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  • 1. Bergström, Jenny
    et al.
    Clark, Brendon
    Frigo, Alberto
    Mazé, Ramia
    Redström, Johan
    Vallgårda, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Becoming materials: material forms and forms of practice2010In: Digital Creativity, ISSN 1462-6268, E-ISSN 1744-3806, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 155-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a result of development toward ‘smart’ materials, materials now enable an expanding range of aesthetic expressions and user experiences. These materials are fundamentally temporal in their capacity to assume multiple, discrete states of expression that can be repeatedly and minutely controlled. These materials come to be, or become, only over time and in context—they are becoming materials. Thus, in the development and application of such materials, we must engage more extensively with the experience of materials in practices of design and of use. This paper introduces and discusses the concept of becoming materials—as well as the implications for practice—through a series of examples from our own practice-led research within art, design and architecture. Coming to terms with the implications for material practices of design and of use, we suggest, requires the development of new concepts and methods for doing and studying the design of becoming materials.

  • 2.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Landin, Hanna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    An Interactive Textile Hanging: Textile, Context, and Interaction2012In: Studies in Material Thinking, ISSN 1177-6234, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents three scenarios in which we explore different possibilities for interactive textile hangings, textile hangings that are knitted and attached to servomotors. We have identified a series of variables that address the relationship between the expressions of the changeable pattern, created by rotating motors, and the unchangeable textile pattern. We use these variables, combined with contextual dichotomies, to discuss the relationships between the textile expression, the temporal expression, the place and the interactions for these scenarios.

  • 3.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Persson, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Stretch & Squeeze2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A computer mouse is a generic interaction tool designed for navigating graphical elements on a two dimensional plane. It is developed in a context of technology and formed to serve the ergonomics of the desktop work situation. A textile mouse, on the other hand, engages a different context. The textile alone evokes the traditions of clothes and home décor that will inevitably influence how it is perceived and consequently used.

  • 4. Fernaesus, Ylva
    et al.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    John Tharakan, Mili
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Lundström, Anders
    Touch and Feel Soft Hardware2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With soft hardware we refer to electronic components, coatings, and shells built from materials that make them elastic, flexible, floppy and malleable. By introducing new material properties into electronic and computational contexts we expect to open new paths for designing interactive things. Building electronics with textile and other soft materials may easily degrade elements such as speed, power, and storage capacities; however, these constraints can be acceptable if not down right desirable in these new contexts. We see how sensors, actuators, computers and even battery cells made of soft materials enables us to embed them into soft shapes that in turn afford certain forms of interaction. With the term soft hardware, we also highlight the interplay between computational and physical materials in interaction designs.

  • 5.
    Landin, Hanna
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    A Wall Hanging as an Organic Interface2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We are developing a dynamic textile wall hanging as an interface to the atmosphere of a room. Atmospheres are elusive. An atmosphere is the result of an ongoing negotiation between the activities in the room and the expression of the material objects, the lighting, the temperature, and the boundaries of the room [4, 8]. The wall hanging will play an active part in that ongoing negotiation. The activities in the room will influence how the textile wall hanging changes structure, form, color, as well as the pace with which it happens, and the activities in the room may in turn be influenced by the expression of the wall hanging.

  • 6.
    Nilsson, Linnéa
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Satomi, Mika
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Recurring patterns: Like textile2011Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Two pieces of interactive furniture were exhibited in the exhibition "Like Textile" as a part of Milan design week, 12-17 of April 2011. The print on the surface of the furniture can change its expression over time, or in relation to someone touching or sitting on the surface. The prototypes were developed in a project called Recurring patterns, where we explore the process of designing dynamic patterns over time.

  • 7.
    Nilsson, Linnéa
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Satomi, Mika
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Recurring patterns: Stockholm furniture fair2011Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Two pieces of interactive furniture were exhibited at the Stokholm furniture fair, 8-12 of February 2011. The print on the surface of the furniture can change its expression over time, or in relation to someone touching or sitting on the surface. The prototypes were developed in a project called Recurring patterns, where we explore the process of designing dynamic patterns over time.

  • 8.
    Nilsson, Linnéa
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Satomi, Mika
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Understanding the complexity of designing dynamic textile patterns2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through a smart textile design project we have identified two sets of complex issues generally relevant for design with state changing materials. Specifically, we show how the temporal dimension of smart textiles increase the complexity of traditional textile design variables such as form and colour. We also show how the composite nature of smart textiles creates a series of interdependencies that make the design of the textile expressions additionally complex. We discuss how these forms of complexity provide opportunities as well as challenges for the textile expressions, and we show how we dealt with them in practice.

  • 9.
    Nilsson, Linnéa
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Designing with Smart Textiles: a new research program2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    No longer is it sufficient to add ‘smart’ to textiles to secure interesting research results. We have surpassed the initial stages of explorations and testing and now need to raise the bar. We have thus specified a research program in which we investigate what it means to design with smart textiles. What can we design with smart textiles? And how do we design with smart textiles? We now explore how these complex, often abstract, materials can enter traditional design practices and what role smart textile can play in the design of our environment. In this paper, we discuss the challenges we see at present, we outline our new research program and we qualify it through three examples of our ongoing projects: The smart textile sample collection, Dynamic textile patterns, and Bonad [tapestry]. The paper is as much an invitation to join forces, as it is a description of a maturing process within design research. We are over the first love, now what?

  • 10.
    Satomi, Mika
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Nilsson, Linnéa
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Recurring Patterns2011Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What if your furniture expresses appreciation when you sit on them? Or what if they call for attention if they have been empty for too long? Textiles always change expression over time due to use and exposure to sunlight, moist, etc. The textile on these pouffes changes expressions in a dynamic interplay with their use. A bright pattern is gradually revealed when someone sits on them but hid again when they stand idle by. In other words, their patterns are recurring in both space and time.

  • 11.
    Satomi, Mika
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Nilsson, Linnéa
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Recurring Patterns2011Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What if your furniture expresses appreciation when you sit on them? Or what if they call for attention if they have been empty for too long? Textiles always change expression over time due to use and exposure to sunlight, moist, etc. The textile on these pouffes changes expressions in a dynamic interplay with their use. A bright pattern is gradually revealed when someone sits on them but hid again when they stand idle by. In other words, their patterns are recurring in both space and time.

  • 12.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Sokoler, Tomas
    A Material Strategy: Exploring Material Properties of Computers2010In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As design problems are inherently indeterminate or wicked, we have to rely on various strategies when practicing design. In this paper, we propose a material strategy that emphasizes the expressional potential of computers. We argue how computers, in principle, can be understood as a material for design and how they can be part of a formgiving practice. We embark on the beginning of establishing a practical understanding of the computer as a material by articulating a number of material properties of computers. Two of these properties, computed causality and connectability, are given shape through material samples of a computational composite. The composite is in the form of a copper tile of which the computer controls the thermodynamic behavior. The material strategy proposed here which produced dramatic results is still in its infancy, but by adopting a material understanding of computers and beginning to embody the space of opportunities it unfolds, we take the first steps towards a new way of designing computational objects and architectures.

  • 13.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Sokoler, Tomas
    Material Computing: Computational Materials2010In: Ubicomp '10 The 2010 ACM Conference on Ubiquitous Computing, ACM , 2010, p. 383-384Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Embedding computers into our environment is perhaps not only a job for computer scientist and engineers. We propose to understand the computer as a material for design as means to invite artists, architect, and designers to participate in envisioning how and where the computational power can be used. We will invite the conference attendees to (once again) think about how to bridge the so-called gap between computational and material properties but this time using a material rather than the traditional information centric perspective. The invitation is extended through hands-on experiences with our two samples of computational composites.

1 - 13 of 13
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