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  • 1.
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Across disciplines and cultures: Harnessing diversity2015Other (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Case study of Rovio Entertainment and “Angry Birds”2016Other (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Human players at the center of an ecosystem: The case of video games in Finland2015In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on ecosystems as ways of organizing innovation and firm-level growth position a focal firm at the center of each ecosystem they study. This study of the video games industry in Finland argues that it can also be human users that are are at that center. In the birth and early developmental stages of the ecosystem or a game-design project, individual human beings can absorb and live with ambiguity and absence or fluidity of rules of the game, even be entertained by and enjoy such ambiguity. 

  • 4.
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Introduction to design business management2015Other (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Introduction to Design Business Management2015Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Also agricultural and food sciences can benefit from the recent interest in design thinking, an interest in both research and practice.  

  • 6.
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Leveraging academic resistance to consumerism to strengthen the capitalist project: The case of Aalto University2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    •New public management, an emphasis on control, as well as consumerism, have grown their influence in universities. Taken too far, this kind of an influence can have destructive psychological and social outcomes on practices and institutions of good research, on academic collegiality, and on the peer review system. Yet, paradoxically, it appears fewer and fewer academics rise to the barricades to resist such developments. This paper analysis why and how do academics in favor of consumerism appear to win over academics in favor of collegiality? 

  • 7.
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Problem solving and problem search in design business management2015Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In managing design and in managing as design, it makes sense to ask "why" before asking "what"; that is, it makes sense to ask first why is there a problem before asking what is a solution. Thought leadership on and implication of this simple idea is mapped across Stanford University, NEw York, London, Oxford, Gothenburg, Borås, Helsinki, and St. Petersburg.

  • 8.
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Rethinking design fashion: New materiality, smart products, and upcycling2014In: Swedish Design Research Journal, ISSN 2000-964X, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 53-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manufacturing operations in much of textile fashion have migrated from the developed economies to developing countries in search of cost economies. Consideration for the natural environment has been lost in the process due to lack of clarity what corporation or some other participant in what kind of an economy is most responsible. This paper is intended as a thought piece on how new materialisms offers an approach to bring back responsible concern for the natural environment in textile fashion and, perhaps, beyond.

  • 9.
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Rethinking textile fashion: A research agenda2015Other (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Swedish School of Textiles.
    Rethinking textile fashion: A research agenda2015Other (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    The art of organizing: Computer games as an art form, a business, and a community2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The starting points of this paper are twofold. Firstly, computer game design can be taken as an art form (Crawford 1982). Seconly, and building on the first point, computer games can be taken as a model of organising whereby there are multiple dimensions or levels of analysis (Burger-Helmchen & Cohendet 2011). In and across the starting points, this paper unfolds a set of findings and generates a set propositions. The propositions include that new forms of art such as computer games have been and will be much like old forms of art. More specifically, the proposition here is that each new particular form of art, as well as art generally, needs to be invented in order to exist (Shiner 2001). In order to persist and not only to exist for a short instance, one or another kind of a process organizing needs to happen. Such a process can unfold following a a grand design. The process of organizing can be dictated by chance or be a result of drift. Or, the process can emerge in a series of small steps. In the latter instance, hybridization or a combination, even recombination, can be the way of the happening. 

  • 12.
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    The progressive personality: The strange case of Janne T.2016In: Research and Dialogue: Writings in honour of Janne Tienari / [ed] Susan Meriläinen & Eero Vaara, Aalto University , 2016, p. 20-23Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Transvaluation of the meaning of “fast” in fast food, fast music, and fast fashion2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores how to transvaluate, to re-evaluate and to repudiate neoliberal standards for creative and cultural industries. The paper's focus is on three creative and cultural industries -- food, music and fashion -- all of which have crafts-based origins. These industries were long under the protective eye and of, in one way or another, of the cultural system of what is a nation. However since the 1970s or the 1980s these industries have increasingly been dominated and domesticated by the still continuing rise of the values of neoliberalism, subjected to wave upon wave of reengineering and reorganization, assimilated into the global market system.

    At one extreme, affluent consumers, often affluent owner-capitalists or financiers, are empowered to determine what is good food, good music, or good fashion. These affluents are now increasingly co-creators of what they consider culturally meaningful for themselves. Growing amounts of resources flow in the direction of making and keeping the affluents content, which is not always in fit with culturally meaningful content from the perspective of the traditional or authentic creatives in these industries: the chefs, the artists, the designers, What the affluents desire are fancy restaurants, selective clubs, and expensive clothes. Catering to the lifestyles of these rich and famous is increasingly a trans-industry of its own, with ever less room for authentic cultural creation, as authenticity used to be understood. New bureaucratic forms of education and training drive by various forms of "positive psychology" reproduce the focus on the tongues, minds and navels of the affluent, as if their satisfaction and inspiration of these were the only global standard that matters.  By virtue of their new role as co-creators, the affluents are offered what is rich in meaning and high in value to them.

    At the other extreme, the authentic cultural creatives following vocation and the average citizen have received the stick, at best left holding its short end. Cultural creatives trying to follow their original call and the average citizen are now both squeezed out of being key beneficiaries of participation in these industries. What is forced down throats, into ears and on bodies are degenerated, industrialized and highly wasteful variations - fast food, fast music, fast fashion - co-created with and for the affluents. Almost explicitly hindered by market prices to access such meaning, in any case, the cultural creatives and the average citizen are face to face with the neoliberal tide that is drowning the original authenticity of arts of crafts and their meanings. Values that originally drove food, music, and fashion industries, such as sustainability, are now increasingly dominated, converted and domesticated by neoliberal, technocratic and bureaucratic values and ideologies.

    Analysis of food, music and fashion industries in various countries in this paper suggests that to transvaluate the neoliberal tide what is needed is a trans-disciplinary mindset, reminiscent of authentic innocence of the crafts-minded and pre-industrial hierarchy of life-affirming values and norms: to reflect upon, to act upon, and to adhere what is good by virtue of good with local environments and authentic ways of consumption, cultural practice, and creativity.  Recipes, hits and fashions to repudiate what has been wasteful and inefficient in fast food, music and fashion include good food, good music, upcycled clothes, and new technologies. The paper calls for further research on how to trans-valuate, trans-discipline and cross-pollinate across these recipes, hits, and fashions.

     

    References:

    Ainamo, A. 2014 Rethinking textile fashion: New materiality, smart products, and upcycling, Design Research Journal, 2, 53-60.

    Appadurai, A 2013 " The future as cultural fact: essays on the global condition" - Rassegna Italiana di Sociologia, 2013

    Appadurai, A. 2013b "Response to comments", Rassegna Italiana di Sociologia, 2013

    Appadurai, A. 1988 "How to make a national_cuisine: Cookbooks in contemporary India", .Comparative Studies in History and Society, 30(1): 3-24.

    GC Bruner -1990 "Music, mood, and marketing", The Journal of Marketing.

    C Caldwell, SA Hibbert -2002 "The influence of music tempo and musical preference on restaurant patrons' behavior", Psychology & Marketing.

    C Caldwell, SA Hibbert 1999 "Play that one again: the effect of music tempo on consumer behaviour in a restaurant", European Advances in Consumer Research,

    F Dannen - 1991 Hit men: Power brokers and fast money inside the musicbusiness

    - Random House LLC

    SA Eroglu, KA Machleit, JC Chebat 2005 "The interaction of retail density and music tempo: effects on shopper responses", Psychology & Marketing,

    hargadon and Sutton 1997 "Technology brokering in a product design firm2, Administrative Science Quarterly.

    FH Kirkpatrick 1943 ", " - Journal of applied psychology, 1943

    Krol, P. J. and Lavoie, M. 2014, "Beyond nursing nihilism, a Nietzschean transvaluation of neoliberal values,"Nursing Philosophy, 15(2): 112-124.

    McElrea, H  and Standing, L 1992 "Fast music causes fast drinking",Perceptual and Motor Skills.

    Millman, R. 1986 "The influence of background music on the behavior of restaurant patrons," Journal of Consumer Research.

    Rita Orji • Julita Vassileva • Regan L. Mandryk 2013 LunchTime: a slow-casual game for long-term dietary behavior change, Personal and Ubiquitous Computing. Pers Ubiquit Comput; DOI 10.1007/s00779-012-0590-6

    TC Roballey, C McGreevy, RR Rongo 1985 "The effect of music on eating behavior",

    ... - Bulletin of the ...,  - Springer

    Rozin, P. & Fallon, A. 1986 "Likes and dislikes , in What Is America Eating?: Proceedings of a Symposium. Food and Nutrition Board, Commission on Life Sciences, Division on Earth and Life Studies, National Research Council

    Sassarelli, R. 2013 "Value, valuation, transvaluation" Rassegna Italiana di Sociologia, 2013

    A Szabo, A Small, M Leigh 1999 "The effects of slow-and fast-rhythm classical music on progressive cycling to voluntary physical exhaustion." The Journal of sports medicine and ..., 1999

     

  • 14.
    Ainamo, Antti
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Hyöty, Jussi
    FIM .
    Vilen, Merita
    Case study of Nokia’s design strategy in mobile phones, 1980s to 20072016Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Case study of Cr8tv, joint research betweeen European Commission, Lancaster University, Politecnico Milan,  Corvinus University, and Gothenburg Universit

  • 15.
    Ainamo, Antti
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Hällgren, Markus
    Rehn, Alf
    Copenhagen Business School.
    Summit fever2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mountain climbers call it “summit fever” when one or more individuals in a group of climbers become so enamored with the notion of reaching the summit of a mountain that they ignore less exciting issues such as how to safely descend the mountainside and live to tell one’s self and others about the experience. In this paper, we review decision-making literature on symmetric vs. asymmetric goal formation, as well as innocuous and fallacious learning. We develop a process theory of summit fever by defining that summit fever is when fallacious learning in chase of an asymmetric goal disproportionately narrows attention to a peak milestone. A halfway milestone that represents a peak experience then is prone to lead to goal conflation so that the way forward is compromised at the expense of reaching the ultimate goal. We illustrate the emerging framework by revisiting how and how summit fever led to a mountaineering accident on K2 in 2008 whereby 11 out of 26 climbers involved died. Our conclusions include implications for further research.

  • 16.
    Ainamo, Antti
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kolho, Kaija-Leena
    Helsinki University, Faculty of Medicine.
    Progress in the treatment and outcome of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients2016In: Expert Review of Clinical Immunology, ISSN 1744-8409, p. 1-33Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review discusses how treatment of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients has improved with attention to therapeutic quality and cost. The number of such patients in Western countries has increased rapidly. Similarly to what has been the trend in the management of adult IBD, the pediatric IBD therapy has become more active than earlier. High use of immunosuppressants has helped to control the extensive and aggressive course of pediatric IBD. Full disease control already at an early phase has advantages such as to preserve normal child growth and development, to maintain overall good health and quality of life, as well as to decrease the psychosocial burden of the disease. A key research direction is to develop the more active approach into a way to reduce healthcare costs by decreasing the so-far high rate of surgery of pediatric IBD patients. 

  • 17.
    Ainamo, Antti
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Svengren Holm, Lisbeth
    Vidinge, Christina
    Gothenburg University.
    Horvath, Dora
    Corvinus University.
    Designers as innovators in organizational contexts: A proposal for a typology2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Task 2.2.2: Developing a Typology of the Roles of Designer and Design Competence in Innovation

    The purpose of this paper is to specify and develop a classifica­tion scheme of the roles of designers­­ in innovation, in particular to how they may contribute to business and economic growth and success. The purpose, in other words, is to make sense of such new concepts in the new and conflated field of innovation and design as “open innovation” and “co-designing” and of how to become an innovative and creative organization that is highly successful; whether talking about in-house designers, hiring design consultancies to work on product or service design or on organizational processes in commercial or public contexts

    Despite a high interest, there has been a paucity of research that would have defined or specified on the basis of case-based evidence, for example, roles that designers and their competence can have as a force for innovation. Such definition is the objective of our research project, Creativity for Growth and Innovation in Europe (Cre8tv.EU), where we define these roles and create a typology for the roles designers and design competence have for innovation and how such design involvement can be harnessed for creating competitive advantage of firms.

  • 18. Kulinska, Maria
    et al.
    Bruniaux, Pascale
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    VIRTUAL MANNEQUINS AND GARMENT PARAMETRIZATION2016In: VIRTUAL MANNEQUINS AND GARMENT PARAMETRIZATION, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Kulinska, Maria
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Swedish School of Textiles, University of Borås.
    Bruniaux, Pascale
    ENSAIT.
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Chen, Yan
    Zeng, Xienyi
    How virtual fitting leads to sustainable fashion2016In: Proceedings, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Especially in the fast fashion segment of the global clothing industry, ill-fitting garments degenerate into waste as they return to store, are left unsold or unused, or otherwise outdate. To address these problems of ill-fit, we accessed from databanks the 3D morphological measurements of 478 French female consumers. We extracted virtual mannequins representative of three dominant bodylines types. Clinical evidence suggests that, among body lines for good fit between a particular consumer and a particular grade of garment, the neck and armholes are pivotal. Cross-tabulating across the above matrix of design requirements, our simulation reveals how virtual fitting for draping and ease allowance on a particular virtual mannequin improves fit and thus reduces garment waste. Given that 3D parametrization holds promise to improve sustainability in fast fashion, we call for clinical trials, as well as for replication or trials in other segments of the fashion industry, other products than garments, and/or other industries. 

  • 20.
    Kykyri, Virpi-Liisa
    et al.
    Jyväskylä University.
    Tienari, Janne
    Aalto University.
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Puutio, Risto
    Metacommunication in organizational changeIn: Journal of management inquiry, ISSN 1056-4926, E-ISSN 1552-6542Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21. Ravaja, Niklas
    et al.
    Aula, Pekka
    Falco, Alessio
    Laaksonen, Salla
    Salminen, Mikko
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Online News and Corporate Reputation A Neurophysiological Investigation2015In: Journal of Media Psychology, ISSN 1864-1105, E-ISSN 2151-2388, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 118-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined emotional, motivational, and evaluative responses to positively and negatively valenced online news messages about companies with a good or bad corporate reputation; the valence of reader comments on the news messages was also varied. In addition to self-report ratings, physiological measurements, including electroencephalography (EEG), facial electromyography (EMG), and electrodermal activity (EDA), were obtained continuously. Self-reported pleasure and willingness to use products/services, relative left frontal EEG activation (i.e., approach motivation), and EDA were higher for good-reputation companies compared with bad-reputation companies. The findings show that corporate reputation affects emotional and motivational processes and that the emotional tone of messages and reader comments in online news affects reputation formation.

  • 22. Sievers, Henrik
    et al.
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Path creation meets path continuation in a complex technological system: Sonera’s quest for telecom industry’s dominant design, 1980-20102016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been paucity of research in how industrial evolution and path dependence happen in a complex technological system. Historical analyses of technologies such as those related to automobiles provide evidence that once a dominant design is settled, there are increasing returns to industry- and market-wide adoption. Innovation and the creation of a (potential) path alone do not suffice. Against this background, this paper reports on findings from our analysis of a historical and embedded case study of the telecom industry and Sonera (a.k.a. Telecom Finland), 1980 to 2010. The paper concludes with four propositions, two of them strengthening earlier research and two other ones offering novel directions. These are: (1) also in a complex technological system, upon or directly after the occurrence of a discontinuity or discontinuities, complementary assets appear to provide limited competitive advantage for any company; (2) once a dominant design is in place, it homogenizes consumer and other customer preferences also in a complex technological system; (3) the homogenization increases possibilities for “hybridization”; that is, that co-existing and meeting of two or more earlier independent paths continue; and (4) at this “intersection”, there is, at least for a short moment, simultaneous path continuation and path creation. 

  • 23.
    Sievers, Henrik
    et al.
    Aalto University.
    Hacklin, Fredrik
    ETH Zurich.
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Salo, Jari
    Kohtamaki, Marko
    University of Vaasa.
    Coevolution of market orientation and industry evolution: A historical and comparative study in a telecom company2016Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focus on learning about coevolution of a market orientation (MO) and industry evolution (IO) on the basis of a longitudinal case study of marketing orientation and new telecommunications technologies in the global telecommunications industry, and how the orientation and the technologies shaped and were shaped by developments within a Finnish telecommunications firm. It appears that when the industrial market evolved from closed to semi-open, MO took the form of actions to commercialize technological expertise, create new services, and to provide ways on how communicate strategic vision. MO is here defined as the coexistence and coevolution of customer orientation, competitor orientation, and inter-functional coordination. It is defined to be strong when it is proactive and explorative, weak when it is reactive and exploitative. When the industrial market studied in this paper opened up fully, MO transformed into actions focusing attention on the short term, controlling actions and cognition as to commercialize expertise or new services. In other words, the full opening up of an industrial market appears to weaken marketing orientation, while initial semi-opening appears to be more conducive to capabilities in R&D, cross-functional or cross-SBU collaboration, credibility of strategic vision, or bargaining power vis-à-vis vendors. Implications for further research are given.

  • 24. Svengren Holm, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Ainamo, Antti
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Designers’ roles in digital context: A three-company comparative study2016Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 24 of 24
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