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  • 1.
    Andersson, R.
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Ekwall, Daniel
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Torstensson, H.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Revised guidelines on intermodal transfer techniques needs and technologies2004Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Deliverable 2.2 of the Intermode-TRANS project presents a first version of guidelines on intermodal transfer techniques needs and technologies. The guidelines are based on an initial investigation of joint European projects and other sources, as well as on discussions with researchers and stakeholders, the results of which were presented in Deliverable 2.1 - State of art on intermodal transfer techniques. A series of workshops with stakeholders and experts in intermodal transport and transshipment facilities and techniques brought a number of additional identified problems and research needs,. Principally, the workshops confirmed the findings of D2.1, which therefore form the core also of these guidelines. The guidelines include a summary of more than 24 joint European research projects, addressing intermodality, where several results have not yet become exploited. Identified areas of development and recommendations for further work address a.o. technology for transshipment, including container standards and handling, harmonization of rail infrastructure and rail and road vehicles, marketing and knowledge management in the field, information systems for logistics support, training and awareness-raising, the cost vs. benefit structure, and a number of actions of a political and organizational nature.

  • 2.
    Andersson, R
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Eriksson, H
    Torstensson, H
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Similarities and differences between TQM, six sigma and lean2006In: TQM Magazine, ISSN 0954-478X, E-ISSN 1758-6887, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 282-296Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Andersson, R.
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Ottosson, T.
    University of Borås, Professional Services. University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Larsson, J.
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    A Case Study: A quality approach to managing supply chain risks.2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Andersson, Roy
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Kombination av ledningsfilosofier bäst.2007In: Intelligent logistik, ISSN 1653-9451, Vol. 2, p. 23-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Andersson, Roy
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Kvalitet ger cost cutting. Ericssons erfarenheter2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Andersson, Roy
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Quality-driven logistics2007Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall objective of this thesis is to describe and explain how different quality management philosophies can be combined in the supply/demand chain, in order to contribute to its resilience. The analysis is both quantitative and qualitative, based on theory and literature related to TQM, Lean, Agile and Six Sigma, one literature study and three case studies that were performed in companies. The studies are related to four research questions and are presented in four papers. The first research question focuses on similarities and differences between the quality management concepts TQM, Lean and Six Sigma. The findings were that TQM, Six Sigma and Lean have many similarities, but they differ in some areas. For examples Lean addresses process flow and waste, whereas Six Sigma addresses variation and design. The conclusion is that there is a lot to gain if organisations are able to combine these three concepts, as they are complementary. Two case studies and a literature survey supported the findings. The second research question focuses on outcomes in a logistics process if using quality management. The findings were that the quality management approach leads to risks being mitigated, managed and monitored and ensures a more effective, robust and flexible process, very much in line with the Agility philosophy. Solutions for quicker response to customers have also been introduced. The findings were supported by two case studies in seven companies. The third research question focuses on how prepared the transport- and logistics-oriented companies are for the application of quality concepts and quality management philosophy. The findings were that they can be described as being TQM-oriented. The companies do not consider Lean and Six Sigma to be future trends. Focus is on the customer, while they do not focus on variations or removing waste. The findings were supported by a case study in 24 companies. The fourth research question focuses on how quality concepts can contribute to risk control and resilience in an organisation. A combined Lean/Six Sigma approach by using Six Sigma framework and the last phase, Perfection, in the Lean concept, implies that the companies’ resilience, due to their strengthened ability to handle variability, risk management and agility, was improved. The findings were supported by two case studies in seven companies.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Roy
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Quality-driven logistics today and tomorrow2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Andersson, Roy
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Supply chain resilience through quality management2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The length and complexity of the supply chain tend to increase, rather than diminish, thereby making the supply chain riskier and less predictable and, hence, more vulnerable. At the same time, customers are becoming increasingly demanding. The challenge to businesses today is to create a resilient supply chain in order to manage and mitigate risk and vulnerability. The purpose of the thesis is to explore, describe and develop the use of a combined quality management philosophy in logistics processes in order to improve supply chain resilience. The findings are supported by six studies, which are presented here in six papers. The studies show that there is a lot to gain if organisations are able to combine quality management philosophies, as they are complementary to one another. TQM places its strongest emphasis on the commitment and involvement of all employees. Lean is a discipline that focuses on process speed and removal of waste in order to increase customer value. Six Sigma benefits from an added focus on variability and design of products/services and processes. It has been indicated that a combined quality management philosophy makes the logistics processes more reliable, flexible, agile and robust while reducing cost. The companies’ risk awareness has increased and their risk management has been improved, thanks to the Six Sigma training programmes and philosophy. Using a combined quality management philosophy, the speed of production could be increased, and the responsiveness and flexibility could be improved, which means quicker response to changes. It has also been indicated that a combined quality management philosophy improves the companies’ resilience, due to their increased agility and strengthened ability to handle variability and risk management. Quality management tools can be very effective in the companies’ efforts to control supply chain risk and to identify risk sources of variation, even outside the focal company. In Six Sigma projects, the root cause of variation is often found outside the focal companies, which requires more collaboration in the supply chain. However, if the companies that use a combined quality management philosophy intend to become more resilient, they must involve suppliers and customers more in their own processes and design products/services and processes together. Collaboration with the suppliers and customers and the notion of how to extend a combined quality management philosophy outside the focal company are of importance in order to make the whole supply chain resilient. This could lead to a problem, especially since the conditions for transport and logistics in regards to the application of quality methods and tools represent a large area, unexploited by the companies. On the other hand, Six Sigma has standardised training courses, and it has been demonstrated how a Six Sigma framework can enable collaboration across companies’ boundaries in the supply chain, with the use of Six Sigma training and the DMAIC-roadmap as a common platform. Even if a combined quality management philosophy is effective and efficient, the companies must re-invest in additional methods, tools and strategies to make the entire supply chain resilient. It could be this re-investment in risk prevention and mitigation solutions that enables faster process responsiveness, the establishment of a risk management culture by creating common values, culture and rules in the supply chain and the use of logistics strategies and methods.

  • 9.
    Andersson, Roy
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Överträffa kundernas förväntningar2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Hammerberg, P
    A six sigma framework enabling collaboration across company boundaries in supply chain.2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Torstensson, Håkan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    How to Integrate Suppliers by Training in Lean Thinking2013In: / [ed] Dahlgaard Park, Su Mi, Dahlgaard, Jens, Gomišček, Boštjan, University of Maribor , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Much research has addressed how to implement lean in a focal company, but little has been published about how to integrate suppliers in strategies and the focal company’s culture, such as lean production or lean thinking. The purpose of the article is to investigate if suppliers can become more integrated in the supply chain by training in lean thinking at the focal company and to explain a possible structure of the training. Design/methodology/approach: A multiple-case study has been conducted of the focal com- pany and five of its supply companies. The findings are supported empirically by on-site interviews and by observations, as well as by a binomial two-proportion test that was used to analyse the statistical data of the delivery precision. Findings: While the training programme does not show a conclusive result for the supply chain, it has made a difference for all participating suppliers. In most cases the training programme was a trigger that started or boosted the internal work with continuous improvements. In some cases it helped create structured ways of working and improved the internal production flows.

  • 12.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Månsson, Bo
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Yar Hamidi, Daniel
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Resilience in the supply and demand chain a new management strategy2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The length and complexity of the supply chain tend to increase, rather than diminish, thereby making the supply chain riskier and less predictable and, hence, more vulnerable. At the same time, customers are becoming increasingly demanding. The challenge to businesses today is to create a resilient supply chain in order to manage and mitigate risk and vulnerability. The purpose of this paper is to describe the use methods and tolls from quality and logistics can improve supply chain resilience. There are five principles that characterise supply chain resilience: risk management culture, agility, design-and innovation-led organisations, collaboration and spreading and anchoring of the vision, goal, values and methods. Using a combined quality management philosophy, the speed of process could be increased, and the responsiveness and flexibility could be improved, which means quicker response to changes. It has also been indicated that a combined quality management philosophy improves the companies’ resilience, due to their increased agility and strengthened ability to handle variability and risk management. Quality management tools can be very effective in the companies’ efforts to control supply chain risk and to identify risk sources of variation, even outside the focal company.

  • 13.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Torstensson, A
    A combined quality approach to controlling supply chain risk2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14. Ericsson, Evelina
    et al.
    Andersson, Roy
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Interview survey of DFSS adoption in large enterprises2010In: 13th International QMOD Conference, Cottbus, Germany, August 30-SeptemberArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Andersson, Roy
    Jönköping University.
    Lantz, Björn
    Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers.
    Total productive maintenance in support processes: an enablerfor operation excellence2015In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 1042-1055Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to stay competitive in today’s marketplace, it is vital to reduce activities that do

    not create value. Lean production has in the last decade been seen as a philosophy to

    reduce non-value time. The office environment often presents a major improvement

    opportunity to reduce non-value time. Lean contributes positively to business

    performance applied in a manufacturing context and is also suggested to do the

    same in a service context. The purpose of the paper is to analyse and determine how

    total productive maintenance (TPM) can be applied within the support process and

    to identify effects from an employee and business perspective. A case study has

    been performed and a qualitative research approach was selected. Empirical data

    were gathered by using semi-structured interviews at one case company, but from

    several teams that had applied TPM. The result was then used as an inductive

    approach to explore how TPM can be applied in a support process. To implement

    and apply TPM within an office context, it should be structured in three steps

    (i) define, (ii) implement and (iii) sustain. TPM should be conducted as a part of the

    ordinary day-to-day work. The planning and discussions connected to TPM can be

    included in regular daily departmental ‘stand-up meetings’ involving everybody. The

    work with 5S and maintenance should also be a part of the TPM structure,

    connecting it as a system and not as an isolated activity. TPM can create value from

    both a business and an employee perspective. In the employee perspective, TPM

    reduces the risk of missing/forgetting areas of responsibility and creates more

    involvement. In the business perspective, objectives such as cost and quality are

    improved, but TPM also enables the reduction of waste.

  • 16.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Andersson, Roy
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Torstensson, Håkan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Organisational resilience through crisis strategic planning: a study of Swedish textile SMEs in financial crises of 2007–20112012In: International Journal of Decision Sciences, Risk and Management, ISSN 1753-7169, E-ISSN 1753-7177, Vol. 4, no 3/4, p. 314-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global financial crises of 2007–2011 have created tremendous impact on Swedish organisations, particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). In such a context, study of organisational resilience, to survive and thrive, becomes increasingly significant. Key to economic resilience is upheld by crisis management (CM), business continuity planning (BCP) and growth perspectives. Thus crisis strategic planning (CSP) becomes fundamental in underpinning resilience. The study categorises resilient and less resilient SMEs in terms of their financial performance, and identifies what strategies differentiate them. Resilient firms showed better short-term CM through higher operational flexibility, while the less resilient firms lacked strategic readiness. Resilient firms showed more long-term strategies through BCP and growth strategies through market penetration, diversification and transformational initiatives. Multi-strategic initiatives help to develop CSP model, categorising firms along different resilience types, characterised by low and high degrees of planning and adaptation, respectively. Resilient Swedish SMEs mostly showed planned resilience in financial crises.

1 - 16 of 16
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