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  • 1. Davis, Felecia A.
    et al.
    Dumitrescu, Delia Mihaela
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Patterning by heat: responsive textile structures2013Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This publication is a exhibition catalog which is one of 6 catalogs in the set. It is titled Patterning by Heat: Responsive Textile Structures and describes two research phases that develop textiles for architectural application. The first phase is discussed in the essay 'Digital Translations Workshop: Form Active Textile Structures'. A second phase is discussed in the essay ' Transforming Material: Responsive Knitted Tension Structures'.

  • 2.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Dual-textures: textiles in between function and ornamentation2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrating computational technology to architectural surfaces challenges the traditional design process offering novel possibilities to design materials and spaces. Starting with a conceptual design exercise, the present paper discusses the relation between form, textile expression and human interaction in architectural design by joining together different design practices such as architecture, textile and interaction design. The aim of the paper is to challenge design views and to integrate textiles and computerized technology as part of the expression in space design that means to relate the aesthetic of the space to the user’s actions. It is a reflection on the role of interactive textiles textures that exceed the expressional and technological limits of the traditional textile materials having dual nature between function and ornamentation in architectural design. The present paper is an example of practice based research and follows a design project that had as objective to design a collection of interactive textile structures meant to be used in an architectural context. The aim of the project was to explore the soft face of computerized technology and to integrate it into the space design to generate new typologies that relate the space to the human presence; to explore situations how people’s relation to the space materializes and progresses in time by the mean of interactive soft surfaces.

  • 3.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Interactive Textile Expressions in Spatial Design: Architecture as Synesthetic Expression2010In: Design Principles and Practices: An International Journal, ISSN 1833-1874, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 11-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extending the role of the surface from just an embellishment of the tectonics to communicative devices challenges the traditional design process in architecture. Through a series of design examples, the paper presents a research program that introduces and discusses a new grammar of ornamentation generated by the relation between surface expression and the act of use in the build space. Projects such as Knitted light, Touching loops, Designing with heat and Tactile glow are examples meant to analyze the relation between material, space, time and interaction expression through the design of three dimensional knitted interactive textile structures. The design process joins together different design fields such as architectural, textile and interaction design in order to re-define the relation between human being and space. The design process starts with the microstructure of the textile element and ends with the space design using the interaction design as a tool to relate the human presence to space. The paper aims to propose new interactive spatial expressions created by the integration of computational technology into soft interactive textile surfaces that enable the user to perceive the complexity of the architectural space through a synesthetic perception, that exceeds the limits of visuality.

  • 4.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    International Seminar at Kolding Design School- Textiles, light, ornament and interior space2009Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Knitted Light ‐ Space and Emotion ‐ design of textile expressions that integrate light as functional and aesthetic asset in order to enlarge our space experience. Starting from the relation between light, textiles and space the present project proposes a vision of textiles as an interface between interior and exterior as part of building facades. The purpose of the project is to reintroduce textiles as an alternative to the functional and aesthetic layer of glass by being applied to the interior part of the façade. This is to create a textile interface that interacts with light between the indoor and outdoor environment; to offer architects an advanced textile complement to the conventional materials in building design. The design process follows two general paths one oriented towards function having as aim to enhance the functional potential of the material such as energy saver and the other towards expression by using the emotional potential of the combination of textiles and light to raise the user’s interaction with the built environment. Each of the resulting prototypes develops an individual idea based on the effect created by light and its surface in order to create an interactive environment. Alongside with the aesthetical values given by the exploration of the relation between textiles and light, the project has a strong technical approach by exploring different possibilities to integrate artificial light into the textile structures and to create three‐dimensional surfaces using knitting as a technique.

  • 5.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Knitted Light: Space and Emotion2008In: The Nordic Textile Journal 2008, Special Edition Smart Textiles, p. 158-169Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Relational Textile Expressions for Space Design- an example of practice-based research in architectural design2011In: Proceedings of Symposium and annual meeting in the Nordic Association of Architectural Research, Aarhus, Denmark, 4-6 May 2011, Nordic Association of Architectural Research , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Starting with Allen’s definition on architectural design as a material practice, this paper develops further the discussion on practice-based research methods and on the role of the artifact in development of foundational theory of architectural design. Relational Textile Expressions for Space Design is an example of practice-based research in architectural design, where research by material design aims to develop theoretical knowledge based on designed experiments.

  • 7.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Relational Textiles2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between technology and the expression of form have always been interconnected in the architectural design process; associating the art of envisioning spaces with the craft of materializing them. Recently in terms of surface fabrication, computational tools of representation and material fabrication opened for architectural design new possibilities to explore novel spatial expressions. Surface design processes in architecture start to borrow from the logic of representation of different non-hierarchical structures, e.g., biological systems or textile construction techniques. Relating to that, the present fascination of textiles in architectural design relies on this specific way of building surface design as non-hierarchical form, and by that, allowing the designer to play with the depth of the surface design at micro and macro levels. Exploring different relations between digital and physical through textiles expressions, this research reassess static principles of form–marking the turn from static to relational principles. Thus, the intention is to describe how the character of the textiles and computation as design material redefines the notion of space trough surface aesthetics merging the digital to the physical, and how spatiality can be questioned through textile and interaction aesthetics. Using practice-based research methodology, this research opens and explores this design space by relating theory and practice; it questions and reframes fundamental concepts of expression and scale in architecture by proposing methods for surface design, and a specific language to describe textile architectural aesthetics.

  • 8.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Relational Textiles for Space Design:design methods and expressions2011Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of the Smart Textiles field opens possibilities for designers to combine traditional surface fabrication techniques with advanced technology in the design process. When it comes to the field of Smart Textiles as interactive materials for space design, it is essential to understand the identity of the material through design and also to understand the novel expressions being mediated for space. Thus, the purpose of this thesis is to develop knowledge by design on Smart Textiles as materials for architecture and to do so through design. The thesis formulates a research program to frame the design explorations. Thus, Relational Textiles for Space Design is defined as a research program in architecture where the focus lies on developing methods to design interactive textile surfaces using knitted constructions. The program is illustrated by the design projects e.g., Knitted Light, Touching Loops, Designing with Heat and Tactile Glow. As a result of the research, a new methodological framework for interactive textile design is proposed. The framework defines the notions of field and frame of reference for the design. These notions form a method to discuss design variables of relational textile expressions. Based on the design examples, the emerging expressions are described according to the field relations that the interactive textile introduces in space. Thus, expressions of spatialization e.g., reduction, amplification, addition and disassociation are introduced.

  • 9.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Relational textiles: surface expressions in space design2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of the Smart Textiles field opens possibilities for designers to combine traditional surface fabrication techniques with advanced technology in the design process. The purpose of this work is to develop knowledge on interactive knitted textiles as materials for architecture and to do so through practice-based design research. The thesis formulates a research program in order to frame the design explorations, in which scale and material expression are major placeholders. Consequently, Relational Textiles for Space Design is defined as a research program with focus on surface aesthetics and the program is illustrated by design experiments exploring the expressiveness of light, heat and movement as design materials. As a result of the research presented in this thesis, a new methodological framework for interactive textile design is proposed. The framework defines field of reference and frame of reference as basic notions in surface design. These notions form a basic frame used to revise and present the methods behind the design examples Knitted Light, Touching Loops, Designing with Heat, Tactile Glow, Repetition and Textile Forms in Movement. Relating the space of Relational Textiles for Space Design to existing surface methodology in architecture gives rise to new issues that need to be addressed. For which levels of the design process will these textiles be integrated? The last chapter reflects on the role of Relational Textiles for Space Design as possible methods or expressions in the existing space of surface prototyping.

  • 10.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Time-based matter: suggesting new variables for space design2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Presently, digitalisation has moved beyond a desktop paradigm to one of ubiquitous computing; by introducing new possibilities and dynamic materials to various design fields, e.g. product design and architecture, it allows future spaces to be envisioned. Prior to being incorporated in the housing of the future, however, the hybrid character of computational materials raises questions with regard to the development of the appropriate design methods to allow them to be used in the production of space. Thus, merging physical and digital attributes in the material design process and expression not only enables a better understanding of materials through design, but also requires a cross-disciplinary methodology to be articulated in order to allow different perspectives on e.g. material, interaction, and architecture to interweave in the design process. Based on a practice-based research methodology, this paper proposes a cross-disciplinary framework where the notion of temporal scalability – enabled by the character of computation as a design material – is discussed in relation to form and material in architecture. The framework is illustrated by two different design examples, Repetition and Tactile Glow, and the methods behind their creation – merging time, material, and surface aesthetics – are discussed.

  • 11.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Davis, Felecia
    Pennsylvania State University.
    Knitted Heat-Active Textiles: Pixelated Reveal and the Radiant Daisy2017In: Active Matter / [ed] Skylar Tibbits, Cambridge (MA): MIT Press, 2017, p. 205-212Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Davis, Felecia
    Pattering by Heat2012Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Patterning by Heat: The Responsive Textile Structures presents 4 different computational textile structures that change the appearance of space through 2 different transformations that happen in the surface expression. The first typology of material is pixilated, designed with yarn that melts at high temperature; accordingly, the fabric opens or breaks when it receives current. The opening allows designers flexibility to experiment with see through effects on the fabric, or to ‘write’ upon the fabric making apertures, collecting foreground and background together in one shape. The second material has been designed with yarn that shrinks or draws solid lines in the fabric when it receives current. The shrinking reveals a more opaque patterning in the textile closing parts of that textile off, transforming the nature of that space. Both breaking and shrinking yarns have been knitted into four different architectural tension structures that are designed using computation and textiles to track people’s presence in space by the changes that appear in the surface design.

  • 13.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Davis, Felecia
    Stuckeman Center for Design and Computation in the School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture at Pennsylvania State University.
    What and When Is the Textile? Extending the Reach of Computation through Textile Expression2015In: Real Time - Proceedings of the 33rd eCAADe Conference - Volume 2 / [ed] Martens, B, Wurzer, G, Grasl T, Lorenz, WE and Schaffranek, R, Vienna, Austria: Vienna University of Technology , 2015, Vol. 2, p. 417-426Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors of this article argue for 'making time appear' in computational materials and objects so that it can be used to help people become aware of their relation to their environments. [Hallnäs & Redström 2001] As more computational and responsive materials come into play when designing architectural spaces designers might consider opening up the dimension of time to 'make time appear' rather than disappear. [Hallnäs & Redström 2001] Computational materials are materials which transform expression and respond to inputs read by computer programs. Making time appear can have many uses particularly in applications where people can be helped by the awareness of unfolding of time, where the temporality is linked to transformative body experience rather than project efficiency or collapsing distance. If architects, designers, engineers and others could begin to consider and use time as a way to promote reflection then it would be possible to design materials which could expand human thinking through the material itself.

  • 14.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Hörteborn (Henrysson), Erica
    Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Williams, Chris
    Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Zboinska, Malgorzata
    Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Felbrich, Benjamin
    Institute for Computational Design and Construction, University of Stuttgart.
    Textile architecture (in)formed by wind: Design processes and tools: Workshop 92018Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop will explore the design processes and tools related to textile architecture formed by wind. On one hand, we will focus on how the internal structure of textiles can affect their behaviour and geometric expression when in movement. On the other, we will experiment with diverse tools useful for designing such textile architecture in movement, ranging from digital simulations of aesthetic expressions and behaviours, through structural property assessment, up to physical models set in motion by moving air.

    Textiles as design materials in architecture are considered formless. In tensile architecture, textiles are designed to follow a predesigned shape, with coated woven fabrics stretched until the resulting shape is virtually stiff; this to avoid deformation by wind. But what happens if we allow movement in the textile? What if wind becomes a design variable to decide upon the expression of textile architectural form? As a building material textile is starting to gain more interest in architecture. The possibility of creating seemingly endless variations of textiles with different behaviour and functionalities is very appealing from a design perspective. It is an easily transported and lightweight material and can be made from a range of different yarns, including reused textile fibres and wood, which gives it a great potential to be a sustainable choice for architecture.

    The workshop will use a combination of computational tools using C++ code, Processing code and Grasshopper to investigate fabric geometry and behaviour at scales from the knitting and weaving of individual yarns to clothes and large-scale fabric structures. At the small scale we are focusing on topology and graph theory and at the large scale the interaction of fabric and wind is of prime interest. The emphasis is on geometry, physics and artistic expression of textile in motion. Participants will be given a simple source code which can be modified, even by those with little experience of programming. Throughout the workshop participants will get a basic introduction in different textile morphologies, and the possibility to explore different textile material behaviours, from the structure and geometries of the treads in the woven and knitted textile to the shapes and application in a building scale. The relationship between these scales will be explored both physically and digitally. How does the geometry of the threads affect the overall shape? Participants will work with both computer models as well as physical models, and gain an understanding for the geometry of the textile material, learn about different ways and means of simulating textile behaviour in movement and get a comparison of the challenges brought in by each type of simulation. A large-scale model will be produced during the workshop and exhibited during the conference.

  • 15.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Kooroshnia, Marjan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Landin, Hanna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Exploring the relation between time-based textile patterns and digital environments2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Presently, digital sketching environments have come to be used as a complement to the traditional manufacturing techniques for textiles; the research presented here looks into the area of time-based patterns and their relation to digital tools and textile structural techniques. Thus, the aim of this work is to expand on the existing methods used by designers, and to explore ways for capturing and expressing the complexity and temporality of pattern changes in textiles. Furthermore, our result sketches a method for using dynamic colors to design complex surface patterns for textiles by utilizing methods that facilitate the hiding and/or revealing of multiple colors and shapes on the printed surface of the textile; this method is discussed in connection to the different expressions that can be achieved by using knitting as media for print.

  • 16.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kooroshnia, Marjan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Landin, Hanna
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Silent colours: Designing for wellbeing using smart colours2018In: Proceedings of AIC 2018 Colour & Human Comfort, Lisbon, Portugal, 25-29 September 2018.: Lisbon, Portugal 25-29 September 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When used within textile printing, smart colours have expanded the design possibilities for textile patterns as relates to both motifs and, more importantly, uses. Smart colours suggest new functionalities and provide specific perceptions, reactions, and activities in terms of usage. At the same time, the need for peripheral information sources that are less intrusive than many of the everyday devices of the present has continuously been addressed to improve wellbeing, e.g. by making life more manageable and meaningful through the use of technology in everyday life. We aim to increase knowledge of the design qualities of smart colours, which is of use in relation to creating non- or less intrusive ways of displaying peripheral information. This paper focuses on the character of colour transition and discusses different colour-changing possibilities with regard to surface patterns; that is, from the perspectives of different levels of change and complexity and in relation to levels of intrusiveness and information comprehensibility. 

  • 17.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kooroshnia, Marjan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Landin, Hanna
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Heester, Bob (Designer, Contributor)
    Faculty of Architecture, TU Delft, The Netherlands.
    Dritsa, Dimitra (Contributor, Designer)
    Faculty of Architecture, TU Delft, The Netherlands.
    Slagter, Esther (Contributor, Designer)
    Faculty of Architecture, TU Delft, The Netherlands.
    Teeuw, Marien (Contributor, Designer)
    Faculty of Architecture, TU Delft, The Netherlands.
    Textrunium2015Other (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Landin, Hanna
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kooroshnia, Marjan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Talman, Riikka
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    On researching and teaching Textile Design: examples from the Swedish School of Textiles2018In: Soft Landing / [ed] Nimkurat, N., Raebild, U., Piper, A., Helsinki, Finland: Cumulus International Association of Universities and Collegies in Art, Design, Media , 2018, 3, p. 72-87Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Artistic research in design is relatively new compared to experimental research in the natural sciences but it has matured a great deal over the last decade. Its extensive development has brought new challenges to professional practice, and also raised questions regarding how knowledge should be imparted in academia. By examining the field of textile design, which has traditionally been taught in close synergy with professional practice, we can discern the emergence of doctoral theses that have brought not only new perspectives to textile practice but also a new role to the design educator as a researcher within the academia. One of the challenges that design education program are facing, however, relates to creating a better connection between research and education in order to continually enrich curricula with new developments in the field, so that basic knowledge and novelty can interact. By looking closely at the development of the research environment at The Swedish School of Textiles and the interaction with undergraduate and postgraduate education, this chapter describes how research has informed the development of textile design education.

  • 19.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Landin, Hanna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    An Interactive Textile Hanging: Textile, Context, and Interaction2012In: Studies in Material Thinking, ISSN 1177-6234, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents three scenarios in which we explore different possibilities for interactive textile hangings, textile hangings that are knitted and attached to servomotors. We have identified a series of variables that address the relationship between the expressions of the changeable pattern, created by rotating motors, and the unchangeable textile pattern. We use these variables, combined with contextual dichotomies, to discuss the relationships between the textile expression, the temporal expression, the place and the interactions for these scenarios.

  • 20.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Lundstedt, Lotta
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Persson, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Satomi, Mika
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Repetition: interactive expressions of pattern translation2012In: Proceedings The Art of Research 2012, The art of research 2012 Making, Reflecting and understading, 28-29 November 2012 at Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture Helsinki, Finland, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a way of opening a space where methods from the fields of fashion design, textile design and interaction design overlap, the project Repetition intersects different methodologies through practice-based research in design. Experiments were conducted to explore ways of creating relationships between body and space by means of translating information as pattern design between garments and interactive knitted walls. By arranging a startup performance, we reflected on the expressional variables that influence the expression of the pattern translations; variables concerning the garments, the walls, the print and the movements were illustrated by the expressions found. The result formulates specific descriptions regarding accuracy and distribution of pattern translation, illustrating basic concepts of pattern formations identified in visual changes appearing in the garment. By communicating our understanding of basic expressions, Repetition aims to formulate a new framework for collaborative work as a method for further design.

  • 21.
    Dumitrescu, Delia Mihaela
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Landin, Hanna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Mohr, Christian
    University of Borås, Central Administration.
    Knitted Forms in Movement2014Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Presence in a space has own rhythm of change; it is organic,but it can be expressed structurally by the textile forms. The textile acts as a mirror between spaces that have been separated; the textile collects and spreads information through changes in structure. Motion sensors embedded in the textile are tracking the movement in one space, after a short time the textile starts to rotate the knitted modules in a slow pace repositioning its patterns.

  • 22.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Nilsson, Linnéa
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Persson, Anna
    Worbin, Linda
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Smart Textiles as raw materials for design2014In: Shapeshifting: A Conference on Transformative Paradigms of Fashion and Textile Design / [ed] Frances Joseph, Mandy Smith, Miranda Smitheram, Jan Hamon, Auckland, New Zealand: Textile and Design Laboratory and Colab, Auckland University of Technology , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Materials fabricate the designed artefact, but they can also play an important role in the design process; as a medium or method used to develop the design. Textiles can, with their soft and flexible properties, be easily transformed and altered in numerous ways; for example, by cutting, folding orprinting on the material. This transformative character makes textiles interesting sketching media for surface explorations when designing artefacts. The development of transformable materials; for example, fusible yarns and colour changing pigments, have expanded these inherent transformative qualities of textiles and have opened up the design field of smart textiles. Accordingly, this new material context has created a new area for textile designers to explore, where it is possible to enhance and play with the alterable character of their textiles, and control their transformation through physical manipulation and programming. However, these expanded transformative properties also open up a new task for textile designers; to design "smart textiles as raw materials for design". By this term we mean, textiles that are not finished in their design but that can be developed and enhanced when they take part in a product or space design process. In this article, we explore and start to define what smart textiles as raw materials for design can be, and look at how these materials can come into and add something to another design process. The foundation for this exploration is a number of textile examples from the “Smart Textiles sample collection” and our experiences when developing and designing with them. (The Smart Textiles sample collection is a range of textiles that is designed and produced by the Smart Textile Design Lab, to give students, designers and researchers direct access to different types of smart textiles). The possibilities and limitations of smart textiles as raw materials for design are explored by looking at the textile examples from two perspectives: firstly, by looking at the considerations that come with designing this type of textile design, and secondly by looking at what these transformative textiles can bring to another design process. Each example is analyzed and classified according to what transformable design variables for structure and surface change can be embedded in the textile design, and what design variables this subsequently creates for a design process that uses these materials i.e., describing what type of transformation different examples of smart textiles introduce to the design process/design space; whether the change is reversible or irreversible, and whether the change occurs through physical or through digital manipulation of the material. This article ends with a discussion of how smart textiles in the form of raw materials for design could influence how we design textiles and how we design with textiles. Can transformative materials enrich material explorations in a design process? Can further development and alteration of the material design be introduced or defined by the textile designer? Could smart textiles as raw materials for design open up a stronger connection between the design of textiles and the design of the product or spaces where they will be used?

  • 23.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Persson, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Exploring Heat as Interactive Expressions for Knitted Structures2011In: Nordic Design Research Conferences, Making Design Matter Proceedings of Nordes 2011. Nordic Design Research Conference 2011, Helsinki, Finland, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a practice-based research project in which design experiments were conducted to explore how knitted structures can be designed with particular emphasis on various interactive heat expressions. Several heat transformable structures, able to both sense and react to human touch, were developed in the textile collection Knitted Heat. The designed textiles serve as references to reflect further on the role of interactive textiles as materials for potential designs. Specific scenarios defined by shrinking, breaking, stiffening, texturizing and warming expressed by the textile transformations exemplify and discuss their potential as complementary for other design processes.

  • 24.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Persson, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Touching Loops2009Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Touching Loops is a collection of three knitted textiles with structure-changing interactive properties. The textiles are able to sense and react to touch by shrinking, breaking or becoming stiff. The textiles are thought of as interactive architectural material. When they are touched, a specific area in the textile becomes hot. A microcontroller that is connected to the textile is programmed to sense and react to touch. The materials in the samples react to heat in different ways by shrinking, becoming stiff or by breaking into pieces. The developing process consisted in programming the patterns for industrial machines in such a way that the conductive silver yarns are of important matter for the material aesthetics besides their function to generate heat. The three knitted pieces react in different ways when current passes trough the conductive yarns. The first piece combines a silver coated copper yarn and Pemotex yarn in a ridge pattern. In the second sample a Jaquard pattern combines shrinking polyester monofilament, a Grilon yarn and a silver coated copper yarn. This piece reacts to heat by breaking and shrinking. The third piece is constructed with partial knitting and ridge patterns and the yarns used are Pemotex, a Grilon yarn and the silver coated copper yarn. When the conductive yarn gets hot, the ridges shrink and harden. The aim of the project is to explore possibilities for expressive interactive tactile knitted materials and structures. The textiles are seen as a possible material to use in the context of architecture.

  • 25.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Persson, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Stretch & Squeeze2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A computer mouse is a generic interaction tool designed for navigating graphical elements on a two dimensional plane. It is developed in a context of technology and formed to serve the ergonomics of the desktop work situation. A textile mouse, on the other hand, engages a different context. The textile alone evokes the traditions of clothes and home décor that will inevitably influence how it is perceived and consequently used.

  • 26.
    Persson, Anna
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Touching Loops: Interactive Tactility in textiles2008Other (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Satomi, Mika
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Lundstedt, Lotta
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Dumitrescu, Delia Mihaela
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Persson, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Repetition2011Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    “Repetition” is a Fashion Design and E-textile design project, which explore the use of thermo-chromic ink fabric and its interaction when designing a garment for performance art centering the body and movement as its design element.

  • 28.
    Tadesse, Melkie Getnet
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Gheorghe Asachi Technical University of IASI.
    Nierstrasz, Vincent
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Loghin, Carmen
    Gheorghe Asachi Technical University of IASI,Romania.
    Chen, Yan
    Soochow University, China.
    Wang, Lichuan
    Soochow University, China.
    3D Printing of NinjaFlex Filament onto PEDOT:PSS-CoatedTextile Fabrics for Electroluminescence Applications2017In: Journal of Electronic Materials, ISSN 0361-5235, E-ISSN 1543-186X, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 2082-2092, article id 6015-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electroluminescence (EL) is the property of a semiconductor material pertaining to emitting light in response to an electrical current or a strong electric field. The purpose of this paper is to develop a flexible and lightweight EL device. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) measurement was taken to observe the thermal degradation behavior of NinjaFlex. Poly (3, 4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly (styrene sulfonic acid) (PEDOT:PSS) with ethylene glycol (EG) was coated onto polyester fabric where NinjaFlex was placed onto the coated fabric using three-dimensional (3D) printing and phosphor paste and BendLay filament were coated 3D-printed subsequently. Adhesion strength and flexibility of the 3D-printed NinjaFlex on textile fabrics were investigated. The TGA results of the NinjaFlex depicts that no weight loss was observed up to 150°C. Highly conductive with a surface resistance value of 8.5 ohms/sq., and uniform surface appearance of coated fabric were obtained as measured and observed by using four-probe and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively at 60% PEDOT:PSS. The results of the adhesion test showed that peel strengths of 4160, 3840 N/m were recorded for polyester and cotton specimens, respectively. No weight loss was recorded following three washing cycles of NinjaFlex. The bending lengths were increased by only a factor of 0.082 and 0.577 for polyester and cotton samples at 0.1 mm thickness, respectively; which remains sufficiently flexible to be integrated into textiles. The prototype device emitted light with a 12 V alternating current (AC) power supply. 

  • 29.
    Worbin, Linda
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Bondesson, Amy
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Dumitrescu, Delia
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Landin, Hanna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Persson, Anna
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Mohr, Christian
    University of Borås, Central Administration.
    Textile Possibilities2008Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Textile can be more than just patterns and washability. Today it can have other functions, visible or hidden and they can be interactive. Textile has simply become high-tech. What used to be considered science fiction is today reality. The exhibition TEXTILE POSSIBILITIES focuses on experiments that explores the possibilities that modern textile materials offers. There are no actual products on display in the exhibition, instead the latest research from textile is shown. For instance, visitors can experience how electricity, heat and movements alter colours and structures within the textiles. The exhibition shows the research process and lets the visitor interact with the different textile prototypes. The exhibition TEXTILE POSSIBILITIES aims to inspire, convey knowledge and to visualise a possible textile development. It shows a way for how experimental design research through collaboration with the commercial community can affect and build it’s own future here in Sweden.

  • 30.
    Dumitrescu, Delia (Creator)
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Persson, Anna (Creator)
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    designing with heat2009Artistic output (Unrefereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aiming to open a new design space that connects three areas of architectural, interaction and textile design, the knitted structures Furry lines and Groovy squares were designed. By combining conventional textile yarns together with conductive yarns, the result investigates the sensation of warmth through the design of knitted structures. The purpose is to offer a synesthetic experience that correlate the physical and visual perception of space and focuses on tactility as an asset to create interactive architectural environments. The structures were made using different knitting techniques, combining a silver-coated copper yarn and conventional textile yarns. The silver coated copper yarn is used both for heat generating and touch sensing properties. Connected to a microcontroller able to sense and react on small differences in electricity, the textile becomes a touch sensor itself. By offering feed-back to hand touch DESIGNING WITH HEAT DELIA DUMITRESCU ANNA PERSSON by becoming warmly pleasant to the skin, new types of patterns can be created using the combination between heat and human touch that exceed the visual dimension. Designing with heat exemplifies how visible and invisible expressions merge into one experience, expressed through the textile material. The textile structure is perceived both through the eyes of imagination and the skin as heated patterns. The prototypes show how heat could be part of the surface aesthetics alongside with colour and shape.

  • 31.
    Dumitrescu, Delia (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kooroshnia, Marjan (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Keune, Svenja (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Talman, Riikka (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kapur, Jyoti (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Exhibition on on-going research, experimental work and prototypes in textile design from the Smart Textiles Design Lab at Techtextil 2017 in Frankfurt on 9-12th May 20172017Artistic output (Unrefereed)
  • 32.
    Dumitrescu, Delia (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kooroshnia, Marjan (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kapur, Jyoti (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Keune, Svenja (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Landin, Hanna (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Talman, Riikka (Designer)
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Smart Textiles design: advancement of methods and expressions at MoOD and Indigo 172017Artistic output (Unrefereed)
1 - 32 of 32
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