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  • 1.
    Casciani, Daria
    et al.
    Design Department, Politecnico di Milano, Durando 10, Milan.
    Chkanikova, Olga
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Department of Business Administration and Textile Management, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Department of Business Administration and Textile Management, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden;Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Exploring the nature of digital transformation in the fashion industry: opportunities for supply chains, business models, and sustainability-oriented innovations2022In: Sustainability: Science, Practice, & Policy, E-ISSN 1548-7733, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 773-795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides a comprehensive overview of the digital transformation of the fashion industry and describes the opportunities and influences on supply chains, business models, and sustainability-oriented innovations that it offers. Desk research was performed to review emerging cases of companies that engage actively in using 3-dimensional virtual and digital (3DVD) technologies, such as 3D modeling, virtual and augmented reality (VR and AR), 2- and 3-dimensional (2D/3D) scanning, and digital twinning (DT). The analysis shows how the adoption of digital technologies provides opportunities to dematerialize the traditional fashion supply-chain model of garment production and distribution and maps the innovative shifts occurring in the fashion industry's processes, products, and services. The adoption of 3DVD technologies by fashion companies unleashes new opportunities with respect to innovation in products/services and optimization of operational processes to streamline activities, shorten the lead time for designing, prototyping, manufacturing, marketing and retailing, and reorganizing the working phases. These capabilities also drive multicentred business-model innovations and thus affect value creation and delivery and capture changes. In addition, the analysis shows that digital transformation affects the four dimensions of sustainability that are interconnected intrinsically across supply-chain processes. Cultural sustainability is paramount, as fashion is a complex cultural system that is able to create products/services that influence the environment, economy, and society. In particular, 3DVD technologies promote cultural transformation of design processes to achieve a remix of skills and open knowledge, a behavioral shift from the consumer perspective in terms of diversity and self-expression, and a change in the organizational culture of companies that drive the digital transformation.

  • 2.
    Chkanikova, Olga
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Gustafsson, Kim
    We Love You Communications.
    Timour, Fredrik
    Fashion Innovation Center, Swedish Fashion Council.
    Shaping the future of fashion-tech - business models, roles and skills aiding digital transformations2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to identify emerging revenue streams and business model opportunities offered within fashion-tech, and what transformational roles and skills are required in order to support fashion-tech business model transformation and value capture. 

    Design/methodology/approach: A focus group study is conducted digitally in three episodes with about ten invited industry practitioners representing fashion brands, technology firms, telecom operators and provider of circularity services. Ontologically, this adopts a four-step process on fashion-tech to explore current state, future directions, transitions required, and supporting roles and skills to assist transitions.  

    Findings: The top 3 revenue streams identified are subscriptions, digital platforms and data selling, while sustainable and circular business model was considered the most important for capturing value via these revenue streams. 7 meta-level skillset were resultant which revealed 11 future job roles essential for fashion-tech transformation. 

    Research limitations/implications: The paper highlights a list of prospective revenue streams, BM transformation requirements, skillsets and roles that are offered within, and required for, fashion-tech value chains, thus providing systematic understanding of digital transformation in the fashion industry. However, the results cannot be generalized. Practical implications (if applicable): The paper sheds some key takeaways for companies working with fashion-tech business models in terms of revenue streams, business models, roles and skillsets to consider. 

    Originality/value: The novelty lies in its suggested approach of starting from revenue streams and then aligning it with transformations in business model elements, in order to understand how to capture value from fashion-tech business models.  

    Download full text (pdf)
    Chkanikova, Pal et al. (2021). Shaping the future of fashion-tech - business models, roles and skills aiding digital transformations
  • 3.
    Chkanikova, Olga
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Sroufe, R.
    Duquesne University Palumbo, Donahue School of Business, 820 Rockwell Hall, Pittsburgh, PA, 15282, USA.
    Third-party sustainability certifications in food retailing: Certification design from a sustainable supply chain management perspective2021In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 282, article id 124344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to examine the proliferation of retail-driven sustainability certification schemes focusing on the role of certification and its design from a corporate perspective. It does so by exploring three different cases of certification design in the food retailing industry: unilateral Tesco Nurture, collaborative GlobalGAP, and multi-stakeholder UTZ certifications. Using case study methods and viewing the certifications through the application of collective action logic and dynamic capability theory, we provide new insights important to researchers, retailers, and supply chains. The results of this study show that retail efforts to develop certifications are driven by better alignment with the business’ goal of improving the sustainability performance of supply chains. Retail-driven certifications can enable stronger brand assurance, stakeholder satisfaction, competitive development of certified supply volumes, and dynamic capabilities that contribute to effective, efficient and faster upgrades to sustainability practices in the supply chain. The contributions of this study also identify numerous factors that influence the development of certifications via collaborative/multi-stakeholder or unilateral efforts. There are three major factors: 1) trade-offs between different aspects of certification design and institutional-stakeholder context, 2) challenges of ‘collective’ bargaining, and 3) generation of dynamic capabilities. From results, we posit the co-existence of multiple certifications, called “standards multiplicity,” as advantageous for facilitating retailers’ engagement with sustainable supply chain management. Finally, conclusions and implications allow us to predict the evolving complexity of retail-driven certifications will enable dynamic capabilities, opportunities for creating competitive advantage, and open a dialogue for other industries to learn from these insights. © 2020 Elsevier Ltd

  • 4.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. University of Gävle - Intelligent Industry Research Centre.
    Chkanikova, Olga
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Casciani, Daria
    Politechnico di Milano - Design Department.
    Colombi, Chiara (Editor)
    Politechnico di Milano - Design Department.
    Case study svalability of multidisciplinary fashion-tech solutions2022In: Piloting fashion-tech educational strategies: Proof of concept for innovative fashion-tech products and services / [ed] Casciani, Daria, Colomin, Chiara, Milan: FT alliance , 2022Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This publication is the result of a didactic research process involving students, teaching staff and industryexperts from across Europe in three (3) learning experiences implemented over a period of almost oneyear (2021-2022). It aims to identify and describe the major lessons learned from the testing and pilotingof three innovative Fashion-Tech learning experiences in order to discuss opportunities for Fashion-Tech (i) Strategic Innovation, (ii) applied Research for the future Education Agenda and (ii) cooperation,networking and partnership opportunities.The work has been organised and synthesized by Politecnico di Milano as leader of the activities relatedto designing and piloting Fashion-Tech learning experiences (WP2), and project coordinator of theFashion-Tech Alliance, a 3-years European academia-industries partnership project aimed to facilitatethe exchange, flow of knowledge, and co-creation within the Fashion-Tech sector to boost students’employability and fashion-tech innovation potential. This project specifically involves five renownedHigher Educational Institutions Academic partners (Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Design, ESTIAÉcole Supérieure Des Technologies Industrielles Avancées, Högskolan i Borås, University of the ArtsLondon - London College of Fashion, Technische Universiteit Delft), one Fashion-Tech research Centres(Centexbel) and seven industrial partners (Decathlon International, Pangaia Grado Zero, Pauline vanDongen, Pespow, Stentle / M-Cube Group, We Love You Communication, and PVH Europe). The aimof this project is to provide an evidence-based perspective on the Fashion-Tech education reporting onthe relationship between advanced teaching/learning approaches about design, business management,and engineering that can be applied to the future generation of fashion-tech professionals.This publication consists of five chapters presenting the learning experiences’ workflow starting fromthe research premises, the implementation, and evaluation, followed by a reflection on the results withconcluding remarks and future perspectives on Fashion-Tech education. Chapter 1 sets the premisesof the Fashion-Tech educational research, meanwhile, the following chapters (2,3,4) present the casestudies of the three piloted learning experiences describing the contents, objectives, and outcomes,reporting the methodology and lesson learned in terms of Fashion-Tech emerging topics, and reflectionson the phases of the didactic experiences. Each of these chapters is followed by visual charts thatpresent the results showcasing the portfolio of innovative Fashion-Tech concepts of products/servicesdeveloped during the learning experiences. Finally, chapter 5 sets out the findings and future trajectoriesfor Fashion-Tech education and collaboration. It discusses how the research findings led to setting thepremises for prospective scenarios of the Fashion-Tech education, which serve as an invitation to opena collaborative discussion on the future of Fashion-Tech educational models, collaborative engagementbetween different stakeholders of the sector, and all concerned about the skills of future Fashion-Techprofessionals.This publication contains the deliverable D2.2 Proofs of Concept for innovative FT products/services,in fulfillment of the European Project FTalliance Weaving Universities and Companies to Co-createFashion-Tech Future Talents (612662-EPP-1-2019-1-IT-EPPKA2-KA - FTall).

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Gustafsson, Kim
    We Love You Communication.
    Timour, Fredrik
    Swedish Fashion Council.
    Chkanikova, Olga
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Shaping the Future of Fashion2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report provides summary of insights on future Fashion–Tech business models and Fashion–Tech roles & skills to aid business model transformations.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Vellesalu, Ann
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Chkanikova, Olga
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Hjelmgren, Daniel
    Salomonson, Nicklas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Institutional re-configuration and value co-creation in circular product development: A service ecosystem perspective in the textile and apparel industry2023In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 414, article id 137682Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on circular product development has gained popularity in recent years. While such approaches focus on the product's design phase to create environmental and economic value, they lack in understanding the co-created and dynamic nature of a multifaceted system of actors important for the transition to circularity. The purpose is to explore how multi-level institutional re-configuration patterns influence resource integration and its associated value co-creation during circular product development in a service ecosystem. Responding to the need to address the applicability of Service-Dominant Logic to managerial practice, the paper relies on a single case study of circular product development involving B2B actors in a supply chain for workwear garments in healthcare. Data was collected using participant observation during an innovation project lasting 1,5 years. The data, which was supplemented by semi-structured interviews and online queries, was analysed through coding, condensation and interpretation. The findings demonstrate the importance of interdependencies between institutional re-configuration patterns and the interrelatedness of the micro, meso and macro levels in a service ecosystem as these enable value co-creation opportunities during circular product development. For practitioners, the paper provides an understanding of how to manage enablers and barriers arising during circular product development through institutional work.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7.
    Vellesalu, Ann
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Salomonson, Nicklas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Hjelmgren, Daniel
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Chkanikova, Olga
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Making, breaking and maintaining institutionalized rules of resource integration: enablers and challenges for circular product development in a B2B service ecosystem2022Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 7 of 7
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  • nn-NO
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