Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aarnikoivu, Melina
    et al.
    University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Mahon, Kathleen
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Agnafors, Marcus
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Hoffman, David
    Finnish Institute for Educational Research, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Angervall, Petra
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Another higher education journal - Really?2019In: Journal of Praxis in Higher Education, ISSN 2003-3605, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Angervall, Petra
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Doctoral supervision for career competition? Negotiating Social Capital in Research education.2018In: The Peaceful University: aspirations for academic futures, compassion, generosity, imagination and creation / [ed] Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Academic policy in Europe currently emphasizes efficiency and high performance along with ‘flexible entrepreneurialism’ and creativity in ways that can appear to be both contradictive and double edged on several levels in academic institutions (Ball, 2012; Bendix Petersen, 2009). The present paper relates to this aspect of higher education policy. It is based on a study with 52 research students on different doctoral programs in Education Sciences at six Swedish universities and asks questions about how these doctoral students understand, cope with and challenge different demands in their research education and what kind of relationship they have with their research supervisors. Supervisors constitute institutional and relational social capital in a double sense and are vital for how the research students' bond and link resources in research education (Putnam, 2001). As the data and analysis shows, in fact the students create directions and legitimacy in different practises (Nahapiet and Ghoshal, 1998) depending on the kind of social capital they have or gain access to: institutional or relational, individual-competitive or collective-horizontal and their social capital is thus related to what they can share collectively, such as in conferences, seminars and teaching. These activities help them to develop exchange and bonding value and form bridges between interests and networks; either horizontal or more vertical ones (e.g. influential contacts). Depending on the ‘academic value’ of the social capital of a research supervisor we see that these research students get access to specific and more or less ‘advantageous’ paths. Also, it appears as if social capital is unevenly shared and distributed between groups and individuals and is specifically related to gender (Moren Cross and Lin, 2008). This creates unequal conditions for men and women research students in research education.

  • 3.
    Angervall, Petra
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Gustafsson, Jan
    Högskolan Väst.
    Silfver, Eva
    Umeå Universitet.
    Academic Career: On institutions, social capital and gender2018In: Higher Education Research and Development, ISSN 0729-4360, E-ISSN 1469-8366, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 1095-1108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During decades of change in the Western higher education sector, new ways of understanding academic work have reinforced notions of the impact of social capital. The present study investigates researchers’ experiences of their own career making within two areas of Education Sciences in Swedish higher education: Childhood Studies (CS) and Science Education (SE). The structure at the CS departments is collaborative and integrated; teaching and research are seen as an entity. This structure creates a coherent career path where members of the collective group jointly produce and accumulate social capital; it also appears to be related to discourses of femininity. In the SE departments, the career structure is strategic and differentiated; the two career paths work in parallel through a differentiation between teaching and research. This appears to be related to discourses of masculinity. In conclusion, our analysis shows how social capital and gender mutually create different ways of doing an academic career.

  • 4.
    Angervall, Petra
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Mahon, KathleenUniversity of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.Agnafors, MarcusUniversity of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.Hoffman, David, M.Finnish Institute for Educational Research, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.Aarnikoivu, MelinaUniversity of Jyväskylä, Finland.
    Journal of Praxis in Higher Education (JPHE)2019Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This journal is dedicated to praxis in higher education. A key assumption underpinning the journal is that education is a moral and political activity and that higher education and its practitioners cannot free themselves from moral nor political considerations. However, this assumption comes with several commitments. Rather than standing only from the outside looking in, as in positioning science or research as more valuable or important, this journal calls for the importance of a reflexive inside perspective (cf. Kemmis 2012; Walzer 1987). This implies taking the present structures, conditions, traditions and values – both internal and external – seriously, but also in situ when researching higher education (cf. Bendix Petersen, 2014). The journal is committed to research aimed at the transformation of existing practices and conditions in higher education. In particular, it is promoting research that has a transformative potential including both practical and theoretical dimensions of educational work and higher education research. It is also committed to the idea that through education research, one can seek to both promote justice as well as the capacity of people to express agency, and increase the possibilities provided by society at large to its members (cf. Fraser 2009). 

    Research concerning praxis in higher education is thus both a theoretical position on a particular practice and itself an active engagement.  This journal welcomes contributions that are directly concerned with praxis in higher education or with research that is manifestly relevant to praxis in higher education.

    First issue 1(1) 2019:

    Editorial: ‘Another higher education journal—Really?’ By Melina Aarnikoivu, Kathleen Mahon, Marcus Agnafors, David M. Hoffman, and Petra Angervall

    Research articles:

    1. ‘A conceptual enquiry into communities of practice as praxis in international doctoral education’By Liexu Cai, Dangeni, Dely L. Elliot, Rui He, Jianshu Liu, Kara A. Makara, Emily-Marie Pacheco, Hsin-Yi Shih, Wenting Wang, and Jie Zhang

    2. ‘Organising the ‘industrialisation of instruction’: Pedagogical discourses in the Swedish Primary Teacher Education programme’By Lena Sjöberg

    3. ‘The work of university research administrators: Praxis and professionalization’By Sandra Acker, Michelle K. McGinn, and Caitlin Campisi

    4. ‘Teacher educators’ perceptions of their profession in relation to the digitalization of society’By Anna Roumbanis Viberg, Karin Forslund Frykedal, and Sylvana Sofkova Hashemi

  • 5.
    Angervall, Petra
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Silfver, Eva
    Umeå Universitet.
    Assembling lines in research education: Challenges, choices and resistance among Swedish doctoral students2019In: Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, ISSN 2398-4686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose:The higher education sector in Sweden has, over decades, faced increasing demands in terms of efficiency rates in research, as well as increasing demands in the international competition for external revenue. These demands have influenced academic career trajectories and post-doctoral tracks as well as the everyday work of doctoral students. The aim of this article is to investigate how doctoral students express and challenge subjectivity in the present context of research education. Design/methodology/approach: We depart from the overall understanding that doctoral students lines of actions in research education depend on and form assemblages, and thus define an academic institution. By re-analysing eight in-depth interviews we illustrate how doctoral students from different milieus comply but also challenge, use border-crossings and change directions in research education. Findings: The results show that some of these doctoral students try to act as loyal and satisfied, especially in regard to their supervisors, whereas others use coping strategies and resistance. It is illustrated that when some of the students use ‘unsecure’ molecular lines they appear more open to redefining possibilities and change, in comparison with those on more stable molar lines. Those acting on molar lines sometimes express a lack of emotional (productive) engagement, even though this particular group tend to more often get access to rewarded assemblages. These patterns are partly gender related. Research limitations/implications: The tension between finding more stable lines and spaces for change is apparent in doctoral students’ subjectivity, but also how this tension is related to gender. The women doctoral students appear more mobile but also in a sense more alert than their men peers. This offers insights in how actions define and redefine academic institutions, but also different subjectivities. Originality/value: In the present, given the manifold demands on academic institutions, new insights just as and methodological approaches are necessary to illustrate how contemporary changes affects research education and the everyday life of doctoral students.

  • 6.
    Angervall, Petra
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Simonsson, Angelica
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Assembling Gender Equality? Potentials and borders for gender equality work in Higher Education2019In: Rethinking Knowledge Regimes / [ed] Sekretariatet för genusforskning, Göteborg, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The policy changes of higher education in Sweden have resulted in a more individualized, specialized and measured academic work force (Ball, 2012; 2013). Through policy governance measures of performance, costs and time effectiveness, teaching quality, of work environment as well as of aspects of equality and justice, the intention has been to create a more effective and high performing academicinstitution (Blackmore, 2017). Leaving aside sparks of resistance, within the academe there is a strong consensus about the necessity, effectiveness and “neutrality” of standards through measurement. Previous studies (Alnebratt and Rönnblom, 2016) indicate that gender equality work in Sweden tends to express standards related to “objectivity”, but simultaneously involves activities that are political and transgressive. Therefore, there is a continuous need to investigate what kind of actions that are part of the realization of gender equality in the academe today. This study concerns the institutionalization of gender equality work within this context. How is gender equality work carried out in this academic landscape, and what does this work produce in terms of equality and the understanding thereof? By interviewing influential representatives and by observing how gender equality is realized in different contexts in the academe, we want to identify and deconstruct what we understand as gender equality assemblages (Liinason, 2017) and how they form, but also perform, gender equality in higher education (McPherson, 2015)Thus, in light of recent decades of policy changes, we are interested in what clusters of actions, interests, values or challenges that are involved in and directed to influence gender equality work, as well as their conceptual, practical and political implications for gender equality in higher education.

  • 7.
    Mellén, Johanna
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Angervall, Petra
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Gender and choice: Differentiating options in Upper secondary STEM programmes.2019In: Journal of education policy, ISSN 0268-0939, E-ISSN 1464-5106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extensive reforms of Sweden’s education system during the last few decades have resulted in deregulation and individualization of schools. In upper secondary education, a distinct flexible course structure with multiple options was introduced in order to enhance school effectiveness and equity. This study departs in some of the previously outlined tensions in educational research between market interests and a ‘free choice discourse’ in relation to processes of differentiation. The purpose of this article is to investigate the ways gender patterns may be reproduced in relation to the emergence of multiple options and the re-organization of subject matters within Swedish upper secondary science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. Our case addresses relations between discourses of choice and gender articulated in policy incentives, and large-scale enrolment patterns. Our results show how multiple options reproduce gender orders by 1) changing the system in accordance with a general market logic emphasizing ‘freedom of choice’, and 2) distinguishing predominantly gendered subject matters. Also, our results point to the importance of studying the STEM domain at a non-aggregated level to further understand the mechanisms behind gender gaps in STEM education.

  • 8.
    Morely, Louise
    et al.
    Centre for Higher Education and Equity Research (CHEER), University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.
    Angervall, Petra
    University of Gothenburg.
    Dodillet, Susanne
    Institutionen för pedagogik och specialpedagogik, Göteborgs universitet.
    Berggren, Caroline
    Institutionen för pedagogik och specialpedagogik.
    Re-purposing fika: rest, recreation or regulation in the neoliberalized Swedish University?2018In: European Journal of Higher Education, ISSN 2156-8235, E-ISSN 2156-8243, ISSN 2156-8235, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fika is the Swedish practice of assembling for a coffee break at work or home. This paper investigates the material, social and temporal investments in fika in accelerated and accountable organizational cultures, and asks what purpose it serves in neoliberalised academic employment regimes today. Analysis of our thirteen interviews with administrators and academics in a Faculty of Education in a large research-intensive Swedish university suggests that there are multiple interpretations of fika. Traditionally, fika has been used as a site for team-building, democratization, and well-being at work, but might have been re- purposed and incorporated in neoliberal surveillance and normalization technologies in which one’s corporate loyalty and interpersonal skills are made visible for assessment. We noted an affective and gendered economy with fika eliciting feelings of pleasure in the social and recreational aspects, but shame and anger at what was perceived as coercion to perform a particular type of sociable subjectivity.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf