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  • 1.
    Brancoli, Pedro
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Environmental impacts of food waste in a life cycle perspective: A case study in a Swedish supermarket2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The food production system has been acknowledged as a problem that needs to be addressed in order to achieve a sustainable society. Hertwich and Peters (2009), estimate that 10-30% of an individual’s environmental impact is related to the industrial production and consumption of food. The problem is aggravated by the wastage of one third of the global food production. The consequences of the wastage of food are the loss of resources, such as energy, water, land and labour and unnecessary emissions of pollutants.

    In order to address this problem several actions have been proposed. The Sustainable Development Goal 12.3, which Sweden has committed to fulfil, aims to reduce by half the amount of food waste along the production and supply chain by 2030.

    Retail is an important player in the food supply chain. Its influence spreads both upstream to suppliers and downstream to consumers. Therefore, this research aims to contribute to reduction of the environmental impacts related to food waste in retail, by identifying products with high environmental impacts. The main goals of this study are 1) the quantification of food waste produced by the supermarket and 2) to examine the environmental impacts of selected products in order to assess the impacts generated by the waste production at the supermarket.

    The findings of the research revealed 1) the importance of not only measuring the food waste in terms of mass, but also in terms of environmental indicators and costs. The results indicate bread as an important contributor for the environmental footprint of the supermarket and a potential product for interventions 2) Sorting the organic content of the products from its packaging before sending it to the current waste treatment leads to a reduction in the carbon footprint.

    The research identified the following recommendations: 1) increasing supermarket personnel and consumers’ awareness regarding the environmental impact of food waste, 2) finding alternative routes for waste treatment and 3) improving logistic operations.

  • 2.
    Brancoli, Pedro
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Life Cycle Assessment of Waste Management Systems2019In: Sustainable Resource Recovery and Zero Waste Approaches / [ed] Mohammad J. Taherzadeh, Kim Bolton, Jonathan Wong and Ashok Pandey, Elsevier, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Brancoli, Pedro
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. University of Borås.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Rousta, Kamran
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    LCA as a Supporting Tool for Supermarket Food Waste Management2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Brancoli, Pedro
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Rousta, Kamran
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Life cycle assessment of supermarket food waste2017In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, Vol. 118, p. 39-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Retail is an important actor regarding waste throughout the entire food supply chain. Although it produces lower amounts of waste compared to other steps in the food value chain, such as households and agriculture, it has a significant influence on the supply chain, including both suppliers in the upstream processes and consumers in the downstream. The research presented in this contribution analyses the impacts of food waste at a supermarket in Sweden. In addition to shedding light on which waste fractions have the largest environmental impacts and what part of the waste life cycle is responsible for the majority of the impacts, the results provide information to support development of strategies and actions to reduce of the supermarket's environmental footprint. Therefore, the food waste was categorised and quantified over the period of one year, the environmental impacts of waste that were generated regularly and in large amounts were assessed, and alternative waste management practices were suggested. The research revealed the importance of not only measuring the food waste in terms of mass, but also in terms of environmental impacts and economic costs. The results show that meat and bread waste contributes the most to the environmental footprint of the supermarket. Since bread is a large fraction of the food waste for many Swedish supermarkets, this is a key item for actions aimed at reducing the environmental footprint of supermarkets. Separation of waste packaging from its food content at the source and the use of bread as animal feed were investigated as alternative waste treatment routes and the results show that both have the potential to lead to a reduction in the carbon footprint of the supermarket.

  • 5.
    Brancoli, Pedro
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ferreira, Jorge A.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Changes in carbon footprint when integrating production of filamentous fungi in 1st generation ethanol plants2017In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrating the cultivation of edible filamentous fungi in the thin stillage from ethanol production is presently being considered. This integration can increase the ethanol yield while simultaneously producing a new value-added protein-rich biomass that can be used for animal feed. This study uses life cycle assessment to determine the change in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions when integrating the cultivation of filamentous fungi in ethanol production. The result shows that the integration performs better than the current scenario when the fungal biomass is used as cattle feed for system expansion and when energy allocation is used. It performs worse if the biomass is used as fish feed. Hence, integrating the cultivation of filamentous fungi in 1st generation ethanol plants combined with proper use of the fungi can lead to a reduction of GHG emissions which, considering the number of existing ethanol plants, can have a significant global impact.

  • 6.
    Brancoli, Pedro
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lundin, Magnus
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Eriksson, Mattias
    Bread loss rates at the supplier-retailer interface – Analysis of risk factors tosupport waste prevention measures2019In: Resources, Conservation and Recycling, ISSN 0921-3449, E-ISSN 1879-0658, p. 128-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper quantifies bread waste throughout the Swedish supply chain and investigates the loss rate of prepackagedbread products at the supplier-retailer interface. The goal is to understand the extent of bread waste inSweden and to identify risk factors for high quantities of waste at the supplier-retailer interface, in order toprovide information supporting waste prevention measures. The study uses primary data, in combination withnational statistics and data from sustainability reports and the literature. Primary data were collected from 380stores of a Swedish retail company and a bakery. Bread waste was calculated to be 80 410 tons/year in Sweden,the equivalent of 8.1 kg per person/year, and was found to be concentrated at households and in retail, specificallyat the supplier-retailer interface. The results provide evidence that take-back agreements between suppliersand retailers, where the retailer only pays for sold products and the supplier bears the cost of the unsoldproducts and their collection and treatment, are risk factors for high waste generation. Current business modelsmay need to be changed to achieve a more sustainable bread supply chain with less waste.

  • 7.
    Brancoli, Pedro
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. University of Borås.
    Rousta, Kamran
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Environmental impacts of supermarket food waste in a life cycle perspective2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Ferreira, Jorge
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Brancoli, Pedro
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Agnihotri, Swarnima
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    A review of integration strategies of lignocelluloses and other wastes in 1st generation bioethanol processes2018In: Process Biochemistry, ISSN 1359-5113, E-ISSN 1873-3298, Vol. 75, p. 173-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    First-generation ethanol plants offer successful, commercial-scale bioprocesses that can, at least partially, replace fossil fuels. They can act as platforms to integrate lignocelluloses, wastes and residuals when establishing 2nd generation ethanol. The present review gathers recent insights on the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic substrates into lot generation ethanol plants, through microbial conversion or cogeneration systems. It shows that, among different lot generation ethanol plants, sugar-based ethanol by-products, dominate integration studies characterized by strong techno-economic and life-cycle assessment components. In comparison, there are fewer studies that focus on grain-derived lignocellulosic residuals and other wastes. There is consensus that integrating second generation feedstocks into first generation plants can have positive techno-economic and environmental impacts. In addition to realizing production of ethanol from 2nd generation feedstocks, these possibilities can impact waste management by establishing relevant biorefineries and circular economy. They can also supply a wide range of renewable products. Considering the potential of this waste management strategy, further research on these and many other substrates is needed. This will shed light on the effect of the integration, the relevant types of microorganisms and pretreatments, and of other physical parameters on the effectiveness of running lot generation plants with integrated second generation feedstocks.

  • 9.
    Souza Filho, Pedro
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Brancoli, Pedro
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Zamani, Akram
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Techno-Economic and Life Cycle Assessment of Wastewater Management from Potato Starch Production: Present Status and Alternative Biotreatments2017In: Fermentation, Vol. 3, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Weidema, Bo
    et al.
    Aalborg University.
    Simas, Moana S.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    Schmidt, Jannick
    Aalborg University.
    Pizzol, Massimo
    Aalborg University.
    Løkke, Søren
    Aalborg University.
    Brancoli, Pedro
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Relevance of attributional and consequential information for environmental product labelling2019In: The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, ISSN 0948-3349, E-ISSN 1614-7502, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Considering the general agreement in the literature that environmental labelling should be based on consequential modelling, while all actually implemented environmental labelling schemes are based on attributional modelling, we investigate the arguments for this situation as provided in the literature, and whether a dual label, representing on the same label the attributional and consequential results for the same product, can be a relevant solution or at least contribute to a more informed discussion.

    Methods

    We developed a dual label for three hypothetical, comparable products and presented this for a small test audience, asking three questions, namely “Which product would you choose?”, “Was the attributional information useful?” and “Would you accept to have only the attributional information?”

    Results and discussion

    From this small pilot exercise, it appears that informed consumers may have a strong preference for consequential information and that the main problem in communicating consequential results is that they are perceived as less trustworthy and more uncertain due to the fact that the consequences are located in the future. It thus appears important to build into a consequential label some increased level of guarantee of future good behaviour.

    Conclusions

    We propose to apply the above questions to a more statistically representative audience to confirm or refute the findings of this little test exercise.

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