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  • 1.
    Kristensen Johnstone, Tonje
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Alternative design methods in surface pattern design2016Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop introduces an alternative design method to increase the understanding of using abstract, spatial design variables in the design process. How does it affect the way of working? In what way could an abstract design variable influence the physical designed outcome?

    The aim of the workshop is to explore how concrete and abstract design variables is interpreted, understood and applied in the design process, as well as providing a discussion concerning this.

  • 2.
    Kristensen Johnstone, Tonje
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Conceptual spatial determinations insurface pattern design: Introducing alternative design variables as tools in the design process2018Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What is the function of a surface pattern? What does it do when we use it?

    They have practical and decorative functions depending on the context in which they appear; they may be used on a carpet, incorporated into wallpaper, or placed in a car interior. Surface patterns are also carriers of form, colour, and narrative, and are able to affect rooms, spaces, and surfaces – an important consideration. On a more abstract level surface patterns act as spatial definers; contributing to define a space with its directions, planes and perspectives. This introduces a design variable in the design process that answers the question “what is the pattern doing as a space definer?”.

     This workshop introduces spatial determination as a design variable. The question is how this affect your way of working in the process of designing a surface pattern?

  • 3. Kristensen Johnstone, Tonje
    Playfulness and its transition toward economic meaningfulness2013Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    PhD Exhibition. Vernissage at TI03 Textiles Open Innovation Centre in Gent, Belgium. Travelling to Estonia, New Zeeland, Eindhoven during 2013-14.

  • 4.
    Kristensen Johnstone, Tonje
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Spatial determinations in surface pattern design2016Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface pattern and ornaments has been around us for thousands of years. Pattern design and pattern making is and always has been an important human activity. Regardless of the cultural aspects that exist, there is a timeless systematic concerning pattern. It is all about the relationship between figure and background and the way the elements are organised on a surface. When designing pattern, different design variables are used in order to achieve a certain expression. Design variables are the designers ‘tools’, the extensional information needed to express intentions within a textile. A textile designer is presented with an almost endless number of design variables to handle in the design process. It could be colour, form, line, texture, volume etc. Designing surface patterns in spatial contexts with a totally different design variable could be challenging. What kind of thinking is required, what material to apply, and which type of expression do you wish to accomplish?

    This workshop introduces alternative design variables as tools in the design process. How does it affect the textile design process if abstract spatial determinations are employed as a design variable?

  • 5.
    Kristensen Johnstone, Tonje
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Surface pattern and spatiality2014Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate the relationships between surface pattern, spatiality and scale from the perspective of textile design. The research interest focuses on the explorations of textile patterns and spatiality, it also concerns documenting this as materials to simplify the understanding and designing of textile patterns in a spatial context.

  • 6.
    Kristensen Johnstone, Tonje
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Surface patterns, spatiality and pattern relations in textile design2017Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This licentiate thesis focuses on surface patterns, spatiality, and pattern relations in textile design, and aims to explore surface patterns as spatial definers and what they mean in the context of surface patterns. A secondary focus relates to applying conceptual spatial determinations as alternative design variables in design processes, and exploring how these could be used to define and analyse pattern relations.

    Through a series of exploratory design experiments that used printed and projected surface patterns in a three-dimensional setting, which were documented using photographs and film, the notion of pattern relations, wherein scale was used as a design variable, was explored. The outcome of the experiments showed the expressional possibilities that surface patterns may provide in a defined space, and how these are connected to pattern relations. In order to encourage an accompanying discussion regarding alternative methods of analysing surface patterns, the construction of a theoretical model was initiated. Workshops with design students were used as another practical method in this work.

    The results showed that there is great potential in using conceptual spatial determinations to define pattern relations by viewing surface patterns as spatial definers, rather than taking a traditional perspective on their functions. Another outcome is the theoretical model, which proposes a specific approach to pattern relations.

    This research demonstrates how conceptual spatial determinations can benefit the textile design process, as well as design teaching, which could in turn provide the field with new expressions that may lead to a change in or fruitful addition to the practice.

  • 7. Kristensen Johnstone, Tonje
    Textile design and surface pattern design with/in relation to spatial contexts.2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This research area is about textile design and surface pattern design with/in relation to spatial contexts. With this background, some fundamental themes that frame the field of the PhD work are described. More specifically, surface patterns, pattern design, scale and pattern expressions as well as textile design and design methods, within a spatial context.

     

    Ornament in several senses, repetition and pattern relations. Within these areas I will try to explain what this means, how this affects the visual, what is notable, problematic and difficult. And then give examples; reviewing previous projects in related areas, but also contemporary and historical views on the issues.

  • 8.
    Kristensen Johnstone, Tonje
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Textile pattern and spatiality2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This PhD project investigates the relationships between textile patterns, scale and spatial contexts from the perspective of textile design. Against this background, the purpose is to answer the research questions “How can the designer get a better understanding of scale and size in designing textile patterns and what kind of functions and characteristics do different patterns have in spatial contexts?”. It is expected that this practical and methodical approach can offer insights of scale and size issues in designing textile patterns, and may be useful especially for the textile design community.

  • 9.
    Kristensen Johnstone, Tonje
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Textile pattern and spatiality2013Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This PhD project investigates the relationships between textile patterns, scale and spatial contexts from the perspective of textile design. In order to examine this area, a physical model in scale 1:10 was built to create a scenario for the design example. The design decisions were made to understand and to analyze what´s happening concerning scale and pattern. The patterns are tried methodically in six different scales and with the four most common repeat methods. This practical and methodical design example aims to share a systematic approach for a better understanding of scale and size in designing textile patterns and to find functions and characteristics among different patterns in spatial contexts.

  • 10.
    Kristensen Johnstone, Tonje
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Textile pattern and spatiality2013Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper concerns how textile design students deal with textile patterns and scale problems in relation to spatial contexts in the perspective of textile design. The study investigates how design students are working with pattern design in a full-scale Pattern Lab. The results should assist textile designers in their daily work as pattern designers. Both practical work and observations in the Pattern Lab as well as interviews were used as method. The result provided support of the fact that knowledge is needed about pattern design and scale issues. The contribution is to give the designer a better understanding of scale and size in designing textile patterns and to find functions and characteristics among different patterns in spatial contexts.

  • 11.
    Kristensen Johnstone, Tonje
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The impact of scale on a block-repeated surface pattern in spatial contexts2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Kristensen Johnstone, Tonje
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Workshop of Rules2015Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    All kinds of patterns deals with rules. In fact, rules are surrounding us everywhere from traffic rules to instructions on what to wear on the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony. In this workshop we examine the notion of pattern, and how design students relate to rules and pattern, and to ideas that we think are fundamental to pattern design.

  • 13.
    Kristensen Johnstone, Tonje
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    McCallum, David
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    In The Clouds: The workshop as a method of exploring the relationship between rules and pattern design2016In: In The Clouds: The workshop as a method of exploring the relationship between rules and pattern design, 2016, p. 11-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface pattern is a fundamental component of human expression, especially in textile design. It is often influenced by patterning in nature, structures that are also often easily described by mathematical principles. This paper presents the workshop as a method for exploring the relationship between rules and pattern. A workshop was conducted with textile- and fashion design students to test two assumptions: Design guided by rules would create a recognisable pattern, and, Visual patterns would easily be reducible to rules. The aim was to explore the relationship between pattern and rules in design processes, and to provide a foundation for reflection and critical discussion of this relationship. The results of the workshop could not reliably prove either assumption because, as was discovered through the workshop, the concepts of pattern and rules are neither universal nor obvious, and as such cannot be so simply tested. Pattern and rules are varied and nuanced phenomena and their relationship equally so.

1 - 13 of 13
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