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  • 1.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ahlstrom, Linda
    Jonsson, A
    Sandsjö, Leif
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Forsman, M
    Lindegård, A
    Ahlstrand, C
    Kadefors, R
    Hagberg, M
    Myofeedback training and intensive muscular strength training to decrease pain and improve work ability among female workers on long-term sick leave with neck pain: a randomized controlled trial2011In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 84, no 3, p. 335-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The theoretical framework is that muscle tension in the neck is related to insufficient muscular rest and is a risk factor for chronic pain and reduced work ability. Promoting muscle strength and muscle rest may increase work ability and reduce neck pain. OBJECTIVES: To test whether myofeedback training or intensive strength training leads to decreased pain and increased work ability in women on long-term sick leave. METHODS: This is a randomized controlled trial of two 1-month interventions with myofeedback or muscular strength training in the home environment. Female human service organization workers (n = 60) on long-term (>60 days) sick leave and with chronic neck pain were followed with self-reported and laboratory-observed data of health, pain, muscular activation, and work ability, at baseline, immediately after the intervention and 3 months after baseline. RESULTS: For both intervention groups, pain was lowered over time compared with the control group. Decreased pain and muscular activity was associated with increased self-rated work ability and with laboratory-observed work ability at 3-month follow-up. Decreased pain was also associated with increased self-rated work ability at 1-month follow-up. Muscular strength training was associated with increased self-rated work ability and mental health. Myofeedback was associated with increased observed work ability and self- rated vitality. CONCLUSIONS: The two interventions showed positive results, suggesting that they could be developed for use in health care practice to address pain and work ability. The intensive muscular strength training program, which is both easy to conduct at home and easy to coach, was associated with increased work ability.

  • 2.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Fallman, Sara L
    Ahlstrom, Linda
    Return to work from long-term sick leave: a six-year prospective study of the importance of adjustment latitudes at work and home.2016In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 171-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The aim was to investigate the long-term importance of adjustment latitude for increased work ability and return to work among female human service workers on long-term sick leave.

    METHODS: A cohort of female human service workers on long-term sick leave (>60 days) was given a questionnaire four times (0, 6, 12, 60 months). Linear mixed models were used for longitudinal analysis of the repeated measurements of work ability and return to work.

    RESULTS: Having a higher level of adjustment latitude was associated with both increased work ability and return to work. Adjustments related to work pace were strongly associated with increased work ability, as were adjustments to the work place. Having individual opportunities for taking short breaks and a general acceptance of taking short breaks were associated with increased work ability. At home, a higher level of responsibility for household work was related to increased work ability and return to work. Individuals with possibilities for adjustment latitude, especially pace and place at work, and an acceptance of taking breaks had greater increased work ability over time and a greater work ability compared with individuals who did not have such opportunities.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights the importance of opportunities for adjustment latitude at work to increase work ability and return to work among female human service workers who have been on long-term sick leave. The results support push and pull theories for individual decision-making on return to work.

  • 3.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lagerström, M
    Hagberg, M
    Work-system risk factors for permanent work disability among home-care workers: a case-control study2003In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, ISSN 0340-0131, Vol. 76, no 3, p. 216-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: There is a growing need for home-care services in western societies. As home-care workers show high levels of absence related to poor health it is important that we broaden our knowledge about what factors in the work system contribute to this. The aim of this study was to explore and estimate the impact of the work system on permanent work disability and its relative importance compared with home-life risks among home-care workers. METHODS: The cases (617 subjects) were all home-care workers in Sweden, whose disability pension was approved in 1997 or 1998. The controls (771 subjects) were home-care workers still working. We used a questionnaire to gain situation-specific information on working life and home life 5 and 15 years before disability pension entitlement. RESULTS: The most important risk factors in the work system were poor ergonomic/lifting conditions, time pressure and lack of professional caring technique. Fifteen years prior to disability pension entitlement, insufficient management (odds ratio (OR) 95%, CI 2.6[1.6;4.2]) and relational problems at work were also risk factors. Five years before disability pension entitlement, poor organisational support (4.1 [2.5;6.7]), opportunities for co-working and working climate (3.5 [2.4;5.2]) were also strongly related to a persisting work ability. The magnitude of exposure to a number of risk factors had an increased effect (highest 13.8 [5.6-33.8]). The strongest risk factor in home life was little opportunity to rest from work (4.9 [3.0;8.0]). The risk factors in working life were robust to the inclusion of the grouped risk factors of home life. CONCLUSIONS: The conclusion was that risk factors related to the work system are, alone, strongly related to permanent work disability among home-care workers. Also, exposure to several of the risk factors constitutes a notably strong risk for permanent work disability.

  • 4. Larsman, Pernilla
    et al.
    Kadefors, Roland
    Sandsjö, Leif
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Psychosocial work conditions, pereived stress, perceived muscular tension, and neck/shoulder symptoms among medical secretaries2013In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 86, no 1, p. 57-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Unfavorable psychosocial working conditions are hypothesized to lead to perceived stress, which, in turn, can be related to an increased risk of development of neck/shoulder symptoms through increased and sustained muscle activation. The aim of the present study was to test this hypothesized process model among medical secretaries, a female-dominated profession characterized by a high amount of visual display unit use and a high prevalence of neck/shoulder symptoms. Methods In this cross-sectional study, a questionnaire survey was conducted among medical secretaries ( n = 200). The proposed process model was tested using a path model framework. Results The results indicate that high work demands were related to high perceived stress, which in turn was related to a high perceived muscle tension and neck/shoulder symptoms. Low influence at work was not related to perceived stress, but was directly related to a high perceived muscle tension. Conclusions In general, these cross-sectional results lend tentative support for the hypothesis that adverse psychosocial work conditions (high work demands) may contribute to the development of neck/shoulder symptoms through the mechanism of stress-induced sustained muscular activation. This process model needs to be further tested in longitudinal studies.

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