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  • 1.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Hilletoft, Per
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Hilmola, Olli-Pekka
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Lean Six Sigma strategy in telecom manufacturing2014In: Industrial management + data systems, ISSN 0263-5577, E-ISSN 1758-5783, ISSN 0263-5577, Vol. 114, no 6, p. 904-921Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Lean Six Sigma strategy ensures flexible, robust, and efficient processes. However, to make them more agile in order to sustain in today’s highly competitive environment, something more is required. This could include staff training, strengthening company culture and collaborating with key partners in the supply chain.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Hilletoft, Per
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Lean Six Sigma strategy: A case study from Sweden2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Lean Six Sigma strategy ensures more flexible, robust, and efficient processes. However, to make them agile, something more is required. This could include training the staff, strengthening company culture and collaborating with key partners in the supply chain.

  • 3. Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Svensson, Victor
    Preventive maintenance is an enabler for operation excellence in support processes2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    TPM in a Lean office environment can create values both in a business and an employee dimension. In the employee dimension TPM reduces the risk of missing/forgetting areas of responsibility and creates more involvement. In the business dimension objectives such as cost, quality and supporting the reduction of waste improved. Preventive maintenance meetings can be included and performed once a month in the ordinary departmental “stand-up meetings”. Methods like 5S, which need to be updated on a continuous basis, and standardized maintenance should also be connected to the TPM work. But first all employees should be trained in order to have the same direction/behavior.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Roy
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Torstensson, Håkan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    How to Integrate Suppliers by Training in Lean Thinking2013In: / [ed] Dahlgaard Park, Su Mi, Dahlgaard, Jens, Gomišček, Boštjan, University of Maribor , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Much research has addressed how to implement lean in a focal company, but little has been published about how to integrate suppliers in strategies and the focal company’s culture, such as lean production or lean thinking. The purpose of the article is to investigate if suppliers can become more integrated in the supply chain by training in lean thinking at the focal company and to explain a possible structure of the training. Design/methodology/approach: A multiple-case study has been conducted of the focal com- pany and five of its supply companies. The findings are supported empirically by on-site interviews and by observations, as well as by a binomial two-proportion test that was used to analyse the statistical data of the delivery precision. Findings: While the training programme does not show a conclusive result for the supply chain, it has made a difference for all participating suppliers. In most cases the training programme was a trigger that started or boosted the internal work with continuous improvements. In some cases it helped create structured ways of working and improved the internal production flows.

  • 5.
    Göbel, Hannes
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Cronholm, Stefan
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    LeAgile Management: an IT Service Management Perspective2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In order to reduce or eliminate different organizational problems, the sector of manufacturing often makes use of the two popular concepts: Agile and Lean. Lean as well as Agile have been proven to contribute with significant benefits such as responding to changing environments and to reduce costs. A literature review reveals that researchers have advanced the idea of Lean and Agile concepts coexisting through the development of a theory of “LeAgile” manufacturing. However, the state-of-art shows that Lean and Agile still are separately discussed in a shared context and that they are not yet clearly and fully integrated. Furthermore the existing LeAgile theories are only studied within the industry concerning manufacturing and production systems and the empiric evaluations are vague. The main purpose of this paper is to study Lean and Agile concepts within an IT Service Management (ITSM) context in order to understand how they could be fully integrated and what the expected value is. Methodology: In order to find an answer to the research question, we have applied a qualitative research approach. The research approach embraced three phases in a three year project where researchers studied several ITSM organizations. Findings: Our study shows that it is possible to fully integrate components of Lean and Agile concepts within the ITSM sector. The decoupling point previously defined in Leagile theory have become blurred. We have also shown that embracing “LeAgile IT Service Management” leads to positive effects such as: higher customer satisfaction, better communication between service providers and consumers, increased efficiency (and effectiveness), reduced costs and improved quality. Originality: The originality is justified by the scope of application (ITSM) in combination of the empirical sources used. The scientific contribution is motivated by the debate on how Lean and Agile philosophies can co-exist within organizations. The contribution consists of improved knowledge to each of the Lean and Agile fields separately as well as to the LeAgile theory and ITSM. The practical contribution is motivated by the identification of existing problems within the ITSM sector and how the LeAgile concepts can reduce them.

  • 6.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Textile Management enabled by lean thinking2016Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Reports from the European Commission point out a difficult financial landscape and competitive mar-ket for textile companies. Increased competition from low-wage countries is one cause. This has forced changes to both the companies’ structure and the supply chain, like off-shoring and outsourcing of manufacturing activities. The new structure means that companies have to address efficiency in areas like support processes and development. To address this, other industry sectors, such as automo-tive, have explored and implemented lean. Research confirms that organizations can increase perfor-mance by introducing lean. However both in the textile sector and generally in settings outside manu-facturing several researchers have identified research gaps, both in terms of administrative applications and how employees are affected. These gaps are explored in three different research questions support-ing the following main purpose:

    To explore how lean principles and methods, from a textile management perspective, can benefit tex-tile companies

    The research methodology aligns to an abductive research approach, merging theory and real-life ob-servation throughout the project. This approach also supports a close connection between theory-building and practice development. The empirical data, from which the analysis and conclusions are made, is gathered in four appended papers. Two of them use a case study methodology, one a single case study approach and one a multiple-case study approach, respectively. The two other papers use an action research approach. The research quality has been demonstrated mainly by addressing issues related to research bias and reactivity, two key areas in qualitative research.

    Concluding the results shows that lean can serve as an enabler for the textile sector, applied in a textile management context. The research provides useful insights of effects due to lean intervention and also adds to the lean research body beyond a manufacturing context. From a managerial implications stand-point the research supports companies regarding both how to apply lean outside production and what effects that it can result in. It can also serve as a guideline at a strategy level on how to achieve busi-ness improvement. Future research is needed at system level with a scope of an entire company, since this research has explored lean at a minor scale. Also conflicting findings connected to changed work-related stress levels were found regarding the employee perspective. This needs to be explored further to understand how possibly increased stress can be reduced or eliminated.

  • 7.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Andersson, Roy
    Jönköping University.
    Lantz, Björn
    Technology Management and Economics, Chalmers.
    Total productive maintenance in support processes: an enablerfor operation excellence2015In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 1042-1055Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to stay competitive in today’s marketplace, it is vital to reduce activities that do

    not create value. Lean production has in the last decade been seen as a philosophy to

    reduce non-value time. The office environment often presents a major improvement

    opportunity to reduce non-value time. Lean contributes positively to business

    performance applied in a manufacturing context and is also suggested to do the

    same in a service context. The purpose of the paper is to analyse and determine how

    total productive maintenance (TPM) can be applied within the support process and

    to identify effects from an employee and business perspective. A case study has

    been performed and a qualitative research approach was selected. Empirical data

    were gathered by using semi-structured interviews at one case company, but from

    several teams that had applied TPM. The result was then used as an inductive

    approach to explore how TPM can be applied in a support process. To implement

    and apply TPM within an office context, it should be structured in three steps

    (i) define, (ii) implement and (iii) sustain. TPM should be conducted as a part of the

    ordinary day-to-day work. The planning and discussions connected to TPM can be

    included in regular daily departmental ‘stand-up meetings’ involving everybody. The

    work with 5S and maintenance should also be a part of the TPM structure,

    connecting it as a system and not as an isolated activity. TPM can create value from

    both a business and an employee perspective. In the employee perspective, TPM

    reduces the risk of missing/forgetting areas of responsibility and creates more

    involvement. In the business perspective, objectives such as cost and quality are

    improved, but TPM also enables the reduction of waste.

  • 8.
    Manfredsson, Peter
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Göbel, Hannes
    University of Borås, School of Business and IT.
    Torstensson, Håkan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Agility enabling lean: A team based method for flexibility and structure2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method, derived from lean thinking and agile methods containing four steps, using short, time-boxed iterations, was developed and implemented in a support team. The effects of the method in use include a clearer structure of work tasks in terms of priorities, objective and better alignment with business goals. It also increased closure and definition of tasks and better levelling of work tasks between team members. However, a negative effect was an increased level of stress in the work environment. The agility-based method supported the team’s lean implementation by creating a pull system with work-in-progress control. Other lean elements were improved, such as levelling of workload. Hence the agility-based method approach can be viewed as an enabler for lean management.

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