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  • 1.
    Brancoli, Pedro
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ferreira, Jorge A.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Changes in carbon footprint when integrating production of filamentous fungi in 1st generation ethanol plants2017In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrating the cultivation of edible filamentous fungi in the thin stillage from ethanol production is presently being considered. This integration can increase the ethanol yield while simultaneously producing a new value-added protein-rich biomass that can be used for animal feed. This study uses life cycle assessment to determine the change in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions when integrating the cultivation of filamentous fungi in ethanol production. The result shows that the integration performs better than the current scenario when the fungal biomass is used as cattle feed for system expansion and when energy allocation is used. It performs worse if the biomass is used as fish feed. Hence, integrating the cultivation of filamentous fungi in 1st generation ethanol plants combined with proper use of the fungi can lead to a reduction of GHG emissions which, considering the number of existing ethanol plants, can have a significant global impact.

  • 2. Bátori, Veronika
    et al.
    Ferreira, Jorge A
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ethanol and Protein from Ethanol Plant By-Products Using Edible Fungi Neurospora intermedia and Aspergillus oryzae2015In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2015, no nov23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Feasible biorefineries for production of second-generation ethanol are difficult to establish due to the process complexity. An alternative is to partially include the process in the first-generation plants. Whole stillage, a by-product from dry-mill ethanol processes from grains, is mostly composed of undegraded bran and lignocelluloses can be used as a potential substrate for production of ethanol and feed proteins. Ethanol production and the proteins from the stillage were investigated using the edible fungi Neurospora intermedia and Aspergillus oryzae, respectively. N. intermedia produced 4.7 g/L ethanol from the stillage and increased to 8.7 g/L by adding 1 FPU of cellulase/g suspended solids. Saccharomyces cerevisiae produced 0.4 and 5.1 g/L ethanol, respectively. Under a two-stage cultivation with both fungi, up to 7.6 g/L of ethanol and 5.8 g/L of biomass containing 42% (w/w) crude protein were obtained. Both fungi degraded complex substrates including arabinan, glucan, mannan, and xylan where reductions of 91, 73, 38, and 89% (w/v) were achieved, respectively. The inclusion of the current process can lead to the production of 44,000 m(3) of ethanol (22% improvement), around 12,000 tons of protein-rich biomass for animal feed, and energy savings considering a typical facility producing 200,000 m(3) ethanol/year.

  • 3.
    Fazelinejad, Somayeh
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ferreira, Jorge A.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Brandberg, Tomas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Fungal biomass and ethanol from lignocelluloses using Rhizopus pellets under simultaneous saccharification, filtration, and fermentation (SSFF)2016In: Biofuel Research Journal, ISSN 2292-8782, Vol. 9, p. 372-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The economic viability of the 2nd generation bioethanol production process cannot rely on a single product but on a biorefinery built around it. In this work, ethanol and fungal biomass (animal feed) were produced from acid-pretreated wheat straw slurry under an innovative simultaneous saccharification, fermentation, and filtration (SSFF) strategy. A membrane unit separated the solids from the liquid and the latter was converted to biomass or to both biomassand ethanol in the fermentation reactor containing Rhizopus sp. pellets. Biomass yields of up to 0.34 g/g based on the consumed monomeric sugars and acetic acid were achieved. A surplus of glucose in the feed resulted in ethanol production and reduced the biomass yield, whereas limiting glucose concentrations resulted in higher consumption of xylose and acetic acid. The specific growth rate, in the range of 0.013-0.015/h, did not appear to be influenced by the composition of the carbon source. Under anaerobic conditions, an ethanol yield of 0.40 g/g was obtained. The present strategy benefits fromthe easier separation of the biomass from the medium and the fungus ability to assimilate carbon residuals in comparison with when yeast is used. More specifically, it allows in-situ separation of insoluble solids leading to the production of pure fungal biomass as a value-added product. (C) 2016 BRTeam. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Ferreira, Jorge
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Integration of filamentous fungi in ethanol dry-mill biorefinery2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The industrial production of bioethanol as a replacement to gasoline is well-established worldwide, using starch- or sugar-rich substrates. Additionally, the bioethanol plants produce animal feeds derived from fermentation leftovers. The biorefinery character of bioethanol plants can be enhanced via process diversification. This entails the production of more value-added products, which can be accomplished by including edible filamentous fungi as the second biocatalysts while taking advantage of the available equipment for cost-effective inclusion. The process diversification can be achieved either via valorisation of the process leftovers or via inclusion of other residual substrates.

     

    In dry-mill biorefineries, baker’s yeast is unable to consume residual pentose sugars and other more complex substrates in the process leftovers so called whole stillage and thin stillage. Edible ascomycetes and zygomycetes fungi can be used to accomplish yeast and consume those residual substrates in stillage as well as from external substrates of lignocellulosic origin, e.g. spent sulphite liquor and wheat straw. The conversion of these substrates to ethanol, and biomass rich in protein, lipids, respective essential amino acids and fatty acids as well as chitosan was investigated in this thesis.

     

    Among the filamentous fungi studied, Neurospora intermedia was the best ethanol producer from thin stillage. Process developments included primary shake-flasks experiments, followed by pilot scale-up using 26 L, 2.3 m3 and 80 m3 bioreactors. The 26 L bioreactor, as a bubble column led to similar performance as an airlift bioreactor, and also a continuous mode could be successfully used instead of a batch process. By using a dilution rate of 0.1 h-1, around 5 g/L of ethanol and 4 g/L of biomass rich in protein, lipids, amino acids and fatty acids essential to humans were obtained. The inclusion of the process can potentially lead to a spent medium lower in solids and viscosity which may facilitate the energy-intensive evaporation and drying steps as well as the water recycling back to the process. By applying a two-stage cultivation with whole stillage, up to 7.6 g/L of ethanol could be produced using 1 FPU cellulase/g suspended solids and 5.8 g/L of biomass containing 42% (w/w) crude protein. In the first stage (ethanol production), N. intermedia was used, while Aspergillus oryzae was the biocatalyst in the second stage for further biomass production. Both strains were able to degrade complex substrates both in liquid and solid fraction of whole stillage. The extrinsic substrates included spent sulphite liquor and pretreated wheat straw slurry. When the former was used, up to around 7 g/L of Rhizopus sp. could be obtained in a 26 L airlift bioreactor. The biomass was rich in protein and lipids (30–50% and 2–7% on a dry weight basis, respectively). The monomers of the latter were continuously filtered for production of biomass under simultaneous saccharification fermentation and filtration. Biomass yields of up to 0.34 g/g of consumed monomeric sugars and acetic acid were obtained.

     

    The inclusion of the process for valorisation of thin stillage can potentially lead to the production of 11,000 m3 ethanol and 6,300 tonnes of biomass at a typical facility producing 200,000 m3 ethanol/year.

  • 5.
    Ferreira, Jorge A.
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Edebo, Lars
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Zygomycetes-based biorefinery: Present status and future prospects2013In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 135, p. 523-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fungi of the phylum Zygomycetes fulfil all requirements for being utilized as core catalysts in biorefineries, and would be useful in creating new sustainable products. Apart from the extended use of Zygomycetes in preparing fermented foods, industrial metabolites such as lactic acid, fumaric acid, and ethanol are produced from a vast array of feedstocks with the aid of Zygomycetes. These fungi produce enzymes that facilitate their assimilation of various complex substrates, e.g., starch, cellulose, phytic acid, and proteins, which is relevant from an industrial point of view. The enzymes produced are capable of catalyzing various reactions involved in biodiesel production, preparation of corticosteroid drugs, etc. Biomass produced with the aid of Zygomycetes consists of proteins with superior amino acid composition, but also lipids and chitosan. The biomass is presently being tested for animal feed purposes, such as fish feed, as well as for lipid extraction and chitosan production. Complete or partial employment of Zygomycetes in biorefining procedures is consequently attractive, and is expected to be implemented within a near future.

  • 6.
    Ferreira, Jorge A.
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Niklasson, Claes
    Lundin, Magnus
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Edebo, Lars
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Spent sulphite liquor for cultivation of an edible Rhizopus sp.2012In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 173-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spent sulphite liquor, the major byproduct from the sulphite pulp production process, was diluted to 50% and used for production of an edible zygomycete Rhizopus sp. The focus was on production, yield, and composition of the fungal biomass composition. The fungus grew well at 20 to 40°C, but 32°C was found to be preferable compared to 20 and 40°C in terms of biomass production and yield (maximum of 0.16 g/g sugars), protein content (0.50-0.60 g/g), alkali-insoluble material (AIM) (ca 0.15 g/g), and glucosamine content (up to 0.30 g/g of AIM). During cultivation in a pilot airlift bioreactor, the yield increased as aeration was raised from 0.15 to 1.0 vvm, indicating a high demand for oxygen. After cultivation at 1.0 vvm for 84 h, high yield and production of biomass (up to 0.34 g/g sugars), protein (0.30-0.50 g/g), lipids (0.02-0.07 g/g), AIM (0.16-0.28 g/g), and glucosamine (0.22-0.32 g/g AIM) were obtained. The fungal biomass produced from spent sulphite liquor is presently being tested as a replacement for fishmeal in feed for fish aquaculture and seems to be a potential source of nutrients and for production of glucosamine.

  • 7.
    Ferreira, Jorge A.
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Airlift bioreactors for fish feed fungal biomass production using edible filamentous fungi2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Airlift bioreactors are generally considered to be better alternatives for cultivation of filamentous fungi in comparison to stirred-tank bioreactors or bubble columns bioreactors. The reason for the former includes fungal growth around all internal parts including impellers, baffles or pH, temperature and oxygen probes limiting mass transfer, whereas the latter is limited by air flow rates that can be applied before the system provides deficient mixing and so mass transfer rates. Spent sulphite liquor, a by-product from the paper pulp industry, was used for cultivation of edible Rhizopus sp., a strain isolated from Indonesian tempeh used as human food, using a 26 L airlift bioreactor. Increasing the aeration rate from 0.15 to 1 vvm led to increased biomass production (1 vs 7 g/L). The aeration rate was also found to influence fungal morphology and metabolite production during batch cultivation. Rhizopus sp. shifted from mycelial suspensions at 0.15 and 0.5 vvm to small compact pellets of regular size at 1 vvm. The production of ethanol and lactic acid, a proof of sub-optimal aeration conditions, was also reduced when increasing the aeration rate from 0.15 to 1 vvm. The produced biomass was found to be composed, on a dry weight basis, of 30-50% protein, 2-7% lipids, and 3-9% glucosamine. Considering the edible character of the fungus used as well as its biomass nutritional characteristics, there is a potential for its use as fishmeal replacement within the increasing aquaculture sector.

  • 8.
    Ferreira, Jorge A.
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Airlift bioreactors for fish feed fungal biomass production using edible filamentous fungi2017In: FFBiotech Symposium, University of Lille, Villeneuve d'Ascq, France, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Ferreira, Jorge A.
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Improving the biorefinery "status" of ethanol plants with edible filamentous fungi2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Ferreira, Jorge A
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Production of ethanol and biomass from thin stillage by Neurospora intermedia: A pilot study for process diversification2015In: Engineering in Life Sciences, ISSN 1618-0240, E-ISSN 1618-2863, Vol. 15, no 8, p. 751-759Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dry mill ethanol processes produce ethanol and animal feed from whole grains,where the wastewater after the distillation and separation of solid materials is called“thin stillage.” In this work, similar production of ethanol (3.5 g/L) and biomass(5 g/L) from thin stillage was obtained during batch cultivation of the edible fungusNeurospora intermedia in a 2-m high airlift reactor and bubble column. The fungalbiomass, containing 50% w/w protein and 12% w/w lipids, was rich in essentialamino acids and omega-3 and -6 fatty acids. In a continuousmode of fermentation,dilution rates of up to 0.2 h−1 could be applied without cell washout in the bubblecolumn at 0.5 vvm. At 0.1 h−1, around 5 g/L of ethanol and 4 g/L of biomasscontaining ca. 50% w/w protein were produced. The fungus was able to assimilatesaccharides in the liquid fraction as well as sugar backbones such as xylan andarabinan in the solid fraction. The inclusion of the current process could potentiallylead to the production of 11 000 m3 of ethanol (5.5% improvement vs. normalindustrial process) and around 6300 tons of high-quality biomass for animal feed ata typical facility producing 200 000 m3 ethanol per year.

  • 11.
    Ferreira, Jorge A.
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Production of Ethanol and Biomass from Thin Stillage Using Food-Grade Zygomycetes and Ascomycetes Filamentous Fungi2014In: Energies, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 3872-3885Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A starch-based ethanol facility producing 200,000 m3 ethanol/year also produces ca. 2 million m3 thin stillage, which can be used to improve the entire process. In this work, five food-grade filamentous fungi, including a Zygomycete and four Ascomycetes were successfully grown in thin stillage containing 9% solids. Cultivation with Neurospora intermedia led to the production of ca. 16 g·L−1 biomass containing 56% (w/w) crude protein, a reduction of 34% of the total solids, and 5 g·L−1 additional ethanol. In an industrial ethanol production process (200,000 m3 ethanol/year), this can potentially lead to the production of 11,000 m3 extra ethanol per year. Cultivation with Aspergillus oryzae resulted in 19 g·L−1 biomass containing 48% (w/w) crude protein and the highest reduction of the thin stillage glycerol (54%) among the Ascomycetes. Cultivation with Rhizopus sp. produced up to 15 g·L−1 biomass containing 55% (w/w) crude protein. The spent thin stillage had been reduced up to 85%, 68% and 21% regarding lactic acid, glycerol and total solids, respectively. Therefore, N. intermedia, in particular, has a high potential to improve the ethanol process via production of additional ethanol and high-quality biomass, which can be considered for animal feed applications such as for fish feed.

  • 12.
    Ferreira, Jorge A.
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Mahboubi, Amir
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Waste biorefineries using filamentous ascomycetes fungi: Present status and future prospects2016In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 215, no sept, p. 334-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Filamentous ascomycetes fungi have had important roles in natural cycles, and are already used industrially for e.g. supplying of citric, gluconic and itaconic acids as well as many enzymes. Faster human activities result in higher consumption of our resources and producing more wastes. Therefore, these fungi can be explored to use their capabilities to convert back wastes to resources. The present paper reviews the capabilities of these fungi in growing on various residuals, producing lignocellulose-degrading enzymes and production of organic acids, ethanol, pigments, etc. Particular attention has been on Aspergillus, Fusarium, Neurospora and Monascus genera. Since various species are used for production of human food, their biomass can be considered for feed applications and so biomass compositional characteristics as well as aspects related to culture in bioreactor are also provided. The review has been further complemented with future research avenues.[on SciFinder (R)]

  • 13.
    Ferreira, Jorge
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Brancoli, Pedro
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Agnihotri, Swarnima
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    A review of integration strategies of lignocelluloses and other wastes in 1st generation bioethanol processes2018In: Process Biochemistry, ISSN 1359-5113, E-ISSN 1873-3298, Vol. 75, p. 173-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    First-generation ethanol plants offer successful, commercial-scale bioprocesses that can, at least partially, replace fossil fuels. They can act as platforms to integrate lignocelluloses, wastes and residuals when establishing 2nd generation ethanol. The present review gathers recent insights on the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic substrates into lot generation ethanol plants, through microbial conversion or cogeneration systems. It shows that, among different lot generation ethanol plants, sugar-based ethanol by-products, dominate integration studies characterized by strong techno-economic and life-cycle assessment components. In comparison, there are fewer studies that focus on grain-derived lignocellulosic residuals and other wastes. There is consensus that integrating second generation feedstocks into first generation plants can have positive techno-economic and environmental impacts. In addition to realizing production of ethanol from 2nd generation feedstocks, these possibilities can impact waste management by establishing relevant biorefineries and circular economy. They can also supply a wide range of renewable products. Considering the potential of this waste management strategy, further research on these and many other substrates is needed. This will shed light on the effect of the integration, the relevant types of microorganisms and pretreatments, and of other physical parameters on the effectiveness of running lot generation plants with integrated second generation feedstocks.

  • 14.
    Ferreira, Jorge
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Lennartsson, Patrik
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Partial or complete inclusion of Zygomycetes fungi in biorefineries2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Ferreira, Jorge
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Lennartsson, Patrik
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Thin stillage utilization by edible Ascomycetes and Zygomycetes for an improved ethanol2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Ferreira, Jorge
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Lennartsson, Patrik
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Zygomycetes-based biorefineries2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Gmoser, Rebecca
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ferreira, Jorge
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Post-treatment of Fungal Biomass to Enhance Pigment Production2019In: Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology, ISSN 0273-2289, E-ISSN 1559-0291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new post-treatment method of fungal biomass after fermentation is revealed. The post-treatment strategy was utilized to produce pigments as an additional valuable metabolite. Post-treatment included incubation at 95% relative humidity where the effects of harvesting time, light, and temperature were studied. Pigment-producing edible filamentous fungus Neurospora intermedia cultivated on ethanol plant residuals produced 4 g/L ethanol and 5 g/L fungal biomass. Harvesting the pale biomass after 48 h submerged cultivation compared to 24 h or 72 h increased pigmentation in the post-treatment step with 35% and 48%, respectively. The highest pigment content produced, 1.4 mg/g dry fungal biomass, was obtained from washed biomass treated in light at 35 °C whereof the major impact on pigmentation was from washed biomass. Moreover, post-treated biomass contained 50% (w/w) crude protein. The post-treatment strategy successfully adds pigments to pre-obtained biomass. The pigmented fungal biomass can be considered for animal feed applications for domestic animals.

  • 18.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ferreira, Jorge A.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lundin, Magnus
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Gmoser, Rebecca
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pigment Production by the Edible Filamentous Fungus Neurospora Intermedia2018In: Fermentation, ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 4, no 11, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The production of pigments by edible filamentous fungi is gaining attention as a result of the increased interest in natural sources with added functionality in the food, feed, cosmetic, pharmaceutical and textile industries. The filamentous fungus Neurospora intermedia, used for production of the Indonesian food “oncom”, is one potential source of pigments. The objective of the study was to evaluate the fungus’ pigment production. The joint effect from different factors (carbon and nitrogen source, ZnCl2, MgCl2 and MnCl2) on pigment production by N. intermedia is reported for the first time. The scale-up to 4.5 L bubble column bioreactors was also performed to investigate the effect of pH and aeration. Pigment production of the fungus was successfully manipulated by varying several factors. The results showed that the formation of pigments was strongly influenced by light, carbon, pH, the co-factor Zn2+ and first- to fourth-order interactions between factors. The highest pigmentation (1.19 ± 0.08 mg carotenoids/g dry weight biomass) was achieved in a bubble column reactor. This study provides important insights into pigmentation of this biotechnologically important fungus and lays a foundation for future utilizations of N. intermedia for pigment production. 

  • 19.
    Mahboubi, Amir
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ferreira, Jorge A.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Production of Fungal Biomass for Feed, Fatty Acids, and Glycerol by Aspergillus oryzae from Fat-Rich Dairy Substrates2017In: Fermentation, ISSN 2311-5637, Vol. 3, no 4Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dairy waste is a complex mixture of nutrients requiring an integrated strategy for valorization into various products. The present work adds insights into the conversion of fat-rich dairy products into biomass, glycerol, and fatty acids via submerged cultivation with edible filamentous fungi. The pH influenced fat degradation, where Aspergillus oryzae lipase was more active at neutral than acidic pH (17 g/L vs. 0.5 g/L of released glycerol); the same trend was found during cultivation in crème fraiche (12 g/L vs. 1.7 g/L of released glycerol). In addition to glycerol, as a result of fat degradation, up to 3.6 and 4.5 g/L of myristic and palmitic acid, respectively, were released during A. oryzae growth in cream. The fungus was also able to grow in media containing 16 g/L of lactic acid, a common contaminant of dairy waste, being beneficial to naturally increase the initial acidic pH and trigger fat degradation. Considering that lactose consumption is suppressed in fat-rich media, a two-stage cultivation for conversion of dairy waste is also proposed in this work. Such an approach would provide biomass for possibly feed or human consumption, fatty acids, and an effluent of low organic matter tackling environmental and social problems associated with the dairy sector.

  • 20.
    Mahboubi, Amir
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Biotechnology.
    Ferreira, Jorge A.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Value-added products from dairy waste using edible fungi2017In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 59, p. 518-525Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Nair, Ramkumar B
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kalif, Mahdi
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ferreira, Jorge A.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Mild-temperature dilute acid pretreatment for integration of first and second generation ethanol processes2017In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 245, p. 145-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of hot-water (100 °C) from the 1st generation ethanol plants for mild-temperature lignocellulose pretreatment can possibly cut down the operational (energy) cost of 2nd generation ethanol process, in an integrated model. Dilute-sulfuric and -phosphoric acid pretreatment at 100 °C was carried out for wheat bran and whole-stillage fibers. Pretreatment time and acid type influenced the release of sugars from wheat bran, while acid-concentration was found significant for whole-stillage fibers. Pretreatment led up-to 300% improvement in the glucose yield compared to only-enzymatically treated substrates. The pretreated substrates were 191–344% and 115–300% richer in lignin and glucan, respectively. Fermentation using Neurospora intermedia, showed 81% and 91% ethanol yields from wheat bran and stillage-fibers, respectively. Sawdust proved to be a highly recalcitrant substrate for mild-temperature pretreatment with only 22% glucose yield. Both wheat bran and whole-stillage are potential substrates for pretreatment using waste heat from the 1st generation process for 2nd generation ethanol.

  • 22.
    Nair, Ramkumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery.
    Ferreira, Jorge
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Evaluating dilute phosphoric acid pretreated wheat bran for ethanol and edible fungal biomass production: A pilot study2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of the work:

    The present study reports the application of using dilute phosphoric acid for pretreatment of wheat branbiomass and its subsequent use as an ethanol fermentation substrate for edible fungi, Neurospora intermedia inbench scale (4.5L) and pilot airlift (26L) reactors.

    Approach:

    The optimized pretreatment conditions to release maximum sugar and minimum inhibitor concentrations weredetermined using a statistically modelled experimental setup. The dilute acid pretreatment was scaled up withthe validation of lab results in a biorefinery demo plant (BDP) at Svensk Etanolkemi AB – SEKAB (Örnsköldsvik,Sweden). The structural and physiological changes in the bran biomass during the pretreatment process werealso studied. Bench scale and pilot scale enzymatic hydrolysis of the pretreated biomass and subsequent ethanolfermentation using edible ascomycetes fungi, N. intermedia were studied using airlift reactors.

    Scientific innovation and relevance:

    With the use of dilute phosphoric acid, the study put forth an alternative strategy to the current use of relativelystronger acids for lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment. The potential use of acid pretreated lignocellulosicbiomass (wheat bran) as an ethanol feedstock, together with the edible fungal cultivation is a first of its kindapproach towards a wider ‘biorefinery’ concept. Improving the co-product (DDGS) quality and ethanol yield inthe existing wheat based ethanol facilities, whereby enhancing the overall ethanol production economics formsthe ultimate aim of the study.

    Results:

    Wheat bran was subjected to dilute acid pretreatment at varying acid concentrations (0.5–3.0% w/v),temperature (150–210◦C), and reaction time (5–20 min). The interaction of multiple factors showed theoptimum pretreatment conditions at acid concentration of 1.75% (w/v), at 190◦C for 10 min. A maximum totalpolysaccharide yield of 0.27 ± 0.01 g/g dry biomass loading, corresponding to 66% of the theoretical maximumwas observed. The effect of the dilute acid pretreatment on the functional groups of the wheat bran cellulosewas determined with 78% reduction in the cellulose crystallinity index. Enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated slurryfrom the demo plant showed 85% total theoretical yield of polysaccharides. Compared to the untreated branbiomass, an increase of 51% was observed in the ethanol yield following pretreatment, with a total ethanol yieldof 95% theoretical maximum. Similar results were also observed on scaling up the reaction volume in a benchscale (4.5L) and pilot scale (26L) airlift reactors, which will also be presented in detail.

    Conclusions:

    The present work brings out the potential of using phosphoric acid as an efficient pretreatment agent addressingthe long existing problems associated with the sulfur contamination of the feed. Additional advantages relatedto the nutritional enrichment of DDGS (at the existing wheat based ethanol facility), with the use of edibleascomycetes fungi were also achieved. However, techno-economical analyses are required to determine theactual industrial feasibility of the process.

  • 23.
    Tadesse Abate, Molla
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ferri, Ada
    Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino.
    Guan, Jinping
    College of Textile and Clothing Engineering, Soochow University.
    Chen, Guoqiang
    College of Textile and Clothing Engineering, Soochow University.
    Ferreira, Jorge
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Nierstrasz, Vincent
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Single-step disperse dyeing and antimicrobial functionalization of polyester fabric with chitosan and derivative in supercritical carbon dioxide2019In: Journal of Supercritical Fluids, ISSN 0896-8446, E-ISSN 1872-8162, Vol. 147, p. 231-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, a novel green approach was adopted to develop antimicrobial polyester fabric using sustainable biopolymers (chitosan/derivative) as eco-friendly antimicrobial agents via the resource efficient supercritical CO2 (scCO2) dyeing route in a single step. Polyester fabric was dyed with a small amount of dye (0.4% owf) in the presence of chitosan/derivative (3% owf) in scCO2 at 120 °C, 25 MPa for 1 h. The success of chitosan/derivative impregnation was confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Zeta Potential (ζ), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Water Contact Angle (WCA) measurements. According to the result, excellent color strength and fastness properties were obtained and the treated samples also reduced 75 − 93% of Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922) bacteria within one hour. This suggests that the dye and chitosan/derivative had no adverse effect on each other, proving compatibility. This new approach would help to reduce the cost of production and environmental pollution associated with the conventional textile finishing processes.

  • 24.
    Thunuguntla, Rahul
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Mahboubi, Amir
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ferreira, Jorge
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Integration of Membrane Bioreactors with Edible Filamentous Fungi for Valorization of Expired Milk2018Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Around 29 million tons of milk end as waste yearly in Europe, representing an environmental issue but also a potential substrate for biological valorization given its nutritional value. Aspergillus oryzae and Neurospora intermedia are edible filamentous fungi with dissimilar metabolism when grown in expired milk. Neurospora intermedia is more devoted to lactose consumption; 68 and 57% of lactose was consumed after cultivation in expired milk and its liquid fraction, respectively. Aspergillus oryzae consumed less lactose in expired milk (14%), but led to better microfiltration characteristics of the final effluent due to fat and protein degradation. A two-stage fed-batch cultivation using membrane bioreactors (MBRs) was developed, bringing together both fungal metabolic characteristics when grown in 70% diluted expired milk. In the first MBR, A.oryzae degraded fat and protein, improved microfiltration, and produced ca 11 g/L of biomass. In the second MBR, N. intermedia consumed the remaining lactose in the permeate and originated ca 7 g/L of biomass. The developed system was successful for valorization of non-sterile milk due to the balance between consumption of bacterial growth-derived acids, consequent pH, and fungal enzymatic activities. Besides, a final clear effluent (83% reduction of COD) was obtained, which is of interest considering wastewater treatment.

1 - 24 of 24
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