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  • 1.
    Ericsson, Amanda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Mima-te Trailer2013Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A trailer of the African redesigning fashion brand Mima-te.

  • 2.
    Ericsson, Amanda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The Life of a Dress. An introduction2014Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Life of a Dress is a travelling exhibition and series of workshops. In the light of the global trade of second-hand clothing the project aims to investigate how value-adding activities in participatory handicraft workshops in local communities may engage a population from different generations and nationalities in an exercise in reappropriating these materials. It is a further aim of the project to observe and induce aspects of developing, influencing and reconstructing sustainable patterns of consumption and production. The project explores models for fashion remanufacturing and creates opportunities for further development. The exhibition features collaborations with celebrated photographers and presents a world of dresses and artworks that have been produced or found along the way. In its centre, an open workshop developing shared ideas and skills from its participants takes place.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Ericsson, Amanda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The Life of a Dress, Mexico2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a summary of a field study made in Mexico during six weeks in October/November 2012. The concept, process and findings from a practical project "The Life of a Dress", containing a participatory design workshop given at a cultural center in Mexico City are presented together with an overview of five Mexican design and slow fashion brands. The brands presented are in different ways exploring alternative product development processes of producing and communicating design, identity and heritage through combining new design thinking with traditional handicraft manufacturing. The handicraft industry is a vital part of the Mexican economy and for many families in rural villages it is the main source of income. New products are developed in collaboration with craftsmen and respect are given to the time it takes to make the materials and products which are being made in close relation to nature. The action research project "The Life of a Dress" is a traveling exhibition presenting a concept of revival of second-hand clothes through visual installations and hands-on workshops adding value to discarded clothes. The group of students which followed the workshop in Mexico City in 2012 created a collection of 50 dresses which were all labeled with a common brand "Hecho en Faro", collaboratively created in the premises of production. The project "The Life of a Dress" has been ongoing since 2009 and has so far been taking place in four different continents (Sweden, Hong Kong, Mozambique and Mexico). The aim of the project is to explore how design, traditional handicraft and waste clothing might be tools for capacity building and/or business development, on a local as well as global level.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 4.
    Ericsson, Amanda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The Life of a Dress, Mexico: FILM2013Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A short film showing the methodology and working-progress behind the exhibition and workshop THE LIFE OF A DRESS at the cultural center EL FARO DE ORIENTE in Mexico City, October 2012

    Link to the short film: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cp20qjeuR-c

  • 5.
    Ericsson, Amanda
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The Life of a Dress: Mozambique2014Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Life of a Dress explores possible ways to use, improve and reconfigure the current system of fashion through reclaiming what the system itself is creating and wasting. The concept of sustainable design is explored as an approach which is here defined as being sensitive to the local and global context. The exhibition and workshop has since 2009 visited different continents and countries to share its content and learn from local projects and people about ways of how to rethink the use of materials. It is exploring how second-hand dresses found in local markets and streets may be used as assets for further transformation. Craft workshops and prototyping labs are created around the collected materials and people are invited to join in. During these workshops participants are encouraged to challenge current structures and ways of thinking around materials and making. The BIG MAMA, a mini-dress similar to an oversized t-shirt is one example of a product which is made in most of the workshops. It is a catalyst element normally brought in to the making process to see how the participants interact with the given materials and each other and how this may vary between different countries. The exhibitions are normally built up around the map dress which rests like a symbol for the global nature of textiles, clothing and fashion. Imagination is used and regarded as the main renewable resource in and outside this project. Creativity and its various forms of expressions is further explored and used to drive to project forward.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Ericsson, Amanda
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Brooks, Andrew
    African Second-hand Clothes: Mima-te and the development of sustainable fashion2015In: Routledge Handbook of Sustainability and Fashion, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge , 2015, p. 91-99Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A vast surplus of unwanted clothing is produced from excessive consumption in the Global North where a far greater volume of second-hand clothing is collected than can be locally retailed in charity shops or as ‘vintage fashion’. The majority of collected second-hand clothes are exported and sold overseas in market places in the developing world, with diverse and disputed economic and cultural effects. We discuss an African fashion brand, Mima-te which is collecting American and European second-hand clothes found in the markets of Maputo, Mozambique and up-cycling them, creating value and crafting new fashion.

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