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  • 1. Haider, Jutta
    Controlling the urge to search. Studying the informational texture of practices by exploring the missing element.2017In: Information Research, Vol. 22, no 1, p. CoLIS paper 1613.-CoLIS paper 1613.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. This paper examines situations in which people restrict themselves in order to control their online searching and how this is negotiated. It is framed in a sociomaterial perspective taking account of the entanglement of information technology with its users and the conditions of its use. It contributes to a conceptual discussion of the sociomaterial shaping of the informational texture of issues and practices and of how online search is entangled across practices and situations. Method. The paper draws on empirical material from 21 focus groups with 127 participants carried out in Sweden 2014 and 2015. Analysis. The focus group conversations were transcribed and analysed using qualitative content analysis to establish returning themes. The present analysis cuts across these themes by tracing anecdotes of failed or restricted searches. Results. The following issues are discussed: notions of self-control to avoid surveillance, search as a 'conversation killer', as posing a risk for learning something unwelcome, of how not to be able to form the question, and of how to relate to being offline. Conclusion. The paper closes with a question joining methodological and theoretical concerns: How can we study identifiable information activities and objects as enmeshed across practices, while still considering their specific character as information activities?

  • 2. Haider, Jutta
    Interrupting practices that want to matter: The making, shaping and reproduction of environmental information online2012In: Journal of Documentation, Vol. 68, no 5, p. 639-658Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This article aims to explore construction, production and distribution of environmental information in social media. Specifically, the focus is on people's accounts in social media of their everyday life practices aimed at leading what are considered environmentally friendly lives. The article seeks to establish how through the reproduction of alignments of certain everyday and domestic practices with environmental destruction and protection situated information on the environment is constructed and made available. Design/methodology/approach: This study is based on a qualitative, interpretative analysis of content, materiality and form of blogs and of their enmeshed social media applications, dedicated specifically to aspects of environmentally friendly everyday life. The blogs were selected from an interlinked set of 60 Swedish language environment blogs. Findings: Formal, topical and social arrangements give priority to certain material conditions and practices that then underpin a set of dominant versions of a greener life, while others remain submerged. The routinised alignment of certain practices with the environment is indispensable for environmental information to work. However, breaking with routines and re-arranging practices is what makes them possible in the first place. De-routinisation and the culturally non-habitual character make for the informational value of material practices and of practices of engagement. Social implications: The study contributes to the understanding of what makes environmental information meaningful in everyday life. This has potential implications for policy making and information campaigns in the area. Originality/value: Environmental issues are an underrepresented area of research in LIS. This article contributes to the development of this research area in the field. Furthermore, uniting a practice approach with a theoretical interest in everyday life politics is a novel addition to studies of social engagement in online environments. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 3. Haider, Jutta
    Of the rich and the poor and other curious minds: On open access and "development"2007In: Aslib Proceedings: New Information Perspectives, Vol. 59, no 4-5, p. 449-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - The paper seeks to reconsider open access and its relation to issues of "development" by highlighting the ties the open access movement has with the hegemonic discourse of development and to question some of the assumptions about science and scientific communication upon which the open access debates are based. The paper also aims to bring out the conflict arising from the convergence of the hegemonic discourses of science and development with the contemporary discourse of openness. Design/methodology/approach - The paper takes the form of a critical reading of a range of published work on open access and the so-called "developing world" as well as of various open access declarations. The argument is supported by insights from post-development studies. Findings - Open access is presented as an issue of moral concern beyond the narrow scope of scholarly communication. Claims are made based on hegemonic discourses that are positioned as a priori and universal. The construction of open access as an issue of unquestionable moral necessity also impedes the problematisation of its own heritage. Originality/value - This paper is intended to open up the view for open access's less obvious alliances and conflicting discursive ties and thus to initiate a politisation, which is necessary in order to further the debate in a more fruitful way. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

  • 4. Haider, Jutta
    Open Access hinter verschlossenen Türen oder wie sich Open Access im und mit dem Entwicklungsdiskurs arrangiert2012In: Open Initiatives: Offenheit in der digitalen Welt und Wissenschaft, Vol. 59, p. 449-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines a number of dominant assumptions which underpin the Open Access movement. The notion of science in central documents of the Open Access movement is discussed and put in relation to the discourse of international development. This way it becomes obvious that Open Access indeed challenges parts of the scholarly communication system, that however the notions of knowledge and of science it draws on are largely anchored in a hegemonic discourse of development and progress.

  • 5. Haider, Jutta
    Openness as Tool for Acceleration and Measurement: Reflections on Problem Representations Underpinning Open Access and Open Science2018In: Open Divide.: Critical Studies on Open Access / [ed] Schöpfel, Joachim; Herb, Ulrich, Sacramento, CA: Library Juice Press , 2018, p. 17-28Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasingly open access emerges as an issue that researchers, universities, and various infrastructure providers, such as libraries and academic publishers, have to relate to. Commonly policies requiring open access are framed as expanding access to information and hence as being part of a democratization of society and knowledge production processes. However, there are also other aspects that are part of the way in which open access is commonly imagined in the various policy documents, declarations, and institutional demands that often go unnoticed. This essay wants to foreground some of these issues by asking the overarching question: What is the problem that open access is seen to solve represented to be? The paper will discuss how demands to open up access to research align also with an administrative enclosure and managerial processes of control and evaluation. It will show that while demands for free and open access to research publications - created or compiled in research processes funded by public money - are seen as contributing to the knowledge base for advancing society for a common good and in that sense framed as part of a liberating discourse, these demands are also expression of a shift of control of the science community to invisible research infrastructures and to an apparatus of administration as well as subscribing to an ideal of entrepreneurialism as well as continuing a problematic and much criticized understanding of Western science as universal.

  • 6. Haider, Jutta
    The structuring of information through search: sorting waste with Google2016In: Aslib Journal of Information Management, ISSN 1020150165, Vol. 68, no 4, p. 390-406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore informational structures producing and organising the construction of waste sorting in Sweden. It shows how the issue is constructed by it being searched for in Google and how this contributes to the specific informational texture of waste sorting in Sweden. It is guided by the following questions: who are the main actors and which are the central topics featuring in Google results on popular, suggested searches for waste sorting in Sweden? What do the link relations between these tell the author about the issue space that is formed around waste sorting in Sweden? How is the construction of the notions of waste sorting and waste shaped in the information available through Google ’ s features for related and other relevant searches? Design/methodology/approach – Waste sorting is discussed as a practice structured along moral rules and as a classification exercise. The study brings together two types of material, results from searches carried out in Google and lists of Google query suggestions for relevant search terms. These are analysed with a mixed method approach, uniting quantitative network analysis and qualitative content analysis of query suggestions. A sociomaterial approach theoretically grounds the analysis. Findings – Waste sorting in Sweden emerges as an issue that is characterised by dense networks of rules and regulation, focused in public authorities and government agencies, which in turn address consumers, waste management businesses and other authorities. Search engine use and waste sorting in Sweden are shown to be joined together in various mundane everyday life practices and practices of governance that become visible through the search engine in form of search results and suggested searches. The search engine is shown to work as a fluid classification system, which is also created and shaped by its use. Originality/value – The study offers a novel methodological approach to studying the informational structures of an issue and of its shaping through it being searched for. The sociomaterially grounded analysis of Google as a fluid classification system is original.

  • 7. Haider, Jutta
    et al.
    Kjellberg, Sara
    Data in the making: Temporal aspects in the construction of research data2016In: New big science in focus : Perspectives on ESS and MAX IV / [ed] Rekers, Josephine V.; Sandell, Kerstin, Lund: Lund Studies in Arts and Cultural Sciences , 2016, p. 143-163Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8. Haider, Jutta
    et al.
    Sundin, Olof
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Beyond the legacy of the Enlightenment? Online encyclopaedias as digital heterotopias.2010In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 15, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how we can understand contemporary participatory online encyclopaedic expressions, particularly Wikipedia, in their traditional role as continuation of the Enlightenment ideal, as well as in the distinctly different space of the Internet. Firstly we position these encyclopaedias in a historical tradition. Secondly, we assign them a place in contemporary digital networks which marks them out as sites in which Enlightenment ideals of universal knowledge take on a new shape. We argue that the Foucauldian concept of heterotopia, that is special spaces which exist within society, transferred online, can serve to understand Wikipedia and similar participatory online encyclopaedias in their role as unique spaces for the construction of knowledge, memory and culture in late modern society.

  • 9. Haider, Jutta
    et al.
    Sundin, Olof
    Lunds universitet.
    How do you trust? On infrastructural meaning-making and teh need for self reflection.2019In: Understanding Media and Information Literacy (MIL) in the Digital Age.: A question of Democracy - A question of Democracy / [ed] Ulla Carlsson, Gothenburg: University of Gothenburg and UNESCO , 2019, p. 107-112Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The chapter focuses on the notion of critical evaluation of information, which is an important part of media and information literacy (MIL). The concepts frictions of relevance and infrastructural meaningmaking are introduced to shed light on the information infrastructure’s significance for MIL in today’s digital media ecology. Furthermore, the chapter discusses some of the limitations inherent in placing theresponsibility for evaluating information predominantly on the individual, thus challenging the straightforward connection between MIL and democracy.

  • 10. Haider, Jutta
    et al.
    Sundin, Olof
    Invisible search and online search engines. The ubiquity of search in everyday life.2019Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Invisible Search and Online Search Engines considers the use of search engines in contemporary everyday life and the challenges this poses for media and information literacy. Looking for mediated information is mostly done online and arbitrated by the various tools and devices that people carry with them on a daily basis. Because of this, search engines have a significant impact on the structure of our lives, and personal and public memories. Haider and Sundin consider what this means for society, whilst also uniting research on information retrieval with research on how people actually look for and encounter information. Search engines are now one of society’s key infrastructures for knowing and becoming informed. While their use is dispersed across myriads of social practices, where they have acquired close to naturalised positions, they are commercially and technically centralised. Arguing that search, searching, and search engines have become so widely used that we have stopped noticing them, Haider and Sundin consider what it means to be so reliant on this all-encompassing and increasingly invisible information infrastructure. Invisible Search and Online Search Engines is the first book to approach search and search engines from a perspective that combines insights from the technical expertise of information science research with a social science and humanities approach. As such, the book should be essential reading for academics, researchers, and students working on and studying information science, library and information science (LIS), media studies, journalism, digital cultures, and educational sciences.

  • 11. Haider, Jutta
    et al.
    Sundin, Olof
    Lunds universitet.
    The fragmentation of facts and infrastructural meaning-making: New demands on information literacy2019In: Information research, ISSN 1368-1613, E-ISSN 1368-1613, Vol. 24, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a theory-driven discussion on the role of facts in society, couched between a brief historical overview and a discussion of the contemporary situation, exemplified in particular by openly available web-based fact services. Implications for the conceptualisation of information literacy – and in particular information literacy in relation to today’s dominant algorithmic information infrastructure – are considered throughout. Method. This is a conceptual paper where theoretical reasoning is accompanied by examples from a small empirical material. This material consists of the use and observation of three web-based fact services as well as expert interviews with three producers and one user of one of the services. In particular Hannah Arendt’s essay “Truth and politics” is drawn on to contextualise and understand the role of facts in society. Results. The web-based fact services investigated here facilitate and describe the creation of facts based on open data in a rather traditional way, i.e. by providing references and pointing to sources. However, the established facts are then inserted into today’s networked information landscape, which is an arena for competing knowledge claims working according to the market’s principles of popularity, and this leads to conflicting situations and poses new demands on information literacy. **Conclusions.**This paper suggests the need for a view of information literacy that accounts for infrastructural meaning-making at the same time as it enables the political dimensions of the way in which facts and factual information are created and valued in contemporary society to be taken seriously.

  • 12. Haider, Jutta
    et al.
    Sundin, Olof
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Wikipedia, heterotopi och versioner av kulturella minnen2011In: Human IT, ISSN 1402-1501, E-ISSN 1402-151X, Vol. 11, no 3Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article proposes a view of contemporary online encyclopaedias, specifically Wikipedia, as digital heterotopias. For this the article draws together studies on encyclopaedic expressions throughout history with Foucault's notion of heterotopia, i.e. actually existing utopias or 'other', particular spaces that exist besides society's regular spaces and which work according to their own rules. Furthermore, the article investigates Wikipedia as an archive for our cultural memory in its different – and often contested - versions. Participatory online encyclopaedias are hence framed as continuation of an Enlightenment ideal as well as distinct networked spaces that are made possible through the affordances of the Internet.

  • 13. Sundin, O.
    et al.
    Haider, Jutta
    The networked life of professional encyclopaedias: Quantification, tradition, and trustworthiness by Olof Sundin and Jutta Haider2013In: First Monday, Vol. 18, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims at making visible new orders of encyclopaedic knowledge by means of an ethnographic study carried out during eight months at the editorial office of the leading commercial encyclopaedia in Sweden, Nationalencyklopedin (NE). The investigation is framed in a socio-technical understanding of how people, technologies and practices relate to each other. Three themes were identified during the analysis: Organisation of labour amongst the editors, the use of statistics, and the contrast between NE as a producer of facts and NE as a producer of analysis. The analysis revolves around the ambivalence, uncertainty, sometimes even friction, between traditional encyclopaedic knowledge and network culture. The often routine-based practices of updating articles meet ideas of project work, of open data, of algorithms and most of all of quantification. 

  • 14.
    Sundin, Olof
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Library and Information Science.
    Haider, Jutta
    Debating Information Control in Web 2.0: The Case of Wikipedia vs. Citizendium2007In: Joining Research and Practice: Social Computing and Information Science / [ed] Andrew Grove, ASIS&T , 2007, Vol. 44Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15. Sundin, Olof
    et al.
    Haider, Jutta
    Andersson, Cecilia
    Carlsson, Hanna
    Kjellberg, Sara
    The search-ification of everyday life and the mundane-ification of search2017In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 73, no 2, p. 224-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to understand how meaning is assigned to online searching by viewing it as a mundane, yet often invisible, activity of everyday life and an integrated part of various social practices.

    Design/methodology/approach – Searching is investigated with a sociomaterial approach with a starting point in information searching as entangled across practices and material arrangements and as a mundane part of everyday life. In total, 21 focus groups with 127 participants have been carried out. The study focusses particularly on peoples’ experiences and meaning-making and on how these experiences and the making of meaning could be understood in the light of algorithmic shaping.

    Findings – An often-invisible activity such as searching is made visible with the help of focus group discussions. An understanding of the relationship between searching and everyday life through two interrelated narratives is proposed: a search-ification of everyday life and a mundane-ification of search.

    Originality/value – The study broadens the often narrow focus on searching in order to open up for a research-based discussion in information science on the role of online searching in society and everyday life. 

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