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  • 1. Almerud, S
    et al.
    Alapack, R.J.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö University.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Växjö University.
    Beleuguered by technology: Care in technologically intense environments2008In: Nursing Philosophy, ISSN 1466-7681, E-ISSN 1466-769X, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 55-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern technology has enabled the use of new forms of information in the care of critically ill patients. In intensive care units (ICUs), technology can simultaneously reduce the lived experience of illness and magnify the objective dimensions of patient care. The aim of this study, based upon two empirical studies, is to find from a philosophical point of view a more comprehensive understanding for the dominance of technology within intensive care. Along with caring for critically ill patients, technology is part of the ICU staff's everyday life. Both technology and caring relationships are of indispensable value. Tools are useful, but technology can never replace the closeness and empathy of the human touch. It is a question of harmonizing the demands of subjectivity with objective signs. The challenge for caregivers in ICU is to know when to heighten the importance of the objective and measurable dimensions provided by technology and when to magnify the patients’ lived experiences, and to live and deal with the ambiguity of the technical dimension of care and the human side of nursing.

  • 2.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Lützen, Kim
    Uncovering Tacit Caring Knowledge2002In: Nursing Philosophy, ISSN 1466-7681, E-ISSN 1466-769X, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 144-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to present re-enactment interviewing and to propose that it can be used to reveal tacit caring knowledge. This approach generates knowledge not readily attainable by other research methods, which we demonstrate by analysing the epistemological and methodological underpinnings of re-enactment interviewing. We also give examples from a study where re-enactment was used. As tacit knowledge is often characteristic of care, re-enactment interviewing has the potential to engage the informant in a holistic mode and thereby reveal wisdom of the body. When the care provider recalls an event, the details are articulated, which contributes to in-depth data, which subsequently serves as a basis for trustworthy analysis.

  • 3. Karlsson, AC
    et al.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Larsson Mauléon, A
    Almerud Österberg, S
    Only a whisper away. A philosophical view of the awake patient's situation during regional anaesthetics and surgery.2012In: Nursing Philosophy, ISSN 1466-7681, E-ISSN 1466-769X, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 257-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the awake patient's intraoperative situation and experiences during regional anaesthetics and surgery are reflected upon by using the work of the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Merleau-Ponty's phenomenological idea of the body as being at the centre of the world highlights the patient's embodied position and bestows significance onto the body as a whole, as a lived body. A case, based on the findings from a previous interview study, is presented as a contextual starting point where a patient goes from having a familiar body recognized as her own to having a partially anaesthetized body experienced as an unknown object. The intraoperative caring space is described in this context as the mutual ground where the awake patient and the nurse anaesthetist (NA) can interact to create meaning. The NA can act as the patient's bodily extension to bridge the gap between the patient's experiences and the situation. This calls for the NA's proximity and genuine presence in order to meet and understand the patient's awake experiences. Learning from the patient's situatedness gives information that is valuable for NAs to share with patients who are less experienced with this contextual situation. The challenge for the NA is not to perform routine-based care, but to acknowledge every patient's lifeworld and uniqueness thus enabling the patient to move easily along the mind–body–world continuum. The core of intraoperative care is to provide support and promote well-being of awake patients in the intraoperative environment. The use of a philosophical perspective is relevant for nurses who work in an intraoperative setting where patients undergo regional anaesthetics. This study shows how nursing research using phenomenological philosophy can help uncover new meanings known only to the patients living the experience.

  • 4.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Experiences of exclusion when living on a ventilator: reflections based on the application of Julia Kristeva's philosophy to caring science2011In: Nursing Philosophy, ISSN 1466-7681, E-ISSN 1466-769X, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 12-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The research presented in this work represents reflections in the light of Julia Kristeva's philosophy concerning empirical data drawn from research describing the everyday life of people dependent on ventilators. It also presents a qualitative and narrative methodological approach from a person-centred perspective. Most research on home ventilator treatment is biomedical. There are a few published studies describing the situation of people living at home on a ventilator but no previous publications have used the thoughts in Kristeva's philosophy applied to this topic from a caring science perspective. The paper also addresses what a life at home on a ventilator may be like and will hopefully add some new aspects to the discussion of philosophical issues in nursing and the very essence of care. Kristeva's philosophy embraces phenomena such as language, abjection, body, and love, allowing her writings to make a fruitful contribution to nursing philosophy in that they strengthen, expand, and deepen a caring perspective. Moreover, her writings about revolt having the power to create hope add an interesting aspect to the work of earlier philosophers and nursing theorists.

  • 5. Sandman, Lars
    What’s the use of Human Dignity within Palliative Care?2002In: Nursing Philosophy, ISSN 1466-7681, E-ISSN 1466-769X, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 177-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n discussions on palliative care and in palliative care we often hear references to the idea of a ‘death with dignity’ or a ‘dignified death’ in different forms. Dignity is obviously one of the more central concepts in discussions on the topic of a good death, and it is frequently used to label good dying and death, and good care for dying people.† Still, a problem in relation to the concept of dignity is that it is used in a number of different ways and it is far from clear what it implies to talk in terms of dignity in relation to death and dying. In Saunders & Baines (1983) it is even argued that this lack of clarity should result in us not using the concept. In this short paper I will outline and develop some ideas concerning this developed in my thesis A good death. On the value of death and dying (Sandman, 2001). First I will present a number of different uses and connotations of the term ‘dignity’ found in the palliative (and other) care contexts. Then I will focus specifically on the idea of human dignity and its relevance to palliative care. The first part of that discussion will be devoted to the basis of such a human dignity and the second part to the implications that accepting such a dignity will have for palliative care.

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