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  • 1.
    Eriksson, Siw
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The Mediating Role of Product Representations; A Study with Three-Dimensional Textiles in Early Phases of Innovation2014Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Eriksson, Siw
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Berglin, Lena
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Gunnarsson, Emanuel
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Guo, Li
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Lindholm, Hanna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Sandsjö, Leif
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Three-dimensional multilayer fabric structures for interactive textiles2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract. The integration of performances in interactive textile fabric system has so far been rather complicated since they are based on multilayer or three-dimensional principles. These structures are today mainly put together by means of several processes, which is laborious and time consuming. In this interdisciplinary study we have combined the principle of a three-dimensional multilayer weaving process and interactive textiles structures in order to enable the manufacturing of interactive textile structure in one process. The process is investigated using a manual reconstructed loom and the approach has been to use the 3D structures in order to integrate and organize conductive and compressive spacer layers as a textile capacitive structure. Measurements on such a structure was done by construction a first order passive high pass filter and using the fabric sample as the capacitor and a 1MΩ resistor. The behavior of the measurement of the capacitive sensor is quite close to the theoretical calculation and already at this stage the structure might be used to indicate the presence of a pressure. In this project we have shown that a three-dimensional structure enables the development of interactive textiles in one process. Further the concept of using a rebuilt manual loom has shown great potential in early research stages. It is considerable saving time and resources since, in this case, it is easy to reconstruct the loom design compared to performing similar reconstruction on a machine. Future research will focus on developing other types of interactive structures. Another issue will be to scale down the size of the structures in order to get thinner and more flexible qualities.

  • 3.
    Eriksson, Siw
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Berglin, Lena
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Gunnarsson, Emanuel
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Guo, Li
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Lindholm, Hanna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Sandsjö, Leif
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Tredimensionell vävteknik med möjliga tillämpningar inom medicinsk teknik2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Integreringen av interaktiva egenskaper i teknisk textil har rönt stort intresse inom textil-forskningen de senaste åren. Med interaktiva textila strukturer avses textila system som interagerar med sin omgivning i någon mening. Ett sätt att åtadkomma dessa interaktiva strukturer är att foga samman lager av olika struktur eller material där varje lager tillför textilen/det textila systemet olika egenskaper. Det typiska tillvägagångssättet för att sammanfoga olika lager av textila material är att använda någon form av lamineringsteknik. Föreliggande projekt rör en ny vävteknik som möjliggör att flera textila lager med olika egenskaper vävs samman i en och samma process utan de tillsatser eller extra hantering som krävs vid laminering. Utöver de uppenbara produktionstekniska fördelarna möjliggör kombinationen av olika egenskaper i en lagerstruktur också att speciella krav på slutprodukten lättare kan tillgodoses. Det medicintekniska området förväntas ha stor nytta av textila strukturer som kan utformas i tre dimensioner eller kombinera olika egenskaper i en och samma struktur. Syftet är att demonstrera hur en nyutvecklad vävteknik för tredimensionella strukturer kan tillämpas för att tillverka interaktiva textila strukturer i en och samma tillverkningsprocess. I detta delprojekt har den tredimensionella tekniken använts för att utveckla en kapacitiv struktur utformad helt i textil. Genom mindre modifieringar av och tillägg till en 16-skaftad datorstyrd manuell prototypvävstol har två ledande och ett isolerande skikt kombinerats för att realisera en textilbaserad kondensator. I ett första test realiserades ett enkelt högpassfilter med den kapacitiva textila strukturen som kondensator. Filtrets egenskaper visade sig väl följa den förväntade filterkarakteristiken. Den nyutvecklade tredimensionella vävtekniken förväntas ha stora tillämpningsmöjligheter inom det medicintekniska området.

  • 4.
    Eriksson, Siw
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Design & Human Factors/Chalmers University of Technology.
    Jiaqi, Yao
    Design & Human Factors/Chalmers University of Technology.
    Lieng, Phu
    Design & Human Factors/Chalmers University of Technology.
    Sandsjö, Leif
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Wallgren, Pontus
    Design & Human Factors/Chalmers University of Technology.
    Karlsson, MariAnne
    Design & Human Factors/Chalmers University of Technology.
    Ambulance Personnel Participating in Co-Design of a New Concept for Detection of Traumatic Injuries in Emergency Care2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUNDStudies in product development argue the importance of user involvement when designing products. Benefits include targeting relevant problems, finding usable and innovative solutions, and elicit user needs and expectations that may prove critical when introducing the new product.

    However, some difficulties have been identified. These are mainly related to differences between the users and developers in terms of skills, experiences, terminology, goals and perspectives and that the users tend to neglect the value of their input. Typically users are also included too late in the process to have any real opportunities to alter the final product.

    The aim of this study was to explore how early inclusion of user competence might influence the development of a novel concept for detection of traumatic injuries in emergency care.

    METHODSAmbulance nurses representing car and helicopter ambulance were invited to three consecutive workshops to co-design key products of the new concept together with development personnel from the company behind the new concept and design researchers/engineers. The workshops were held in the ideation, concept generation, and development stages of the project. Each workshop was prepared by the researchers to enable and stimulate interaction within the group by applying design practices and provide mock-ups/illustrations. 

    RESULTS Preliminary results from interviews tell that the company representatives report more detailed knowledge about the ambulance personnel’s needs earlier in the process compared to previous projects, and that this knowledge contributed to products with higher usability.

    The ambulance personnel were positive and pleased to contribute their knowledge. One response was “it is very interesting to contribute to the development of a future product”.

    CONCLUSIONSThe tested co-design process facilitated the ambulance nurses to contribute their knowledge so that needs and requirements was understood and integrated by the engineers in the design of the new concept for emergency care.

  • 5.
    Eriksson, Siw
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Sandsjö, Leif
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. MedTech West.
    Three-dimensional Fabrics as Medical Textiles2015In: Advances in 3D Textiles: A volume in Woodhead Publishing Series in Textiles / [ed] X. Chen, Woodhead Publishing Limited, 2015, p. 305-340Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of 3D textile applications in medicine is rapidly increasing as new technology and procedures are introduced in health care.  A first estimate of current medical applications of both general and 3D textiles is presented based on the medical devices classification system established by the US Food and Drug Administration. The textile specifics for these applications are covered from a textile technique perspective where the different 3D weaving as well as knitting, braiding and non-woven techniques are described and how their properties they can contribute in medical applications. In addition, emerging opportunities based on smart textiles as part of textile systems are described on a general level. The strong application areas of 3D medical textiles, i.e. wound management, vascular grafting and scaffolding for tissue engineering are covered in detail both from the medical and textiles perspective. Finally, some future lines of development are suggested and a short discussion on how new 3D textiles applications can be developed in close cooperation between the textile industry and the health care sector is presented.

  • 6.
    Eriksson, Siw
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Sandsjö, Leif
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Karlsson, MariAnne
    Design & Human Factor, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Facilitating User Involvement in Development of 3D Smart Textiles For Healthcare Applications2015In: Proceedings of the 6th World Conference on 3D Fabrics and their Applications, Manchester,UK/Raleigh,USA, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart textiles are textiles based on different types of smart materials that can sense or react on environmental stimuli. This new technology is a growing area which exhibits characteristics particularly suitable for capturing (electro) physiological signals, e.g. to monitor ECG, EEG or respiration. These textiles most often form a three dimensional structure where different materials with different characteristics are bound together in different layers. However, in order to take full advantage of these new opportunities the textile industry needs to find new methods to develop innovative smart textile products. One strong and valuable contribution is to involve users early in the development process.

    The aim of this paper is to highlight how product representations, e.g. prototypes or material samples, can be used to facilitate the communication between users and developers in the development of new healthcare solutions based on textiles. The study presented in this paper was performed through participatory observation. The case is based on the development of a textile structure with three dimensional properties for long-term monitoring of EEG signals.   

    The main findings are that product representations support the exchange of knowledge and experiences between users and developers by five different facilitating roles:

    Product representations serve to demonstrate (technical) solutions; to verbalise, i.e. serve to fill in were words are missing or when terms are not understood; to visualise, i.e. facilitating members of the development team to envision or adapt mental images of the intended future product; to stimulate, i.e. to inspire the development team to suggest new ideas or design; and, finally, to integrate, i.e. to unite different perspectives within the development team.

    Conclusion: By using product representations during the development process to facilitate the dialogue between users and developers, the textile industry may take full advantage of the opportunities made available by new development of materials and new technology in order to fulfil users’ needs.

  • 7.
    Eriksson, Siw
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Sandsjö, Leif
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Karlsson, MariAnne
    Facilitating user involvement in textile development.2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Eriksson, Siw
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Sandsjö, Leif
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Karlsson, MariAnne
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Product Representations as Mediating Tools in the Development of New Medical Technology2018In: Design4Health - Fifth International Conference on Design4Health.: Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Design4Health, Sheffield, UK, 4–6 September 2018. / [ed] Kirsty Christer, Claire Craig & Dan Wolstenholme, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Involving users in the design process of new products and services is generally disputed as a prerequisite for fulfilling users' needs and requirements. The importance of user involvement has been argued also regarding the development of new medical technology. Collaboration between users and developers/designers is however not without problems due to differences in, e.g. background, training, perspective, and vocabulary. In order to address these differences, the need for different 'mediating tools' has been emphasized. One type of mediating tools is product representations (PRs). Earlier studies have most often focused on the type of PR that should be used in different phases of the development process in order to get input on different designs. This paper describes instead how and in what situations different PRs mediated communication and collaboration between professional users (medical experts) and designers in an innovation project targeting a solution for long-term monitoring of brain activity based on electroencephalographic (EEG) signals.

  • 9.
    Guo, Li
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Smart textiles .
    Eriksson, Siw
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Sandsjö, Leif
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    3D Composite Textile Characteristics Relevant in Pressure Ulcer Management2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION

    Effective ulcer management requires the wound to be in a moist but still breathable environment, to facilitate healing, absorb exudates and prevent maceration. One of the applicable methods to achieve this is the use of composite dressings. Most composite dressings are made of three layers to provide absorption and a bacterial barrier in a non- or semi-adherent cover. Various common textile materials such as cotton, polyester, polypropylene and cellulose can be used as different layers in those wound dressings. In addition to these established dressings, electrical stimulation therapy may be used in treating ulcers. It has been reported that electrical stimulation can reduce the area and depth of the wound in a shortened time compared to conventional treatment. In summary, encouraging wound healing results have been obtained both from using composite wound dressing and from applying of electrical stimulation. The aim of this study is to present a conceptual design based on a woven 3D structure that combines the composite wound dressing properties with electrical stimulation for pressure ulcers healing/management.

    METHOD

    In the suggested structure, different layers in X, Y and Z led were designed with different materials for different purposes.  The top layer consisting of a low-density web to provide a non-adherent layer combined with two textile electrodes made of conductive threads, the middle layer contributes pressure release and absorption of exudates, and the bottom layer next to the wound for moisture keeping while still allowing adequate ventilation.

    Two key properties were addressed in the study: pressure release and the possibility to provide electrical stimulation of the wound. Simulation with COMSOL Multiphysics was used to study pressure distribution according to Hertz contact theory. The surface resistance of the electrodes were also studied using in-house designed four-point measurement probes.

    RESULTS

    The simulation results show the composite structure to exhibit good pressure release properties. Surface resistance testing proved that the textile electrodes have resistance in the magnitude of 102 indicating that textile electrodes can be used for electrical stimulation in ulcers healing.

    The first results from this study demonstrate the feasibility to design a textile system combining established composite dressings solutions with means for electrical stimulation based on 3D weaving technique to be applied in pressure ulcer healing. 

  • 10.
    Guo, Li
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Eriksson, Siw
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Sandsjö, Leif
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Surface Resistivity of Textile-Based Electrodes2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Textile-based electrodes show great potential as substitution of conventional electrodes when long-time monitoring is required. The flexibility and high skin-electrode contacting area make it possible to avoid the use of contact gel, which may cause irritation to the patients' skin. In this study, textile-based electrodes were made by combining conductive materials with high absorption nature fibres with the intention to create and maintain a microenvironment that improve the contact between the skin and electrode by local sweating at the electrode site. Alternatively artificial sweat (i.e. saline) may be added for a similar effect. However, by adding nature fibres into the electrodes, the electrical properties of the electrodes are modified due to the ration of conductive yarns is decreased. In this paper, the surface resistivity in the warp and weft directions and its distribution were measured in a four-wire resistance mode. The resistivity of the conductive yarns, the type of nature fibres, the textile construction and the fabric pick density were selected as the independent variables and the surface resistivity in warp and weft measurement directions was the dependent variable to be analysed. Preliminary results show that the conductivity of the conductive yarns are more important than the fabric pick density; surface resistance were not measurable in warp direction of most plain weave fabrics since the conductive yarns were only involved in the weft direction, however, the resistance were measureable in the case of satin fabrics; and that the surface resistivity is more evenly distributed in weft direction than the warp direction

  • 11. Karlsson, MariAnne
    et al.
    Eriksson, Siw
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Sandsjö, Leif
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Investigating the conceptual phase of innovation: Communication and collaboration in multidisciplinary teams2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Lieng, Phu
    et al.
    Chalmers.
    Yao, Jiaqi
    Chalmers.
    Candefjord, Stefan
    Chalmers.
    Kidborg, Stefan
    Medfield Diagnostics AB.
    Eriksson, Siw
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Wallgren, Pontus
    Chalmers.
    Sandsjö, Leif
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Design of Microwave-based devices for prehospital diagnosis of traumatic internal injuries2015In: Abstracts - Medicinteknikdagarna 2015, 13-14 oktober 2015, Uppsala Konsert & Kongress, 2015, p. 95-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13. Löfhede, Johan
    et al.
    Eriksson, Siw
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Sandsjö, Leif
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Guo, Li
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Thordstein, Magnus
    Monitoring of Brain Activity Using Textile Electrodes2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Sandsjö, Leif
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Löfhede, Johan
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Eriksson, Siw
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Guo, Li
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Thordstein, Magnus
    EEG Measurements using Textile Electrodes2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15. Wiklund, Urban
    et al.
    Karlsson, Marcus
    Berglin, Lena
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Eriksson, Siw
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Guo, Li
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Bäcklund, Tomas
    Sandsjö, Leif
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Rytm och formanalys av EKG från textila sensorer2010Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 15 of 15
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