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  • 1.
    Bondas, Terese
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Photography as a Data Collection Method in Intensive Care2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The suffering patient is thrown into a strange and unfamiliar environment of different technological devices in an Intensive care unit. The intensive room is a place for care and treatment, for rest and recovery, a visiting room, and a working place for the staff. In this context patients and relatives are very vulnerable and are in a need of support. Patients may suffer from unreal experiences, often very traumatic during their stay in ICU and many patients also suffer from unpleasant memories, and some develop post traumatic stress after their discharge. In order to design optimal rooms in ICU it would be important to identify factors which are meaningful for the patients and relatives. The aim of this study, as part of a larger research project, is to illuminate patients’ and relatives’ experiences of the physical room, the design and the interior in the ICU. Photographs combined with interviews are used as data collection methods within the ICU-context. Relatives and former patients are asked to photograph different aspects of the room that they remember or associate with a feeling. The pictures were used later during an interview with the informants. In total the researcher meets the informants three times, first time to inform, the second time to take the photos and a third time for the interview. This method gives the researcher opportunity to deepen the understanding and capture aspects of the room that otherwise might have been hidden. The presentation will focus on photography as a research method.

  • 2.
    Egerod, Ingrid
    et al.
    University of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet.
    Kaldan, Gudrun
    University of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Saetre Hansen, Britt
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Stavanger University Hospital.
    Froulund Jensen, Janet
    Department of Anesthesiology, Holbæk Hospital.
    Oxenboll Collet, Marie
    Department of Intensive Care 4131, Copenhagen University Hospital.
    Halvorsen, Krisitin
    Department of Nursing and Health Promotion, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo Metropolitan University.
    Eriksson, Thomas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    Jensen, Hanne Irene
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Vejle and Middelfart Hospitals.
    Trends and recommendations for critical care nursing research in the Nordic countries: Triangulation of review and survey dataIn: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Priorities for critical care nursing research have evolved with societal trends and values. In the 1980s priorities were the nursing workforce, in 1990s technical nursing, in 2000s evidence-based nursing and in 2010s symptom management and family-centred care.

    Objectives

    To identify current trends and future recommendations for critical care nursing research in the Nordic countries.

    Methods

    We triangulated the results of a literature review and a survey. A review of two selected critical care nursing journals (2016–2017) was conducted using content analysis to identify contemporary published research. A self-administered computerised cross-sectional survey of Nordic critical care nursing researchers (2017) reported current and future areas of research.

    Results

    A review of 156 papers identified research related to the patient (13%), family (12%), nurse (31%), and therapies (44%). Current trends in the survey (n = 76, response rate 65%) included patient and family involvement, nurse performance and education, and evidence-based protocols. The datasets showed similar trends, but aftercare was only present in the survey. Future trends included symptom management, transitions, rehabilitation, and new nursing roles.

    Conclusion

    Critical care nursing research is trending toward increased collaboration with patient and family, delineating a shift toward user values. Recommendations include long-term outcomes and impact of nursing.

  • 3.
    Gabre, Marita
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    'A little good with the bad': Newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients' perspectives onself-care: A phenomenological approach2018In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased knowledge is needed about what self-care means from the patients’ perspective, especially since the patient population with type 2 diabetes has been rising. The aim was to describe self-care, as experienced by patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. This study adopted a phenomenological approach. Eight patients were interviewed. A combination of photos and interviews were used. The essential meaning of self-care was found to be an existential struggle that evokes feelings of being in-between one’s old unhealthy life and a new healthier one. In this in-between condition, tension exits between contradictorily emotions of anxiety, hopelessness and hope. This struggle also means questioning one’s identity. It is important that diabetes nurses create an opening for reflection and dare to challenge their patients to reflect on this existential struggle.

  • 4. Lepp, M
    et al.
    Jehad, HO
    Olausson, Sepideh
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Learning Through Drama in the Field of Global Nursing2011In: Applied Theatre Researcher, ISSN 1443-1726, no 12, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how nurses (nurse educators, and doctoral and masters students) from three countries experienced learning through drama in the field of nursing education. In this era of internationalisation, there is an urgent need to prepare nurses with global perspectives. This qualitative study builds on the fourteen participants’ involvement in a drama workshop and their related reflective journals, which were the subject of a quality content analysis. Two categories and five sub-categories emerged in the analysis of the participants’ journals. This study has implications for nursing education and curriculum activities in nursing programs related to the preparation of nurses with a global perspective using drama as core pedagogy. Through drama, participants can access their lifeworlds and share them with one another. Drama makes the experience-based knowledge visible, and in addition develops knowledge about a certain topic depending on the group’s background and contribution.

  • 5.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Det känslomässiga rummet: närståendes upplevelser från intensivvårdsrummet2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Intensivvårdsrummets betydelse för vårdande och välbefinnande: patienters närståendes och vårdpersonalens erfarenheter2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The overall aim of the thesis was to illuminate the meanings of intensive care units’ patient rooms as a place of care for critically ill patients and their loved ones. Moreover, it was aimed to develop photovoice as a data collection method for research in ICU context. Methods and materials: Data has been collected using photovoice methodology in combination with research interviews for all three empirical studies. In total 37 people participated. Nine patients, fourteen loved ones and fourteen nurses from three ICU settings. Study I examined the perspective of loved ones, for this purpose a phenomenological hermeneutic method rooted in the philosophy of Ricoeur was chosen. Study II and III examined patients’ respectively nurses’ perspective. Both studies are phenomenologically orientated guided by a reflective lifeworld approach rooted in continental philosophy. Study IV is a theoretical paper focusing on employing photovoice as a data collection method in ICU context. Main findings: The tone and touch of caring is vital for how ICU patient room is materialized for patients. The interior design and furnishing has a great impact on the wellbeing of the loved ones and also the support they can offer the critically ill patient. One major finding is that the ICU patient room is a taken for granted place for health care providers and the impact of it upon caring, patients’ and loved ones wellbeing is not reflected over. It also seems unclear who is responsible for the environment of ICU once it has been built. The environment of ICU affects nurses’ ability to care for the patients and their family in a genuine way and to promote their wellbeing during a fragile time in life. Conclusions: There is an urgent need to translate research findings into clinical practice in order to improve the environment of ICU patient rooms. There is also need of further research and policies for transforming the hostile environment of the patient rooms to a healing environment more conductive to people’s recovering process.

  • 7.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Photography as a data collection method in ICU2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    The importance of the patient room in Intensive and Critical Units, ICU2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Engwall, Marie
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Johansson, L
    Evidenced-based and sustainable design in a high tech hospital environment: a challenge for the future2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Intensive care unit (ICU) is the place of care for the most critically ill patients in hospitals. According to previous research the ICU environment can have a negative impact on the patients’ recovery process. Critical illness together with constant nursing activities, strong lightning and noise especially in patient’s room are believed to affect patients’ physiological parameters and wellbeing negatively. Research has addressed the role of the environment in relation to the development of the most common side-effect of care in ICU, namely ICU delirium. In addition, there is a limited access to single rooms in Swedish ICUs. This means that patients with various diagnoses, gender and age are treated together in the same room. Moreover, as many ICUs in Sweden are aged and in need of renewals, in order to meet the demand of contemporary intensive care, several restoration projects are planned in the following years. Aspects mentioned above have raised questions about how an intervention of the physical environment in an ICU could benefit the patients and their families. A literature search showed that there is little research about the impact of the physical environment on patients’ health in this context and that there is a lack of reliable long term studies focusing on the relationship between the physical environment, health and recovery. Therefore this project was initiated by two experienced researchers, Professor I, Bergbom at the University of Gothenburg and Associate professor B, Lindahl at the University College of Borås, with the purpose to investigate if an intervention in the physical environment in an ICU patient room can improve patients’ recovery process and wellbeing. The project has an exploratory and descriptive design. The intervention is located at an ICU, in Western Sweden and implicates a rebuilt patient room. The refurbished room (experimental room) is equipped with sound absorbents behind the walls and ceiling, a cycled lighting system and a new interior decoration. An identical room has remained intact (control room), which makes it possible to compare data from two different environments. All research questions will be related to the sound environment, the light environment and the esthetic layout. The results from this project will be useful in the context of ICU, but also in other high tech environments. The aim of this paper is to provide a description of the intervention project and present findings generated from a sound environment study.

  • 10.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ekebergh, Margareta
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    The ICU patient room: Views and meanings as experienced by the next of kin: A phenomenological hermeneutical study2012In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 176-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rooms in Intensive Care Units are considered as high-tech environments and believed to affect recovery process and wellbeing of patients. Moreover, the design and interiors affect the interplay between the patient and the next of kin. Objective The aim of this study was to describe and interpret the meanings of the intensive care patient room as experienced by next of kin. Design Next of kin (n = 14) from two different intensive care units participated. Data were collected through photo-voice and analysed using aphenomenological hermeneutical method. Results Three major themes emerged; dwelling in the room and time, becoming at home and extension of the room. The results show that the room is perceived as a lived and extended place and space. The design, interiors and furnishing in the patient room are fundamental in shaping the next of kin's experiences in the room and affect wellbeing. Conclusions How intensive care patient rooms are designed, the place given to next of kin and the way they are received in the room are decisive for the support given to the loved one. Simple interventions can make the patient room a more healing environment.

  • 11.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    A phenomenological study of being cared for in a critical care setting: The meanings of the patient room as a place of care.2013In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 234-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary Previous research highlights the impact of care and treatment in ICUs on the patient recovery process and wellbeing. However, little is known about how the interior design in the ICU settings may affect patients’ wellbeing. Objective The aim of this study is, by using a lifeworld perspective, to reveal the meanings of the ICU settings as a place of care. Design Nine patients from three ICUs in Sweden participated. Data were collected using photo-voice methodology and were analysed using a reflective lifeworld phenomenological approach. Results The ICU setting as a place of care for critically ill patients is a complex and multidimensional phenomenon. The place is constituted of patients, staff and technical equipment. The struggle for life and occurrences taking place there determine how the room is perceived. The tone and touch of caring together with interior design are fundamental for the room as lived. The room is experienced in various moods; a place of vulnerability, a place inbetween, a place of trust and security, a life-affirming place, a place of tenderness and care and an embodied place. Conclusion Promoting patients’ well-being and satisfaction of care involves integrating a good design and a caring attitude and paying attention to patients’ needs.

  • 12.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Giving voice to loved ones: Using photo-voice as a data collection method in ICU2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is a place of care for the most critically ill patients. The ICU rooms are considered to be one of the most complicated rooms to design. Providing successful intensive care requires that human, technologies and spatial resources are integrated in a rigorous way. Research shows that being a patient or next-of-kin in ICU is a traumatic experience not only because of the illness but also because of one’s human existence is threatened. Literature suggests that the presence of next-of-kin and the design of ICU affect the patients’ recovery and wellbeing.

  • 13.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Patient safety in relation to the design of the patient room2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    he demographic changes in Western countries, with an aging population and medical and technological progresses, have meant an increased demand on treating multi-morbid patients in intensive care units (Rashid, 2006). Intensive care room is the core of all activities in providing care for the most critically ill patients. According to European Society of intensive Care Medicine, providing a safe and high quality care requires an integration of human, technological and spatial recourses. The patient rooms in ICU are usually crowded places, characterized by high prevalence of stressors such as high levels of sound and strong lighting and constant activity with a negative effect on the patients’ recovery process. Previous research indicates that the design of patient rooms in ICU can be one of the causes of developing ICU delirium (Dubois, Bergeron, Dumont, Dial och Skrobik 2001). Furthermore, it is highlighted that there is an increase risk of medical errors in ICU environment due to high levels of sound (Christensen, 2002). Patient safety means preventing suffering or damages of any kind, caused by the health care provider or due to milieu related factors. The design and interior of ICU can have an impact on the patient safety and treatment outcomes. The presentation will focus on how design and interior of ICU rooms can meet the demands of patient safety.

  • 14.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Photo-Voice as a Data Collection Method in ICU2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The demographic changes in Western countries, with an aging population and medical and technological progresses, have meant an increased demand on treating multi-morbid patients in intensive care units (Rashid, 2006). Intensive care room is the core of all activities in providing care for the most critically ill patients. According to European Society of intensive Care Medicine, providing a safe and high quality care requires an integration of human, technological and spatial recourses. The patient rooms in ICU are usually crowded places, characterized by high prevalence of stressors such as high levels of sound and strong lighting and constant activity with a negative effect on the patients’ recovery process. Previous research indicates that the design of patient rooms in ICU can be one of the causes of developing ICU delirium (Dubois, Bergeron, Dumont, Dial och Skrobik 2001). Furthermore, it is highlighted that there is an increase risk of medical errors in ICU environment due to high levels of sound (Christensen, 2002). Patient safety means preventing suffering or damages of any kind, caused by the health care provider or due to milieu related factors. The design and interior of ICU can have an impact on the patient safety and treatment outcomes. The presentation will focus on how design and interior of ICU rooms can meet the demands of patient safety.

  • 15.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    The ICU patient room: Views and meanings as experienced by the next of kin2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intensive care unit, ICU, is considered to be one the most complicated area for care of critically ill patients. The rooms in ICU are small and narrow and the high tech environment believes to affect patients and next-of-kin wellbeing. Previous research reveals that a large number of patients suffer from unreal experiences, often very traumatic during their stay in ICU. Unpleasant memories and risk of developing post traumatic stress after discharge from ICU is rather common. In this context next-of-kin play an important and crucial role for supporting the patient though the process of illness and recovery. Next-of-kin in ICU are considered to be a lifeline for patients. Furthermore, the design and interiors of ICU affect the interplay between the patient and the next-of-kin.

  • 16.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Almerud Österberg, Sofia
    Patient safety in relation to the design of the patient rooms in Intensive Care Units: Staff’s lived experiences of their working environment in high technological settings2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Sundberg, Fredrika
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Fridh, Isabell
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Olausson, Sepideh
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Room Design - A Phenomenological-Hermeneutical Study: A Factor in Creating a Caring Environment.2019In: Critical Care Nursing Quarterly, ISSN 0887-9303, E-ISSN 1550-5111, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 265-277, article id 31135477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Medical technology has progressed tremendously over the last few decades, but the same development cannot be seen in the design of these intensive care unit environments. Authors report results of a study of evidence-based room design, emphasizing the impact on conveying a caring attitude to patients. Ten nonparticipant observations were conducted in patient rooms with 2 different designs, followed by interviews. The data were analyzed using a phenomenological-hermeneutical approach. The results did not reveal that it was obvious that redesigned spaces resulted in a more caring attitude. The meanings of caring displayed during nursing activities were interpreted by interpreting gazes. Some of the nursing staff had an instrumental gaze, interpreted as caring with a task-orientated approach, while others communicated their caring with an attentive and attuned gaze, where the needs of the patients regulated the working shift. The study findings indicated that caring may not be perceived when nurses use a task-oriented approach. However, when nurses practice a person-centered approach, using an attentive and attuned gaze, caring is conveyed. Caring in intensive care contexts needs to be assisted by a supportive environment design that cultivates the caring approach.

  • 18.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Halabi, JO
    Abdalrahim, MS
    Olausson, Sepideh
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lepp, M
    Learning Through Drama in th Field of Global Nursing2012Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 18 of 18
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