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  • 1.
    Bergh, Anne-Louise
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Persson, Eva
    University of Borås, School of Health Science. Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Jan
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Örebro University Hospital.
    Friberg, Febe
    University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway.
    Registered nurses’ perceptions of conditions for patient education: focusing on aspects of competence.2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 523-536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: It is important to clarify nurses' perceptions of conditions for patient education in daily work as research findings are ambiguous. There is a gap between societal regulations on nurses' competence in accomplishment/achievement of patient education and research findings. AIM: The aim was to describe nurses' perceptions of conditions for patient education, focusing on aspects of competence. The aim was also to describe differences in conditions for nurses working in primary, municipal and hospital care. METHODS: The study is a cross-sectional survey and is part of a project about nurses' patient-education. A randomized selection of nurses (842) received a questionnaire comprising 47 items concerning factual experience and attitudes to patient education and 13 background items. Questionnaires were returned by 83% of participants. Descriptive statistics, non-parametric tests and content analysis for open-ended items were used. RESULTS: Nurses' perceptions of conditions for patient education differ between health-care settings. Primary care nurses are at an advantage in following research in patient education, perception of their own competence (prioritizing and knowing their mandate in patient teaching), pedagogical education and post graduate specializations. CONCLUSIONS: Nurses' patient education must be more visualized and appropriate conditions created at each workplace. In this change process, managers' support is considered vital.

  • 2. Binfa, Lorena
    et al.
    Robertson, Eva
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ransjö-Arvidson, Anna-Berit
    "We are always asked; 'where are you from?'": Chilean women's reflections in midlife about their health and influence of migration to Sweden2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 24, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This study explored how Chilean immigrant women living in Sweden perceived and related their life situations and health status during midlife to their migration experiences. Method: Three focus group discussions (FGDs) were performed with 21 middle-aged Chilean women (40-60 years) who had lived in Stockholm for at least 15-20 years. In-depth interviews were held with three key informants. A combination of manifest and latent content analysis was performed to structure and categorize the tape-recorded and transcribed data. Findings: Three main themes emerged from the data: (i) Chilean women's reflections about migration and resettlement; (ii) Health during midlife; perceptions of Chilean women living in Sweden; and (iii) Strategies to manage their lives and to gain social acceptance and position. The Chilean women reflected about the discrimination they had met in the Swedish society and within the health care system along with health changes they had had during midlife. They connected some of their health related problems to their hardships of migration. They also expressed confusion about the health care they had received in Sweden including conflicting and mistrusting relationship with some health care providers. Important for their way of coping with their own health seemed to be a recognition of their own space, level of independence, self-acceptance and awareness of power relationships. Conclusion: The results illuminate the importance of awareness of influence of gender and socio-cultural aspects, power relationships and communication skills among health care providers on women's health. Complementary interventions to the biomedical paradigm are needed and should be addressed in Swedish health staff educational programmes as well as in clinical training.

  • 3.
    Björk, Kristofer
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Department of Intensive Care Northern Älvsborg Hospital.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Fridh, Isabell
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Family members’ experiences of waiting in intensive care: a concept analysis2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    The aim of this study was to explore the meaning of family members' experience of waiting in an intensive care context using Rodgers' evolutionary method of concept analysis.

    METHOD:

    Systematic searches in CINAHL and PubMed retrieved 38 articles which illustrated the waiting experienced by family members in an intensive care context. Rodgers' evolutionary method of concept analysis was applied to the data.

    FINDINGS:

    In total, five elements of the concept were identified in the analysis. These were as follows: living in limbo; feeling helpless and powerless; hoping; enduring; and fearing the worst. Family members' vigilance regarding their relative proved to be a related concept, but vigilance does not share the same set of attributes. The consequences of waiting were often negative for the relatives and caused them suffering. The references show that the concept was manifested in different situations and in intensive care units (ICUs) with various types of specialties.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The application of concept analysis has brought a deeper understanding and meaning to the experience of waiting among family members in an intensive care context. This may provide professionals with an awareness of how to take care of family members in this situation. The waiting is inevitable, but improved communication between the ICU staff and family members is necessary to reduce stress and alleviate the suffering of family members. It is important to acknowledge that waiting cannot be eliminated but family-centred care, including a friendly and welcoming hospital environment, can ease the burden of family members with a loved one in an ICU.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-03-13 16:00
  • 4.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ahlborg, Tone
    Partner relationships and long-term sick leave among female workers: consequences and impact on dimensions of health and return to work2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 720-729Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few efforts have been made to prospectively identify resources and obstacles outside work that may predict regained work ability and return to work when workers are on sick leave. This study investigates the association between partner relationships and sick leave. Our research questions were as follows: (i) What is the influence of sick leave, pain, stress and domestic strain on the quality of the dyadic partner relationship?, and (ii) What is the influence of the partner and social relationship on pain, stress, work ability, self-rated health and return to work? A cohort of female workers (n = 225) on long-term sick leave (>60 days), all in a partner relationship, at 6-month intervals completed a questionnaire based on the Quality of Dyadic Relationship (QDR) instrument, the Interview Schedule of Social Interaction (ISSI), the Work Ability Index (WAI) and the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ). Univariate and multivariate analyses of baseline and prospective data were performed. The results showed that decreased partner relationship quality was related to having major responsibility for household work despite being on sick leave, having pain and having decreased social integration. Among younger individuals on sick leave, a reduction in the quality of the partner relationship was shown already at the first (6-month) follow-up, while among middle-aged women, such a reduction was seen only at the 12-month follow-up. No dimensions of partner relationship quality at baseline were related to dimensions of return to work, either as a resource or as an obstacle. Consequently, our results show that a good relationship does not keep the woman from returning to work. Having main responsibility for household work, which implies domestic strain while on sick leave, predicts lower partner relationship quality. The practical implications are that healthcare professionals treating women on sick leave should emphasize the importance of keeping a social network as well as making sufficient adjustments at home for the relationship quality to be safeguarded. Special attention should be given to the young woman on sick leave as being on sick leave seems to influence her partner relationship considerably.

  • 5.
    Dellve, Lotta
    et al.
    Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cernerud, L
    Hallberg, LRM
    Harmonizing dilemmas. Siblings of children with DAMP and Asperger syndrome´s experience of coping with their life-situation2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, ISSN 0283-9318, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 172-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this qualitative study was to describe, from their own perspective and experiences, how siblings of children with deficits in attention, motor control and perception (DAMP) and Asperger syndrome cope with their life situations in their families. Fifteen adolescent females 12-18 years old, siblings of boys with DAMP (8 subjects) and Asperger syndrome (7 subjects), were interviewed. The method used in sampling and analysis of interview protocols was the constant comparative method for grounded theory. The inductive categorization of data produced two core concepts, one about the siblings' life situations in DAMP and Asperger syndrome ('dilemma of requirements and concerns') and one about the siblings' coping processes ('harmonizing'). Of the six categories identified, four were categories of the processes of coping ('gaining understanding', 'gaining independence', 'following a bonding responsibility' and 'balancing'). The qualitative differences between coping processes were related to the two categories of context to cope within the experienced dilemma 'requirements' and 'concerns'. The findings contribute to a deeper understanding of the siblings' life situations, and may be important for health personnel in encounter families and for identifying siblings with special needs. The findings may also aid in the development of preventive programs for siblings of children with DAMP and Asperger syndrome.

  • 6. Elmqvist, C.
    et al.
    Brunt, D.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Being first on the scene of an accident: experiences of "doing" prehospital emergency care2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 266-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prehospital emergency care includes the care and treatment of patients prior to them reaching hospital. This is generally a field for the ambulance services, but in many cases firemen or police can be the ones to provide the first responses. The aim of this study was to describe and understand experiences of being the first responder on the scene of an accident, as described by policemen, firemen and ambulance staff. A lifeworld perspective was used in four different traumatic situations from southern Sweden. The data consisted of 13 unstructured interviews with first responders. The phenomenological analysis showed that experiences of being the first responder on the scene of an accident is expectations of doing a systematic course of action, dressed in the role of a hero, and at the same time being genuine in an interpersonal encounter. This entails a continuous movement between ‘being’ and ‘doing’. It is not a question of either – or, instead everything is to be understood in relation to each other at the same time. Five constituents further described the variations of the phenomenon; a feeling of security in the uncertainty, a distanced closeness to the injured person, one moment in an eternity, cross-border cooperation within distinct borders and a need to make the implicit explicit. This finding highlights the importance of using policemen and firemen in doing life support measures while waiting for the ambulance staff, and would in turn increase the importance of the relationship between the different professionals on the scene of an accident.

  • 7.
    Englund, Ann-Charlotte
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Hartman, Jan
    Segesten, Kerstin
    Assisting teens with asthma to take command2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 193-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In English To meet and work with teenagers may be a challenge for caregivers as adolescence is a period when youths try to establish autonomy. Although asthma is an increasing problem worldwide, few studies have addressed professional caregivers' motives and actions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe professional caregivers' strategies in their work with teenagers with asthma. Grounded theory, inspired by Glaser, was used to uncover the phenomenon. The informants were seven professional caregivers who worked at an eight-day asthma camp for teenagers in Sweden. Participant observations and interviews were used, and the first author collected the data and participated in the activities. Findings show that professional caregivers' core concern is to assist teenagers with asthma to take command. This core concern gives rise to five strategies: showing respect, being at hand, promoting own responsibility, promoting to exceed boundaries and promoting reflections. In professional caregivers' attempt to assist teenagers to take command some differences are seen in the way they support boys and girls. One conclusion drawn from our study is that the provisional theory of 'Assisting teenagers with asthma to take command' is not only suitable for professional caregivers working at asthma camps; it may, in some degree, also be used as a source of inspiration for professional caregivers in other settings.

  • 8. Erdner, A
    et al.
    Magnusson, A-B
    Nyström, Maria
    Lützén, K
    Social and Existential Alienation Experienced by People with Long-term Mental Illness2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 373-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore how people suffering from long-term mental illness and who live in the community experience their daily lives. The study was based on an ethnographic framework involving participant observations with 23 individuals from two rehabilitation centres and interviews with six women and two men. The observational notes and interviews were recorded, transcribed into the data and analysed based on the phases of hermeneutic interpretation. The process consisted of identifying tentative interpretations that highlighted various impediments that prevent people with long-term mental illness from having an active life. The impediments can also be interpreted as a form of alienation, an interpersonal phenomenon and a consequence due to of the lack of social acceptance towards mental illness. The participants expressed concern about the future and lack of hope. Viewing themselves as being ‘odd’ is not a symptom of mental illness, but rather evidence of experiencing existential and social alienation not only as a consequence of other people's reactions but also their own negative attitudes towards mental illness and effects of their cognitive dysfunction.

  • 9. Forsberg, Anna
    et al.
    Cavallini, Josefine
    Fridh, Isabell
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lennerling, Annette
    The core of social function after solid organ transplantation.2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Social function is a key aspect of health-related quality of life after solid organ transplantation (SOT). The focus of this study was to report how solid organ-transplanted patients change their social function after transplantation.

    AIM: To investigate the main concerns associated with social function after SOT and how solid organ transplant recipients (SOTRs) deal with these concerns.

    METHOD: Twenty SOTRs, 13 men and 7 women, with a mean age of 54 years (range 22-75 years) and due for their first-year follow-up were included in this study. The informants had received various types of solid organs. Data were collected through in-depth interviews, which were recorded and transcribed verbatim for analysis by the method of grounded theory (GT) developed by Charmaz.

    RESULT: The GT of this study describes the efforts by the 20 SOTRs to adapt socially in order to maintain their social functioning and leading a normal life. The efforts summaries a process wherein the generated GT is present through three main categories: deconstruction, restriction and reconstruction, showing various ways to socially adapt. Through this process, a clear path of transition through adaptation is evident, starting before transplantation and continues beyond the first year after transplantation.

    CONCLUSION: Social functions improved through a process of adaptation during the first year after transplantation. Working and travelling were the two most important aspects of social function. All the informants emphasised the importance of regaining a normal life, which was the outcome of a successful adaptation.

  • 10. Friberg, Febe
    et al.
    Öhlén, J
    Nyström-Petersson, Maria
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Context and Methodological Decontextualisation in Nursing Research with Examples from Phenomenography2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 37-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In both human science and nursing research the concept of context is important. However, context can be understood in different ways. The aim of this article is to elucidate, discuss and problematize context, decontextualization and recontextualization in some health care-related phenomenographical studies. A further aim is to problematize the concet of context in a wider perspective of human complex ohenomena which characterize nursing research demand a broad contextual understanding. Both the local or immediate experiences of the phenomen of interest as well as the socio-cultural discourse. A balance between openness and pliability t the phenomenon is suggested. Reflection is considered an important tool in this process. Within phenomenography, the interest i s directed towards conceptions of certain aspects of the worlds. Thus, context in a wider sense is given a subordinate role. Accordingly, phenomenography is considered to have limited applicability in nursing research when complex phenomena are to be studied.

  • 11.
    Fridh, Isabell
    et al.
    [external].
    Forsberg, Anna
    Bergbom, Ingegerd
    End-of-life care in intensive care units: family routines and environmental factors2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 25-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to describe family care routines and to explore environmental factors when patients die in Swedish intensive care units (ICUs). The main research questions were: what are the physical environmental circumstances and facilities when caring for patients in end-of-life and are there any routines or guidelines when caring for dying patients and their families? A questionnaire was sent to 79 eligible Swedish ICUs in December 2003, addressed to the unit managers. The response rate was 94% (n = 74 units). The findings show that, despite recommendations highlighting the importance of privacy for dying ICU patients and their families, only 11% of the respondents stated that patients never died in shared rooms in their ICU. If a patient dies in a shared room, nurses strive to ensure a dignified goodbye by moving the body to an empty room or to one specially designated for this purpose. The majority (76%) of the units had waiting rooms within the ICU. The study also revealed that there is a need for improvements in the follow-up routines for bereaved families. Many units reported (51%) that they often or almost always offer a follow-up visit, although in most cases the bereaved family had to initiate the follow-up by contacting the ICU. Guidelines in the area of end-of-life care were used by 25% of the ICUs. Further research is necessary to acquire a deeper knowledge of the circumstances under which patients die in ICUs and what impact the ICU environment has on bereaved families.

  • 12.
    Fridh, Isabell
    et al.
    Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Forsberg, Anna
    Bergbom, Ingegerd
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    End-of-life care in intensive care units: family routines and environmental factors.2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 25-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to describe family care routines and to explore environmental factors when patients die in Swedish intensive care units (ICUs). The main research questions were: what are the physical environmental circumstances and facilities when caring for patients in end-of-life and are there any routines or guidelines when caring for dying patients and their families? A questionnaire was sent to 79 eligible Swedish ICUs in December 2003, addressed to the unit managers. The response rate was 94% (n = 74 units). The findings show that, despite recommendations highlighting the importance of privacy for dying ICU patients and their families, only 11% of the respondents stated that patients never died in shared rooms in their ICU. If a patient dies in a shared room, nurses strive to ensure a dignified goodbye by moving the body to an empty room or to one specially designated for this purpose. The majority (76%) of the units had waiting rooms within the ICU. The study also revealed that there is a need for improvements in the follow-up routines for bereaved families. Many units reported (51%) that they often or almost always offer a follow-up visit, although in most cases the bereaved family had to initiate the follow-up by contacting the ICU. Guidelines in the area of end-of-life care were used by 25% of the ICUs. Further research is necessary to acquire a deeper knowledge of the circumstances under which patients die in ICUs and what impact the ICU environment has on bereaved families.

  • 13.
    Fridh, Isabell
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Falk, Kristin
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Henoch, Ingela
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Öhlén, Joakin
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ozanne, Anneli
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Jakobsson Ung, Eva
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Extensive human suffering: a point prevalence survey of patients´most distressing concerns2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To explore patients' most distressing concerns during a hospital stay. BACKGROUND: The characteristics of hospitalised patients have changed. Care is provided at a higher age, lengths of stay have fallen and the nursing workload is increasing. It is presumed that hospitalised patients are more seriously ill and have more palliative needs than previously. Studies show that inpatients suffer from more distress than similar outpatients although there is a lack of overall knowledge about inpatients' distress and major concerns, regardless of age, diagnosis or care setting. METHODS: This study was part of a point prevalence survey (PPS) concerning symptom prevalence. Of the 710 patients who participated in the PPS, 678 (95%) answered an open-ended question in a questionnaire: What is your main concern or what is most distressing or troublesome for you at present? Using a life-world approach, the text was analysed qualitatively and patients' concerns were interpreted in two main dimensions, an intersubjective dimension and a temporal dimension. FINDINGS: The patients reported extensive suffering due to illness, symptoms and failing health. Patients were concerned about family members, existential issues and the future. Three aspects of the patients' most distressing concerns were interpreted: The suffering self, The suffering person in close relations and The suffering person in a threatening world. CONCLUSION: Hospitalised patients are affected by severe illness, distressing symptoms and existential quandaries, revealing extensive human suffering in the midst of the demanding activities that take place during an ordinary day in a hospital. To support patients and alleviate suffering, hospital staff need to be more sensitive to patients' most distressing concerns. This presupposes a hospital environment in which the value system supports caring and comforting behaviour.

  • 14.
    Halldén, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Olsson, Pia
    Christensson, Kyllike
    Early abortion as narrated by young Swedish women2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 243-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of the study was to illuminate meanings of having had an induced abortion among young Swedish women. Methods: Narrative interviews were conducted with ten 18–20-year-old women 2–6 weeks after a medical or surgical abortion in the sixth to twelfth week of pregnancy. Data were analysed according to a phenomenological hermeneutic method. Results: The study disclosed a multitude of complex meanings in the young women’s lived experiences of induced abortion. Four themes were revealed: having cared for and protected the unimagined pregnancy, taking the life of my child-to-be with pain, being sensitive to the approval of others and imagining the taken away child-tobe. The results are discussed in light of Nussbaum’s theory of development ethics. The young women’s ability to be responsible for their choices regarding their own welfare and others’ well-being in a life cycle perspective was disclosed, despite the pain inherent in the responsibility of taking the life of their own child-to-be. Conclusions: The young women’s narratives were replete with ethical reasoning regarding existential matters related to their responsibility of choosing between induced abortion and parenthood and how to live their lives with this experience. Health-care professionals could promote young women’s capability to be responsible, as well as the development of trust in their own fertility and constructive relationships with significant others. In the development of the prevention of unintended pregnancies and the sexual education of young people in Sweden existential dimensions of undergoing an abortion should be given attention.

  • 15.
    Hilli, Yvonne Elisabet
    et al.
    Högskolan i Oslo och Akershus.
    Melender, Hanna-Leena
    Developing preceptorship through action research:part 12015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 470-477Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Hilli, Yvonne Elisabet
    et al.
    Högskolan i Oslo och Akershus.
    Melender, Hanna-Leena
    Developing preceptorship through action research:part 22015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 478-485Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Israelsson-Skogsberg, Åsa
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Personal care assistants' experiences of caring for people on home mechanical ventilation.2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study was to describe personal care assistants' (PCA) experiences of working with a ventilator-assisted person at home. METHODS: Data were collected from fifteen audiotaped semistructured interviews with PCAs supporting a child or adult using home mechanical ventilation (HMV). Thirteen women and two men participated; their working experience with HMV users ranged from one to 17 years (median 6 years). Data were subjected to qualitative content analysis in an inductive and interpretive manner. FINDINGS: Five categories emerged from the data: Being part of a complex work situation; Taking on a multidimensional responsibility; Caring carried out in someone's home; Creating boundaries in an environment with indistinct limits; and Being close to another's body and soul. CONCLUSIONS: The participants felt very close to the person they worked with, both physically and emotionally. They had a great responsibility and therefore a commensurate need for support, guidance and a well-functioning organisation around the HMV user. There is international consensus that advanced home care will continue to expand and personal care assistance is key in this development. We suggest that one way to move forward for PCAs working with HMV users is to create multiprofessional teams led by a key-person who coordinates the individual needs. More research is needed within this area from a broad perspective including the HMV-assisted persons, relatives, personal care assistants and management organisations.

  • 18.
    Jakobsson, Malin
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Josefsson, Karin
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Jutengren, Göran
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Sandsjö, Leif
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Högberg, Karin
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Sleep duration and sleeping difficulties among adolescents: Exploring associations with school stress, self-perception, and technology use2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 197-206, article id SCS12621Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sleep duration and sleeping difficulties among adolescents: exploring associations with school stress, self-perception and technology use

     

    Sleeping problems are increasing among adolescents worldwide. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of self-reported sleep duration and sleeping difficulties, as well as to explore their associations with school stress, self-perception, that is how adolescents perceive their appearance and happiness, and technology use among adolescents. Data were collected in 2015 using a questionnaire. A total of 937 ninth grade adolescents, 15–16 years, from a city in western Sweden participated, resulting in a response rate of 83%. The result showed that 55% of the adolescents slept less than the recommended 8 hours per night and 11% had sleeping difficulties. School stress and technology use were associated with short sleep duration. School stress and self-perception were associated with sleeping difficulties. The girls had worse outcomes for sleeping difficulties, school stress, self-perception and technology use than the boys. Based on the results, there is a need for school nurses to implement preventive measures to improve adolescents’ sleep.

  • 19.
    Jarling, Aleksandra
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Rydström, Ingela
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ernsth-Bravell, Marie
    Institute of Gerontology, Jönköping University.
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Dalheim Englund, Ann-Charlotte
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    A responsibility that never rests - To be a family caregiver to an older person2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    When the ageing population increases, the burden and responsibility of close family members will likely increase. Those closely related who assume a great responsibility can be significantly affected in health, well‐being and daily life.

    Aim

    This study aims to describe the life situation when family caregivers are imposed responsibility for an older person with complex care needs in their own home.

    Methods

    In this Swedish qualitative study, ten family caregivers were strategically selected in order to achieve variations in the life situation. A reflective lifeworld research design based on phenomenological philosophy was used throughout the data collection with the lifeworld interviews and the analytic process.

    Findings

    In terms of extensive responsibility, the life situation is complex and involves emotions that are difficult to manage. In essence, a paradoxical life situation is described which is experienced as both voluntarily and nonchosen at the same time. The responsibility never rests. The essential meaning is further illustrated with three constituents: loss of freedom, contradictory feelings and affected relationships.

    Conclusion

    A life situation with extensive responsibility for an older family member interferes with the whole life situation with an impact on health and relationships with other people. The findings are crucial for professional caregivers in order to capture the nature of family support in a way that enables a meaningful life for both the family caregiver and the older person being cared for. Knowledge of this will give professional caregivers an increased awareness of the life situation of family caregivers and provide a better understanding of the support they are longing for, and, in some countries, such as Sweden, also are entitled to by law.

  • 20.
    Josefsson, Karin
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Summer Meranius, Martina
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Health and social care management for older adults with multimorbidity: a multiperspective approach.2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multimorbidity, a condition common among older adults, may be regarded as a failure of a complex system. The aim of this study was to describe the core components in health and social care management for older adults with multimorbidity. A cross-sectional design included two methods: individual interviews and group discussions. A total of 105 participants included older adults with multimorbidity and their relatives, care staff, and health care policy makers. Data were analyzed using content analysis. The results show that seven core components comprise a multi-perspective view of health and social care management for older adults with multimorbidity: political steering, leadership, cooperation, competence, support for relatives, availability, and continuity. Steps should be taken to ensure that every older adult with multimorbidity has a treatment plan according to a multi-perspective view to prevent fragmentation of their health care. This study provides relevant evidence developing a multi-perspective model of health and social care management for older adults with multimorbidity.

  • 21.
    Källman, Ulrika
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Knowledge, attitudes and practices among nursing staff concerning pressure ulcer prevention and treatment: a survey in a Swedish healthcare setting2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 334-341Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate (i) attitudes among Registered Nurses (RNs) and Nursing Assistants (NAs) regarding pressure ulcer prevention, (ii) knowledge among RNs and NAs of pressure ulcer prevention and treatment, (iii) practice of risk assessment and documentation regarding pressure ulcers among RNs and NAs and (iv) to identify perceived possibilities and barriers in pressure ulcer prevention and treatment. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 230 questionnaires were distributed to an equal number of RNs and NAs in both municipality as well as hospital care settings. The response rate was 67% (n = 154). In general, all respondents displayed good knowledge on prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers and demonstrated a positive attitude towards this area of care. However, answers provided to some questions indicate that recent research findings and guidelines have not succeeded in reaching out to these occupational groups. Furthermore, only 37% (n = 55) of the participants said that they have an agreed strategy for the prevention of pressure ulcers in their unit. These shortcomings may affect the quality of care provided to the patient and lead to pressure ulcers developing as a consequence. Today, evidence-based methods for risk assessment are available but are not adopted and used in practice. The study highlights the need to further reduce the gap between research and practice.

  • 22.
    Lantz, B.
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    Ottosson, C.
    Parental interaction with infants treated with medical technology2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 597-607Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is well established that parents must interact with their new-born babies to facilitate attachment. However, very little is known about how parents perceive different types of medical technology products commonly used in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) as barriers to their wish to interact with their infants. Aim: This study aims to examine to what extent the different medical technology products commonly used in the NICU are perceived by parents to be obstacles in their wish to interact with their babies. Design and methods: In 2010, a cross-sectional survey, using a questionnaire specifically developed for this study, was conducted among the parents of children who were discharged from any of the five NICUs of the Vastra Gotaland region in Sweden. A consecutive sample of 248 parents anticipated, and multiple regressions and t-tests were used to analyse the data. Results: The parents generally perceived the various medical technology products differently, according to the perceived level of obstruction. The variables of gender, age,educational level, origin, gestational age, previous experience of being a parent, and the offer of accommodation at the NICU were significantly associated with the perceived level of obstruction in the parents’ wish to interact with their baby while the baby was being treated with different medical technology products. Conclusion: The primary implication for practice is that to facilitate attachment, nurses should involve different categories of parents in different ways in the care of their children, depending on the equipment being used in the treatment of the children. Thus, the individual care plan should explicitly include the details of the specific medical equipment, because although its use is medically beneficial for the child, it is associated with potential liabilities regarding parent–child interaction and, consequently, regarding parent–child attachment.

  • 23.
    Lantz, Björn
    University of Borås, School of Engineering.
    The large sample size fallacy2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 487-492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:  Significance in the statistical sense has little to do with significance in the common practical sense. Statistical significance is a necessary but not a sufficient condition for practical significance. Hence, results that are extremely statistically significant may be highly nonsignificant in practice. The degree of practical significance is generally determined by the size of the observed effect, not the p-value. The results of studies based on large samples are often characterized by extreme statistical significance despite small or even trivial effect sizes. Interpreting such results as significant in practice without further analysis is referred to as the large sample size fallacy in this article. Aim:  The aim of this article is to explore the relevance of the large sample size fallacy in contemporary nursing research. Results:  Relatively few nursing articles display explicit measures of observed effect sizes or include a qualitative discussion of observed effect sizes. Statistical significance is often treated as an end in itself. Conclusion:  Effect sizes should generally be calculated and presented along with p-values for statistically significant results, and observed effect sizes should be discussed qualitatively through direct and explicit comparisons with the effects in related literature.

  • 24. Levy-Malmberg, Rika
    et al.
    Hilli, Yvonne
    Yrkeshögskolan Novia.
    The enhancement of clinical competence through caring science.2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 28, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This theoretical research attempts to create a new basis for dialogue between two independent research fields that are connected by an inseparable link. The first, nursing science, is a body of professional knowledge, while the second, caring as an independent body of pure knowledge, conducts basic research with an aspiration towards applicability. This theoretical research uses the guidelines of the Buberian dialogue, which provides new meaning to the concept of clinical competence. The results emphasise the need to adopt abstract knowledge into the nursing field in order to improve the graduate's clinical capabilities. The combination of assessing clinical capability in a judgmental manner together with the dialogical humanistic approach of caring science may create a genuine platform and meeting event as a maturing process, which is intended to promote educational goals, which subsequently receive new meaning, that is, a different type of assessment. However, this assessment cannot be measured since a wide range of ethical moral aspects regarding both the student and the patient will have to be included. Nevertheless, this dialogue between nursing science and caring science can implement evidence on the basis of trust and can be used as a dialogical tool for evaluating clinical skills with the goal of empowering the educational field in nursing. Consequently, this clinical competence is called 'caring maturing means', and the goal is to convert the learning process into a meaningful event with the aim of improvement.

  • 25.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    On locating the metaparadigm concept environment within caring science2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 997-998Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Patients' suggestions about how to make life at home easier when dependent on ventilator treatment: a secondary analysis2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 684-692Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients' suggestions about how to make life at home easier when dependent on ventilator treatment - a secondary analysis Background: While quantitative research has provided valuable information, studies presenting patients' experiences have been lacking in the field of knowledge of home mechanical ventilation. The aim of this study was, therefore, to present patient views and suggestions about how to improve home ventilator care and treatment. Method: Data in the present study comprise 35 qualitative research interviews collected for a primary project carried out in the years 2002-2005 and now analysed using qualitative content analysis, the most established method for secondary analysis. Results: The results are presented as six categories: the start-up process, to attach to oneself and the ventilator, to experience home as a shelter, to seek knowledge and understanding, to build up confidence in technology and the need to have people to relate to and depend on. The article presents a brief summary of patients' ideas and requests to healthcare providers and manufacturers involved in home ventilator treatment. Conclusions: The patients' perspectives and experiences include much useful knowledge of interest for nursing and medical professional practices. More attention needs to be given to these experiences in both home ventilator treatment and research. It is also of great importance for nurses and researchers to encourage manufacturers to develop beautiful and user-friendly design in their products, suitable for 'home use' and not just in hospitals.

  • 27.
    Lindahl, Berit
    [external].
    Patients’ suggestions on how to make life easier at home when being dependent on ventilator treatment: A secondary analysis2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 684-892Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:  While quantitative research has provided valuable information, studies presenting patients’ experiences have been lacking in the field of knowledge of home mechanical ventilation. The aim of this study was, therefore, to present patient views and suggestions about how to improve home ventilator care and treatment. Method:  Data in the present study comprise 35 qualitative research interviews collected for a primary project carried out in the years 2002–2005 and now analysed using qualitative content analysis, the most established method for secondary analysis. Results:  The results are presented as six categories: the start-up process, to attach to oneself and the ventilator, to experience home as a shelter, to seek knowledge and understanding, to build up confidence in technology and the need to have people to relate to and depend on. The article presents a brief summary of patients’ ideas and requests to healthcare providers and manufacturers involved in home ventilator treatment. Conclusions:  The patients’ perspectives and experiences include much useful knowledge of interest for nursing and medical professional practices. More attention needs to be given to these experiences in both home ventilator treatment and research. It is also of great importance for nurses and researchers to encourage manufacturers to develop beautiful and user-friendly design in their products, suitable for ‘home use’ and not just in hospitals.

  • 28.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Persson, Eva
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Bondas, Terese
    'The responsibility of someone else': a focus group study of collaboration between a university and a hospital regarding the integration of caring science in practice.2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 579-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of the study was to develop insights into how nurses, senior preceptors and head nurses experience the integration of caring science in practice and how they value the contributions of nursing students to the integration of caring science in practice. BACKGROUND: Research still reveals differences between theory and practice by nursing students. In Sweden, clinical education units have become one way of creating consistency between university and health care practices on values of caring. METHOD: The study is hermeneutic in design comprising data from three focus group interviews. The participants include registered nurses, senior preceptors and head nurses. RESULT: The study shows that roles and mandates are not clearly defined between the different actors. The university and hospital collaboration in caring science integration was regarded as 'someone else's responsibility'. Research and development seemed excluded from the everyday life of the hospital units. The students seemed to fall somewhere between the hospital 'practice and concrete world of production' and the university 'theory world of education and research'. Three themes emerge: 'integration--someone else's responsibility', 'the hospital--a culture of production' and 'the hospital and the university--different realities'. DISCUSSION: The results suggest the need for professionals within health care and university to reflect on their responsibilities in terms of research and development. The ethos of caring science implies the alleviation of suffering and caring for vulnerable patients including research and development.

  • 29.
    Lindblad, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Holritz-Rasmussen, B
    Sandman, P-O
    A life enriching togetherness: meanings of informal support when being a parent of a child with disability2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 238-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The majority of children affected by disability are cared for at home by their parents. It is well documented in research literature that the parents are in need of professional support. In the striving to improve the professional caring, it is also important to deepen our understanding about the meaning of informal support from the perspective of parents' life world. The aim of this study was to illuminate the meanings of lived experience of informal support, when being a parent of a child affected by disability. Thirteen parents, eight mothers and five fathers within eight families, participated in narrative interviews, which were analysed by using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method. The meanings resulted in three themes: 'being gratified by experiences of the child as having a natural place in relation with others', 'being provided a room for sorrow and joy' and 'being enabled to live an eased and spontaneous daily life'. These themes emanated from the experiences of other persons' being and doing in relation to the parents, the child affected by disability and the siblings. According to our interpretation, informal support means a life enriching togetherness, the core of which is natural human caring. The findings also showed that parents highly valued professional support concerning informal supporters

  • 30.
    Lundgren, Ingela
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Berg, Marie
    Central concepts in the midwife-woman relationship2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 220-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship between the midwife and the woman is essential for a positive experience for woman during childbearing period, i.e. pregnancy, childbirth and the first postpartum phase. Thereby, the aim of this study was to delineate central concepts in the midwife-woman relationship, in normal as well as high-risk situations. A secondary analysis was performed on original texts from eight Swedish qualitative studies, all with a phenomenological or phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. Six pairs of concepts were elucidated; each one describing one aspect from the woman's perspective and one responsive aspect from the midwife. The pairs of concepts are: surrender-availability, trust-mediation of trust, participation-mutuality, loneliness-confirmation, differenceness-support uniqueness and creation of meaning-support meaningfulness. Disciplinary concepts about the midwife-woman relationship have evolved that are essential for care in both normal and high-risk contexts, and we suggest that they should be implemented as a guide for midwifery care.

  • 31. Morberg, Siv
    et al.
    Lagerström, Monica
    Dellve, Lotta
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    The school nursing profession in relation to Bourdieu's concepts of capital, habitus and field.2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 355-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim was to define the work and professional role of school nurses, in terms of Bourdieu's key concepts of capital and habitus. METHOD: A qualitative study with a deductive approach, based on data from six focus-group interviews with 24 school nurses and 15 individual interviews with school nurses. Thus, a total of 39 school nurses participated in the study. The data were analysed using content analysis. RESULTS: The results explain, in terms of Bourdieu's key concepts of capital and habitus, how school nurses experience their work in the educational setting. A model including different aspects of school nurses' work is shown. CONCLUSION: The new Swedish Education Act focuses on promoting students' general health, so that they are able to reach their academic potential. In this task, the school nurse is to be one of a group of several professionals working together. The present study shows how school nurses experience their professional role and their work in relation to Bourdieu's concepts of capital, habitus and field. To strengthen the school nursing profession, school nurses need to show their competence in promoting students' health.

  • 32.
    Nyström, Maria
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    A patient-oriented perspective in existential issues: a theoretical argument for applying Peplau's interpersonal relation model in healthcare science and practice2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 282-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since Hildegard Peplau's interpersonal relation model for psychodynamic nursing, in the 1950s, many theories about humanity have been expanded in the discipline of nursing. For this purpose Rosemarie Rizzo Parse, for example, synthesized principles and concepts from Martha Rogers with existential phenomenology, when she introduced the idea of a simultaneity paradigm as unique for the discipline of nursing in opposition to Peplau's psychodynamic model. The aim of this paper is to discuss borrowed theories in relation to the efforts to find a unique theoretical foundation for healthcare science and practice. It is suggested that Parse's division in a totality vs. a simultaneity paradigm is an artificial distinction. The discussion is concluded with reflections about Peplau's interpersonal relation model, a patient-oriented perspective and psychodynamic theory, as example of a theory, which may help to further understand patients' existential situation.

  • 33.
    Nyström, Maria
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Openness and Pre-understanding: a relationship without hope?2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 339-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In all research, quantitative as well as qualitative, we have to deal with our presuppositions in order to remain open throughout the whole process of inquiry. If we fail to do so the findings might be little more than a reflected image of something already existing in our understanding. The question dealt with in this paper is: how can we gain increased openness by being more aware of our presuppositions. The aim was to investigate the intentional structure of pre-understanding and its effects upon data-collection as well as data-analysis and conclusions in research. The question of pre-understanding is central in Gadamer’s philosophy, even if he is not the first one to discuss this concept. Gadamer further developed the philosophy of understanding. According to him pre- understanding is an intentional structure of feelings and thoughts, which is activated when we regard something as something. By studying the structure of pre-understanding we became more aware of its effect upon understanding. In this paper, theoretical frameworks within cognitive and social psychology as well as psychoanalytic object-relation-theory were compared with Gadamer’s philosophy concerning the conditions of human understanding. Finally the possibility of increased openness in the process of research was discussed. (Such openness is related to knowledge about the structure of pre-understanding.)

  • 34. Nyström, Maria
    et al.
    Lützen, K
    Psychiatric Care and Home Care Service: An Exploration of The Professional World Encountered by Persons with Long Term Mental Illness2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 171-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on the views of professional health care providers within a geographical district in Sweden. A total of 52 interviews with persons representing different professional levels within psychiatry and the social services were conducted. The purpose was to compare their understanding of what their responsibility entailed as well as their perceptions of goals and required competence. A content analysis, supplemented with interpretations within a hermeneutic tradition, showed that there are both similarities and differences within and between the two organizations. A common finding is that professionals with the least education are to a great extent responsible for the practical care of persons with long-term mental illness. The implication of this finding is that it is important to be aware of this division of responsibility when developing psychiatric nursing and the home care services according to the needs of long-term mentally ill patients.

  • 35. Olsson, Ann
    et al.
    Robertson, Eva
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Björklund, Anders
    Nissen, Eva
    Fatherhood in focus, sexual activity can wait: new fathers’ experience about sexual life after childbirth2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 716-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:  Becoming a parent is overwhelming for most men and women and alters the sexual relationship for many couples. Aim:  To describe fathers’ experience about sexual life after childbirth within the first 6 months after childbirth. Method:  A descriptive design, using content analysis with a qualitative approach, based on focus group discussions and one-to-one interviews. Participants:  Eight first-time and two subsequent fathers participated. Results:  Three subthemes were identified: Struggling between stereotypes and personal perceptions of male sexuality during transition to fatherhood; new frames for negotiating sex; a need to feel safe and at ease in the new family situation. The overarching theme emerged as ‘transition to fatherhood brings sexual life to a crossroads’ and guided us to a deeper understanding of the difficulties men experience during the transition to fatherhood. To get sexual life working, a number of issues had to be resolved, such as getting involved in the care of the baby and the household and getting in tune with their partners in regard to sexual desire. The men needed to be reassured and prepared for this new situation by health care professionals. Conclusions:  New fathers in our study put the baby in focus in early parenthood and were prepared to postpone sex until both parties were ready, although they needed reassurance to feel at ease with the new family situation. The fathers’ perceptions of sexual life extended to include all kinds of closeness and touching, and it deviated from the stereotype of male sexuality. This is important information for health care providers and midwives to be aware of for their encounters with men (and women) during the transition to fatherhood, and parenthood and can contribute to caring science with a gender perspective on adjustment of sexual life after childbirth.

  • 36.
    Persson, Eva
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Lindholm, E
    Berndtsson, I
    Lundstam, U
    Hultén, L
    Carlsson, E
    Experiences of living with increased risk of developing colorectal and gynaecological cancer in individuals with no identified gene mutation2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 20-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:  In most families with familial cancers, mutations have not been demonstrated; thus, healthy individuals cannot be tested for mutation status. As a consequence, many persons at risk of familial cancer live with an unknown, but presumably high, risk of developing cancer. Aim:  The aim of this study was to describe individuals’ perceptions of living with an increased risk of colorectal and gynaecologic cancer where the gene mutation is unknown. Methods:  Interviews were conducted with 30 individuals with familial colorectal cancer. These persons have no known mutation and therefore should be considered presumptive carriers. In connection with the interviews, all participants were offered to take part in a surveillance programme consisting of a colonoscopy and gynaecological examinations. The interview transcriptions were analysed by the use of qualitative content analysis. Results:  Two themes emerged from the analyses: first, living under a threat with two subthemes, threat awareness and distancing oneself from the threat. The second theme, living with uncertainty, was divided into four subthemes: influencing one’s family, being on the safe side, facing emotions evoked by examinations and trust and disappointment to the medical services. Conclusion:  These persons live with a lifelong uncertainty with a varying intensity depending on what happens throughout the life trajectory. They have no diagnosis or patient group to relate to; therefore, the entire situation is often perceived as abstract. Thus, providing information and counselling needs to be more deeply elucidated, and we need to address both situational and existential ways of uncertainty. This will, however, require professionals of all disciplines to understand the meaning of uncertainty and help ensure that its adverse effects are decreased with adequate nursing interventions.

  • 37.
    Persson, Eva
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Määttä, Sylvia
    To provide care and be cared for in a multiple-bed hospital room2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 663-670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims:  To illuminate patients’ experiences of being cared for and nurses’ experiences of caring for patients in a multiple-bed hospital room. Background:  Many patients and healthcare personnel seem to prefer single-bed hospital rooms. However, certain advantages of multiple-bed hospital rooms (MBRs) have also been described. Method:  Eight men and eight women being cared for in a multiple-bedroom were interviewed, and two focus-group interviews (FGI) with 12 nurses were performed. A qualitative content analysis was used. Results:  One theme –Creating a sphere of privacy– and three categories were identified based on the patient interviews. The categories were: Being considerate, Having company and The patients’ area. In the FGI, one theme – Integrating individual care with care for all – and two categories emerged: Experiencing a friendly atmosphere and Providing exigent care. Both patients and nurses described the advantages and disadvantages of multiple-bed rooms. The patient culture of taking care of one another and enjoying the company of room-mates were considered positive and gave a sense of security of both patients and nurses. The advantages were slight and could easily become disadvantages if, for example, room-mates were very ill or confused. The patients tried to maintain their privacy and dignity and claimed that there were small problems with room-mates listening to conversations. In contrast, the nurses stressed patient integrity as a main disadvantage and worked to protect the integrity of individual patients. Providing care for all patients simultaneously had the advantage of saving time. Conclusions:  The insights gained in the present study could assist nurses in reducing the disadvantages and taking advantage of the positive elements of providing care in MBRs. Health professionals need to be aware of how attitudes towards male and female patients, respectively, could affect care provision.

  • 38.
    Rydström, Ingela
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Hartman, Jan
    Segesten, Kerstin
    Not letting the disease get the upper hand over life: strategies of teens with asthma2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 388-395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescence is a period when teens normally revolt against being dependent. For teens with asthma this period may be even more difficult to deal with, as they also have to deal with their illness. Since few studies describe this phenomenon, the aim of this study was to provide a theoretical understanding of how teens with asthma manage their everyday life in relation to their disease. A grounded theory research design, according to Glaser, was used to uncover the phenomenon. The study was undertaken at a camp for teenagers with asthma during the summer of 2003. Twelve girls and 11 boys with moderate to severe asthma participated in the study. Participant observations and interviews were used, and the first author collected the data and participated in the activities. The findings reveal a theoretical model which shows that teens' core concern is not to let the disease get the upper hand over life. To manage this core concern the teens were found to use three strategies: keeping a distance to the disease, challenging the disease and taking the disease into consideration. Boys mainly kept a distance to the disease while girls mainly kept the disease into consideration. Challenging the disease seemed to be a strategy used by both girls and boys. The teens' strategies were not studied close to their everyday life, but a conclusion drawn from our study was that the provisional theory in many respects can be transferred to their everyday life, even though further research is needed to develop this provisional theory in other settings

  • 39. Sandvik, Ann-Helén
    et al.
    Eriksson, Katie
    Hilli, Yvonne Elisabet
    Yrkeshögskolan Novia; Högskolan i Oslo och Akershus.
    Understanding and becoming - the heart of the matter in nurse education2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 62-72Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Skyman, Eva
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset Göteborg.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Bergbom, Ingegerd
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Sahlgrenska Akademin.
    Thunberg Sjöström, Harrieth
    Västra Götalands regionen.
    Åhrén, Christina
    Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset Göteborg.
    Being Met as marked – patients’ experiences of beinginfected with community-acquired methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA)2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is known that patients who acquiredmethicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitalssuffer and feel as plague. Moreover, the patientinteraction with nurses and physicians is described asfrightening. Little is known about patient experiencesafter having acquired CA-MRSA concerning care andeveryday life.Aim: To reveal and interpret otherwise healthy patients’lived experiences of receiving care and their everyday lifeafter having acquired community MRSA (CA-MRSA).Methods: A phenomenological hermeneutic approachguided by Ricouer was conducted. Interviews withtwelve patients were transcribed verbatim into a text.The text was analysed in three phases: naive understanding,structural analysis and comprehensive understandingto reveal a possible being in the world. In thisstudy, this referred to what it means to be infected withCA-MRSA.Results: The findings indicate that patients who acquiredMRSA experience a changed body image. They sufferfrom ignorant and frightened behavior from healthcareworkers, social contacts, and also of being bullied by colleagues.Despite this, patients assume great responsibilityfor protecting others. However, knowledgeable staff alleviatesuffering and bring peace of mind to the patients.Conclusions: Preventing patient’s feelings of being a pest,an outsider living with fear, requires urgent educationand understanding about resistant bacteria and how tomeet an infected patient. The results describing patients,affected with MRSA, may contribute and touch the readersto better understanding of patient’s changed bodyimage and suffering and how to mitigate these feelings.

  • 41.
    Summer Meranius, Martina
    et al.
    Mälardalens University.
    Josefsson, Karin
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Health and social care management for older adults with multimorbidity: a multi-perspective approach2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, no 31, p. 96-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multimorbidity, a condition common among olderadults, may be regarded as a failure of a complex system.The aim of this study was to describe the corecomponents in health and social care management forolder adults with multimorbidity. A cross-sectionaldesign included two methods: individual interviews andgroup discussions. A total of 105 participants includedolder adults with multimorbidity and their relatives,care staff and healthcare policymakers. Data were analysedusing content analysis. The results show thatseven core components comprise a multiperspective 

    view of health and social care management for olderadults with multimorbidity: political steering, leadership,cooperation, competence, support for relatives, availabilityand continuity. Steps should be taken to ensure thatevery older adult with multimorbidity has a treatmentplan according to a multiperspective view to preventfragmentation of their health care. This study providesrelevant evidence developing a multiperspective modelof health and social care management for older adultswith multimorbidity.

  • 42.
    suserud, Björn-Ove
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Learning by simulation in prehospital emergency care - an integrative literature review.2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 234-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning by simulation in prehospital emergency care

    – an integrative literature review

    Background: Acquiring knowledge and experience on high-energy trauma is often difficult due to infrequent exposure. This creates a need for training which is specifically tailored for complex prehospital conditions. Simulation provides an opportunity for ambulance nurses to focus on the actual problems in clinical practice and to develop knowledge regarding trauma care. The aim of this study was to describe what ambulance nurses and paramedics in prehospital emergency care perceive as important for learning when participating in simulation exercises.

    Methods: An integrative literature review was carried out. Criteria for inclusion were primary qualitative and quantitative studies, where research participants were ambulance nurses or paramedics, working within prehospital care settings, and where the research interventions involved simulation.

    Results: It was perceived important for the ambulance nurses’ learning that scenarios were advanced and possible to simulate repeatedly. The repetitions contributed to increase the level of experience, which in turn improved the patients care. Moreover, realism in the simulation and being able to interact and communicate with the patient were perceived as important aspects, as was debriefing, which enabled the enhancement of knowledge and skills. The result is presented in the following categories: To gain experience, To gain practice and To be

    strengthened by others.

    Conclusion: Learning through simulation does not requireyears of exposure to accident scenes. The simulated learning is enhanced by realistic, stressful scenarios where ambulance nurses interact with the patients. In this study, being able to communicate with the patient was highlighted as a positive contribution to learning. However, this has seldom been mentioned in a previous research on simulation. Debriefing is important for learning as it enables scrutiny of one´s actions and thereby the possibility to improve and adjust one’s caring. The effect of simulation exercises is important on patient outcome.

  • 43.
    Wallengren, Catarina
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Friberg, F.
    Segesten, K.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Like a shadow- on becoming a stroke victim's relative2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 48-55Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Bremer, Anders
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindström, Veronica
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Vicente, Veronica
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Caring science research in the ambulance services: an integrative systematic review.2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The ambulance services are associated with emergency medicine, traumatology and disaster medicine, which is also reflected in previous research. Caring science research is limited and, since no systematic reviews have yet been produced, its focus is unclear. This makes it difficult for researchers to identify current knowledge gaps and clinicians to implement research findings.

    AIM: This integrative systematic review aims to describe caring science research content and scope in the ambulance services.

    DATA SOURCES: Databases included were MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Web of Science, ProQDiss, LibrisDiss and The Cochrane Library. The electronic search strategy was carried out between March and April 2015. The review was conducted in line with the standards of the PRISMA statement, registration number: PROSPERO 2016:CRD42016034156.

    REVIEW METHODS: The review process involved problem identification, literature search, data evaluation, data analysis and reporting. Thematic data analysis was undertaken using a five-stage method. Studies included were evaluated with methodological and/or theoretical rigour on a 3-level scale, and data relevance was evaluated on a 2-level scale.

    RESULTS: After the screening process, a total of 78 studies were included. The majority of these were conducted in Sweden (n = 42), fourteen in the United States and eleven in the United Kingdom. The number of study participants varied, from a case study with one participant to a survey with 2420 participants, and 28 (36%) of the studies were directly related to patients. The findings were identified under the themes: Caregiving in unpredictable situations; Independent and shared decision-making; Public environment and patient safety; Life-changing situations; and Ethics and values.

    CONCLUSION: Caring science research with an explicit patient perspective is limited. Areas of particular interest for future research are the impact of unpredictable encounters on openness and sensitivity in the professional-patient relation, with special focus on value conflicts in emergency situations.

1 - 44 of 44
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