Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Carbonaro, Simonetta
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Goldsmith, David
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Branding Sustainability: Business Models in Search of Clarity2014In: The Routledge Handbook of Fashion and Sustainability / [ed] Kate Fletcher and Mathilda Tham, Oxford: Routledge, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Carbonaro, Simonetta
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Goldsmith, David
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Fashion and The Design of Prosperity: A Discussion of Alternative Business Models2013In: The Handbook of Fashion Studies, Bloomsbury , 2013, p. 574-593Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract
  • 3.
    Goldsmith, David
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Local Fashionalities: Växbo Lin and WomenWeave2014Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Global Fashion, via the logic of high-speed, large-scale industrial production and anachronistic high-volume consumption habits, causes significant social and environmental damage. Local Fashion is understood as part of the Slow Fashion movement that aims to change the functions of fashion so that they support or lead the quest to flourish within known human and planetary boundaries. This Licentiate thesis examines, through an exploratory narrative based on new and existing research, two Local Fashionalities. Växbo Lin is a small linen manufacturer/brand in Hälsingland, Sweden, producing new heritage home textiles. WomenWeave is a handloom social enterprise in Madhya Pradesh, India, making naya khadi. Their approaches and practices are presented and discussed vis-à-vis notions of “globality”, “locality”, design management, and the quest for sustainability. The narrative aims to improve understandings of what Local Fashion is, and contribute to the effort to design new fashion systems grounded in logic relevant to contemporary human needs and aspirations.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 4.
    Goldsmith, David
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The Worn, The Torn, The Wearable: textile recycling in Union Square2012In: Nordic Textile Journal, ISSN 1404-2487, Vol. 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This narrative focuses on one aspect of the growing phenomenon of textile recycling: the act of “getting rid of” one’s no longer wanted clothing. The story here derives from many visits to Wearable Collections, a business that collects apparel (as well as towels, sheets, shoes, and other textiles) with an “inlet” at the popular Union Square Greenmarket in Manhattan. Over several months, I watched hundreds of individuals drop off thousands of kilos of materials for recycling and talked with many of them about what they were doing and why they were doing it. This investigation was undertaken for two purposes. On one hand, it was a device for practicing a variety of ethnographic field methods to support my current Ph.D. action research with enterprises aiming to build more sustainable fashion systems. On the other hand, it was a means to gain knowledge of what is happening with textile recycling in New York City. The pages that follow have been excerpted from a longer and broader account. The term textile recycling is used here broadly. It encompasses upcycling (for example, making a dress from old dresses, or producing yarn from trimmings from garment manufacturing); downcycling (such as shredding worn out textiles for insulation); practices such as selling, swapping, or giving away; and any other ways of reusing or repurposing that saves — or at least delays — textiles from being buried in landfills or otherwise wasted.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf