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  • 1. Abbaszadeh, A
    et al.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Effect of extraction conditions on yield and purity of citrus pectin by sulfuric and hydrochloric acids2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2. Abedinifar, Sorahi
    et al.
    Karimi, Keikhosro
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Khanahmadi, Morteza
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Ethanol production by Mucor indicus and Rhizapus oryzae from rice straw by separate hydrolysis and fermentation2009In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 828-833Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rice straw was successfully converted to ethanol by separate enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation by Mucor indicus, Rhizopus oryzae, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The hydrolysis temperature and pH of commercial cellulase and beta-glucosidase enzymes were first investigated and their best performance obtained at 45 degrees C and pH 5.0. The pretreatment of the straw with dilute-acid hydrolysis resulted in 0.72 g g (1) sugar yield during 48 h enzymatic hydrolysis, which was higher than steam-pretreated (0.60 g g (1)) and untreated straw (0.46 g g(-1)). Furthermore, increasing the concentration of the dilute-acid pretreated straw from 20 to 50 and 100 g L-1 resulted in 13% and 16% lower sugar yield, respectively. Anaerobic cultivation of the hydrolyzates with M. indicus resulted in 0.36-0.43 g g(-1) ethanol, 0.11-0.17 g g(-1) biomass, and 0.04-0.06 g g(-1) glycerol, which is comparable with the corresponding yields by S. cerevisiae (0.37-0.45 g g(-1) ethanol, 0.04-0.10 g g(-1) biomass and 0.05-0.07 glycerol). These two fungi produced no other major metabolite from the straw and completed the cultivation in less than 25 h. However, R. oryzae produced lactic acid as the major by-product with yield of 0.05-0.09 g g(-1). This fungus had ethanol, biomass and glycerol yields of 0.33-0.41, 0.06-0.12, and 0.03-0.04 g g(-1), respectively. Crown Copyright (C) 2009 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3. Abtahi, Zhohreh
    et al.
    Millati, Ria
    Niklasson, Claes
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Ethanol production by Mucor indicus at high glucose and ethanol concentrations2010In: Minerva biotecnologica (Testo stampato), ISSN 1120-4826, E-ISSN 1827-160X, Vol. 22, no 3-4, p. 83-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mucor indicus was cultivated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions to study its tolerance against high concentration of glucose up to 350 g/L and ethanol up to 120 g/L present in the medium. The fungus could grow well even in 350 g/L glucose and produce ethanol, but it was able to assimilate the entire glucose when its concentration was less than 200 g/L. On the other hand, M. indicus produced ethanol as the main product with yield and concentration up to 0.45 g/g and 73 g/L, respectively, while glycerol, its only major byproduct, was produced up to 24 g/L. However, the fungus was not so tolerant against exogenously added ethanol, and it could not grow with more than 40 g/L added ethanol to the culture. Under aerobic conditions, M. indicus displayed different morphology, switching from long filamentous to yeast-like growth forms by increasing initial glucose concentration. This implies that yeast-like growth can be induced by growing M. indicus at high glucose concentration. Under anaerobic conditions, only one yeast-like form was observed.

  • 4. Akbari, H.
    et al.
    Karimi, K
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Lundin, M
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Optimization of baker's yeast drying in industrial continuous fluidized-bed dryer2012In: Food and Bioproducts Processing, ISSN 0960-3085, E-ISSN 1744-3571, Vol. 90, no 1, p. 52-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Instant active dry baker's yeast is a well-known product widely used for leavening of bread, produced by fermentation, and usually dried by hot air to 94–96% dry matter content. Multi-stage fluidized bed drying process is a commercial effective method for yeast drying. In this work, optimum operating parameters of an industrial continuous fluidized bed dryer for the production of instant active dry yeast were investigated. The dryer contained four zones separated with moving weirs. The operating conditions such as temperature, loading rate of compressed yeast granules, and hot air humidity had direct effects on both yeast activity and viability. The most important factors that affected the quality of the product were loading rate and the operational temperature in each zone on the bed. Optimization was performed for three loading rates of the feed to the dryer, using response surface methodology for the experimental design. The most significant factor was shown to be the loading rate with mean fermentation activity values of 620, 652, and 646 cm3 CO2/h for 300, 350, and 400 kg/h loading rates, respectively. The data analysis resulted in an optimal operating point at a loading rate of 350 kg/h and temperatures of zones 1, 2, 3, and 4 controlled at 33, 31, 31, and 29 °C, respectively. The best activity value was predicted as 668 ± 18 cm3 CO2/h, and confirmation experiments resulted in 660 ± 10 cm3 CO2/h. At the same operating point, the average viability of the cells was predicted as 74.8 ± 3.7% and confirmed as 76.4 ± 0.6%. Compared with the normal operating conditions at the plant, the optimization resulted in more than 12% and 27% improvement in the yeast activity and viability, respectively.

  • 5. Akbari, H.
    et al.
    Karimi, K.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, M.J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Optimization of baker´s yeast drying in industrial continuous fluidized-bed dryer2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Akinbomi, Julius
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Brandberg, Tomas
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Sanni, Adebayo
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Development and dissemination strategies for accelerating biogas production in Nigeria2014In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 5707-5737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the worsening energy crisis of unreliable electricity and unaffordable petroleum products coupled with the increase number of poverty-stricken people in Nigeria, the populace is desperately in need of cheap alternative energy supplies that will replace or complement the existing energy sources. Previous efforts by the government in tackling the challenge by citizenship sensitization of the need for introduction of biofuel into the country’s energy mix have not yielded the expected results because of a lack of sustained government effort. In light of the shortcomings, this study assesses the current potential of available biomass feedstock for biogas production in Nigeria, and further proposes appropriate biogas plants, depending on feedstock type and quantity, for the six geopolitical zones in Nigeria. Besides, the study proposes government-driven biogas development systems that could be effectively used to harness, using biogas technology, the estimated 270 TWh of potential electrical energy from 181 million tonnes of available biomass, in the advancement of electricity generation and consequent improvement of welfare in Nigeria.

  • 7.
    Akinbomi, Julius
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Brandberg, Tomas
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Sanni, Sikiru A.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Development and Dissemination Strategies for Accelerating Biogas Production in Nigeria2014In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 9, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the worsening energy crisis of unreliable electricity and unaffordable petroleum products coupled with the increase number of poverty-stricken people in Nigeria, the populace is desperately in need of cheap alternative energy supplies that will replace or complement the existing energy sources. Previous efforts by the government in tackling the challenge by citizenship sensitization of the need for introduction of biofuel into the country’s energy mix have not yielded the expected results because of a lack of sustained government effort. In light of the shortcomings, this study assesses the current potential of available biomass feedstock for biogas production in Nigeria, and further proposes appropriate biogas plants, depending on feedstock type and quantity, for the six geopolitical zones in Nigeria. Besides, the study proposes government-driven biogas development systems that could be effectively used to harness, using biogas technology, the estimated 270 TWh of potential electrical energy from 181 million tonnes of available biomass, in the advancement of electricity generation and consequent improvement of welfare in Nigeria.

  • 8.
    Akinbomi, Julius
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Evaluation of Fermentative Hydrogen Production from Single and Mixed Fruit Wastes2015In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 4253-4272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The economic viability of employing dark fermentative hydrogen from wholefruit wastes as a green alternative to fossil fuels is limited by low hydrogen yield due to theinhibitory effect of some metabolites in the fermentation medium. In exploring means ofincreasing hydrogen production from fruit wastes, including orange, apple, banana, grapeand melon, the present study assessed the hydrogen production potential of singly-fermentedfruits as compared to the fermentation of mixed fruits. The fruit feedstock was subjected tovarying hydraulic retention times (HRTs) in a continuous fermentation process at 55 °C for47 days. The weight distributions of the first, second and third fruit mixtures were 70%,50% and 20% orange share, respectively, while the residual weight was shared equally bythe other fruits. The results indicated that there was an improvement in cumulativehydrogen yield from all of the feedstock when the HRT was five days. Based on the resultsobtained, apple as a single fruit and a fruit mixture with 20% orange share have the mostimproved cumulative hydrogen yields of 504 (29.5% of theoretical yield) and 513 mL/gvolatile solid (VS) (30% of theoretical yield ), respectively, when compared to other fruits.

  • 9.
    Akinbomi, Julius
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Wikandari, Rachman
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Enhanced Fermentative Hydrogen and Methane Production from an Inhibitory Fruit-Flavored Medium with Membrane-Encapsulated Cells.2015In: Membranes, ISSN 2077-0375, E-ISSN 2077-0375, Vol. 5, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focused on the possibility of improving fermentative hydrogen and methane production from an inhibitory fruit-flavored medium using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane-encapsulated cells. Hexanal, myrcene, and octanol, which are naturally produced in fruits such as apple, grape, mango, orange, strawberry, and plum, were investigated. Batch and semi-continuous fermentation processes at 55 °C were carried out. Presence of 5 g/L of myrcene, octanol, and hexanal resulted in no methane formation by fermenting bacteria, while encapsulated cells in the membranes resulted in successful fermentation with 182, 111, and 150 mL/g COD of methane, respectively. The flavor inhibitions were not serious on hydrogen-producing bacteria. With free cells in the presence of 5 g/L (final concentration) of hexanal-, myrcene-, and octanol-flavored media, average daily yields of 68, 133, and 88 mL/g COD of hydrogen, respectively, were obtained. However, cell encapsulation further improved these hydrogen yields to 189, 179, and 198 mL/g COD. The results from this study indicate that the yields of fermentative hydrogen and methane productions from an inhibitory medium could be improved using encapsulated cells.

  • 10.
    Arabi, R.
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Bemanian, S.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, M.J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Rapid Biodegradation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether (MBTE) by Pure Bacterial cultures2007In: Iranian journal of chemistry & chemical engineering, ISSN 1021-9986, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two pure bacterial strains capable of rapid degrading methyl tert–butyl ether (MTBE) were isolated from an industrial wastewater treatment plant, identified and characterized. These strains are able to grow on MTBE as the sole carbon and energy sources and completely mineralize it to the biomass and carbon dioxide. The strains were identified as Bacillus cereus and Klebsiella terrigena. Both strains are able to grow in the presence of 48 g/l MTBE in water, which is almost the maximum concentration of MTBE in the water. They were able to completely degrade 10 g/l MTBE in less than a day. The specific degradation rate of MTBE at optimum conditions were 5.89 and 5.78 g(MTBE)/g(cells). h for B. cereus and K. terrigena, respectively. The biomass yield was 0.085 and 0.076 g/g, respectively. The cultivations were carried out successfully at 25, 30 and 37 °C, while they showed the best performance at 37 °C. Neither of the strains was able to grow and degrade MTBE anaerobically.

  • 11. Asachi, R.
    et al.
    Karimi, K.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, M.J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Fungal autolysate as a nutrient supplement for ethanol and chitosan production by Mucor indicus2011In: Biotechnology letters, ISSN 0141-5492, E-ISSN 1573-6776, Vol. 33, no 12, p. 2405-2409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mucor indicus can be used to produce ethanol from a variety of sugars, including pentose's. An extract of it, produced by autolysis, could replace yeast extract in culture medium with improved production of ethanol. At 10 g l(-1), the extract gave a higher ethanol yield (0.47 g g(-1)) and productivity (0.71 g l(-1) h(-1)) compared to medium containing yeast extract (yield 0.45 g g(-1); productivity 0.67 g l(-1) h(-1)).

  • 12. Asachi, Reihaneh
    et al.
    Karimi, Keikhosro
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Ethanol production by Mucor indicus using the fungal autolysate as a nutrient supplement2011In: WREC11 World Renewable Energy Conference 2011, Linköping University Electronic Press , 2011, p. 1-6Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Asadollahzadeh, Mohammadtaghi
    et al.
    Department of Pulp and Paper Technology, Gorgan University of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, Gorgan, Iran.
    Ghasemian, Ali
    Department of Pulp and Paper Technology, Gorgan University of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, Gorgan, Iran.
    Saraeian, Ahmadreza
    Department of Pulp and Paper Technology, Gorgan University of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, Gorgan, Iran.
    Resalati, Hossein
    Department of Wood and Paper Sciences, Sari University of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, Sari, Iran.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Using spent sulfite liquor for valuable fungal biomass production by Aspergilus oryzae2017In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 630-638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent and increasing interest in bioconversion of lignocellulosic wastes into value-added products has led to extensive research on various microorganisms and substrates. In this study, filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae was cultivated on spent sulfite liquor (SSL) from a pulp mill. The process using an airlift bioreactor (3.5 L working volume) was successfully carried out in 48 h with an airflow of 0.85 vvm (volume air per volume culture per minute) at 35°C and pH 5.5. The cultivation results showed that the fungal biomass concentration was higher in more diluted SSL. The highest and lowest fungal biomass concentrations when spore inoculation was used were 10.2 and 6.5 g/l SSL, in diluted SSL to 60 and 80%, respectively. The range of crude protein and total fat of the fungal biomass was 0.44 – 0.48 and 0.04 – 0.11 g/g biomass dry weight, respectively. All essential amino acids were present in acceptable quantities in the fungal biomass. The results obtained in this study have practical implications in that the fungus A. oryzae could be used successfully to produce fungal biomass protein using spent sulfite liquor for animal feed.

  • 14.
    Aslanzadeh, S.
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Rajendran, K.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, M.J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    A comparative study between single- and two-stage anaerobic digestion processes: Effects of organic loading rate and hydraulic retention time2014In: International Biodeterioration & Biodegradation, ISSN 0964-8305, E-ISSN 1879-0208, Vol. 95, p. 181-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of an organic loading rate (OLR) and a hydraulic retention time (HRT) was evaluated by comparing the single-stage and two-stage anaerobic digestion processes. Wastes from the food processing industry (FPW) and the organic fraction of the municipal solid waste (OFMSW) were used as substrates. The OLR was increased at each step from 2 gVS/l/d to 14 gVS/l/d, and the HRT was decreased from 10 days to 3 days. The highest theoretical methane yield achieved in the single-stage process was about 84% for the FPW during an OLR of 3 gVS/l/d at a HRT of 7 days and 67% for the OFMSW at an OLR of 2 gVS/l/d and a HRT of 10 days. The single-stage process could not handle a further increase in the OLR and a decrease in the HRT; thus, the process was stopped. A more stable operation was observed at higher OLRs and lower HRTs in the two-stage system. The OLR could be increased to 8 gVS/l/d for the FPW and to 12 gVS/l/d for the OFMSW, operating at a HRT of 3 days. The results show a conclusion of 26% and 65% less reactor volume for the two-stage process compared to the single-stage process for the FPW and the OFMSW, respectively.

  • 15.
    Aslanzadeh, Solmaz
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Berg, Andreas
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Sárvári Horváth, Ilona
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Biogas Production from N-Methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMMO) Pretreated Forest Residues2014In: Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology, ISSN 0273-2289, E-ISSN 1559-0291, Vol. 172, no 6, p. 2998-3008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignocellulosic biomass represents a great potential for biogas production. However, a suitable pretreatment is needed to improve their digestibility. This study investigates the effects of an organic solvent, N-Methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMMO) at temperatures of 120 and 90 °C, NMMO concentrations of 75 and 85 % and treatment times of 3 and 15 h on the methane yield. The long-term effects of the treatment were determined by a semicontinuous experiment. The best results were obtained using 75 % NMMO at 120 °C for 15 h, resulting in 141 % increase in the methane production. These conditions led to a decrease by 9 % and an increase by 8 % in the lignin and in the carbohydrate content, respectively. During the continuous digestion experiments, a specific biogas production rate of 92 NmL/gVS/day was achieved while the corresponding rate from the untreated sample was 53 NmL/gVS/day. The operation conditions were set at 4.4 gVS/L/day organic loading rate (OLR) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 20 days in both cases. NMMO pretreatment has substantially improved the digestibility of forest residues. The present study shows the possibilities of this pretreatment method; however, an economic and technical assessment of its industrial use needs to be performed in the future.

  • 16.
    Aslanzadeh, Solmaz
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Rajendran, Karthik
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Jeihanipour, Azam
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    The Effect of Effluent Recirculation in a Semi-Continuous Two-Stage Anaerobic Digestion System2013In: Energies, ISSN 1996-1073, E-ISSN 1996-1073, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 2966-2981Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of recirculation in increasing organic loading rate (OLR) and decreasing hydraulic retention time (HRT) in a semi-continuous two-stage anaerobic digestion system using stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) was evaluated. Two-parallel processes were in operation for 100 days, one with recirculation (closed system) and the other without recirculation (open system). For this purpose, two structurally different carbohydrate-based substrates were used; starch and cotton. The digestion of starch and cotton in the closed system resulted in production of 91% and 80% of the theoretical methane yield during the first 60 days. In contrast, in the open system the methane yield was decreased to 82% and 56% of the theoretical value, for starch and cotton, respectively. The OLR could successfully be increased to 4 gVS/L/day for cotton and 10 gVS/L/day for starch. It is concluded that the recirculation supports the microorganisms for effective hydrolysis of polyhydrocarbons in CSTR and to preserve the nutrients in the system at higher OLRs, thereby improving the overall performance and stability of the process.

  • 17.
    Aslanzadeh, Solmaz
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Rajendran, Karthik
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Jeihanipour, Azam
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Waste textile processing into biogas using two-stage reactors2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Aslanzadeh, Solmaz
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Rajendran, Karthik
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    A comparative study between conventional and two stage anaerobic process: Effect of organic loading rate and hydraulic retention time2013In: / [ed] Shu Li, Jegatheesan Veeriah, Keir Greg, Kier Merrin, Chang Chia-Yuan, CESE 2013 , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Aslanzadeh, Solmaz
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Rajendran, Karthik
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Pretreatment of Lignocelluloses for Biogas and Ethanol Processes2014In: Advances in Industrial Biotechnology / [ed] Ram Sarup Singh, Ashok Pandey, Christian Larroche, Asiatech Publishers Inc , 2014, p. 125-150Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Aslanzadeh, Solmaz
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Rajendran, Karthik
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Pretreatment of lignocelluloses for biogas and ethanol processes2013In: Advances in Industrial Biotechnology / [ed] Ram Sarup Singh, Ashok Pandey, Christian Larroche, I. K. International Publishing House , 2013, p. 125-150Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Aslanzadeh, Solmaz
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Sárvári Horváth, Ilona
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pretreatment of straw fraction of manure for improved biogas production2011In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 5193-5205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pretreatment of straw separated from cattle and horse manure using N-methylmorpholine oxide (NMMO) was investigated. The pretreatment conditions were for 5 h and 15 h at 120 °C, and the effects were evaluated by batch digestion assays. Untreated cattle and horse manure, both mixed with straw, resulted in 0.250 and 0.279 Nm3 CH4/kgVS (volatile solids), respectively. Pretreatment with NMMO improved both the methane yield and the degradation rate of these substrates, and the effects were further amplified with more pretreatment time. Pretreatment for 15 h resulted in an increase of methane yield by 53% and 51% for cattle and horse manure, respectively. The specific rate constant, k0, was increased from 0.041 to 0.072 (d-1) for the cattle and from 0.071 to 0.086 (d-1) for the horse manure. Analysis of the pretreated straw shows that the structural lignin content decreased by approximately 10% for both samples and the carbohydrate content increased by 13% for the straw separated from the cattle and by 9% for that separated from the horse manure. The crystallinity of straw samples analyzed by FTIR show a decrease with increased time of NMMO pretreatment.

  • 22.
    Aslanzadeh, Solmaz
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Sárvári Horváth, Ilona
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Pretreatment of straw fraction of manure for improved biogas production2011In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 5193-5205Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Barghi, H.
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, M.J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Synthesis of an electroconductive membrane using poly(hydroxymethyl-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene-co-tetramethylene-N-hydroxyethyl adipamide)2013In: Journal of Materials Chemistry C, ISSN 2050-7526, E-ISSN 2050-7534, Vol. 1, no 39, p. 6347-6354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synthesis of a novel electroconductive membrane (ECM) was studied with the aim of producing an electroconductive membrane (ECM) with low electrical resistance and appropriate mechanical properties. The method was based on copolymerization of a highly electroconductive monomer (hydroxymethyl-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) with highly mechanical resistant hydrophilized polyamide 46 (polytetramethylene-N-hydroxyethyl adipamide). Due to the lack of hydroxyl groups, polyamide 46 does not have the tendency to take part in any chemical reactions, therefore prior to copolymerization, PA 46 was hydrophilized with acetaldehyde to create reactive sites, which allowed copolymerization to occur. At the final stage, a very thin layer, 566 nm conductive poly(hydroxymethyl-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) homopolymer was localised using in situ plasma polymerization in order to improve the electrical conductivity of the obtained copolymer. The result was an adherent, highly conductive, semi-hydrophilic and flexible ECM. The presence of hydroxyl groups in the final product led to improved hydrophilicity of the conductive membrane with a surface tension of 41 mJ m−2. The electrical resistance of PA 46 was dramatically reduced after copolymerization, to 202 in dry and 54 kΩ cm−2 in wet conditions; furthermore, after plasma treatment, this reduction continued to 105 in dry and 2 kΩ cm−2 in wet conditions. Other parameters such as flux flow, roughness, pore size, pore distribution, contact angle, surface energy and thermal stability of the ECM were also investigated.

  • 24.
    Barghi, Hamidreza
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Catalytic Synthesis of Bulk Hydrophilic Acetaldehyde-Modified Polyamide 462014In: Current Organic Synthesis, ISSN 1570-1794, E-ISSN 1875-6271, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 288-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrophilization of Polyamide 46 (PA46) via modification with acetaldehyde in continuous phase was studied. The chemical modification of PA 46 with acetaldehyde resulted in a water-swollen polymer with hydrophilic property. The polyamide 46 undergoes a nucleophilic addition with acetaldehyde in the presence of aluminum chloride as a catalyst. The extent of bulk hydroxyethylation using AlCl3 resulted in 95.65% modification counted as total N-hydroxyethylated polyamide 46. The modification resulted in improved hydrophilic properties, and a maximum surface free energy of 44.6 mJ/m2 was achieved after 3 h reaction, whereas the unmodified PA46 had a surface free energy of 11.2 mJ/m2. In addition, thermal properties of the polymers were studied using differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analyses. The functionalization leads to decrease in the crystallization energy from 88 J/g to 51 J/g, while the melting energy is changed from 110 J/g to 53 J/g. Furthermore, the thermal stability of the PA46 to pyrolysis was diminished after hydroxylation.

  • 25.
    Barghi, Hamidreza
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Synthesis and characterization of novel bulk hydrophilic acetaldehyde modified polyamide 462011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Barghi, Hamidreza
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bulk Hydrophilic Functionalization of Polyamide 462013Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    (EN)A modified polymer as result of a bulk functionalization of polyamide 46 (PA 46) is presented, as well as methods for synthesizing the modified polymer. This functionalization of PA 46 is performed to provide a homogenous semi-permeable polyamide 46 capable of different charges and different porosities with particles of nanoscale size in order to replace or improve other polyamide fibers used in the textile industry, filtering processes, selective sorption, controlled release devices, phase transfer catalysts, chromatography media, biocompatible capsules, artificial skins, organs, bone void repair as well as in cell bioreactors and incubators, dental impliments, medical devices, clothing, detectors, perfusion devices, in regenerative medicine, and fuel cells. (FR)Un polymère modifié comme résultat d'une fonctionnalisation en masse de polyamide 46 (PA 46) est présenté, ainsi que des procédés de synthèse du polymère modifié. Cette fonctionnalisation de PA 46 est effectuée pour fournir un polyamide 46 semi-perméable homogène apte à des différentes charges et de différentes porosités avec des particules d'une dimension à l'échelle nanométrique afin de remplacer ou d'améliorer d'autres fibres de polyamide utilisées dans l'industrie textile, les procédés de filtration, la sorption sélective, les dispositifs à libération entretenue, les catalyseurs de transfert de phase, les supports de chromatographie, les capsules biocompatibles, les peaux artificielles, les organes, la réparation de cavités osseuses ainsi que les bioréacteurs et incubateurs de cellules, les implants dentaires, les dispositifs médicaux, les vêtements, les détecteurs, les dispositif de perfusion, en médecine régénérative et dans les piles à combustible.

  • 27. Barghi, Hamidreza
    et al.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Surface electroconductive modification of biopolymers2015In: Surface Modification of Biopolymers / [ed] Kumar, V., Singha, A.S., USA: John Wiley & Sons, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28. Bazooyar, Faranak
    et al.
    Taherzadeh, M.J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Niklasson, C.
    Bolton, K.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Molecular modeling of cellulose dissolution2013In: Journal of Computational and Theoretical Nanoscience, ISSN 1546-1955, E-ISSN 1546-1963, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 2639-2648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work we present computational studies that shed light on the molecular mechanism of the initial stages of cellulose dissolution in saturated steam, which is an important pretreatment step in the conversion of lignocellulose to biofuel. The COMPASS, Dreiding and Universal molecular mechanics force fields and the B3LYP density functional with 6-311G, 6-311++G(d,p) and 6-311++G(2d,2p) basis sets were used to study systems containing glucose, cellobiose and water. These molecular systems were studied since they are sufficiently small to perform the density functional theory calculations in a tractable time, while also being relevant to the dissolution of cellulose in saturated steam. Comparison of the energies and structures obtained from the three force fields with those obtained from the first principles method showed that the COMPASS force field is preferred to the other two and that this force field gives similar structures obtained from the first principles method. This supports the validity of the COMPASS force field for studying cellulose dissolution in saturated steam, and preliminary simulations were performed using grand canonical Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations of cellulose dissolution in saturated steam at 100 °C and 1 bar, 160 °C and 6.2 bar, and 250 °C and 39.7 bar. The results show that the cellulose crystal dissolves in saturated steam at the higher temperatures and pressures.

  • 29. Bhaskar, Thallada
    et al.
    Lee, Keat Teong
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Sauer, Michael
    Nampoothiri, K. Madhavan
    New Horizons in Biotechnology - NHBT 20152016In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 213Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30. Bidgoli, H.
    et al.
    Zamani, A.
    Jeihanipour, A.
    Taherzadeh, M.J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Preparation of carboxymethyl cellulose superabsorbents from waste textiles Fibers and Polymers2014In: Fibers And Polymers, ISSN 1229-9197, E-ISSN 1875-0052, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 431-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Production of superabsorbent polymers from cotton and viscose waste textiles was investigated. The cellulose wastes were carboxymethylated, crosslinked by divinylsulfone, and then converted to superabsorbent material using air-drying, freeze-drying, or air-drying after phase inversion. The separation of cellulose from synthetic polymers in the textile (polyester) was carried out by direct dissolution of cellulose in N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMMO), or separation by dissolution in water after carboxymethylation of the textiles. The progress of the carboxymethylation reaction was evaluated by measurement of the degree of substitution (DS) of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC). The DS values of 0.50–0.86 confirmed the prosperous substitution of hydrophilic carboxymethyl groups into the cellulosic chains. The water binding capacity and the swelling rate of the superabsorbents prepared under different conditions were measured. Under the best condition the superabsorbent obtained from waste textiles showed an ultimate water binding capacity of 541 g/g which was notably higher than that of the reference superabsorbent derived from cotton linter (470 g/g). The amount of absorbed water by this product exceeded that of the reference sample after 60 min immersion.

  • 31. Bidgoli, Hossein
    et al.
    Zamani, Akram
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Effect of carboxymethylation conditions on water binding capacity of chitosan-based superabsorbents2010In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 345, no 18, p. 2683-2689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A superabsorbent polymer (SAP) from chitosan was provided via carboxymethylation of chitosan, followed by cross-linking with glutaraldehyde and freeze-drying. This work was focused on an investigation of the effects of monochloroacetic acid (MCAA), sodium hydroxide, and reaction time on preparation of carboxymethylchitosan (CMCS). The CMCS products were characterized using FTIR spectroscopy, and their degrees of substitution (DS) were measured using conductimetry and FTIR analysis. The highest DS value was obtained when the carboxymethylation reaction was carried out using 1.75 g MCAA and 1.75 g NaOH per g of chitosan in 4 h. The water solubilities of the CMCS products at various pHs were also evaluated, and the results indicated a significant impact of the reaction parameters on the solubility of CMCS. The CMCSs with the highest DS value resulted in SAPs having the highest water-binding capacity (WBC). TheWBCof the best SAP measured after 10 minexposure in distilled water, 0.9% NaCl solution, synthetic urine, and artificial blood was 104, 33, 30, and 57 g/g, respectively. The WBC of this SAP at pH 2–9 passed a maximum at pH 6.

  • 32.
    Björk, Hans
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Lindecrantz, Kaj
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Ericsson, Dag
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Sarv, Hans
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Börjesson, Anders
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Bazooyar, Faranak
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Ahlström, Peter
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Andersson, Bengt-Åke
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Johansson, Andreas
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Skrifvars, Mikael
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    20 år med Institutionen Ingenjörshögskolan: historik, nuläge och framtid2009Report (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Brancoli, Pedro
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ferreira, Jorge A.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Bolton, Kim
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Changes in carbon footprint when integrating production of filamentous fungi in 1st generation ethanol plants2017In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Integrating the cultivation of edible filamentous fungi in the thin stillage from ethanol production is presently being considered. This integration can increase the ethanol yield while simultaneously producing a new value-added protein-rich biomass that can be used for animal feed. This study uses life cycle assessment to determine the change in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions when integrating the cultivation of filamentous fungi in ethanol production. The result shows that the integration performs better than the current scenario when the fungal biomass is used as cattle feed for system expansion and when energy allocation is used. It performs worse if the biomass is used as fish feed. Hence, integrating the cultivation of filamentous fungi in 1st generation ethanol plants combined with proper use of the fungi can lead to a reduction of GHG emissions which, considering the number of existing ethanol plants, can have a significant global impact.

  • 34. Brandberg, T.
    et al.
    Karimi, K.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, M.J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Franzén, C.J.
    Gustafsson, L.
    Continuous fermentation of wheat-supplemented lignocellulose hydrolysate with different types of cell retention2007In: Biotechnology and Bioengineering, ISSN 0006-3592, E-ISSN 1097-0290, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 80-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Medium supplementation and process alternatives for fuel ethanol production from dilute acid lignocellulose hydrolysate were investigated. Dilute acid lignocellulose hydrolysate supplemented with enzymatically hydrolysed wheat flour could sustain continuous anaerobic cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 96581 if further supplemented with ammonium sulphate and biotin. This medium composition allowed for a hexose utilisation of 73% and an ethanol production of 36 mmol l-1 h-1 in chemostat cultivation at dilution rate 0.10 h-1. Three different methods for cell retention were compared for improved fermentation of supplemented lignocellulose hydrolysate: cell recirculation by filtration, cell recirculation by sedimentation and cell immobilisation in calcium alginate. All three cell retention methods improved the hexose conversion and increased the volumetric ethanol production rate. Recirculation of 75% of the bioreactor outlet flow by filtration improved the hexose utilisation from 76% to 94%. Sedimentation turned out to be an efficient method for cell separation; the cell concentration in the reactor was 32 times higher than in the outflow after 60 h of substrate feeding. However, chemostat and continuous cell recirculation cultures became severely inhibited when the dilution rate was increased to 0.20 h-1. In contrast, an immobilised system kept producing ethanol at a stable level also at dilution rate 0.30 h-1. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2007; 98: 80-90. © 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  • 35. Bátori, Veronika
    et al.
    Ferreira, Jorge A
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ethanol and Protein from Ethanol Plant By-Products Using Edible Fungi Neurospora intermedia and Aspergillus oryzae2015In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2015, no nov23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Feasible biorefineries for production of second-generation ethanol are difficult to establish due to the process complexity. An alternative is to partially include the process in the first-generation plants. Whole stillage, a by-product from dry-mill ethanol processes from grains, is mostly composed of undegraded bran and lignocelluloses can be used as a potential substrate for production of ethanol and feed proteins. Ethanol production and the proteins from the stillage were investigated using the edible fungi Neurospora intermedia and Aspergillus oryzae, respectively. N. intermedia produced 4.7 g/L ethanol from the stillage and increased to 8.7 g/L by adding 1 FPU of cellulase/g suspended solids. Saccharomyces cerevisiae produced 0.4 and 5.1 g/L ethanol, respectively. Under a two-stage cultivation with both fungi, up to 7.6 g/L of ethanol and 5.8 g/L of biomass containing 42% (w/w) crude protein were obtained. Both fungi degraded complex substrates including arabinan, glucan, mannan, and xylan where reductions of 91, 73, 38, and 89% (w/v) were achieved, respectively. The inclusion of the current process can lead to the production of 44,000 m(3) of ethanol (22% improvement), around 12,000 tons of protein-rich biomass for animal feed, and energy savings considering a typical facility producing 200,000 m(3) ethanol/year.

  • 36.
    Bátori, Veronika
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Jabbari, Mostafa
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Åkesson, Dan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Zamani, Akram
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Production of Pectin-Cellulose Biofilms: A New Approach for Citrus Waste Recycling2017In: International Journal of Polymer Science, ISSN 1687-9422, E-ISSN 1687-9430, Vol. 2017, p. 1-9, article id 9732329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While citrus waste is abundantly generated, the disposal methods used today remain unsatisfactory: they can be deleterious for ruminants, can cause soil salinity, or are not economically feasible; yet citrus waste consists of various valuable polymers. This paper introduces a novel environmentally safe approach that utilizes citrus waste polymers as a biobased and biodegradable film, for example, for food packaging. Orange waste has been investigated for biofilm production, using the gelling ability of pectin and the strength of cellulosic fibres. A casting method was used to form a film from the previously washed, dried, and milled orange waste. Two film-drying methods, a laboratory oven and an incubator shaker, were compared. FE-SEM images confirmed a smoother film morphology when the incubator shaker was used for drying. The tensile strength of the films was 31.67 ± 4.21 and 34.76 ± 2.64 MPa, respectively, for the oven-dried and incubator-dried films, which is within the range of different commodity plastics. Additionally, biodegradability of the films was confirmed under anaerobic conditions. Films showed an opaque appearance with yellowish colour.

  • 37.
    Bátori, Veronika
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pallhed, Jonny
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Zamani, Akram
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Development of biocomposite films from citrus waste2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Bátori, Veronika
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Åkesson, Dan
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Zamani, Akram
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Pectin-based Composites2017In: Handbook of Composites from Renewable Materials: Biodegradable Materials, John Wiley & Sons, 2017, p. 487-518Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One third of the cell wall of vascular plants is composed of pectin, which serves as the cementing material for the cellulosic network, behaving as a stabilized gel. Industrially, pectin is produced from juice and sugar production waste. Different sources and extraction conditions result in diversity in characteristics and applications of pectin. Most commonly, pectin is used in the food industry as a gelling and thickening agent and it is favored in the pharmaceutical industry as a carrier for colon-specific drugs. Pectin has good potential to be utilized as a matrix in production of environmentally friendly film packaging as well as biocomposite materials. Pectin is sensitive to chemical reactions and promotes the homogeneous immobilization of cells, genes, and proteins. However, due to limited mechanical properties pectin is not used for structural applications but instead rather for composites in which its biodegradable properties can be utilized. Pectin is often reinforced with hydroxyapatite and biphasic calcium phosphate for bone regeneration and tissue engineering applications. It can also be used as a biosorbent for copper removal from aqueous solutions. Active packaging of nanohybrids composed of pectin and halloysite nanotubes that are loaded with rosemary essential oil is another application of pectin-based composites.

  • 39. Cabrera-Rodríquez, Emir
    et al.
    Curbelo-Hernández, Caridad
    Karimi, Keikhosro
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Effect of sodium hydroxide pretreatment at low temperature on chemical composition and enzymatic hydrolysis of spruce2013In: Revista CENIC Ciencias Químicas, ISSN 2221-2442, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The availability of fermentable sugars is a limiting factor for large-scale production of biological products such as bioethanol. Therefore, processes to produce sugars are being developed from lignocellulosic materials by enzymatic hydrolysis. However, the cellulose fraction are not readily accessible for the hydrolyzing enzymes and an efficient hydrolysis requires pretreatment. Several processes have been investigated for this pretreatment. Pretreatment of lignocelluloses with NaOH is among the promissing methods. In the present work, the effect of NaOH pretreatment at low temperature on chemical composition and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of spruce was investigated. A native spruce specie obtained from the forest around Borås city in Sweden was used in an the experiments. This wood was analyzed for carbohydrate and lignin fractions according to NREL methods. The wood was chemically pretreated using 7 % (w/w) sodium hydroxide solution with 5 % (w/v) solid content at 0 °C for 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 h. Commercial enzymes, cellulase (Celluclast 1.5 L, Novozyme, Denmark) and β-glucosidase (Novozyme 188, Novozyme, Denmark) were used in the enzymatic hydrolysis with activities of 30 FPU and 50 IU per gram of wood, respectively. The pretreatments changed the material composition. It was a very low loss of carbohydrate, about 98 % recovery, suggesting no significant carbohydrate hydrolysis. Xylans were the most affected by the pretreatments. The largest xylan removal was almost 50 %, using sodium hydroxide solution for 3 h. The profile of released sugars were also analyzed and compared. An improvement of enzymatic hydrolysis yield was observed as a result of the applied pretreatments, near 40 % glucose yield could be achieved.

  • 40. Cahyari, Khamdan
    et al.
    Syamsiah, Siti
    Sarto,
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Harvesting biohydrogen (BioH2) and biomethane (BioCH4) from fruit waste through sequential thermophilic fermentation2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A sequential two stages thermophilic fermentation of fruit waste i.e. orange, banana, apple, grape, melon to produce biofuels i.e. biohydrogen (BioH2) and biomethane (BioCH4) was investigated. In the first stage, fermentative BioH2 from each waste was successfully carried out without any methane being detected. Among the wastes, apple generated more gas with cumulative BioH2 yield (CHY) as 19.91 mmol/g VS (90% of theoretical value), while the lowest one resulted from melon (8.14 mmol/g VS or 36.8%). In the second stage, fermentative BioCH4 of residual liquid from the first stage was achieved successfully for banana, VEMF, apple, grape, melon, and orange with the cumulative BioCH4 yield (CHY) as 10.62, 14.23, 15.88, 16.26, 16.74, and 18.50 mmol CH4/g VSadded respectively. It was also showed from chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurement that COD removal efficiency achieved significantly high from 48% up to 60% for all the waste except orange which was only 16.7%. It was presumed that orange contained difficult-to-degrade materials such as limonene. In fact, fermentative BioH2 of orange in higher limonene concentration at 18 mg/l was totally inhibited. A simulation of potential generated energy (PGE) from the fruits waste being treated through this method was carried out based on the quantity of worldwide harvested fruits in 2009 (FAO UN), in consideration that 10% of the fruits were wasted. It is surprisingly understood that each of the fruits waste can deliver more than 64 MWh of electricity.

  • 41.
    Cahyari, Khamdan
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Syamsiah, Siti
    Sarto,
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Hydrogen production from fruit waste through dark fermentation2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Chandolias, Konstantinos
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Research Centre for Resource Recovery.
    Pardaev, Sindor
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. University of Samarkand.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business. Research Centre for Resource Recovery.
    Biohydrogen and carboxylic acids production from wheat straw hydrolysate2016In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Chandolias, Konstantinos
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Wainaina, Steven
    Niklasson, Claes
    Chalmers Technical University.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Effects of Heavy Metals and pH on the Conversion of Biomass to Hydrogen via Syngas Fermentation2018In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of three heavy metals on hydrogen production via syngas fermentation were investigated within a metal concentration range of 0-1.5 mg Cu/L, 0-9 mg Zn/L, 0-42 mg Mn/L, in media with initial pH of 5, 6 and 7, at 55 °C. The results showed that at lower metal concentration, pH 6 was optimum while at higher metal concentrations, pH 5 stimulated the process. More specifically, the highest hydrogen production activity recorded was 155.28% ± 12.02% at a metal concentration of 0.04 mg Cu/L, 0.25 mg Zn/L, and 1.06 mg Mn/L and an initial medium pH of 6. At higher metal concentration (0.625 mg Cu/L, 3.75 mg Zn/L, and 17.5 mg Mn/L), only pH 5 was stimulating for the cells. The results show that the addition of heavy metals, contained in gasification-derived ash, can improve the production rate and yield of fermentative hydrogen. This could lead in lower costs in gasification process and fermentative hydrogen production and less demand for syngas cleaning before syngas fermentation.

  • 44.
    Chandolias, Konstantinos
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Youngsukkasem, Supansa
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Rapid Bio-methanation of Syngas by High Cell-density in Reverse Membrane Bioreactor (RMBR)2015In: Advanced Membrane Technology VI: Water, Energy and New Frontiers / [ed] Dibakar Bhattacharyya (University of Kentucky, USA), Benny Freeman (University of Texas, USA), 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45. Christia, Abdi
    et al.
    Setiowati, Arima Diah
    Millati, Ria
    Karimi, Keikhosro
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Cahyanto, Muhammad Nur
    Niklasson, Claes
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Ethanol production from alkali-pretreated oil palm empty fruit bunch by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation with mucor indicus2016In: International Journal of Green Energy, ISSN 1543-5075, E-ISSN 1543-5083, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 566-572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) is a potential raw material for production of lignocellulosic bioethanol. The OPEFB was pretreated with 8% sodium hydroxide solution at 100 °C for 10 to 90 min. Enzymatic digestion was carried out using cellulase and β-glucosidase at 45 °C for 24 h. It was then inoculated with Mucor indicus spores suspension and fermented under anaerobic conditions at 37 °C for 96 h. Sodium hydroxide pretreatment effectively removed 51-57% of lignin in the OPEFB and also its hemicellulose (40-84%). The highest glucan digestibility (0.75 g/g theoretical glucose) was achieved in 40 min NaOH pretreatment. Fermentation by M. indicus resulted in 68.4% of the theoretical ethanol yield, while glycerol (16.2-83.2 mg/g), succinic acid (0-0.4 mg/g), and acetic acid (0-0.9 mg/g) were its by-products. According to these results, the 11.75 million tons of dry OPEFB in Indonesia can be converted to 1.5 billion litres of ethanol per year.

  • 46.
    Dasa, Kris Triwulan
    et al.
    Universitas Gadjah Mada.
    Westman, Supansa Y.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Millati, Ria
    Universitas Gadjah Mada.
    Cahyanto, Muhammad Nur
    Universitas Gadjah Mada.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Niklasson, Claes
    Chalmers.
    Inhibitory Effect of Long-Chain Fatty Acids on Biogas Production and the Protective Effect of Membrane Bioreactor2016In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anaerobic digestion of lipid-containing wastes for biogas production is often hampered by the inhibitory effect of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs). In this study, the inhibitory effects of LCFAs (palmitic, stearic, and oleic acid) on biogas production as well as the protective effect of a membrane bioreactor (MBR) against LCFAs were examined in thermophilic batch digesters. The results showed that palmitic and oleic acid with concentrations of 3.0 and 4.5 g/L resulted in >50% inhibition on the biogas production, while stearic acid had an even stronger inhibitory effect. The encased cells in the MBR system were able to perform better in the presence of LCFAs. This system exhibited a significantly lower percentage of inhibition than the free cell system, not reaching over 50% at any LCFA concentration tested.[on SciFinder (R)]

  • 47.
    Dehkhoda, Anahita
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Brandberg, Tomas
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Comparison of vacuum and high pressure evaporated wood hydrolyzate for ethanol production by repeated fed-batch using flocculating Saccharomyces cerevisiae2009In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 309-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comparison of vacuum and high pressure evaporated wood hydrolyzate for ethanol production by repeated fed-batch using flocculating Saccharomyces cerevisiae

  • 48. Dehnavi, Gholamali Z.
    et al.
    Lauceria, Jose L.
    Rodriguez, Dani
    Beaton, Milagros
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Martin, Carlos
    Fractionation of the main components of barley spent grains from a microbrewery2011In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 45, no 5-6, p. 339-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The chemical composition of barley spent grains generated in a microbrewery and their fractionation by acid hydrolysis and delignification were investigated. The material contained high amount of carbohydrates (60%), while its lignin content was lower than that reported for other sorts of barley spent grains. Different dilute-acid hydrolysis methods were evaluated for separating the main components of the spent grains, without affecting the sugars generated by starch hydrolysis. The utilization of a two-step dilute-acid hydrolysis approach allowed to hydrolyse starch in a first step, at 100 ºC, and hemicelluloses in a second step, at 121 ºC. Acetosolv and alkaline delignification were used for solubilising the lignin fraction. A higher lignin solubilisation (95% of the lignin contained in the raw material) was achieved after alkaline delignification, whereas only 34% of the initial lignin was removed by direct acetosolv. When the acetosolv treatment was combined with acid hydrolysis, lignin solubilisation increased to 74%. Lignin was precipitated from the liquors at recovery rates from 40 to 93%, as depending on the hydrolysis/delignification method used.

  • 49. Ebrahimi, Fatemeh
    et al.
    Khanahmadi, Morteza
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Ethanol production from bread residues2008In: Biomass and Bioenergy, ISSN 0961-9534, E-ISSN 1873-2909, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 333-337Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50. FazeliNejad, Somayeh
    et al.
    Brandberg, Tomas
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Lennartsson, Patrik R.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Inhibitor Tolerance: A Comparison between Rhizopus sp. and Saccharomyces cerevisiae2013In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 5524-5535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zygomycetes fungi are able to produce ethanol, and their biomass may hold a high market value, making them interesting microorganisms from a biorefinery perspective. In the present study, the inhibitor tolerance of the Zygomycetes fungus Rhizopus sp. was evaluated and compared with a flocculating strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The inhibitors furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural [HMF], acetic acid, and levulinic acid and the phenolic compounds catechol, guaiacol, and vanillin were applied in different combinations in a semi-synthetic medium. Glucose uptake and conversion of HMF in the presence of inhibitors were analyzed for the two organisms, and it appeared that the inhibitor resistances of Rhizopus sp. and S. cerevisiae were comparable. However, in the presence of catechol (0.165 g L-1), guaiacol (0.186 g L-1), and vanillin (0.30 g L-1), the glucose uptake by S. cerevisiae was only 3.5% of its uptake in a medium without inhibitors, while under equal conditions, Rhizopus sp. maintained 43% of its uninhibited glucose uptake.

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