Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 114
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Abylaev, Mansur
    et al.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Torstensson, Håkan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Resilience challenges for textile enterprises in a transitional economy and regional trade perspective: a study of Kyrgyz conditions2014In: International Journal of Supply Chain and Operations Resilience, ISSN 2052-868X, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 54-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to contribute to the resilience development of the textile sector in a transitional economy, based on a case study of the Kyrgyz Republic, where the transition to a free market system generated broken supply chains, low diversification, a high open economy level of the textile sector and dependence on international trade regulations. The approach used is based on theories of organisational resilience, literature studies and fieldwork. Scenarios are developed and analysed by event tree and SWOT analysis, to identify resilience properties of the textile sector. Findings focus on the implications of future membership or non-membership, respectively, in the Customs Union of Belarus, Kazakhstan and Russia, where both supportive and adverse effects have been identified. The results contribute to the knowledge of the transitional economy conditions and serve as a guideline for stakeholders about enhancing resilience, both at the industrial and organisational levels, of the Kyrgyz textile sector.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Agrawal, Tarun Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kumar, Vijay
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Blockchain-Based Framework for Traceability – A Case Example of Nonwoven Supply Chain2019In: EDANA-Nonwovens Innovation Academy 2019, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supply chain traceability has emerged as a prime requirement for multi-tier supply chains. It not only enables the supply chain visibility but also caters to the consumer requirements related to transparency, quality assurance, and production tracking. Nonwoven supply chain is one such example that particularly requires traceability implementation due to prevailing problems related to information asymmetry and complex supply chain networks. Conversely, it is challenging for supply chain partners to share all the competitive information in the unsecure environment. In this context, in line with Industry 4.0, this study investigates blockchain technology, which uses a shared and secured data infrastructure to keep track of information about assets and requires no central authority to function. It further proposes a blockchain-based traceability framework that explains supply chain partner interaction and network architecture at organizational level and smart contract and transaction validation rules at the operational level. In order to illustrate the application of the framework, the study presents an example of a nonwoven supply chain to track the nonwoven manufacturing and distribution processes. The proposed system can build a technology-based trust among the supply chain actors, where the distributed ledger would be used to store and authenticate of supply chain transactions.

  • 3. Agrawal, Tarun Kumar
    et al.
    Kumar, Vijay
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Wang, Lichuan
    College of Textile and Clothing Engineering, Soochow University, 215168-Suzhou, China.
    Chen, Yan
    College of Textile and Clothing Engineering, Soochow University, 215168-Suzhou, China.
    Blockchain-based Framework for Supply Chain Traceability: A Case Example of Textile and Clothing Industry2021In: Computers & industrial engineering, ISSN 0360-8352, E-ISSN 1879-0550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traceability has emerged as a prime requirement for a multi-tier and multi-site production. It enables visibility and caters to the consumer requirements of transparency and quality assurance. Textile and clothing industry is one such example that requires traceability implementation to address prevailing problems of information asymmetry and low visibility. Customers find it difficult to access product data that can facilitate ethical buying practices or assure product authenticity. Besides, it is challenging for stakeholders to share crucial information in an insecure environment with risk of data manipulations and fear of losing information advantage. In this context, this study investigates and proposes a blockchain-based traceability framework for traceability in multi-tier textile and clothing supply chain. It conceptualizes the interaction of supply chain partners, and related network architecture at the organizational level and smart contract and transaction validation rules at the operational level. To illustrate the application of the proposed framework, the study presents an example of organic cotton supply chain using blockchain with customized smart contract and transaction rules. It finally demonstrates the applicability of the developed blockchain by testing it under two parameters. The proposed system can build a technology-based trust among the supply chain partners, where the distributed ledger can be used to store and authenticate supply chain transactions. Further, the blockchain-based traceability system would provide a unique opportunity, flexibility, and authority to all partners to trace-back their supply network and create transparent and sustainable supply chain.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4. Agrawal, Tarun Kumar
    et al.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Classification of traceability information in textile and clothing supply chain: A Delphi-based approach2018In: EurOMA 2018 Proceedings, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study explores empirically the need and requirement of traceability system in Textile and Clothing (T&C) supply chain. A Delphi based survey was conducted with 28 supply chain experts (industry professionals and academicians) to collect qualitative and quantitative data in order to identify and prioritize various factors that influence traceability adoption in T&C supply chains. Based on these factors the study further explores, classifies and suggests information that can be recorded and shared for a complete traceability among T&C supply chain actors, both business-to-business and business-to-customers.  

  • 5.
    Agrawal, Tarun Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Exploring secured traceability systems for implementation in textile and clothing supply chain2018In: Proceeding TIWC conference 2018, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information asymmetry and security are major challenges in multi-tier supply chains. Textile and clothing (T&C) supply chain is one such example significantly affected by these problems. Due to its complex and diverse nature, involved actors find it difficult to connect and secure each supply chain links. Exploiting this situation, a parallel counterfeit market is flourishing and gaining serious momentum. Due to this, T&C industries are suffering huge economic losses and job cuts. Additionally, owing to its opaque and untraceable supply chain, T&C industries have become a world of unethical practices. Secured traceability is an effective tool that has potentials to address these issues and make the T&C supply chain transparent and secured. It is a useful mechanism to track and trace products’ history, know about the manufacturing conditions and at the same time secure it from counterfeits and attacks targeting intellectual properties. In this context, the study conduct survey of supply chain experts to explore and rank the key technological requirements (based on the specific nature of the textile product) and traceability information that can be recorded and secured by a secured traceability system. Further, based on the findings of the survey a review of the literature was conducted to explore state of the art technologies to propose a primary secured traceability structure for the T&C supply chain.

  • 6.
    Agrawal, Tarun Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Towards a secured traceability system for closed-loop textile supply chains2017In: Data Driven Supply Chains / [ed] K. S. Pawar; A. Potter and A. Lisec, Nottingham: Centre for Concurrent Enterprise, Nottingham University Business School, 2017, p. 359-367Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Textile and clothing (T&C) industry is characterised by complex and extensive supply chain involving various stakeholders dealing with diverse raw materials. Owing to these complexities, the textile supply chain is facing numerous challenges like, counterfeit products, limited information sharing, ineffective recycling/reuse of textile products, unethical practices and interrupted information flow. As a result, a secured traceability system that can integrate the whole value chain, record, store, and track / trace all supply chain activities, make it more transparent and at the same time safeguard it from unauthorized access, has become a prime requirement for the T&C industry. In this context, the current study conducts a literature review to identify the generic requirements of traceability and in context of T&C closed-loop supply chain (CLSC). It further evaluates the role and key requisites of a cryptographic tag for textiles product, as an additional measures/parameter to secure the traceability system and prevent unauthorised access. Finally, the paper draws on key characteristics of such cryptographic tag for textile CLSC and lay down the tentative methodology that would be followed in the future research for development of a complete secure traceability system. It is anticipated that such secured traceability system can prevent counterfeits, data leakage, bring transparency and automate the reverse logistic process.

  • 7.
    Agrawal, Tarun Kumar
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Traceability in Textile and Clothing Supply Chains: Classifying Implementation Factors and Information Sets via Delphi Study2019In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 06, article id 1698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Aneja, Arun P.
    et al.
    DuPont Company.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ambidexterity drivers in plural business models’ (pBMs’) value-structure: an explorative study from DuPont2016In: From Science to Society: Innovation and Value Creation, University of Cambridge, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates how can ambidexterity be detected and classified in plural business models (pBMs) at the level of their underlying value-structure (value- creation and extraction), and what are the drivers. Such pBMs are run by multi-national firms to accommodate various technologies and innovations however is stressful due to inherent incompatibilities and conflicts between them. Existing scholarly discussion is limited in exploring this issue, from a value generation perspective, essential to identify where to and how to commit resources in these pBMs. The paper builds upon an explorative study of six successful product cases (and their associated business models) from DuPont’s Textiles Fibre Division (DTFD) to show how exploration and exploitation generates resultant trajectories along value- creation and extraction mechanisms, respectively, in a product. Consistent and inconsistent combinations of these trajectories along the value-structure results in four differential drivers of pBMs, viz. (i) technological breakthrough, (ii) market-back technology, (iii) continuous technology, and (iv) continuous market-back, thus characterizing their inherent ambidexterity. These ambidexterity tendencies are along value- creation and extraction mechanisms.

  • 9.
    Aneja, Arun
    et al.
    College of Engineering and Technology, East Carolina University.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. University of Borås.
    Textile Sustainability: Living Within Our Means2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability is defined by Brundtland as “….development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs”. An evaluation of the current ‘pulse of the planet’ which consists of nature’s core business of creating diversity, abundance and continuance yields a bleak future. It suggests limited supplies of natural resources that pose an obstacle to future worldeconomic growth. This paper makes an assessment of a sustainable future for textiles based on economic, social,and environmental dimensions. Both strategic and tactical remedies for the textile value chain are provided. Thecollective actions suggested will not ensure success but rather provide a framework for a better and safer planet.

  • 10.
    Aneja, Arun
    et al.
    East Carolina State University.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Textile Sustainability: Major Frameworks and Strategic Solutions2015In: Handbook of Sustainable Apparel Production / [ed] S. S. Muthu, CRC Press, 2015, p. 289-306Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability is commonly defined as “….development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs”. An evaluation of the current ‘pulse of the planet’ which consists of nature’s core business of creating diversity, abundance and continuance yields a bleak future. It suggests limited supplies of natural resources that pose an obstacle to future world economic growth. In this context, the work makes an assessment of a sustainable future for textiles and apparel industries based on economic, social, and environmental dimensions along the major emergent patterns highlighted in 8 critical sustainability frameworks (viz. ecological footprint, natural step, natural capitalism, industrial ecology, cradle-to-cradle, bio-mimetic, ZERI, and planetary boundaries). A fundamental mind-shift in these industries by identifying various components of non-sustainability is suggested. Such deeper insights and collective changes will not provide solutions to ensure success but rather provide a holistic and integrated systems perspective to give rise to this major transformation. 

  • 11. Aneja, Arun
    et al.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    The Quest for Continual Growth in Textiles: Innovation Diversity and Organizational Resiliency2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The brutally competitive nature globally and raw material volatility of textile industry are some of the reasons why companies cannot afford to fall behind in efficiency, innovation or organizational resiliency. The present article seeks to explore the common thread and textile-related scientific views that changed our lives through the ages. Who were the textile dream weavers and the companies that transformed our industry? In addition we explore how we can use the teachings of these lessons to build novel platforms for innovations in textiles for the future. Today, textiles and fiber science in US and Europe, from its once lofty perch in the global economy, stands in stark contrast to its preeminent position of just a decade ago. Its influence on the society as a whole has eroded enormously. Many of the synthetic fiber products that once fueled the rapid growth of the industry have become mature commodity products now characterized by low growth and lower profit margins. Intense global cost pressure, higher consumer expectations, a highly diverse customer base, shorter fashion cycles and reduced R&D spending have all contributed to the current malaise. What does the future hold and how can we reverse the trend to achieve and sustain the impressive credentials of the past? To add to the current dilemma, organizational ‘health’ and growth processes are constantly threatened in this era of turbulence. James Moore, in his book ‘The Death of Competition’ (1995) describes this dynamics as a ‘co-evolving’ one with unpredictable changes in markets, technology, workforces and organizations. Thus the drive for survival and success has translated, in recent times, to quest for resiliency – to survive and thrive in turbulences. On the other hand, most managers and academicians agree that innovation ensures superior organizational performance while recent research has shown that most resilient companies can dynamically orchestrate diverse innovation strategies. This has intensified the organization’s search for differentiated products and services, processes, business models, technology, strategies etc. pushing firms to gain competitive advantage and also to develop new knowledge and innovation performances to drive sustainable growth. This has resulted in organizations to follow multiple innovation strategies and to prudently devise their innovation repertoire for delivering growth, hence, success in turbulent times emphasizing resiliency. In this paper, authors diagnose an organization’s innovation in terms of the tendency to utilize its resources and dynamic capabilities, and streamline them along an ‘innovation topology’ viewed through a two dimensional matrix of (i) locus of development - innovation either internal or external to the organization, and (ii) change in performance - innovation either in use or being created newly. The portfolio of innovation strategies include sustaining innovation (internal) or through mergers and acquisitions (M&A)/joint ventures (JV) (by extending firm boundary) but using existing resources and capabilities in both cases; or radical/break-through innovations (creating new capacities internally) or disruptive/transformational innovation (exploring and creating new capacities beyond existing boundaries). A case study approach is adopted using Du Pont Company with its unparallel 200 years of ‘history of innovation and transformation’ for validating the proposed model. This is seminal from both business and academic theory-building perspective for devising unique innovation repertoire and organizational resiliency for continual growth.

  • 12.
    Aneja, Arun
    et al.
    Department of Engineering, East Carolina University.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kupka, Karel
    TriloByte Statistical Software, Ltd..
    Militky, Iri
    The Technical University of Liberec.
    Towards a circular economy in textiles: RESYNTEX and the European Uniion2016In: Fibres and Textiles (Vlákna a textil), ISSN 1335-0617, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 15-21Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Europe is at crossroads in terms of growth and living standards. The nexus between circulareconomy, RESYNTEX and textile provides direction and opportunity for seamless prosperity. The currentstrategy consisting of a linear economy for resource utilization, a surprisingly wasteful model of valuecreation, is leading to decline in prosperity and concomitant global influence. It must develop a moreresource savvy circular economy, with the biological and mineral nutrients of modern society continuouslycirculating. Rather than face a bleak and uncertain future dependent on resources from overseas, Europeneeds to develop technologies towards self-sufficiency in energy and water and keep materials requiredfor consumption flowing [1]. This will insure reduction in virgin resources and treat waste as a valuableinput rather than a burden for welfare of society and the environment.RESYNTEX, the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation funded program, will producesecondary raw materials from blends and pure components of unwearable textile waste and is expectedto have a strong circular economy focus. The project will develop and demonstrate a strategic design forclosed loop textile recycling throughout the value chain.

  • 13. Aneja, Arun
    et al.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Militky, Jiri
    Kupka, Karel
    Kremenakova, Dana
    Torstensson, Håkan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Textile Thru the Looking Glass: A Novel Perspective2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, textiles and fiber science in US, Europe and Japan from its once lofty perch in the global economy, stands in stark contrast to its preeminent position of few decades ago. Its influence on the society as a whole has eroded enormously. Many of the synthetic fiber products that once fuelled the rapid growth of the industry have become mature commodity products now characterized by low growth and lower profit margins. To add to the current dilemma, organizational ‘health’ and growth processes are constantly threatened in this era of turbulence. Thus the drive for survival and success has translated, in recent times, to quest for resiliency – to survive and thrive in turbulences. On the other hand, most managers and academicians agree that innovation ensures superior organizational performance while recent research has shown that most resilient companies can dynamically orchestrate diverse innovation strategies. Resiliency in such a context has become a prerequisite for a sustained long term business prosperity fuelled by diverse technological innovations. This has intensified the organization’s search for differentiated products and services, processes, business models, technology, strategies etc. pushing firms to gain competitive advantage and also to develop new knowledge and innovation performance to drive sustainable growth. Organizations now follow multiple innovation strategies to pragmatically devise their innovation repertoire for delivering growth, hence, success in turbulent times while emphasizing resiliency. What does the future hold and how can we reverse the trend to achieve and sustain the impressive credentials of the past? To understand the significance of what the future may hold, and to reverse the downward spiral of the industry, we must evaluate the successes and failures of the past and come to grips with rapid global changes and turbulences currently underway. The present article seeks to explore such an inexorable phenomenon of quantifying and correlating innovation and business resiliency over a time line, from the annual financial data of 35 healthy and unhealthy companies along with 5 textile companies over a span of few decades. These are then extrapolated with certain predictive capabilities to suggest future trends and strategies for the textile companies. Learning from these companies, if adopted, will yield capacity to transform the scenario. Assessments and classification of the economic health of a company is typically made based on some quantity derived from selected indices, such as Altman’s Z-score. These methods can describe an instantaneous status, or a “time snap” of an economical subject but lack information about the time-dynamics of the assessment, which is important for investors, shareholders and the management. We suggest using historical data to estimate current trends in the form of the first and second time-derivative of the appropriate quantity in the time domain. This new information is independent on the quantity itself and beside more precise description can be used as new predictor to improve effectiveness of classification of successful and unsuccessful subjects. This approach is further discussed in this paper.

  • 14.
    Carlsson, Jan
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Gwilt, Alison
    Sheffield Hallam University, UK.
    Larsson, Jonas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Mattila, Heikki
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Torstensson, Håkan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lidström, Anna
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Feasibility of conditional design: Organizing a circular textile value chain by design principles2017Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Carlsson, Jan
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Mouwitz, Pia
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lidström, Anna
    Another Design.
    ReDesign kläder: Förstudie2014Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Carlsson, Jan
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Torstensson, Håkan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Paras, Manoj K.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Re:Textile – Planning a Swedish Collection and Sorting Plant for Used Textiles2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Studien belyser följande frågor:− Finns det några realistiska förutsättningar att etablera en svensk sorteringsanläggning för insamlade textilier med hänsyn tagen till redan etablerade insamlingsstrukturer?− Vilka ar de avgörande kritiska faktorerna?− Hur ser framtiden ut?− Hur kan en framkomlig väg se ut för att etablera en lämplig strategi för en cirkulär ekonomi avseende använda textilier?Grundförutsättningar för studien:Idag bedrivs den ordnade insamlingen av textilier huvudsakligen av välgörenhetsorganisat-ioner som Myrorna, Röda Korset, etc. Av en total konsumtionsvolym på ca 13 kg/capita i Sverige (omfattande kläder och hemtextil) samlas 3-4 kg in av mestadels seriösa operatörer genom direktöverlämning eller genom insamlingscontainrar. Vissa butiker/varumärken har också kommit igång med mottagning av använda textilier, t.ex. H&M, Hemtex, Kapp-Ahl m.fl. Övriga kvantiteter (8-10 kg) har vi inte exakt kännedom om, men troligen hamnar de förr eller senare i containrar för brännbart.Motivet för de seriösa insamlingsorganisationerna att bedriva denna verksamhet är dels att skapa finansiella resurser för att kunna bedriva sin hjälpverksamhet, dels att skapa sysselsätt-ning för en växande kader av personer i arbetsträning och liknande. Detta innebär att verksam-heten i stor utsträckning bedrivs av volontärer samt av subventionerad personal vad avser ar-betskostnader. Samhällsnyttan som skapas genom detta är mycket stor och bör inte äventyras av förändringar i denna struktur. I regeringsuppdraget 2014 till Naturvårdsverket angående hantering av textilier framhålls detta också som en förutsättning.

    Den sorteringsverksamhet som bedrivs av dessa organisationer syftar till att sortera ut de bästa produkterna, som har förutsättningar att säljas genom egna butikskanaler. Ungefär 20 % av volymerna tar denna väg, och dessa har en helt avgörande ”värdeuppväxling”. Övriga 80 % exporteras till avsevärt lägre värde än de första 20 procenten.

    Eftersom välgörenhetsorganisationerna utför denna första fas på ett utomordentligt kostnads-effektivt sätt, samt därigenom skapar samhällsnytta som också är mycket kostnadseffektiv, kan vi inte se något som helst motiv att ändra på detta förhållande utan kanske istället förbättra möjligheterna att utveckla deras värdefulla arbete.

    För en regional/nationell sorteringscentral återstår alltså en potential bestående av ex-portkvantiteterna samt de volymer som hamnar i ”brännbart”.

    De beräkningar vi har utfört baseras på en sorteringsanläggning som bedrivs efter normala affärsbetingelser, dvs. avtalsenliga löner, marknadsmässiga hyror och avskrivningar samt rå-dande finansiella kostnader.

    Den kritiska volymen för en sådan anläggning har beräknats till en kapacitet om 40 ton/dag motsv. ca 50 anställda. Denna kapacitet motsvarar ca 40 % av totalförbrukningen (13 kg/ca-pita) i Västra Götaland eller ca 170 % om insamlingsnivån ligger på nuvarande ca 3 kg/capita.

    För att nå erforderlig volym krävs alltså:

    − Utökat geografiskt upptagningsområde

    − Maximerade marknadsandelar

    − Större insamlad volym per capita.

    Beaktande dagens kostnadsläge för en effektiv anläggning om 40 ton/dag samt de mark-nadsmässiga priser/intäkter som idag är för handen avseende ”2nd choice” kvantiteter är projektet inte ekonomiskt försvarbart. Kostnads/intäktsförhållandet ligger på ca 7,80 SEK/kg mot ca 6,50 SEK/kg.

    De faktorer som påverkar detta förhållande är följande:

    − Andelen förstasortering i fraktionerna (andelen är noll i vårt exempel)

    − Totalvolymerna

    − Kvalitetsfördelning. Bärbara plagg i förhållande till icke bärbart, dvs. kvantiteter för re-cycling etc.

    − Produktiviteten

    −Lönekostnaderna

    − Låga marknadspriser på framförallt material till recycling samt ”rags” (putstrasor)

    − Teknologi för hantering respektive potentiell sensorteknologi för automatisk sortering av-seende främst förekomst av skadliga kemikalier samt fiberinnehåll

    − Recyclingsteknik för återvinning av använda fiber till nya fiber; inte kommersiellt tillgäng-lig ännu

    − Vertikal integration (insamling-sortering; recyclingprocesser/second hand-retailing)Dessa förhållanden kan självfallet förändras och ändra bilden av konceptets realism.

    Slutsatser avseende marknadsutveckling:

    Beaktande att framtidens fiberbehov om mer än 200 miljoner ton/år (från nuvarande ca 90 miljoner ton/år) huvudsakligen genereras genom befolkningsökning och ekonomisk tillväxt i utvecklingsländer som utgör dagens exportmarknader, får detta till följd att dessa marknader blir självförsörjande avseende bärbara second hand-kläder. Alltså: våra exportmarknader minskar betydligt.

    De tekniker och marknader som måste utvecklas i strävan mot en lönsam cirkulär ekonomi utgörs följaktligen av

    − Sorteringsteknik som kan detektera och sortera på skadligt kemiskt innehåll respektive fiberinnehåll. Dessa två sorteringsförutsättningar är grundläggande för säkra och lönsamma produktinnovationer.

    − Nya tekniker och processer för utveckling av nya innovativa, värdeskapande produkter från både mekanisk, kemisk och termisk recycling.

    Dessa båda områden är centrala för att värdet på insamlade textilier kan öka vad avser både volym och priser.

    Förslag till fortsatt arbete; ett diskussionsscenario:Förslaget är att skapa en flexibel öppen struktur, baserad på tre grundkomponenter:

    1. Bygg upp regionala sorteringscentra som ger grundförutsättningar för insamlingsorganisationerna att bedriva sin verksamhet på ett effektivt sätt.En bra samlad sorteringsvolym (summan av varje organisations insamling och sortering)ligger lämpligtvis på ca 40 ton/dag. Vissa gemensamma funktioner kan utvecklas som t.ex. balning/packning, intern transportlogistik etc. Detta skulle ge skalfördelar utan att påverka varje organisations egna affärsprocesser. Det bör kunna vara självfinansierat genom hyror respektive sålda logistiktjänster.

    2. Skapa en agentur eller liknande med uppgift att sälja exportkvantiteter på uppdrag av insamlingsorganisationerna. Motivet skall vara att bättre kunna optimera en kundsamman-sättning som ger en optimal mix av EKONOMI – EKOLOGI – ETIK. Genom att den totalt genererade volymen blir större borde en professionell organisation kunna nå bättre totalt utfall avseende de tre E:na. Erfarenheter från vår empiri ger vid handen att det finns potential för bättre utfall. Den borde också kunna vara självfinansierad genom t.ex. provisionsintäkter.OBS. Om förutsättningarna förändras enligt vår studie kan en fysisk sorteringsanläggning strukturellt etableras och ersätta agenturen.

    3. Ovanstående punkter ger förutsättningar för att bygga upp en testbädd som är inriktad på att kunna serva företag, forskningsorganisationer etc. med kapacitet att köra betatester, som är ett nödvändigt inslag i produktutvecklingsprocessen. Eftersom Sverige saknar en infrastruktur för både subindustriell produktion av fiber och recycling av textilier är detta en viktig förutsättning för utveckling av de produkter/processer som ligger till grund för värdeutvecklingen av använda textilier.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Casciani, Daria
    et al.
    Design Department, Politecnico di Milano, Durando 10, Milan.
    Chkanikova, Olga
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Department of Business Administration and Textile Management, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Department of Business Administration and Textile Management, University of Borås, Borås, Sweden;Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Exploring the nature of digital transformation in the fashion industry: opportunities for supply chains, business models, and sustainability-oriented innovations2022In: Sustainability: Science, Practice, & Policy, E-ISSN 1548-7733, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 773-795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides a comprehensive overview of the digital transformation of the fashion industry and describes the opportunities and influences on supply chains, business models, and sustainability-oriented innovations that it offers. Desk research was performed to review emerging cases of companies that engage actively in using 3-dimensional virtual and digital (3DVD) technologies, such as 3D modeling, virtual and augmented reality (VR and AR), 2- and 3-dimensional (2D/3D) scanning, and digital twinning (DT). The analysis shows how the adoption of digital technologies provides opportunities to dematerialize the traditional fashion supply-chain model of garment production and distribution and maps the innovative shifts occurring in the fashion industry's processes, products, and services. The adoption of 3DVD technologies by fashion companies unleashes new opportunities with respect to innovation in products/services and optimization of operational processes to streamline activities, shorten the lead time for designing, prototyping, manufacturing, marketing and retailing, and reorganizing the working phases. These capabilities also drive multicentred business-model innovations and thus affect value creation and delivery and capture changes. In addition, the analysis shows that digital transformation affects the four dimensions of sustainability that are interconnected intrinsically across supply-chain processes. Cultural sustainability is paramount, as fashion is a complex cultural system that is able to create products/services that influence the environment, economy, and society. In particular, 3DVD technologies promote cultural transformation of design processes to achieve a remix of skills and open knowledge, a behavioral shift from the consumer perspective in terms of diversity and self-expression, and a change in the organizational culture of companies that drive the digital transformation.

  • 18.
    Chizaryfard, Armaghan
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Samie, Yassaman
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    New Textile Waste Management Through Collaborative Business Models for Sustainable Innovation2018In: Detox Fashion: Waste Water Treatment / [ed] S.S. Muthu, Singapore: Springer, 2018, p. 81-111Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In most nations, textile waste management is recognized to be a multi-actor system; however most participating actors tend to play a significant role in handling and treating the textile waste single-handedly thus resulting in a very fragmented system fraught with many challenges. In addition, the main textile waste treatment, e.g. in Sweden is still incineration (nearly 55% of per capita disposal) resulting in low degrees of value generation. Nearly 20% of the waste is handled by ten major charities in Sweden. This highlights the necessity for the actors to perform in a network and expand their collaboration, thus move more efficiently towards development of a sustainable value innovation, and find an alternative new way to manage textile waste. Given this our study strives to investigate the challenges and opportunities of implementation of a collaborative business model for sustainable innovation. By taking the benefits of actor-, activity- and value-mapping technique, our study helps in gaining a better realization of the Swedish textile waste management system. The core values of actors have been identified along with the identification of their shared and conflicting values with the aid of a value mapping tool. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews from seven organizations representing the Swedish textile waste man- agement system. Overall our study provides a rich and descriptive picture of the participating actors, their activities, collaboration and value-orientations within the Swedish textile waste management system, and highlights the key drivers of a collaborative solution, viz. legislation, trust and shared understanding and communication, that can be foreseen to increase dialogue and collaboration among actors to support the movement from egocentric to a multi-actor business model. A clear benefit of such collaborative business models is substitution of incineration by higher degrees of reuse of textiles, which has high potential to generate positive environmental impact, through reduction of toxic effects of textile incineration and also new production processes.

  • 19.
    Chkanikova, Olga
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Gustafsson, Kim
    We Love You Communications.
    Timour, Fredrik
    Fashion Innovation Center, Swedish Fashion Council.
    Shaping the future of fashion-tech - business models, roles and skills aiding digital transformations2021Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to identify emerging revenue streams and business model opportunities offered within fashion-tech, and what transformational roles and skills are required in order to support fashion-tech business model transformation and value capture. 

    Design/methodology/approach: A focus group study is conducted digitally in three episodes with about ten invited industry practitioners representing fashion brands, technology firms, telecom operators and provider of circularity services. Ontologically, this adopts a four-step process on fashion-tech to explore current state, future directions, transitions required, and supporting roles and skills to assist transitions.  

    Findings: The top 3 revenue streams identified are subscriptions, digital platforms and data selling, while sustainable and circular business model was considered the most important for capturing value via these revenue streams. 7 meta-level skillset were resultant which revealed 11 future job roles essential for fashion-tech transformation. 

    Research limitations/implications: The paper highlights a list of prospective revenue streams, BM transformation requirements, skillsets and roles that are offered within, and required for, fashion-tech value chains, thus providing systematic understanding of digital transformation in the fashion industry. However, the results cannot be generalized. Practical implications (if applicable): The paper sheds some key takeaways for companies working with fashion-tech business models in terms of revenue streams, business models, roles and skillsets to consider. 

    Originality/value: The novelty lies in its suggested approach of starting from revenue streams and then aligning it with transformations in business model elements, in order to understand how to capture value from fashion-tech business models.  

    Download full text (pdf)
    Chkanikova, Pal et al. (2021). Shaping the future of fashion-tech - business models, roles and skills aiding digital transformations
  • 20.
    Dehghannejad, Mohammadreza
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Exploring paradoxes to scaling circular business models in cascading systems in the textile and clothing industry2023In: PROCEEDINGS 5th PLATE Conference / [ed] Kirsi Niinimäki, Kirsti Cura, Espoo, Finland, 2023, p. 231-236Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To achieve the ultimate potential of circular economy (CE), cascading plural circular business models (CBMs) can essentially slow down, narrow, and close resource loops while simultaneously achieving long-life products. Operating in cascades, however, organizations face many paradoxical tensions (PTs) due to different goals, designs, and resource requirements, as well as demands for new and unusual collaborations. Having a narrative literature review, 7 categories of PTs that could hinder scaling CBMs in cascaded systems in the textile and clothing (T&C) industry were identified. Conducting 20 semi-structured interviews with European brands/retailers, charities (secondhand stores), sorters, and recyclers who operate in cascading, this paper has contextualized four paradox classes (organizing, performing, belonging, and learning) of Smith and Lewis’s (2011) paradox theory framework along those 7 categories; while mostly classified as organizing and performing, categories 5 (between circular supply structure and governance alternatives) and 1 (between scale and scope) are reported as the most prominent among T&C actors, respectively. Although those prominent categories can directly hinder the scalability of cascading CBMs, those that appeared internally and were associated with a particular CBM could indirectly affect scaling.

  • 21.
    Dissanayake, Kanchana
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Sustainability dichotomies of used clothes supply chains: a critical review of key concerns and strategic resources2023In: The International Journal of Logistics Management, ISSN 0957-4093, no 7, p. 75-97-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Used clothes supply chains are becoming increasingly complex, fragmented and less transparentdue to rising volumes of discarded clothes and its dispersed reverse logistics operations across the Global North(GN) and Global South (GS). While it has a promising impact on circular economy and international tradegrowth, increasing exports of used clothes and overflowing landfills raise some negative concerns on its overallsustainability. This paper addresses the dichotomy that exists in terms of interpreting the sustainabilitycredentials of used clothes supply chains.

    Design/methodology/approach – A systematic literature review was carried out and 55 articles wereexamined to identify the triple bottom line (TBL) sustainability impacts of used clothes supply chains. TBLsustainability issues were identified, reflected through the lens of natural resource-based view and interpretedin the form of propositions.

    Findings – The paper pinpoints sevenTBLsustainability concerns and prescribes three sets of strategic resourcesrequired in glocal used clothes supply chains for mitigating these.These are (1) slowing the supply chain by tacklingpoor quality, overproduction and oversupply issues, (2) improving logistics/supply chain infrastructure andecosystem collaboration and (2) embedding transparent environmental, social and governance (ESG) measurestaken by both value chain actors and regulatory bodies, for embracing system-level sustainable development.

    Originality/value – This is one of the first studies to analyse TBL sustainability of glocal north–south usedclothes supply chains. The study is unique in terms of its scope and contribution to the sustainable supplychain literature.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Dissanayake, Kanchana
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Department of Textile and Apparel Engineering, University of Moratuwa, Moratuwa, Sri Lanka.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Sustainability Impacts of Global Used Clothing Trade and Its Supply Chain2023In: Manufacturing Driving Circular Economy / [ed] Kohl, H., Seliger, G., Dietrich, F., Switzerland: Springer, 2023Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global trade of used clothing, which comprises a series of activities that connect the Global North to the Global South, has grown substantially over the years. This paper analyses the trade data of the export/import trade of used clothing to provide an overview of global trade statistics and explores the sustainability impact of the used clothing trade. Both qualitative and quantitative secondary data were employed in the study. Analysis of export data revealed a declining trend, which may be attributed to the import bans of used clothing and new cheap imports from Asia. While the United States is constantly being the top exporter, and Pakistan is the top importer, the value of exports grew the fastest in China during the last decade. Analysis of sustainability impacts revealed both positive and negative facts. Used clothing markets support thousands of livelihoods and provide affordable clothing for those who live in poverty; however, the fast fashion phenomenon is threatening this important trade. Therefore, this study urges an investigation of alternative business models to reutilize clothing waste. Remanufacturing and recycling-based business models, when implemented in the Global South, could provide viable solutions to reutilize excess clothing while enhancing the sustainability benefits. Developing collaborative relationships among the stakeholders of the used clothing supply chain is immensely necessary to implement such disruptive business models and to capture values along the supply chain.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 23.
    Duru, Sinem Demir
    et al.
    International Financial Corporation, World Bank.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Hertveldt, Sabine (Commentator for written text)
    International Financial Corporation (IFC) Global MAS Advisory.
    Manchanda, Sumit (Commentator for written text)
    International Financial Corporation (IFC) Global MAS Advisory.
    Innovation in manufacturing Personal Protective Equipment: Toward Sustainability and Circularity2021Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Adopting circular economy approaches is becoming an increasingly important part of policy makers’ agendas in the fight against climate change. These approaches include reducing material inputs, using more environmentally friendly and reusable materials when producing goods, ensuring materials are properly recycled, and minimizing waste and pollution. They have become even more important in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, with personal protective equipment (PPE) becoming an inseparable part of daily life. Manufacturers across the globe had to increase PPE production, which inevitably created a surge in plastic waste because polypropylene is still the main material used to manufacture PPE for health-care workers. A recent research study estimates that, since the outbreak, the amount of plastic waste generated globally is 1.6 million tons per day.Furthermore, an estimated 3.4 billion single-use face masks and shields are being discarded every day. This unpredicted increase in plastic waste is happening at a time when countries are reluctant to recycle products because of the lack of complementary decontamination steps and coordination in waste management.Some manufacturers took this opportunity of increased PPE production to adopt circular economy approaches that can be replicated by others. Decentralized production and material sourcing became more important as supply chains were severely disrupted by the pandemic. This has accelerated the ongoing changes in conventional production methods, with businesses embracing a cradle-to-cradle manufacturing model—that is, rethinking the design of their products from the starting point at the sourcing stage through to the end of the product’s life.

    This is not without its challenges. For example, when replacing plastics with alternative materials, manufacturers need to ensure that these materials meet quality standards set by standards institutions and enforced by governments.However, PPE manufacturers cannot shoulder the responsibility of the global plastic waste challenge alone. This publication calls on a broad range of stakeholders along the PPE value chain to work together to shift toward a more sustainable and circular PPE ecosystem.This report takes stock of approaches that PPE manufacturers are taking to make their production more sustainable and achieve a true circular economy, while responding to COVID-19 PPE shortages. It does not provide a life-cycle assessment of each PPE product, which is needed to evaluate the environmental effects associated with each product against the benefits created. The approaches highlighted in this report can be grouped into four main categories:

    •Circular inputs: The use of renewable, bio-based, or completely recyclable materials as input.

    •Resource recovery: Ensuring that useful resources and energy are recovered from disposed products by collecting and reprocessing products at the end of their life.

    •Product use extension: Prolonging the lifespan of PPE products by choosing a design that allows the product to be repaired or by choosing durable materials as inputs for the main PPE parts.

    •Product as service: The product-as-service model allows the consumer to use a product that is retained by the producer to increase resource productivity (for example, leasing PPE). This model allows PPE manufacturers to move from selling products to selling services.

  • 24.
    Edh Mirzaei, Nina
    et al.
    Department of Supply Chain and Operations Management, School of Engineering, Jönköping University,.
    Hilletofth, Per
    Department of Industrial Product Development, Production and Design, School of Engineering, Jönköping University.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Challenges to competitive manufacturing in high-cost environments: checklist and insights from Swedish manufacturing firms2021In: Operations Management Research, ISSN 1936-9735, E-ISSN 1936-9743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on competitive manufacturing (CM) in high-cost environments has earlier indicated that firms struggle to remain competitive and that manufacturing operations often have been offshored to low-cost environments. The purpose of this research is to explore and create a compounded view of challenges related to both internal and external environments of firms when operating in high-cost environments. This issue has been investigated through a qualitative case study involving five manufacturing firms in Sweden. This research has empirically derived the challenges associated with sustaining CM in high-cost environments and developed a prescriptive checklist. Seven main categories of challenges have been identified, ranging from a micro level related to product characteristics and employee involvement, to a macro level related to supply chain collaborations and industry systems. This research contributes to the existing literature on CM in high-cost locations by explaining and detailing what constitutes challenges in this kind of environment.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 25.
    Gwilt, Alison
    et al.
    Sheffield Hallam University.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Conditional garment design for longevity2017In: PLATE: Product Lifetimes And The Environment / [ed] Conny A. Bakker, Ruth Mugge, IOS Press, 2017, Vol. 9, p. 149-153Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the clothing sector, approaches to design for longevity can provide the "…single largest opportunity to reduce the carbon, water and waste footprints of the clothing in the UK" (WRAP, 2013a). Although an emphasis lies on slowing consumption, the types of design-led approaches that can be used to achieve this goal are considerably varied yet sparingly used by the mainstream fashion industry. In light of the growth of a circular economy, the challenge facing the fashion industry is to adapt the existing product design and development model and explore a fashion system where other, more diverse design approaches can prosper. Thus, this paper attempts to contribute to this debate and further highlight factors that need to be considered by fashion companies when developing garments designed for longevity.

    Through a range of novel design principles/methods, underpinning modularity and incremental garment design/construction in this paper we demonstrate how designers may begin to envisage garments as items designed for longevity. The experimental work carried out here is part of a larger initiative, Re:Textile in Sweden (Retextile, 2017). In the experiments conducted we demonstrate the power of various garment design conditions intended to synthesize a change towards garment longevity. Together with highlights of the key processes and basic design principles underpinning these design-led approaches, the experimental work also specifies how and where they contribute in achieving the aims of designing in a circular economy. The findings also highlight the opportunities for improving the redesignability of the garment in its active use life as set by the original design conditions laid in light of design for longevity.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 26.
    Harper, Sara
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Resilience of Small-Series Production Models: Insights From EU Apparel Industry During Covid-192022In: Proceedings of the 26th International Symposium on Logistics: The Journey to Sustainable Supply Chains, 2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of this paper:

    While strategies like nearshoring, digitalization and small order sizes are expected to support resilience in the textile and apparel industry, literature suggests complex implications of small-series production in high-cost contexts on risk exposure. The purpose of the paper is to understand the how supply network configuration related to small-series production models influence resilience, in EU’s textile and apparel industry amidst COVID-19.

     

    Design/methodology/approach:

    A multiple case study is presented, with data collected through semi-structured interviews with seven case companies representing different types of small-series production models. The analysis of risk exposure draws from supply network configuration literature, to identify the implications of small-series production model structures and reconfigurations on resilience.

     

    Findings:

    Product and operations characteristics are more often resilience enablers, whereas priorities/performance (sustainability, innovation, delivery), and supply chains (relationships, locations) can both enable and impede resilience in the face of both external and internal supply chain risks. These findings thus confirm the benefits of such small-series production models for mitigating, adapting to, and withstanding risks emerging from COVID-19 situation.

     

    Value:

    The supply network configuration-based framework adopted in the study enabled analysis of the implications of small-series production and its configuration on resilience (and associated risk exposure), which can support future reconfigurations.

     

    Research limitations/implications:

    Future research can complement this study with quantitative measures of resilience, and comparisons with other industry and location contexts. Additionally, in-depth case studies can address how companies balance positive and negative impacts of small-series supply network configuration on resilience.

     

    Practical implications:

    Managers can be aware of enabling and challenging effects of small-series production model priorities and performance goals, location and relationships, when configuring or reconfiguring structures in response to risks.

  • 27.
    Harper, Sara
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Resilient Local Manufacturing In Sjuhärad: A Delphi Study To Identify Enablers And Challenges2023Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This report details a Delphi study undertaken within the ongoing research project “Resilient supply chains for local textile and clothing production in small series” with funding from Sparbanksstiftelsen Sjuhärad-No.20221947. 

    Specifically, this report summarizes the results of a Delphi study-designed to capture the level of agreement among practitioners operating within the Sjuhärad region in Western Sweden regarding the enablers and challenges of resilience within local textile and apparel manufacturing supply chains. These results are based on the perceptions of representatives from diverse companies that have had experience with local manufacturing and/or sourcing, which undertake activities within one or more value chain stages (textile manufacturing; garment manufacturing; retail). The two main steps of the Delphi study were, first to identify issues that are enablers and/or challenges-relevant to at least two companies within an interview round, and then to evaluate those issues using an online questionnaire to analyze and visualize levels of agreement. 

    A key argument of the study and larger research project is that both localization opportunities and challenges are significant within the textile and apparel industry, due to having high risk exposure with complex global supply chain structures. So, there is a need to understand the complexity of such location decisions in this context, including associated trade-offs for resilience. On one hand, localization can lead to enhanced flexibility, responsiveness, and customization due to reduced complexity and shorter supply chain distances, but on the other hand local supply chains can reduce adaptability related to global network structures and can be challenged by cost trade-offs. To understand this complexity, the supply network configuration approach can be helpful-to show structures that underpin resilience. By addressing the supporting structures and capabilities required for resilience, this report can support development of more resilient supply chains by highlighting what is required for improved resilience outcomes (Competitiveness; Growth; Reduced risk exposure; Reduced recovery time) and what challenges must be overcome.

    The key results of the Delphi study show moderate levels of resilience in the context, which is supported by several enablers, which can be challenging with insufficient levels. Agreement is found with enablers related to:

    • Capabilities and performance priorities (situational awareness; quality; delivery/short lead times; sustainability)
    • Processes (flexibility and agility; competence)
    • Relationships (close and long-term relationships; transparency and communication)

    The only two challenges with high levels of agreement are competence limitations and high costs/cost trade-offs. However, the lack of both strong opinions and high levels of agreement about resilience indicates opportunities for improvement. The suggested need for managers to have strong situational awareness can be a key area to develop.

    In contrast, there were more mixed opinions found among respondents about other enablers/challenges, including location as either an enabler or challenge for resilience, and challenges related to exposure to external risks/disruptions. This suggests diverse experiences related to localization in a context of increasing external challenges. Additionally, the lack of strong opinions about digital tools/automation as an enabler suggests additional development is required, although several respondents emphasize significant recent investments as crucial. The lack of strong agreement about product-related enablers/challenges suggests different perspectives on small-series production, although the majority of respondents consider focusing on small volume, high value products to be more an enabler of resilience than a challenge. Overall, these findings indicate that managers must carefully consider localization with respect to cost trade-offs, limited industry know-how and varying levels of exposure to other challenges in high-cost contexts. 

    Looking forward, such insights related to enablers/challenges of resilience should be taken into consideration within decision-making processes-that define supply network configuration (products, processes, relationships, supply chain structures), with respect to implementation and scaling goals. Notably, the findings suggest companies are likely to need to invest in competence development, including process and technology-related skills, as well as sensing skills (awareness). However, careful consideration of cost trade-offs is required within such decision-making processes, which should be addressed throughout the supply chain from the perspective of actors with control over supply chains. Such decision-making considerations will be addressed in the following report within this research project.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Resilient Local Manufacturing In Sjuhärad_1
  • 28.
    Harper, Sara
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Small-series supply network configuration priorities and challenges in the EU textile and apparel industry2022In: Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, ISSN 1361-2026, E-ISSN 1758-7433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Technology and market pressures are encouraging localized and small-series production in customer-driven industries. The purpose of this paper is to explore and understand the supply chain-, product- and process-design factors for small-series production in EU's textile and apparel industry, to understand configuration decisions, priorities and challenges. 

     Design/methodology/approach 

    An interview study was undertaken with ten companies that represent diverse small-series production models and value chain roles. Interview data was analysed to identify supply network configuration characteristics, decision priorities and challenges. 

     Findings

    Three small-series production models emerged from the analysis, differing with respect to adoption of process postponement and customization. The findings confirm and extend past research regarding diverse decision priorities and product, process, supply chain structure/relationship configurations. Challenges identified relate to planning (priorities) and implementation (configuration). Whereas competence availability and digital technology challenges are common, several difficulties are linked to production model like tensions related to priorities and small volumes, which are not found with customization. 

     Research limitations/implications 

    Future research can make comparisons with other industry and location contexts; adopt dynamic approaches to distinguish between design and reconfiguration processes; and address indicated paradoxical-tensions. 

     Practical implications 

    The study findings can provide guidance for companies regarding identification of priorities and management of (planning/implementation) challenges impacting small-series production in T&A. 

     Originality/value 

    The paper brings a configuration perspective at the supply chain level to the problem of small-series production implementation, which demands holistic and context-specific understanding.

  • 29.
    Harper, Sara
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Supply network configuration and design for small series production in high-cost contexts: Insights from textiles and apparel2020Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In light of technology and market pressures encouraging localized small series production in labor-intensive industries, the purpose of this paper is to understand supply network configurations, design decisions, motivations and challenges, specifically in EU textile and apparel. The multiple case study was focused on understanding different approaches to small series production and associated configurations. The ten cases, from throughout the textile/apparel value chain, were defined to maximize variation between different approaches and seek to have at least two cases that can act as literal replication of similar strategies. The within-case analysis and cross-case synthesis was based on structured and semi-structured follow-up interviews, to identify interactions among supply network configurations, reconfigurations, motivations and challenges. The within-case analysis showed the patterns of configuration and reconfigurations for each company case, categorized using the elements of supply network configuration. Four different approaches to small series production were defined based on use of production on-demand (custom or not) and/or using production/sourcing postponement. The cross-case synthesis validated past research, which has emphasized key motivations such as product quality, short lead times, specialized knowledge and fabric proximity in such contexts. Additionally, the relevance of innovation and sustainability is significant across different case types. Particular focus is on product innovation and environmental sustainability, with most companies reconfiguring to develop or strengthen custom/on-demand production, as well as emphasizing own brands and direct contact with customers. However, in the face of industrial competence limitations, the need for companies to invest into such developments, leads to structural flexibility challenges. Companies using production postponement but not on-demand for customers have established regional fabric and product sourcing, although fabric decisions impact all strategies. Beyond offering characterization of high-cost, small series production with respect to industry and location, the findings can provide support for reconfiguration and decision-making in similar contexts. Future research should continue to focus on the changing industry context in relation to decision-making with focus on various priorities, products, processes and structural configurations. Specifically, social implications can be addressed along with technology and product modularity implications on circular product design and environmental sustainability. 

  • 30.
    Harper, Sara
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Supply network configuration for resilient high-cost textile and apparel manufacturing supply chains: A Delphi study2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing disruptions demand understanding challenges with localizing supply chains for resilience. These opportunities and challenges are significant within the textile and apparel industry. The purpose of the research is to understand how supply network configuration factors (structure/capabilities) enable or challenge the resilience of local manufacturing supply chains, through a two-stage Delphi study. Based on semi-structured interviews with diverse practitioners within a specific high-cost context and survey responses, consensus is found regarding enablers including flexibility, sustainability, close relationships, and situational awareness, and only cost and competence challenges. Findings confirm complex trade-offs and additionally suggest the importance of developing/building upon sensing capabilities.

  • 31. Harper, Sara
    et al.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Towards a conceptual model of manufacturing supply chain configuration for EU textile and apparel industry2018In: EurOMA 2018 Proceedings, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the development of a conceptual model for configuration of supply chains/networks for small series textile and apparel production, in contexts such as the EU. This configurational approach is needed due to the significant mismatch between current industry structures and the demand for small series production. The model, consisting of four elements with resulting themes and groupings, was developed through a systematic approach of the literature on the related types of production. The themes highlight the complexities and interdependencies that must be considered by managers. The linkages between the elements, in line with 3DCE, need to be further addressed.

  • 32.
    Harper, Sara
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Cozzoni, Enrico
    Grado Zero Espace.
    Report including market analysis, stakeholder analysis, survey results, supplier selection criteria list2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the increasing trend of reshoring to relatively high cost production locations like countries in the EU, there is an emphasis on the need to focus on high value-added small series production. This is especially true in high labour intensive industries like apparel and textiles. In this context, supply network configuration, related interdependencies and trade-offs are required to be addressed to support this transition. However, there are limitations as to the current capabilities to meet these needs. In order to better understand the diverse context of small series apparel and textile production, a comprehensive and structured analysis is required. Within this scope and as part of the FBD_BModel project, this report offers: (i) an overview of the current state of the market, regarding the current capabilities, capacities and focuses on notable or best practice industry examples especially in the EU, (ii) a systematic understanding of five representative case companies, (iii) a supplier selection criteria list, and (iv) a ranked list of the criteria based on a supply chain competitiveness survey. The focus of the configuration-based analysis in this report is along four elements, value structure of products/services, operational structure, network structures, and relationship structures of the supply network.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 33.
    Harper, Sara
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kumar, Vijay
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Modelling small-series supply network configuration and capabilities through a mixed-method structural analysis: Insights from high-cost textile/apparel contexts2023In: International Journal of Services and Operations Management, ISSN 1744-2370, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 232-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to understand supply network configuration for small-series production within high-cost contexts, and the context-specific decision logics associated. A total interpretive structural modelling (TISM) and MICMAC mixed-methods approach is used to determine and interpret interrelationships among SNC and capability-related aspects identified from the literature. Respondents come from EU textile/apparel companies, undertaking small-series production/sourcing in the region, with different roles in the value chain. The findings led to several propositions. They highlight the foundational nature of supply chain relationships and digital data sharing; interacting product/process flexibility and specialisation considerations, with associated enablers and barriers; the challenges related to location, which is the crucial supply chain driver; and the need to balance various interrelated capability drivers, such as quality, innovation, and sustainability. These findings can support practitioners for reconfiguration, and the approach can be used to address other contexts and thus enhance generalisability.

  • 34.
    Harper, Sara
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Kumar, Vijay
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Supply network configuration and capabilities for high-cost, small series textile/apparel: A TISM approach2019In: EurOMA 2019 Proceedings, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing emphasis on small series production in higher cost locations is particularly challenging in the textile/apparel industry due to global supply chain configurations. To support (re)configuration in this context, Total interpretive structural modelling (TISM) method is used to gain a deeper understanding of the inter-relationships among configuration/capability related aspects from the literature. TISM interviews were done with 24 industry practitioners producing/sourcing in the EU, or in the process of implementation. The findings validate extensive inter-relations, at the same time highlighting relational aspects, internal integration, and quality as significant drivers. Further in-depth research is required to understand these influences.

  • 35.
    Hultberg, Emelie
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Exploring Scalability from a Triple Bottom Line Perspective: Challenges and Strategic Resources for Fashion Resale2023In: Circular Economy and Sustainability, ISSN 2730-597X, E-ISSN 2730-5988Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resale-based circular business models (CBMs) hold immense potential to contribute towards sustainability in fashion retail. To significantly impact triple bottom line (TBL) sustainability, these fashion CBMs need to be scalable. This paper investigates the challenges for scaling resale-based fashion from a TBL perspective, as well as the strategic resources required to solve these. Based on 15 semi-structured interviews, six key scalability challenges and six main strategic resources are identified. Findings show that even though challenges are mostly referred to in economic terms, environmental and social challenges are also present. The difference is that those challenges are less visible, partly due to the lack of clear and standardised tools and definitions to interpret scale. Lessons from the study can be insightful for practitioners in reflecting on the scalability potential of their CBMs from a TBL perspective and understanding what resources to make use of or develop. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 36.
    Hultberg, Emelie
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lessons on business model scalability for circular economy in the fashion retail value chain: Towards a conceptual model2021In: Sustainable Production and Consumption, ISSN 2352-5509, Vol. 28, p. 686-698Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circular economy and especially circular business model (CBM), is currently being discussed as a way to enable the fashion industry's transition to sustainable business models wherein pollution and resource waste may be reduced. However, one of the prime reasons for a slow transition is lack of scalability of CBMs operating in the fashion retail value chain. What is lacking in the current discourse is research that summarises and condenses the literature on strategies for how scalability can be attained and what that means in context to CBMs where not only economic values are in focus. Therefore, the main purpose of this paper is to explore the main strategic approaches to scale business models and how these can be applied to CBMs in the fashion retail value chain. To do this, a two-part method is adopted consisting of a systematic literature review of 57 business models and scalability papers followed by a review of activities reported by 76 fashion retail companies on how these have, or are planning to, increase the scale of their CBM initiative. Our suggested model provides a basic understanding of strategies for business model scalability seen from four different business model design perspectives. These are further contextualised for CBMs in the fashion value chain and lessons learned are generated in the form of four central propositions. The propositions account on how organisations can leverage resources from their existing conventional business model for efficient scaling of their CBM initiative, how they can consider strategic partnerships to access complementary resources, while also embarking on adaptability by running business pilots either internally or by engaging in collaborative networks for industry-wide learnings and change.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 37.
    Hultberg, Emelie
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Scaling resale-based circular business models: a study of Swedish fashion resellers2021In: 4th PLATE 2021 Virtual Conference, 26-28 May 2021, Limerick, 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present challenges that resale-based circular business models (CBMs) face when trying to scale up, as well as strategic resources that mitigates these challenges and facilitate scaling. The study is anchored in empirical findings from 10 retail companies operating with resale initiatives in the Swedish market. To structure the study, and provide a broader view of scalability that better fit the logic of CBM value creation, we draw on two streams of literature; the notion of novelty and efficiency-centred business model design elements and resource-based theory. The findings show that for resale-based CBMs to scale, these need to overcome challenges related to operational complexity in connection to handling large volumes of unique garments as well as lack of out-of-the box solutions. The study also offers insights into strategic resources and capabilities which can work as guidance for practitioners who want to analyse and manipulate their CBM's ability to scale

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 38.
    Hultberg, Emelie
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Sandberg, Erik
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Towards developing a framework for circular business model scalability analysis: Evidences from fashion retail value chain2019In: PLATE – Product lifetimes and the environment: 3rd PLATE Conference, September 18–20, 2019 Berlin, Germany / [ed] Nissen, Nils F; Jaeger-Erben, Melanie, Berlin, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of circular economy and circular business models have received increasing attention in recent years, especially when it comes to innovation and implementation. The scalability aspect of these models is however less explored. This can also be seen in one off the world’s most resource draining industries; the fashion industry. In recent years circular economy has frequently been mentioned in sustainability reports and new business models have emerged. This paper aims to create a framework that can be used for further analysis of scalability of circular business models in the fashion industry. To do this we draw on the literature on business model scalability and apply learnings form these papers to a CBM context in the fashion industry. Through a systematic literature review of 25 articles, we find three different themes of scalability: central strategies, supporting activities and required resources. In this paper, we have further explored the central strategies and their different orientations, namely growth, connection, efficiency and adaptability. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to circular business action points as stated by 94 fashion companies, and reported in Global Fashion Agenda report. Further research is needed to elaborate these themes for understanding scalability of circular business models in the fashion industry, explore the underpinning logics, and prescribe a comprehensive framework on its basis. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 39. Komassi, Ehsan
    et al.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Investigating short term strategies in product sustainability index implementation, a case study at IKEA2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Companies are aware of long term benefits of sustainability, and that in the future the competitive landscape will change. However, financial concerns slow down the sustainability development process. This article aims to explore how companies move toward long term benefits of sustainability without compromise in their financial objectives in short term. This study focuses on investigating how companies use sustainability index tool as a component of short term strategy. Findings indicate that companies try to simplify the sustainability assessment and combine it with other decision making tools. This simplification is toward finding potential improvements in the product level. Results are summarized in a model which corresponds to the short term strategy development process toward sustainability. This model describes how company identifies critical products based on financial, strategic and sustainability aspects. The investigation has been performed at children’s IKEA in Sweden.

  • 40.
    Kumar, Vijay
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Hernández, Niina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Jensen, Michelle
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Gavle, ¨ Sweden.
    Deep learning based system for garment visual degradation prediction for longevity2023In: Computers in industry (Print), ISSN 0166-3615, E-ISSN 1872-6194, Vol. 144, article id 103779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prolonging garment longevity is a well-recognized key strategy to reduce the overall environmental impact in the textile and clothing sector. In this context, change or degradation in esthetic or visual appeal of a garment with usage is an important factor that largely influence its longevity. Therefore, to engineer the garments for a required lifetime or prolong longevity, there is a need for predictive systems that can forecast the trajectory of visual degradation based on material/structural parameters or use conditions that can guide the practitioners for an optimal design. This paper develops a deep learning based predictive system for washing-induced visual change or degradation of selected garment areas. The study follows a systematic experimental design to generate and capture visual degradation in garment and equivalent fabric samples through 70 cycles in a controlled environment following guideline from relevant washing standards. Further, the generated data is utilized to train conditional Generative Adversarial Network-based deep learning model that learns the degradation pattern and links it to washing cycles and other seam properties. In addition, the predicted results are compared with experimental data using Frechet Inception Distance, to ascertain that the system prediction are visually similar to the experimental data and the prediction quality improves with training process.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 41.
    Kupka, Karel
    et al.
    Trilobyte Statistical Software, Ltd..
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Aneja, Arun Pal
    East Carolina State University.
    Militky, Jiri
    Technical University of Liberec.
    Characterizing Business Resilience Using SVM-Based Predictive Modeling2016In: Meeting on Statistics in Business and Industry / [ed] Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Department of Statistics and Operations Research, Barcelona, Spain, 2016, p. 39-40Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Business resilience has gained prominence, in academia and practice, vis-à-vis the heightened challenges recently faced by organizations, e.g. financial crisis. Developing resilience by thriving or bouncing back from crises yields sound business health in the future.However extant scholarly discussion on predictive modelling of economic resilience is rather limited, while business health studies are mainly limited to bankruptcy failure predictions. These studies mostly utilize financial snapshots (based on only few years data) to construct the predictive models hence are static in nature (Balcaen and Ooghe 2006). Several assumptions underpin these static models, e.g. considering failure as a steady process devoid of organizational history (Appiah et al. 2015, du Jardin and Séverin 2011). Even though, few recent studies (cf. du Jardin and Séverin (2011), Chen et al. (2013) etc.) have designed a “trajectory of corporate collapse” to forecast the changes in firms’ financial health, using various ‘expert systems’ like self-organizing maps (SOM) based upon unsupervised neural network approach, these studies still interpret the findings largely for predicting bankruptcy (a ‘state’) rather than drawing inference on the economic growth or recovery patterns (a ‘trajectory’) of organizations – a key to generate resilience. Neither these studies utilize longitudinal financial data (spanning over many years) to capture the dynamics of corporate history required to build resilience of organizations in reality.In this context, our paper proposes developing a predictive econometric model of business resilience by using ‘expert’ SVM method. The expanded predictor based on financial ratios highlighted by Altman (1968)’s Z-score also takes into consideration the corporate dynamics (first and second derivatives). Historical financial data is gathered from 198 firms representing 26 Dow Jones industrial sectors, and starting from 1960s.Our prediction model achieved comparatively high predictive accuracy of ---- (for a forecasting horizon of ----- years) and is comparable to similar studies. However, the main contribution of the paper is in proposing four archetypical patterns in business health trajectories, derived from the historical hind-sight, defined by tendency-dynamics combinations and is essential to characterize business resilience as follows:

    Business Health (at T = t+1) = Business Health (T = 0 to t) + Resilience function

    These four typical situations range from the most pessimistic case (tendency = Down, dynamics = Down) to the most promising (Up-Up). The four archetypes can be used to explain four resilience functions, viz. (i): up-up as sustainable resilience, (ii) up-down as short-term resilience, till t = T, (iii) down-up as resilience in near-future, at t = T, and (iv) down-down as lack of resilience.

  • 42.
    Larsson, Jonas Larsson
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lindqvist, Rickard
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Atacac AB.
    Johansson, Mats
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Hernandez, Niina
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    From Roll to Bag: D5.2 Final Product Construction Report2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the final product construction report for the From Roll to Bag project. The purpose of this report is to present the implementation of the new pattern technology to selected products and to present the modularity for consumer selection. For fulfilling the tasks (5.1 and 5.2) two garments where chosen, one jacket and one shirt, and customization options regarding fit, model, colour and function were developed for each of them. This includes implementation of novel pattern technology to products, graphics, a product architecture with customisation options and initial production tests to verify perfect fit in production and later in use. The more challenging part was to guarantee manufacturability as the patterns require automated manufacturing equipment due to their detailed construction and the pattern matching. Such equipment includes a cutter with a scanner that identifies the outline of the printed pattern and cuts accoringly. If garments with less detailed graphics are considered for production, pre-dyed fabrics can be used and that requires less investments in manufacturing equipment. Such set up would miss one point of the project but in the tradeoff between investment cost and product price point it may be a viable solution. The garments and customization modules are also fit for production but in order to achieve a detailed production evaluation with exact production times and material consumption a long run of products is needed. Considerations about customer’s experiences in this type value chains are also discussed.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 43.
    Larsson, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Vellesalu, Ann
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Zethraeus, Adrian
    Carlsson, Jan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Feasibility of servitization: Transforming fashion value chains to circularity through service innovation2019Report (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 44.
    Ma, Ke
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Gustafsson, Eva
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    IDENTIFYING INTER-ORGANIZATION COLLABORATION TYPES AND RESEARCH ADVANCEMENTS IN SUPPLY CHAIN CONTEXT2015In: The Proceedings of 20th International Symposium on Logistics (ISL 2015): Reflections on Supply Chain Research and Practice / [ed] KS Pawar, H Rogers and E Ferrari, Nottingham, NG8 1BB UK: Centre for Concurrent Enterprise, Nottingham University Business School, 2015, p. 165-172Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose of this state-of-the-art paper is to make a synthesis analysis oncollaboration in supply chain by literature review of all relevant articles, conceptualizingcollaboration in supply chain and providing implications for future research. Based ondesigned material collection standard, up to year 2014, a total of 1250 papers are usedfor descriptive analysis and a total of 509 papers are carefully reviewed for furtherclassification, conceptualization and comparison analysis. Research in this field is in anincreasing trend in general but most of collaboration in supply chain is still in a low levelin research. Another interesting finding is that logistics seems to be the most promisingsupply chain stage for research about collaboration in supply chain.

    Download full text (pdf)
    IDENTIFYING INTER-ORGANIZATION COLLABORATION TYPES AND RESEARCH ADVANCEMENTS IN SUPPLY CHAIN CONTEXT
  • 45.
    Ma, Ke
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Gustafsson, Eva
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    SIMULATION MODELLING OF RESOURCE SHARING IN INTER-ORGANIZATIONAL SUPPLY CHAIN COLLABORATION WITHIN GARMENT INDUSTRY2016In: UNCERTAINTY MODELLING IN KNOWLEDGE ENGINEERING AND DECISION MAKING: Proceedings of the 12th International FLINS conference / [ed] Xianyi Zeng; Jie Lu; Etienne E Kerre; Luis Martinez; Ludovic Koehl, Singapore: World Scientific, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resource sharing (RS) is an important method in inter-organizational supply chain collaboration (SCC). However, it is still an under-explored area in research of SCC compared to other subjects (e.g. coordinating contract and information sharing). The aim of this paper is to examine the feasibility of applying RS model in the manufacturing stage of garment supply chain and to determine the suitable type of garment for RS in production. Eight scenarios of RS were designed. Discrete-event simulation was used for running experiment of each scenario. The comparison of different scenarios shows that garment manufacturers could get great benefits by applying RS model.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 46.
    Ma, Ke
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Gustafsson, Eva
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    What modelling research on supply chain collaboration informs us? Identifying key themes and future directions through a literature review2018In: International Journal of Production Research, ISSN 0020-7543, E-ISSN 1366-588XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although research regarding supply chain collaboration has been increasing, studies reviewing supply chain collaboration remains limited. This review paper categorises supply chain collaboration and identifies different themes in this research field. Articles were collected based on a designed keywords list and specific subject restrictions in citation databases. Text-mining technology and conceptual criteria were used to categorise and screen articles into different categories. Finally, cluster analysis was used to group articles and identify emerging themes. From the year 1999 to 2017, a total of 678 articles regarding supply chain collaboration were found. These were sorted into six categories: levels of collaboration, industries, supply chain stages, company scales, forms/methods of collaboration and typology of article, and into corresponding sub-categories. 380 articles employing modelling approach where collaboration forms the core of analysis were screened for hierarchical cluster analysis, resulting in four clusters: information sharing paradigm, joint decision-making paradigm, resource sharing paradigm and coordinating contract paradigm. Eleven themes were finally identified based on the four clusters. The number of articles in the field of supply chain collaboration shows an increasing trend by year. However, most of the collaborations discussed were still at a low level. It is expected to explore a higher level of collaborations and related themes in future research.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 47. Mustonen, Milka
    et al.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Mattila, Heikki
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Mashkoor, Yasir
    Success indicators in various fashion business models2013In: Journal of Global Fashion Marketing, ISSN 2093-2685, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 74-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to analyze the business models of various fashion companies, based on their 2009 financial indicators, to understand how different operation models correlate with success and whether selected performance indicators monitor operational success. Based on their business models, the companies were classified as follows: brand retailers, brand marketers, luxury brands, and multi-brand retailers. Brand retailers with a high net profit margin and a rapid turnover of inventory were significantly more profitable than traditional multi-brand retailers. Luxury brand companies were another successful group. Though their stockturn was low, their net profit was high because of their unique design and high brand value. Brand marketers could adapt well to rapid changes, because their business was primarily based on intangible assets. Furthermore, multi-brand retailers showed the lowest financial ratios because of their slow stockturn and low net profit margin.

  • 48.
    Pacheco Martins, Adriana
    et al.
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Torstensson, Håkan
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    Advanced Computing Techniques: New tools for fast fashion sales forecasting2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper was developed in order to collect resources for future research that aims to design and evaluate an appropriate forecasting system, which is able to contribute to the sustainability of the fast fashion model. It describes in a systematic way how the tasks of forecasting demand and placing orders are currently performed in the fast fashion model. It was also needed to ground this description on theoretical concepts of forecast and management. The study reviews some of the available advanced computing techniques used for forecasting clothing demand and analyzes the implications of better forecasting techniques in the FF model. We expose why there is a need for better forecasting in the fast fashion model and the promising techniques that can be tested to improve managerial operations in the fast fashion model.

  • 49.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Swedish School of Textiles.
    A Competitive Business Strategy Development for Market Expansion: A Study of a Branding Enterprise2009Book (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Pal, Rudrajeet
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Applying 3DCE for value creation in second-hand clothing chain: a Swedish study2015In: Reflections on Supply Chain Research and Practice / [ed] K. Pawar, H. Rogers, E. Ferrari, Nottingham, UK: Centre for Concurrent Enterprise, Nottingham University Business School, 2015, p. 544-553Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Second-hand clothing value chains in western countries are fragmented and complex affecting value generation. In this context, various attributes of product, process and supply chain design decisions are essential to enhance value creation; for example, new product take-back schemes, process reengineering, reuse and redesign, closer coordination, etc. These activities need to be synchronized to redesign products, processes and associated value chains independently and more necessarily simultaneously thus calling for three-dimensional concurrent engineering (3-DCE) as a critical lens to explore the existing value creation activities. The paper explores the antecedents of value creation in second-hand clothing value chains in Sweden along 3-DCE perspective. The research adopts a mixed method where data is collected through desk research and semi-structured interviews twelve actors in the second-hand clothing network.

     The paper identified value generating stages as collection, sorting, refurbishing, reselling of used clothes and redesigning. These stages have various enablers and challenges at the intra-organizational and value chain levels. At the intra-organizational level, key antecedents are strategic logistics infrastructure for collection, sorting, transportation as well as creative retailing. Effective merchandise planning is another critical enabler for reuse and redesign, while right market knowledge is yet another essential enabler. At the value chain level, key antecedents are process integration, well-designed collection network and collaborative collector-sorter partnerships along with product design for durability. Further, supporting sustainability communication also enables higher value generation in the organization. These antecedents were further mapped in the paper along 3-DCE drivers to identify their foci.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
123 1 - 50 of 114
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf