Change search
Refine search result
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bergnell, Anneli
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Cronqvist, Marita
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Fihn, Gunilla
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Kolback, Kerstin
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Pokka, Helena
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Welin Mod, Agneta
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Zimmerman, Fredrik
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Lärarutbildning och vetenskaplighet2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    [...]Lärarutbildningen vid Högskolan i Borås har alltså bedömts hålla hög kvalitet. Ett skäl till detta framgår av Högskoleverkets motiveringar och handlar om en god balans mellan vetenskaplig och professionsbaserad kompetens bland lärar-utbildarna. I den här rapporten ges ett smakprov på områden där enskilda lärare vid institutionen har fördjupade kunskaper och intressen. Utgångspunkten för artiklarna är texter skrivna inom ramen för en kurs, Lärarutbildning och veten-skaplighet, läsåret 2008-09. De sju artiklarna behandlar på olika sätt och med olika utgångspunkter och tillämpningar, relationen mellan teori och praktik, just den fråga som har varit, är och ständigt kommer att vara lärarutbildningens kärnfråga.

  • 2.
    Cronqvist, Marita
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Att undervisa etiskt: - i princip och praktik2018In: Läraren och yrkesetiken: Principer, värden och förhållningssätt i förskolans och skolans vardag / [ed] Sara Irisdotter Aldenmyr, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, 1:1, p. 85-101Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Cronqvist, Marita
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Didethics - a didactic model including professional ethics2017In: Nordisk Tidskrift för Allmän Didaktik, ISSN ISSN:2002-1534, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 68-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethics in teaching can be understood in different ways. In this article, ethics in teaching is interpreted as values that are expressed by the teacher through words or actions in interaction with students. Previous research has indicated that ethics in teaching with this meaning is difficult to recognize and verbalize. Professional ethics also seems to be randomized and built mostly on personal feelings. In an empirical study of professional ethics, data was analyzed in order to find the essence of the phenomenon professional ethics. The study indicated a lack of professional ethics in preparing and in following up teacher students for school-based training, in didactic plans and in dialogues with teacher educators in the field. This inspired the development of a didactic model, Didethics, in an attempt to make visible and to raise awareness of the importance of professional ethics in teaching. In this model, the essence of professional ethics according to the result of the empirical study becomes a part of didactics. Therefore, the implementation of the study and the result formulated as the essence of professional ethics is presented first, followed by the didactic model and descriptions of how it can be useful to future teachers.

  • 4.
    Cronqvist, Marita
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Etiskt ledarskap: Didaktik i förskola och skola2018 (ed. 1:1)Book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Cronqvist, Marita
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Leading ethically- learning practically2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leading ethically- learning practically

    In an empirical study about professional ethics as lived practice, student teachers and teacher educators both at campus and in field mention the teachers function as role model.

    The aim of the empirical study is to examine and provide a better understanding of how student teachers implicitly (in action) and explicitly (through statements orally and written) express and learn their ethical responsibilities and what their statements tell us about professional ethics. One of the questions is:

    •How does learning in professional ethics develop during the first semesters of teacher education?

    Ethics deals with what is “good” and “right” and is linked to various ethical dilemmas. Views on ethics as being normative and descriptive cannot be fully separated. However, in this study, the ethics referred to are chiefly descriptive since the student teachers talk about their own experiences.  Challenges in teaching assignments consist of different ethical dilemmas. A dilemma does not have a right answer (Husu & Tirri, 2003) but how to handle it depends on considerations and the teacher’s own judgment in relation to the actual situation.

    Previous research on teacher education and student teachers´ learning, relevant to this study, concerns the importance of dispositions and earlier experiences in teacher education (Johnson, 2008; Dottin, 2009; Sockett, 2009 & Schussler & Knarr, 2013), lifelong learning (Ranagården, 2009 & Strömberg, 2010) and connecting theory with practice (Gustavsson, 2008 & Eriksson, 2009). Many studies emphasize the importance of dealing with student teachers´ dispositions during teacher education. There seems to be a lack of awareness about how personal values and previous understandings affect education and the shaping of professional roles. Researchers demand a teacher education that systematically tends to student teachers´ self-consciousness and self-reflection about what values they express and that supports their use and development of different tools and strategies.

    This study is based on lifeworld theory.  Hence, intentionality and the natural attitude as parts of phenomenology and lifeworld theory are highly relevant.  When student teachers make new experiences during their teacher education, new understanding is built on the student teacher´s lifeworld, the way that the student teacher relates to and interacts with the world. Intentionality is when one directs ones awareness onto objects or events (Husserl, 1995/1907), meaning that when we experience something we experience it as something with a meaning. A person´s lifeworld is the sum of all meanings; it is impossible to escape but can be reflected upon (Husserl, 1995/1907). The natural attitude, to take things for granted in order to cope with daily situations (Husserl, 1970b/1936), explains why ethics in teaching situations often remain unspoken. When something is natural and unquestioned, the experiences are implicit. When a student-teacher meets children, the meeting is between different lifeworlds and the situation depends on what experiences both the children and the student-teacher bring with them. Through reflection and self-awareness, objects and events experienced as natural attitude can become conscious and open to study (Dahlberg, Dahlberg & Nyström, 2008).

    This study draws on the ethical responsibility thatbothLévinas (1993) andLøgstrup (1994) describe asinevitableandcrucial for a person in order tounderstand him- or herself. When meetinga child, there is an ethicalobligation and responsibility involved (Todd, 2001). Student teachers deal withthis responsibilityin different ways: by being passive or by acting on different options. Whether thestudent teacher is aware of thechoicesand howchoices are made is based onthe individual'slifeworldand the impacton the lifeworld that the teacher education may have.Alleducational activityisthusa process oflifeworlds constantly being shaped and reshaped.

    The methodology, RLR (Reflective Lifeworld Research), that this study is based on, emphasizes how the individual give meanings to phenomena and it is these meanings that the researcher is studying.

    Since earlier research has indicated that professional ethics are embedded in practice, this study examines how student teachers experience professional ethics during their school-based training.  Ten student teachers, with different orientations to preschool and Elementary school have been interviewed. In addition to interviews, empirical data consists of observations during student teachers´ meeting with children, dialogues with supervisors, seminars at campus, meetings with mentors and different kinds of written material during this period, for example didactic plans and diaries. The data collection was conducted during the student teachers´ second, third and fourth semester.

    All the interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. The respondents prepared the interviews in advance to talk about situations where the experience of the phenomenon appeared. An open approach during the interview includes bridling pre-understandings. Further, the bridling in this study is done by discussing the findings with colleagues and supervisor, by doing the analysis over a long period of time, and by analyzing in different stages. These stages entailed that I started looking for different meaning units in the data and marked them by comments in the margins of transcriptions. Out of my comments, I searched for meanings that seemed to belong to each other and structured patterns (clusters). In this process different parts of the data are constantly compared to the whole and the whole to the parts, iteratively, to see if the patterns remained convincing (Dahlberg et al., 2008). The different stages of analyzing makes it possible to go back in process and to check what was said and if it can be interpreted differently.

    As a part of the result, the function of the teacher as a role model was emphasized. When educators at campus and in field use this expression of leadership, they never explain what they mean. The meaning is implicit. However, student teachers also use this expression but explain what it means to them to be a role model. When student teachers experience their supervisor as a role model, descriptions of different ways of making good relations to the children are characteristic. Supervisors are asking questions about how children are feeling both in pre/school and at home. They address the children in the same way as they address colleagues. Another characteristic way to be a role model is to be present in the interaction with children. Supervisors manage to cope with the situation as it appears and are willing to disregard their planning when it is needed. They also manage to balance between being strict and to joke with the children, depending on the situation.

    Osguthorpe (2008) explains that the pedagogue needs to teach ethically as being a role model which is different from teaching ethics. How to educate student teachers to be role models for children is a complex undertaking that raises several questions (Sanderse, 2013). Student teachers sometimes know that they are role models but do not always realize what it means and how they make certain values visible in their actions (Schussler and Knarr, 2013). Their intentions, perceptions and practice are connected in teacher education and it is a highly relevant topic to all teacher educators both in Europe and in the rest of the world to discuss how teacher education can handle student teachers development to teach ethically, as role models.

    References

     

    Dahlberg, K., Dahlberg, H. & Nyström, M. (2008). Reflective life world research. 2. ed. Lund: Studentlitteratur.

     

    Dottin, E. S. (2009). Professional judgment and dispositions in teacher education, Teaching and teacher education 25(1), 83-88.

    Eriksson, A. (2009). Om teori och praktik i lärarutbildning: en etnografisk och diskursanalytisk

    studie. Diss. Göteborg : Göteborgs universitet, 2009.

    Tillgänglig på Internet: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/19352

    Gustavsson, S. (2008). Motstånd och mening: innebörd i blivande lärares seminariesamtal. Diss. Göteborg : Göteborgs universitet, 2008.

    Tillgänglig på Internet: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/17754

     

    Husserl, E. (1970/1936). The crisis of European sciences and transcendental phenomenology: an introduction to phenomenological philosophy. Evanston: Northwestern U.P.

     

    Husserl, E. (1995/1907). Fenomenologins idé. 2. uppl. Göteborg: Daidalos.

     

    Husu, J. & Tirri, K. (2003). A case study approach to study one teacher´s moral reflection, Teaching and Teacher Education, 19(3), 345-357.

    Johnson, L. E. (2008). Teacher candidate disposition: moral judgement, or regurgitation? Journal of moral education 37(4), 429-444.

     

    Lévinas, E. (1993). Etik och oändlighet: samtal med Philippe Nemo. 3., utök. uppl. Stockholm: B. Östlings bokförl. Symposion.

    Løgstrup, K. E. (1994). Det etiska kravet. Göteborg: Daidalos.

    Osguthorpe, R. D. (2008). On the Reasons We Want Teachers of Good Disposition and Moral Character. Journal of Teacher Education, 59(4), 288-299.

    Ranagården, L. (2009). Lärares lärande om elever: en sociologisk studie av yrkespraktik. Göteborg: Department of Sociology, Göteborg University.

     

    Sanderse, W. (2013). The meaning of role modeling in moral and character education.  Journal of moral education, 42(1), 28-42.

     

    Schussler, D., & Knarr, L. (2013). Building awareness of dispositions: enhancing moral sensibilities in teaching, Journal of Moral Education 42(1), 71-87.

  • 6.
    Cronqvist, Marita
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Lärarstudentens livsvärld - i forskning om etiskt ansvar2019In: Fenomenologi i praktiken: Fenomenologisk forskning i ett skandinaviskt perspektiv / [ed] Helena Dahlberg, Sidsel Ellingsen, Bente Martinsen, Susanne Rosberg, Stockholm: Liber , 2019, 1, p. 284-300Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta kapitel handlar om hur fenomenologisk forskning kan ge ny kunskap om vad det innebär att ta ansvar för barn i undervisning genom att ta del av lärarstudenters erfarenheter. Det handlar således om möten mellan livsvärldar i fenomenologisk forskning, forskarens möten med sina intervjupersoner i en intervjustudie och deras berättelser om sina möten med barn och VFU-lärare.

  • 7.
    Cronqvist, Marita
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Reflecting and Verbalizing Teaching – Supported by Didactic and Digital tools2019In: Beijing International Review of Education, ISSN 2590-2547, Vol. 1, no 2-3, p. 512-532, article id 2590-2539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In teacher education, it is problematic to intertwine theory and practice. It is also problematic that student teachers lack self-awareness about what values they express in their meetings with pupils. They need to reflect and verbalize their teaching experiences. In this article, results from a study in teacher education are presented from a development work where a combination of a didactic tool that visualizes ethics in teaching and a digital tool, video paper is tried. The purpose is to investigate how this combination can stimulate student teachers´ reflections on their teaching during their internship and through follow-up in the campus course. Findings indicate that the tools in themselves are not enough to bridge theory and practice. However, the tools can be helpful to teacher educators. Reflections presented in video papers are quite different in content, range and depth which are visualized through the questions of the didactic tool and by different typologies for reflection. The reflections show that there are many ways to verbalize ethics which raises questions about what it really means to visualize ethics.

  • 8.
    Cronqvist, Marita
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Samverkan: hur då?2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Som VFU-ansvarig så befinner jag mig ofta mitt i problematiken om hur teori och praktik kan förstås och hur sambandet kan se ut. Min främsta utmaning handlar om att upprätthålla en god kommunikation med alla berörda. Som VFU-ansvarig blir du en slags samordnare för högskolans lärare, studenterna, kommunens representanter och VFU-lärarna. Alla parter ska tillsammans ge studenterna en utbildning där teori och praktik kan mötas. Innan studenterna ska göra sin VFU så bjuds VFU-lärarna in till VFU-konferenser där syftet är att informera om kursen och om VFU, samt att erbjuda en föreläsning som ligger inom ramen för kursen. Detta är ett sätt att erbjuda VFU-läraren kompetensut-veckling och att stödja i VFU-uppdraget. Många gånger kan det vara dålig uppslutning till dessa konferenser och det är ett exempel på hur möjligheten att samverka mellan teori och praktik försvåras. Hinder som många VFU-lärare upplever är att det är svårt att lämna sin klass, rektorn är kanske inte så villig att sätta in vikarie och högskolan har krav från VFU-lärarnas fackliga organisa-tioner att inte lägga konferenserna utanför den normala arbetstiden. Det finns generellt en vilja att delta i en samverkan mellan profession och akademi men många gånger kan faktorer som man kan tycka är triviala, såsom att informa-tionen om vilken VFU-lärare som är inbjuden till vilken konferens är begriplig, bli reella hinder på vägen.

  • 9.
    Cronqvist, Marita
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    The combination of a didactic model, Didethics, and videopapers to visualize ethics in teaching2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A study of professional ethics in teacher education indicated that student teachers in their didactic plans mostly did not attend to ethics (Cronqvist, 2015) and therefore, a new didactic model could be needed. A didactic model called Didethics was created theoretically in order to visualize ethical aspects of teaching. Since ethics is embedded in all teaching, it is crucial to pay attention to ethics in planning, but also in implementation and follow-up, which the model does. The theoretical model Didethics was tried in practice in combination with videopapers, a multimodal text covering selected recorded video sequences with associated reflective texts. During student teachers´ school-based education they were filming some sequence when they were acting and then chose different clips and reflected on them in a paper. As a follow-up on campus, student teachers showed their clips and told about their reflections. As part of the work, student teachers were asked to use the clips to reflect on didactic questions from the model and the function of the model as a tool. The aim of this study is to try how the theoretically created didactic model, Didethics, functions in practice to visualize ethics. Student teachers´ videopapers are analyzed in order to find answers to the following questions:

    • How do student teachers use the model?
    • How does the model affect the expressions of ethics, implicit and explicit?
    • How do student teachers experience the didactic model, Didethics, in the education of children?
    • How do student teachers experience the didactic model, Didethics, in their own learning?

    Previous research on teacher education and students´ learning, relevant to the need to make ethics in teaching visible, is about the importance of students´ dispositions and earlier experiences in teacher education (Schussler & Knarr, 2013; Johnson, 2008; Sockett, 2009; Dottin, 2009).There seems to be a lack of attention to how dispositions and previous understandings influence education and the shaping of professional role. Researchers demand a teacher education that systematically attends to students´self-consciousness about what values they express and their judgment in context (Schussler, Stooksberry & Bercaw, 2010). Values verbalized by students are not always aligned to how they act in context (Johnson, 2008). They often enact values unaware of how children perceive their actions and therefore, self-awareness need to be supported (Schussler & Knarr, 2013).

    Lazarus & Olivero (2009) state that “videopapers are multimedia documents that integrate and synchronise video, images and text in one non-linear, cohesive document” (p 256). The combination of words and acting, seeing and verbalizing can be a useful tool in teacher education in order to visualize and make explicit tacit knowledge (Smith & Krumsvik, 2007). Ethics of teaching is often mentioned as tacit knowledge, both difficult to notice in actions and to verbalize. Therefore, the combination of the didactic model and videopaper is interesting to try.  Previous research in the area of teacher education has shown that videopapers can lead to increased reflection among the involved participants (Almås & Krumsvik, 2008; Smith & Krumsvik, 2007). They can also help bridging theory and practice (Lazarus & Olivero, 2009). In this study, videopaper is used as empirical data to examine how the didactic model, Didethics functions in order to visualize ethics. The ability of videopapers to represent practice is highly interesting.

    The combination of videopapers and the didactic model, Didethics, to visualize ethics in teaching, to find different strategies to support reflection and to bridge the gap between theory and practice makes the study most relevant to development of teacher education internationally.

    The study was implemented in a course in Swedish with focus on didactics for teachers working in grades 7-9 (pupils from 13 to 16 years old). This course is held in the second semester of teacher education but three of the students were in their sixth semester, studying together with students from the second semester out of economical reasons. Altogether, nineteen student teachers were participating.

    In preparation for the assignment, a combined lecture and workshop about the model was given. In the workshop, students made concrete planning of their teaching, using the model. Problems that occurred were that the students had not met their supervisors yet and therefore did not know if they were able to use the planning and no one of the supervisors participated in their own lecture about the model and therefore were not able to support the students in using the model. It is unclear how this affected student teachers´ abilities to use the model.  When students came back from school-based education, they got technical help to make clips from their recordings. Out of these clips, they wrote reflections on their choices of teaching methods, content, judgment and meanings of professional ethics.

    The analysis was made phenomenologically with the aim to understand the didactic model´s ability to visualize ethics in teaching as a phenomenon.  At first, videopapers were read carefully several times to get a grasp on the whole. Thereafter, meaning units out of research questions were marked for each paper (Dahlberg, Dahlberg & Nyström, 2008). The analysis was thereby moving from the whole to the part and then back to the whole again. Out of this movement in the analysis and the meaning units, a division was made, based on whether the model was mentioned, reflected on, if ethics or professional ethics were mentioned, if meanings of professional ethics could be identified more or less distinctly as they are formulated in the model and if meanings of professional ethics were mentioned even if connections to the model were missing. Papers without any connections to the model, ethics or meanings of professional ethics at all, were separated. Words in the markings of meaning units are “model”, “method” and “reflection” and these meaning units form patterns (clusters) in the material (Dahlberg et al., 2008).

  • 10.
    Cronqvist, Marita
    University of Borås, Faculty of Librarianship, Information, Education and IT.
    Yrkesetik i lärarutbildning - en balanskonst2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study is to examine and to increase the understanding of how student teachers implicitly (in action) and explicitly (through oral and written statements) express and learn professional ethics and what these expressions reveal about professional ethics. Previous research has indicated that professional ethics as phenomenon is difficult to separate and to view in the meeting between pedagogue and child. Professional ethics is often unspoken and based on personal feelings and not on formulated knowledge. In this study professional ethics is examined as the student teacher´s lived practice in the meeting with the child. The study is based on life-world theory and Reflective Life-world Research (RLR). This means for example that the phenomenon of professional ethics is examined as it present itself to student teachers and that the researcher must make efforts to be open to the phenomenon, reflect on it and to bridle preunderstandings. Ten student teachers with different orientations to preschool and elementary school have been followed, eight of them from second to fourth semester in periods when university courses and school-based education meet. Empirical data is collected from interviews, observations and different written statements. Findings are presented in three parts: Part 1 presents the issues for each individual student teacher. In part 2 the essence of professional ethics is formulated as seven elements of meaning: 1) that ambiguity requires an approach to responsibility, 2) that external factors can be obstacles, 3) that relationships and learning are interwoven, 4) that experiences should be for a child´s best interest, 5) that inclusion should be available to every child, 6) that authority should be exercised through an atmosphere of joy, respect and safety, and 7) that development occurs when theory and practice meet in reflection. Part 3 is a theoretical presentation. Reflection, self-reflection, judgment and student teachers as role models emerge as the primary tools of professional ethics. These tools are dependent on each other and intertwine cognition and emotion, experiences, theories and practice. In addition to the essence of professional ethics, my conclusion is that learning about professional ethics is based on the student teacher´s life world and takes place in a lifelong learning process. Consequently, teacher education needs to support meta-learning (learning how to learn) and build education on the student teacher´s individual life world as a resource. The student teachers as role models are developed through virtuous actions continuously being performed and through teacher educators acting as role models. Judgment and phronesis are also developed in practice through student teachers´ experiences of balancing between various factors in the complex situation. Since learning is developed in practice and from experiences, school-based education becomes valuable in order to stimulate learning. Another conclusion is that experiences must be discussed and analyzed thoroughly and systematically in education. In this process reflection is crucial. Based on the findings, a didactic model, Didethics, has been created in order to implement ethics in the same way as content (subject) and methods are included in didactics. Through asking questions, the model implements ethics, links it with content and methods and follows ethics through the planning, implementation and evaluation of the learning process.

  • 11.
    Cronqvist, Marita
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Education and Behavioural Science.
    Bredmar, Anna-Carin
    Att utveckla och bedöma lärarskicklighet genom dialog2013In: Doktorander som kreativa brobyggare. Centrum för Utbildningsvetenskap och Lärarforskning. Tema: Läraryrkets Praktik / [ed] Karin Rönnerman, Peter Erlandson, Unviersity of Gothenburg , 2013, p. 53-60Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf