risk. It is more than the absence of accidents, avoidance of error or even the control of risk. Defining an organization as safe because it has a low rate of error or accident has the same limitations as defining health in terms of not being sick. Safety, seen as a collective property that emerges from the interaction between actors in an organization, is continuously maintained by a self-conscious dialectic between collective learning from success and a deep belief that no learning can be taken to be exhaustive as the knowledge base for the complex and dangerous operations is inherently and permanently imperfect. Safety, seen as a constructed human concept does not exist ‘out there’ independent of our minds and culture ready to be measured (Rochlin, 1999). However, performance measurement and indicators are today a fundamental principle of management in many organizations as the idea that well defined performance indicators may support the identification of performance gaps between current and desired performance and provide indication of progress towards closing the gaps. Indicators are thus seen as potent tools for aiding managers in focusing resources to particular areas of the organization that impact upon organizational outcomes; as well as being part of error detection to support safe practice and to build resilient organizations (Mauléon & Gauthereau, 2012; Gauthereau, 2001; Hutchins 1995). Following these arguments the pursuit of safety and performance measurement could seem to be conflicting. Based upon these assumptions the purpose of this pilot study has therefore been to investigate the use of Key Performance Indicators (KPI’s) or indicators as they are called at Ringhals AB in order to gain a deeper understanding of how this shapes organizational practice in terms of safety. The results show that RAB as an organization needs to reflect upon the way QPR as a management control tools is enacted within the organization as this have implications on organizational processes and output including the safety culture. Questions needed to be asked are how do employees interpret and translate indicators in their practice? How do data owners collect, translate and transfer data into the indicator system? how do indicator owners, managers and regulatory institutions and organizations requiring this data (e.g. WANO, SSM) translate it? And how is the indicator system continuously adapted in a continuously changing environment? As a culture of safety depends on remaining dynamically engaged in new assessments and avoiding stale, narrow, or static representations of the changing paths (revising or reframing the understanding of paths toward failure over time); safety should thus be seen as a dynamic non-event (Weick,1987; Hollnagel et al., 2006). And success in terms of safety belongs to organizations, groups and individuals who are resilient in the sense that they recognize, adapt to and absorb variations, changes, disturbances, disruptions, and surprises – especially disruptions that fall outside of the set of disturbances the system is designed to handle (Rasmussen, 1990; Rochlin, 1999; Weick et al., 1999; Sutcliffe & Vogus, 2003) but what is often neglected is that this need for adaptation and recognition includes the adaptation of indicators and performance measurement systems such as QPR.

  • 2.
    Mauléon, Christina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Gothenburg Research Institute, Gothenburg University.
    Risky business or support? And for who? Investigating the enactment of digital management control systems in Swedish Primary schools.2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Mauléon, Christina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Trygghetsrådet -TRR2015In: Mellan jobb - Omställningsavtal och stöd till uppsagda i Sverige / [ed] Lars Walter, Stockholm: SNS Förlag , 2015, 1, p. 44-56Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Mauléon, Christina
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Understanding Project Meetings as Conversational Dramas: A Close Study of the Co-construction of a Common Project Goal.2013In: The International Journal of Interdisciplinary Educational Studies, ISSN 2327-011X, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 9-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a close study of a project meeting which had the purpose of creating a shared understanding, within the project, of the project goal. The aim of the paper is to contribute to more knowledge of what may go on in such meetings, as this knowledge can support joint directed action in both projects and organizations. The setting is an introductory meeting to Knowledge Overlapping Seminars (KOS) in a Six Sigma project with actors from different knowledge domains participating. Design: Participative observation and action research. Findings: This study shows how the co-construction of a shared understanding of the project goal was a highly emotional process. In the meeting co-construction involved the negotiation and re-negotiation of the project member’s different perspectives of the project goal. By accepting and managing the emotional turns in the meeting the facilitator supported the actor’s co-construction of a shared understanding of the project goal. Value: Through its thick descriptions this study contributes to the understanding of how identity, emotion and co-construction of a shared understanding are intertwined relational processes which shape and are shaped in action and as such can affect organizational outcomes.

  • 5.
    Mauléon, Christina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    What’s up with the numbers? A study of the translation of key performance indicators at a nuclear powerplant.2015In: European Group of Organizational Studies (EGOS)2015: Organizations and the Examined Life: Reason, Reflexivity and Responsibility, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Mauléon, Christina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Why Key Performance Indicators?: A study of the translation of KPI’s at a nuclear power plant.2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Mauléon, Christina
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Spante, Maria
    Högskolan Väst.
    Exploring the raison d’etre of an incident reporting system in an elementary school.2015In: The future of Risk analys in the Nordic Countries, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Mauléon, Christina
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Gothenburg Research Institute, Gothenburg University.
    Spante, Maria
    On the intended and unintended consequences of the enactment of digital management control systems in Swedish Schools2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Mauléon, Christina
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Gothenburg Research Institute, Gothenburg University.
    Spante, Maria
    Högskolan Väst.
    Safety and the use of management control systems and Key Performance Indicators at a Swedish nuclear power plant2016In: The SRA Nordic Chapter Annual Meeting Book of abstracts: Where are we and where are we going? New insights into risk analysis in the Nordic countries., Gothenburg Research Institute , 2016, p. 12-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Mauléon, Christina
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Gothenburg Research Institute, Gothenburg University.
    Spante, Maria
    Högskolan Väst.
    When digital supportsystems in school risk to fail: on the investigation of intended and unintended consequences on individual, organizational and societal levels.2016Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 10 of 10
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