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  • 1. Löve, J
    et al.
    Hagberg, M
    Dellve, Lotta
    University of Borås, School of Health Science. [external].
    Balancing extensive ambition and a context overflowing with opportunities and demands: A grounded theory on stress and recovery among highly educated working young women entering male-dominated occupational areas2011In: International Journal for Quality in Health Care, ISSN 1353-4505, E-ISSN 1464-3677, Vol. 6, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several factors underline the issue of stress-related health among young highly educated women. Major societal changes might provide more new challenges with considerably changed and expanded roles than were expected by earlier generations, especially among women. The quantity of young women with higher education has also increased threefold in Sweden in less than two decades and there are a growing number of young women that hereby break with traditional gender positions and enter new occupational areas traditionally dominated by men. The research questions in the present study were: “What is the main concern, regarding stress and recovery, among young highly educated working women breaking with traditional gender positions and entering male-dominated occupational areas?” and “How do they handle this concern?” We conducted open-ended interviews with 20 informants, aged 23-29 years. The results showed that the synergy between highly ambitious individuals and a context overflowing with opportunities and demands ended up in the informants’ constantly striving to find a balance in daily life (main concern). This concern refers to the respondents experiencing a constant overload of ambiguity and that they easily became entangled in a loop of stress and dysfunctional coping behavior, threatening the balance between stress and sufficient recovery. In order to handle this concern, the respondents used different strategies in balancing extensive ambition and a context overflowing with opportunities and demands (core category). This preliminary theoretical model deepens our understanding of how the increasing numbers of highly educated young women face complex living conditions endangering their possibility of maintaining health and work ability.

  • 2.
    Råberus, Anna
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Holmström, I K
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalens University.
    Galvin, Kathleen
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    The nature of patient complaints: a resource for healthcareimprovements2019In: International Journal for Quality in Health Care, ISSN 1353-4505, E-ISSN 1464-3677, Vol. 31, no 7, p. 556-562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The aim of this study was to explore the nature, potential usefulness and meaning of complaints lodged by patients and their relatives.

    Design

    A retrospective, descriptive design was used.

    Setting

    The study was based on a sample of formal patient complaints made through a patient complaint reporting system for publicly funded healthcare services in Sweden.

    Participants

    A systematic random sample of 170 patient complaints was yielded from a total of 5689 patient complaints made in a Swedish county in 2015.

    Main outcome measure

    Themes emerging from patient complaints analysed using a qualitative thematic method.

    Results

    The patient complaints reported patients’ or their relatives’ experiences of disadvantages and problems faced when seeking healthcare services. The meanings of the complaints reflected six themes regarding access to healthcare services, continuity and follow-up, incidents and patient harm, communication, attitudes and approaches, and healthcare options pursued against the patient’s wishes.

    Conclusions

    The patient complaints analysed in this study clearly indicate a number of specific areas that commonly give rise to dissatisfaction; however, the key findings point to the significance of patients’ exposure and vulnerability. The findings suggest that communication needs to be improved overall and that patient vulnerability could be successfully reduced with a strong interpersonal focus. Prerequisites for meeting patients’ needs include accounting for patients’ preferences and views both at the individual and organizational levels.

  • 3. Santos, M
    et al.
    Ravn-Fischer, A
    Karlsson, T
    Herlitz, J
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Bergman, B
    Is early treatment of ac ute chest pain provided sooner to patients who speak the national language2013In: International Journal for Quality in Health Care, ISSN 1353-4505, E-ISSN 1464-3677, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 582-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Identify differences in the early treatment of acute chest pain patients with regard to the language proficiency of patients and thus identify opportunities for improving equity in cardiac care. Design Retrospective cross-sectional study comparing care delivered to Swedish-speaking (SS) and non-Swedish-speaking (NSS) patients. Setting A Swedish university hospital that provides highly specialized care to 1.6 million inhabitants. Participants All patients with acute chest pain or symptoms suggestive of acute coronary syndrome who sought care between mid-September and mid-December 2008 (2588 visits). Missing data on the patient group to which study subjects belonged were 2% (45 visits). NSS represented 8% of the 2543 visits (NSS = 2334; NNSS = 209). Main Outcome Measure(s) Delay times from arrival in hospital to admission to catheterization laboratory or ward (ΔTHOSP-PCI), first physical contact to first electrocardiogram (ΔTCONTACT-ECG), first physical contact to first aspirin (ΔTCONTACT-ASA) and arrival in hospital to coronary angiography (ΔTHOSP-ANGIO). Also included baseline characteristics of patients, diagnosis and findings in hospital and secondary preventive activities. Results The median ΔTHOSP-PCI was longer for NSS by 43 min [254 versus 211, 95% confidence interval (CI), odds ratio (OR) = (1.3; 2.8)]. The median ΔTCONTACT-ECG and ΔTHOSP-ANGIO were longer for NSS by 4 min [17 versus 13, 95% CI, OR = (0.8; 1.8)] and 14 h [44 versus 30, 95% CI, OR = (0.6; 3.6)], respectively. Conversely, the median ΔTCONTACT-ASA was longer for SS by 20 min [81 versus 61, 95% CI, OR = (0.3; 1.6)]. Conclusions Poorer language proficiency was associated with longer delay time from arrival in hospital to admission to catheterization laboratory or ward. No other delay times were found to be statistically significantly different with respect to the language proficiency of patients.

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