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  • 1.
    Ferreira, Jorge
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Brancoli, Pedro
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Agnihotri, Swarnima
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    A review of integration strategies of lignocelluloses and other wastes in 1st generation bioethanol processes2018In: Process Biochemistry, ISSN 1359-5113, E-ISSN 1873-3298, Vol. 75, p. 173-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    First-generation ethanol plants offer successful, commercial-scale bioprocesses that can, at least partially, replace fossil fuels. They can act as platforms to integrate lignocelluloses, wastes and residuals when establishing 2nd generation ethanol. The present review gathers recent insights on the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic substrates into lot generation ethanol plants, through microbial conversion or cogeneration systems. It shows that, among different lot generation ethanol plants, sugar-based ethanol by-products, dominate integration studies characterized by strong techno-economic and life-cycle assessment components. In comparison, there are fewer studies that focus on grain-derived lignocellulosic residuals and other wastes. There is consensus that integrating second generation feedstocks into first generation plants can have positive techno-economic and environmental impacts. In addition to realizing production of ethanol from 2nd generation feedstocks, these possibilities can impact waste management by establishing relevant biorefineries and circular economy. They can also supply a wide range of renewable products. Considering the potential of this waste management strategy, further research on these and many other substrates is needed. This will shed light on the effect of the integration, the relevant types of microorganisms and pretreatments, and of other physical parameters on the effectiveness of running lot generation plants with integrated second generation feedstocks.

  • 2.
    Sárvári Horváth, Ilona
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    del Pilar Castillo, Maria
    RISE-Process and Environmental Engineering.
    Schnürer, Anna
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Agnihotri, Swarnima
    Ylitervo, Päivi
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Edström, Mats
    RISE- Process and Environmental Engineering.
    Utilization of Straw Pellets and Briquettes as Co-Substrates at Biogas Plants2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Biogas reactors can be utilized more efficiently when straw and food waste are digested together instead of separately. In the present study, straw in the form of pellets and briquettes has been used in experiments and calculations. Co-digestion of different substrates can give a more optimal substrate composition and a more efficient utilization of available digester volume. The pelleting and briquetting process has been shown to be an adequate pretreatment method of the straw. Digesting food waste and straw together showed synergistic effects with improved degradation of the food waste as well as a higher total volumetric methane production as compared to when food waste was used as the sole substrate. Energy produced through increased biogas production was higher than the energy needed for the pelleting and briquetting process. The positive effect in regard to gas production was mainly seen for the straw pellets, results supported by both chemical and microbiological analysis. These effects were observed in both mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. In conclusion, this study illustrates that straw is a suitable co-digestion substrate to food waste and can be used to improve gas yields as well as for more efficient utilization of the digester volume. These results show the biogas potential of straw, today not yet used as a substrate to a large extent.

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