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  • 1.
    Bondas, Terese
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Hall, E
    Challenges in approaching metasynthesis research2007In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 113-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this study was to contribute to the development of metasynthesis through an analysis of the challenges involved. The study grew out of the critique of qualitative metaresearch raised by current developers of metamethodologies. Different views on the application of methodologies have emerged in the literature, contributing to confusion and ambiguity concerning the challenging questions of what, why, how, and who in metasynthesis research, which might increase the risk of misunderstanding. The roots of metasynthesis research are seen as multifaceted and influencing the development of the methods in different directions. The primary worth of metasynthesis is theoretical and/or methodological development (synthesis) combined with the potential for reflection: going beyond and behind the studies (meta). Metasynthesis research has also the potential to raise questions of research collaboration, culture, and language.

  • 2.
    Bremer, Anders
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Sandman, Lars
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Experiencing Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: Significant Others’ Lifeworld Perspective2009In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 19, no 10, p. 1407-1420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When patients suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA), significant others find themselves with no choice about being there. After the event they are often left with unanswered questions about the life-threatening circumstances, or the patient’s death, or emergency treatment and future needs. When it is unclear how the care and the event itself will affect significant others’ well-being, prehospital emergency personnel face ethical decisions. In this article we describe the experiences of significant others present at OHCA, focusing on ethical aspects and values. Using a lifeworld phenomenological approach, 7 significant others were interviewed. The essence of the phenomenon of OHCA can be stated as unreality in the reality, which is characterized by overwhelming responsibility. The significant others experience inadequacy and limitation, they move between hope and hopelessness, and they struggle with ethical considerations and an insecurity about the future. The study findings show how significant others’ sense of an OHCA situation, when life is trembling, can threaten values deemed important for a good life.

  • 3.
    Bremer, Anders
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Sandman, Lars.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    To survive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a search for meaning and coherence2009In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 323-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary responsibility of prehospital emergency personnel at out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) is to provide lifesaving care. Ethical considerations, decisions, and actions should be based in the patient's beliefs about health and well-being. In this article, we describe patients' experiences of surviving OHCA. By using a phenomenological approach, we focus on how OHCA influences patients' well-being over time. Nine survivors were interviewed. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is described as a sudden and elusive threat, an awakening in perplexity, and the memory gap as a loss of coherence. Survival means a search for coherence with distressing and joyful understanding, as well as existential insecurity exposed by feelings of vulnerability. Well-being is found through a sense of coherence and meaning in life. The study findings show survivors' emotional needs and a potential for prehospital emergency personnel to support them as they try to make sense of what has happened to them.

  • 4.
    Karlsson, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Eriksson, Thomas
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Fridh, Isabell
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    The Patient’s Situation During Interhospital Intensive Care Unit-to-Unit Transfers: A Hermeneutical Observational Study2019In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interhospital intensive care unit-to-unit transfers are an increasing phenomenon, earlier mainly studied from a patient safety perspective. Using data from video recordings and participant observations, the aim was to explore and interpret the observed nature of the patient’s situation during interhospital intensive care unit-to-unit transfers. Data collection from eight transfers resulted in over 7 hours of video material and field notes. Using a hermeneutical approach, three themes emerged: being visible and invisible; being in a constantly changing space; and being a fettered body in constant motion. The patient’s situation can be viewed as an involuntary journey, one where the patient exists in a constantly changing space drifting in and out of the health personnel’s attention and where movements from the journey become part of the patient’s body. Interhospital transfers of vulnerable patients emerge as a complex task, challenging the health personnel’s ability to maintain a caring atmosphere around these patients.

  • 5.
    Lindahl, Berit
    et al.
    [external].
    Sandman, PO
    Rasmussen, B
    Being dependent of home mechanical ventilation: depictions of patients’ experiences over time2006In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, ISSN 1049-7323, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 881-901Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the authors describe the meanings of experiences of being dependent on a ventilator (HMV) and living at home as narrated by 13 people who had been using a ventilator via a mask or tracheostomy for half a year. The analyses revealed various movements across time toward the goal of using the ventilator successfully, and some narratives depicted suffering caused by care. The analyses also yielded different representations of embodiment. These findings were abstracted into two contrasting meanings of the experience of using HMV over time: a closing in or an opening up of the lived body, oneself, to other people and to the world. The authors illustrate this interpretation with two images. Ignorance and negative attitudes on the part of professionals working and/or managing care in the patients' homes are interpreted as causing suffering and intensifying a closed-in mode of being.

  • 6.
    Lindahl, Berit
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Sandman, P-O
    Rasmussen, Birgit
    On being dependent of home mechanical ventilation: depictions of patients' experiences over time2006In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 33-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, the authors describe the meanings of experiences of being dependent on a ventilator (HMV) and living at home as narrated by 13 people who had been using a ventilator via a mask or tracheostomy for half a year. The analyses revealed various movements across time toward the goal of using the ventilator successfully, and some narratives depicted suffering caused by care. The analyses also yielded different representations of embodiment. These findings were abstracted into two contrasting meanings of the experience of using HMV over time: a closing in or an opening up of the lived body, oneself, to other people and to the world. The authors illustrate this interpretation with two images. Ignorance and negative attitudes on the part of professionals working and/or managing care in the patients’ homes are interpreted as causing suffering and intensifying a closed-in mode of being.

  • 7.
    Nilsson, Christina
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    van Limbeek, Evelien
    Zuyd University.
    Vehvilainen-Julkunen, Katri
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Lundgren, Ingela
    Vaginal birth after caesarean - Views of women from countries with high VBAC rate2017In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 325-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the consequences for women’s health, a repeat cesarean section (CS) birth after a previous CS is common in Western countries. Vaginal Birth After Cesarean (VBAC) is recommended for most women, yet VBAC rates are decreasing and vary across maternity organizations and countries. We investigated women’s views on factors of importance for improving the rate of VBAC in countries where VBAC rates are high. We interviewed 22 women who had experienced VBAC in Finland, the Netherlands, and Sweden. We used content analysis, which revealed five categories: receiving information from supportive clinicians, receiving professional support from a calm and confident midwife/obstetrician during childbirth, knowing the advantages of VBAC, letting go of the previous childbirth in preparation for the new birth, and viewing VBAC as the first alternative for all involved when no complications are present. These findings reflect not only women’s needs but also sociocultural factors influencing their views on VBAC.

  • 8.
    Sundler J, Annelie
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Ekenstam, Claes
    The meaning of close relationships and sexuality: women's well-being following a myocardial infarction.2009In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 375-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relationships and sexuality following heart attack (MI) have been studied; nevertheless, little is known about the meaning of social support and relationships to health and well-being after an MI. To our knowledge, no qualitative studies have further investigated the phenomenon. In this study we explore the meaning of close relationships and sexuality to women's health and well-being following MI. Ten women were interviewed using a reflective lifeworld approach and phenomenological epistemology. The meaning of women's close relationships following an MI appears to be closely intertwined with their long-term health process; both health processes and the relationships are affected. Suffering after an MI can be compared to taking a fall in that close relationships can become a safety net. Close relationships and sexuality are integrated into their lived bodies, and in that way have profound influence in their lifeworld experiences. Not all close relationships are intimate; however, all close and meaningful relationships can provide power and strength to the women's health processes. At the same time, these relationships also appear to drain energy and cause suffering.

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