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  • 1.
    Andersson, Morgan
    et al.
    Chalmers tekniska Högskola.
    Fridh, Isabell
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Is it possible to feel at home in a patient room in an intensive care unit? Reflections on environmental aspects in technology dense environments: Is it possible to feel at home in a patient room in an intensive care unit?2019In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the patient’s perspective and the philosophical underpinnings that support what might be considered optimal for the future design of the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patient room. It also addresses the question of whether the aspects that support at-homeness are applicable to ICU patient rooms. The concept of ‘at-homeness’ in ICUs is strongly related to privacy and control of space and territory. This study investigates whether the sense of at-homeness can be created in an ICU, when one or more patients share a room. From an interdisciplinary perspective, we critically reflect on various aspects associated with conflicts surrounding the use of ICU patient rooms. Thus, from an architectural and a caring perspective, the significance of space and personal territory in ICU patient rooms is emphasized. Recommendations for further research are suggested. In conclusion, privacy and control are deemed to be essential factors in the stimulation of recovery processes and the promotion of wellbeing in situations involving severe illness or life-threatening conditions.

  • 2.
    Bergh, Anne-Louise
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Friberg, Febe
    Persson, Eva
    Dahlborg Lyckhage, Elisabeth
    Perpetuating ‘New Public Management’ at the expense of nurses’ patient education: A discourse analysis2015In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 190-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to explore the conditions for nurses' daily patient education work by focusing on managers' way of speaking about the patient education provided by nurses in hospital care. An explorative, qualitative design with a social constructionist perspective was used. Data were collected from three focus group interviews and analysed by means of critical discourse analysis. Discursive practice can be explained by the ideology of hegemony. Due to a heavy workload and lack of time, managers could ‘see’ neither their role as a supporter of the patient education provided by nurses, nor their role in the development of nurses' pedagogical competence. They used organisational, financial, medical and legal reasons for explaining their failure to support nurses' provision of patient education. The organisational discourse was an umbrella term for ‘things’ such as cost-effectiveness, which were prioritised over patient education. There is a need to remove managerial barriers to the professional development of nurses' patient education. Managers should be responsible for ensuring and overseeing that nurses have the prerequisites necessary for providing patient education as well as for enabling continuous reflective dialogue and opportunities for learning in practice.

  • 3. Karlsson, Veronika
    et al.
    Lindahl, Berit
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Bergbom, Ingegerd
    Patients' statements and experiences concerning receiving mechanical ventilation: a prospective video-recorded study2012In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 247-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients' statements and experiences concerning receiving mechanical ventilation: a prospective video-recorded study Prospective studies using video-recordings of patients during mechanical ventilator treatment (MVT) while conscious have not previously been published. The aim was to describe patients' statements, communication and facial expressions during a video-recorded interview while undergoing MVT. Content analysis and hermeneutics inspired by the philosophy of Gadamer were used. The patients experienced almost constant difficulties in breathing and lost their voice. The most common types of communication techniques patients used were nodding or shaking the head. Their expressions were interpreted as stiffened facial expression, tense body position and feelings of sadness and sorrow. Nursing care for patients' conscious during MVT is challenging as it creates new demands regarding the content of the care provided. In caring for patients undergoing MVT while conscious, establishing a caring relationship, making patients feel safe and helping them to communicate seem to be most important for alleviating discomfort and instilling hope.

  • 4.
    Lindahl, Berit
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Sandman, PO
    Rasmussen, B
    Meanings of living at home on a ventilator2003In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 19-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nine adults were interviewed in order to illuminate the meanings of being dependent on a ventilator and living at home. The data were analysed using a phenomenological-hermeneutic method inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur. Five main themes emerged through the analysis: experiencing home as a safe and comfortable space from which to reach out, experiencing the body as being frail, brave and resilient, striving to live in the present, surrendering oneself to and trusting others, and experiencing technology as a burden and a relief to the lived body. Meanings of being home on a ventilator were interpreted as maintaining autonomy and persistence in interaction with the ventilator and other human beings and being able to rise above yourself and your personal boundaries in order to live a good life. These meanings indicate that aesthetic and ethical values impact on the lived body. They are bound up with experiencing a vital force and interdependency, bringing safety and courage into daily life.

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