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  • 1.
    Seipel, Sina
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Yu, Junchun
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Periyasamy, Aravin
    Technical University of Liberec.
    Viková, Martina
    Technical University of Liberec.
    Vik, Michal
    Technical University of Liberec.
    Nierstrasz, Vincent
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Characterization and optimization of an inkjet-printed smart textile UV-sensor cured with UV-LED light2017In: IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, 2017, Vol. 254, article id 072023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the development of niche products like smart textiles and other functional high-end products, resource-saving production processes are needed. Niche products only require small batches, which makes their production with traditional textile production techniques time-consuming and costly. To achieve a profitable production, as well as to further foster innovation, flexible and integrated production techniques are a requirement. Both digital inkjet printing and UV-light curing contribute to a flexible, resource-efficient, energy-saving and therewith economic production of smart textiles. In this article, a smart textile UV-sensor is printed using a piezoelectric drop-on-demand printhead and cured with a UV-LED lamp. The UVcurable ink system is based on free radical polymerization and the integrated UVsensing material is a photochromic dye, Reversacol Ruby Red. The combination of two photoactive compounds, for which UV-light is both the curer and the activator, challenges two processes: polymer crosslinking of the resin and color performance of the photochromic dye. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used to characterize the curing efficiency of the prints. Color measurements are made to determine the influence of degree of polymer crosslinking on the developed color intensities, as well as coloration and decoloration rates of the photochromic prints. Optimized functionality of the textile UV-sensor is found using different belt speeds and lamp intensities during the curing process.

  • 2.
    Seipel, Sina
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Yu, Junchun
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Viková, Martina
    Technical University of Liberec.
    Vik, Michal
    Technical University of Liberec.
    Koldinská, Marie
    Technical University of Liberec.
    Havelka, Antonin
    Technical University of Liberec.
    Nierstrasz, Vincent
    University of Borås, Faculty of Textiles, Engineering and Business.
    Color performance, durability and handle of inkjet-printed and UV-cured photochromic textiles for multi-colored applications2019In: Fibers And Polymers, ISSN 1229-9197, E-ISSN 1875-0052, Vol. 20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development and design of novel functional and smart textile materials such as textile sensors and multicolored systems based on photochromic dyes necessitate controls of color intensities, switching speeds, and material durability. Precise control and synchronization of dye kinetics are important for multi-colored photochromic applications especially. However, durability towards abrasion and washing should not be compromised on if we aim to design reliable future textile products. In this study, two different commercial photochromic dyes — a naphthopyran and a spirooxazine-based dye — have been applied on PET fabric by inkjet printing and UV-LED curing. The photochromic textiles’ color behavior, fastness to abrasion and washing, and handle are evaluated using spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy, and Kawabata evaluation system. Despite a decrease in color performance after washing, the photochromic inkjet print is effective and barely influences the textile structure. Reduced rigidity of the host matrix promoted higher color yields and faster dye kinetics, but also improved durability towards abrasion and washing. In order to synchronize kinetics of the different dye types for multi-colored applications, distinct curing conditions are preferable, which, however, result in varying print durability. In the design of multi-colored photochromic textiles, dye kinetics, and durability have to be balanced.

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