Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Brandrup-Wognsen, G
    et al.
    Berggren, H
    Caidahl, K
    Karlsson, T
    Herlitz, Johan
    [external].
    Sjöland, H
    Predictors for recurrent chest pain and relationship to myocardial ischaemia during long-term follow-up after coronary artery bypass grafting1997In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 304-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To describe the impact of coronary artery bypass grafting on chest pain during 2 years of follow-up after the operation and to identify predictors of chest pain and its relationship to myocardial ischaemia 2 years after the operation. Methods: Patients were approached with a questionnaire at the time of coronary angiography (1291) and 3 months (1664), 1 year (1638) and 2 years (1613) after coronary artery bypass grafting. Two years after the operation, a computerised 12-lead electrocardiogram was obtained during a standardised bicycle exercise test (618). Results: Prior to surgery, 37% of the patients were unable to perform physical activity compared with 6% after the operation (PB0.0001 for change in degree of limitation). Only 3% had no chest pain at all prior to the operation, while 58% of the patients were free from chest pain 2 years after surgery (PB0.0001). We found no correlation between patients reporting chest pain and signs of ischaemia at exercise test, but there was a highly significant correlation with chest pain during the exercise test (PB0.0001). Independent predictors of chest pain were severity of preoperative angina (PB0.0001), younger age (P 0.0009), previous coronary artery bypass grafting (P 0.003), duration of symptoms (P 0.005), the need for prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass (P 0.04) and the absence of left main stenosis (P 0.04). Conclusion: Independent predictors of chest pain were identified 2 years after coronary artery bypass grafting. There was a dramatic improvement after coronary artery bypass grafting. However, almost half the patients complained of some kind of chest pain even after the operation. This chest pain correlated well with chest pain during the exercise test but not with signs of myocardial ischaemia.

  • 2. Brandrup-Wognsen, G
    et al.
    Haglid, M
    Karlsson, T
    Berggren, H
    Herlitz, Johan
    [external].
    Mortality during two years after coronary artery bypass grafting in relation to preoperative factors and urgency of operation1995In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 9, no 12, p. 685-691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to describe mortality during the 2-year-period after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) in relation to perioperative risk factors and urgency of operation. All the patients in western Sweden were included in whom CABG was performed between June 1988 and June 1991, without concomitant procedures or re-operations. The study was prospective in design. In all, 2000 patients were operated upon and 186 (9.3%) of the operations were acute. There was a significant relationship between the urgency of the operation and mortality. Early mortality was 2.4% in elective operations and 5.4-62.5% in urgent to emergency operations. The 30-day to 2-year mortality was 4.2%. The perioperative risk indicators independently associated with early mortality were neurologic complications, serum-aspartate aminotransferase (S-ASAT) more than 2.0 microkat/l, urgency of operation, the use of circulatory assist devices, re-operation and ventilator time more than 24 h. The risk indicators for mortality after 30 days were pneumothorax, longer intensive care unit (ICU) time, the use of inotropic drugs and neurologic complications. In conclusion, the multivariate analysis reveals the urgency of the operation as a predictor of early mortality after CABG, but no significant association with mortality was found after 30 days. When excluding death within 30 days, three additional independent predictors of mortality were identified.

  • 3.
    Herlitz, Johan
    et al.
    [external].
    Brandrup, G
    Emanuelsson, H
    Haglid, M
    Karlsson, T
    Karlson, BW
    Sandén, W
    Determinants of time to discharge following coronary artery bypass grafting1997In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 533-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe clinical factors prior to and at the time of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) associated with the number of days until hospital discharge. PATIENTS: All patients from western Sweden in whom during the time period June 1 1988-June 1 1991 CABG was performed without simultaneous valve surgery. METHODS: The time between operation and hospital discharge was calculated for every patient and related to various factors prior to and at the operation. RESULTS: Among 2035 patients the time between operation and discharged alive from hospital varied between 2 and 191 days (median 15 days). When simultaneously considering pre-, per- and postoperative factors the following appeared as independent predictors for a longer hospital time: age (years) (P < 0.0001); female sex, (P < 0.0001); time in respirator (P = 0.0004); previous congestive heart failure (P = 0.0007); reoperation (P = 0.0008); neurological complication (P = 0.001); maximum activity of serum aspartate amino transferase (P = 0.002); pneumo/hydrothorax (P = 0.002), previous cerebrovascular disease (P = 0.004), non-smoker (P = 0.006); supraventricular arrhythmia (0.006); time in intensive care unit (P = 0.007); aortic cross-clamp time (P = 0.009); obesity (P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: A large number of pre- and postoperative factors are associated with an increased time between operation and time to discharge.

  • 4.
    Herlitz, Johan
    et al.
    [external].
    Brandrup-Wognsen, G
    Caidahl, K
    Haglid, M
    Karlson, BW
    Karlsson, T
    Albertsson, P
    Lindelöw, B
    Mortality and morbidity among patients who undergo combined valve and coronary artery bypass surgery. Early and late results1998In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 836-846Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe mortality and morbidity early and late after combined valve surgery and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) as compared with CABG alone. PATIENTS and METHODS: All patients from western Sweden in whom CABG in combination with valve surgery or CABG alone was carried out in 1988-1991. RESULTS: Among 2116 patients who underwent CABG, 35 (2%) had this combined with mitral valve surgery and 134 (6%) had this combined with aortic valve surgery, whereas the remaining 92% underwent CABG alone. Patients who underwent combined valve surgery and CABG were older, included more women and had a higher prevalence of previous congestive heart failure and renal dysfunction but on the other hand a less severe coronary artery disease. Among patients who underwent mitral valve surgery in combination with CABG the mortality over the subsequent 5 years was 45%). The corresponding figure for patients who underwent aortic valve surgery in combination with CABG was 24%. Both were higher than for CABG alone (14%; P < 0.0001 and P = 0.003, respectively). In a stepwise multiple regression model mitral valve surgery in combination with CABG was found to be an independent significant predictor for death but aortic valve surgery in combination with CABG was not. Among patients who underwent mitral valve surgery in combination with CABG and were discharged alive from hospital 77% were rehospitalized during the 2 years following the operation as compared with 48% among patients who underwent aortic valve surgery in combination with CABG and 43% among patients with CABG alone. Multiple regression identified mitral valve surgery in combination with CABG as a significant independent predictor for rehospitalization but not aortic valve plus CABG. CONCLUSION: Among patients who either underwent CABG in combination with mitral valve surgery or aortic valve surgery or CABG alone, mitral valve surgery in combination with CABG was independently associated with death and rehospitalization, but the combination of aortic valve surgery and CABG was not.

  • 5.
    Herlitz, Johan
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Brandrup-Wognsen, G.
    Evander, MH
    Caidahl, K
    Hartford, M
    Karlson, BW
    Karlsson, T
    Karason, K
    Symptoms of Chest Pain and Dyspnoea during a Period of 15 Years after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting2010In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 112-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe changes in chest pain and dyspnoea during a period of 15 years after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and to define factors at the time of operation that were associated with the occurrence of these symptoms after 15 years. DESIGN: Prospective observational study in western Sweden. SUBJECTS: All patients who underwent first-time CABG, without simultaneous valve surgery, between 1 June 1988 and 1 June 1991. There were no exclusion criteria. FOLLOW-UP: All patients were followed up prospectively for 15 years. The evaluation of symptoms took place through postal questionnaires prior to and 5, 10 and 15 years after the operation. RESULTS: Totally, 2000 patients were included in the survey and 904 (45%) of them survived to 15 years. Among these 904 survivors, the percentage of patients with chest pain increased from 44% to 50% between the 5- and 15-year follow-up (p=0.004). The percentage of patients who reported symptoms of dyspnoea increased from 60% after 5 years to 74% after 15 years (p<0.001). Factors at the time of surgery that independently tended to predict chest pain after 15 years were higher age (p=0.04) and prolonged duration of symptoms prior to surgery (p=0.04). Predictors of dyspnoea after 15 years were higher age (p<0.0001), the use of inotropic drugs at the time of surgery (p=0.001), a history of diabetes (p=0.01) and obesity (p=0.01). CONCLUSION: After CABG, relief from chest pain and dyspnoea is generally maintained over a long period of time. Eventually, however, functional-limiting symptoms tend to recur and about half the patients report symptoms of chest pain, while three-quarters report dyspnoea after 15 years. Even if no clear predictor of chest pain was found at the time of surgery, age, the use of inotropic drugs, diabetes and obesity predicted dyspnoea.

  • 6.
    Herlitz, Johan
    et al.
    [external].
    Brandrup-Wognsen, G
    Haglid Evander, M
    Caidahl, K
    Hartford, M
    Karlson, BW
    Karlsson, T
    Karason, nK
    Symptoms of chest pain and dyspnoea during a period of 15 years after coronary artery bypass grafting.2010In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 112-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe changes in chest pain and dyspnoea during a period of 15 years after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and to define factors at the time of operation that were associated with the occurrence of these symptoms after 15 years. DESIGN: Prospective observational study in western Sweden. SUBJECTS: All patients who underwent first-time CABG, without simultaneous valve surgery, between 1 June 1988 and 1 June 1991. There were no exclusion criteria. FOLLOW-UP: All patients were followed up prospectively for 15 years. The evaluation of symptoms took place through postal questionnaires prior to and 5, 10 and 15 years after the operation. RESULTS: Totally, 2000 patients were included in the survey and 904 (45%) of them survived to 15 years. Among these 904 survivors, the percentage of patients with chest pain increased from 44% to 50% between the 5- and 15-year follow-up (p=0.004). The percentage of patients who reported symptoms of dyspnoea increased from 60% after 5 years to 74% after 15 years (p<0.001). Factors at the time of surgery that independently tended to predict chest pain after 15 years were higher age (p=0.04) and prolonged duration of symptoms prior to surgery (p=0.04). Predictors of dyspnoea after 15 years were higher age (p<0.0001), the use of inotropic drugs at the time of surgery (p=0.001), a history of diabetes (p=0.01) and obesity (p=0.01). CONCLUSION: After CABG, relief from chest pain and dyspnoea is generally maintained over a long period of time. Eventually, however, functional-limiting symptoms tend to recur and about half the patients report symptoms of chest pain, while three-quarters report dyspnoea after 15 years. Even if no clear predictor of chest pain was found at the time of surgery, age, the use of inotropic drugs, diabetes and obesity predicted dyspnoea.

  • 7.
    Herlitz, Johan
    et al.
    [external].
    Sjöland, H
    Haglid, M
    Karlson, BW
    Caidahl, K
    Wiklund, I
    Hartford, M
    Karlsson, T
    Impact of a history of diabetes mellitus on quality of life after coronary bypass grafting1998In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 853-861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe the improvement in various aspects of quality of life (QoL) after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), in relation to a previous history of diabetes mellitus. PATIENTS: All patients from western Sweden who underwent CABG between 1988 and 1991 without simultaneous valve surgery. METHODS: Patients were approached with three questionnaires: The Physical Activity Score, the Nottingham Health Profile and the Psychological General Well-being Index prior to surgery and 3 months, 1 and 2 years thereafter. RESULTS: All three questionnaires already showed a significant improvement in QoL after 3 months, remaining at a similar level 1 and 2 years after the operation. In terms of Physical Activity Score improvement was of similar magnitude in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. In terms of the Psychological General Well-Being Index significant and similar improvements were found in diabetic and non-diabetic patients at each evaluation. In terms of the Nottingham Health Profile there was a significant improvement both in diabetic and non-diabetic patients 3 months, 1 and 2 years after the operation. However, improvement was more marked in diabetic than in non-diabetic patients at each evaluation. CONCLUSION: For 3 months, 1 and 2 years after CABG various aspects of QoL as estimated with three different instruments, improved significantly both in diabetic and in non-diabetic patients compared with the situation prior to the operation. However, the three instruments differed somewhat. Thus, whereas in the Physical Activity Score, diabetic patients tended to improve less markedly than non-diabetic patients, the opposite was found in the Nottingham Health Profile.

  • 8. Sjöland, H
    et al.
    Caidahl, K
    Wiklund, I
    Haglid, M
    Hartford, M
    Karlson, BW
    Karlsson, T
    Herlitz, Johan
    [external].
    Impact of coronary artery bypass grafting on various aspects of quality of life1997In: European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, ISSN 1010-7940, E-ISSN 1873-734X, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 612-619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To prospectively study the improvement in quality of life (QoL) after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Consecutive patients (n = 2121) who underwent CABG at Sahlgrenska University Hospital between 1988 and 1991 received 3 questionnaires for the study of QoL: the Physical Activity Score, the Nottingham Health Profile and the Psychological General Well-being Index, which were responded both before surgery and at 3 months (n = 1059), 1 year (n = 1045) and 2 years (n = 1027) postoperatively. RESULTS: All differences were tested against baseline. The Physical Activity Score improved (mean 4.3 before CABG, 3.1, 3 months after (P < 0.0001), and 2.8, 2 years postoperatively (P < 0.0001)). The Nottingham Health Profile score improved (mean 20.5 before CABG, 11.4, 3 months (P < 0.0001), and 10.4, 2 years postoperatively (P < 0.0001)). The Psychological General Well-being Index improved (mean 91.1 before CABG, 103.8, 3 months (P < 0.0001), and 105.8 (P < 0.0001), 2 years after CABG). The subscale analyses of the Nottingham Health Profile and the Psychological General Well-being Index 2 years after CABG showed the greatest improvement in areas reflecting physical capacity and pain, to be followed by mental qualities. At 2 years after CABG only sexual problems were still markedly frequent, and independent predictors for sexual problems after surgery were preoperative problems (P < 0.00001), male sex (P < 0.0001), and diabetes mellitus (P = 0.0008). CONCLUSION: QoL was markedly and significantly improved after CABG. The major improvement was seen already at 3 months, with further slight improvement observed 2 years after surgery. The major improvement was found in areas reflecting physical capacity and pain, which is consistent with symptomatic and objective measurements after CABG. In contrast to the overall improvement in QoL sexual problems were still markedly common 2 years after CABG. The mechanism for this is not fully understood and needs further investigation.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf