Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Almerud, S
    et al.
    Alapack, R.J.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Växjö University.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    Växjö University.
    Of vigilance and invisibility: being a patient in technologically intense environments2007In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 151-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Equipment and procedures developed during the past several decades have made the modern intensive care unit (ICU) the hospital’s most technologically advanced environment. In terms of patient care, are these advances unmitigated gains? This study aimed to develop a knowledge base of what it means to be critically ill or injured and cared for in technologically intense environments. A lifeworld perspective guided the investigation. Nine unstructured interviews with intensive care patients comprise its data. The qualitative picture uncovered by a phenomenological analysis shows that contradiction and ambivalence characterized the entire care episode. The threat of death overshadows everything and perforates the patient’s existence. Four inter-related constituents further elucidated the patients’ experiences: the confrontation with death, the encounter with forced dependency, an incomprehensible environment and the ambiguity of being an object of clinical vigilance but invisible at the personal level. Neglect of these issues lead to alienating ‘moments’ that compromised care. Fixed at the end of a one-eyed clinical gaze, patients described feeling marginalized, subjected to rituals of power, a stranger cared for by a stranger. The roar of technology silences the shifting needs of ill people, muffles the whispers of death and compromises the competence of the caregivers. This study challenges today’s caregiving system to develop double vision that would balance clinical competence with a holistic, integrated and comprehensive approach to care. Under such vision, subjectivity and objectivity would be equally honoured, and the broken bonds re-forged between techne, ‘the act of nursing’, and poesis, ‘the art of nursing’.

  • 2. Bruce, K
    et al.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    The hand-over process and triage of ambulance-borne patients: The experience of emergency nurses2005In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 201-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most important tasks that a nurse faces in the emergency room, when receiving a patient, is handover and the triage function. The aim of the study was to explore the experiences of nurses receiving patients who were brought into hospital as emergencies by ambulance crews through an analysis of the handover and triage process. A qualitative descriptive interview study inspired by the phenomenological method was used with six emergency nurses. There are three elements to a handover: a verbal report, handing over documented accounts and the final symbolic handover when a patient is transferred from the ambulance stretcher onto the hospital stretcher. The study identified that the verbal communication between ambulance and emergency nurses was often very structured. The ideal handovers often involved patients with very distinct medical problems. The difficult handover or the ‘non-ideal’ one was characterized by a significantly more complicated care situation. The handover function was pivotal in ensuring that the patient received the correct care and that care was provided at the appropriate level. The most seriously afflicted patients arrived by ambulance; therefore, the interplay between pre-hospital and hospital personnel was vital in conveying this important information. To some extent, this functioned well, but this research has identified areas where this care can be improved.

  • 3. Eriksson, Thomas
    et al.
    Bergbom, Ingegerd
    Visits to intensive care unit patients: frequency, duration and impact on outocme2007In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 20-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of the presence of patients’ loved ones during their intensive care unit (ICU) stay is a frequently discussed topic among ICU staff. Today, ICU patients’ loved ones are seen as important for the care of the patient. There is a gap in knowledge and research concerning the frequency and duration of visits by loved ones and the effect of such visits on patient outcome. The aim of this study was to explore the frequency and duration of loved ones’ visits and whether or not such visits have an impact on patient outcome. A prospective, explorative observational study design was used. The sample included 198 ICU patients from a general ICU in Sweden. Twenty-five per cent of the patients had no visitors whatsoever. Forty-seven per cent of the patients who had visitors had visits of ≤0·5 h/day, 36% had visits of between 0·6 and 2 h/day and 17% had visits of >2 h/day. The most frequent visitors were spouses and children. Significant differences between the groups were that the patients who had no visitors were older, had a shorter ICU stay, lower nine equivalents of nursing manpower score and more often lived alone. There were no significant differences in mortality and length of hospital stay over time. We could not establish that patients who had no visitors had a poorer outcome. Most of the older patients had no visitors, which indicates that elderly people may have a poorer social network; thus, there may be a greater need for professional caring relationships and care planning.

  • 4. Forsberg, Anna
    et al.
    Lennerling, Annette
    Fridh, Isabell
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Rizell, Magnus
    Lovén, Charlotte
    Flodén, Anne
    Attitudes towards organ donor advocacy among Swedish intensive care nurses.2015In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 20, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the attitudes of Swedish intensive care nurses towards organ donor advocacy.

    BACKGROUND: The concept of organ donor advocacy is critical to nurses who care for potential donors in order to facilitate organ donation (OD).

    DESIGN: A retrospective cross-sectional study was employed.

    METHODS: Inclusion criteria in this survey were to be a registered nurse and to work in a Swedish intensive care unit (ICU). Participants were identified by the Swedish association of health professionals. A number of 502 Swedish ICU nurses answered the 32-item questionnaire Attitudes Towards Organ Donor Advocacy Scale (ATODAS), covering the five dimensions of organ donor advocacy: attitudes towards championing organ donation at a structural hospital level, or at a political and research level, attitudes towards actively and personally safeguarding the will and wishes of the potential organ donor, or by using a more professional approach and finally to safeguard the will and wishes of the relatives. Data were analysed with the SPSS version 18·0 and the results were assessed by using Student's t-test and post hoc test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), χ(2) , Pearson's correlation and regression analysis.

    RESULTS: The most favoured advocacy action was safeguarding the POD's will and wishes by a professional approach, closely followed by actively and personally safeguarding the POD's will and wishes. Nurses at local hospitals reported a more positive attitude towards organ donor advocacy overall compared with nurses at larger regional or university hospitals. Important factors leading to positive attitudes were seniority, working experience, participating in conversations with relatives, caring for brain-dead persons and private experiences from OD or organ transplantation.

    CONCLUSIONS: Intensive and critical care nurses with short working experience in university hospitals showed the least positive attitude towards organ donor advocacy. This is problematic because many ODs and all transplantations are performed in university hospitals.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: This study emphasizes the importance of organizing the care of PODs and their relatives in a way that promotes advocacy.

  • 5.
    Fridh, Isabell
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare. Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Sahlgrenska University Hospital .
    Åkerman, Eva
    Karolinska university hospital, Stockholm.
    Family-centred end-of-life care and bereavement services in Swedish intensive care units: A cross-sectional study.2019In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Post-intensive care syndrome-family is a common problem in relatives of patients who die in an intensive care unit. Family-centred end-of-life care with support for the family during and after the death is supposed to prevent suffering and avoid illness.

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate family-centred end-of-life care and bereavement follow-up services offered to family members of patients who die in Swedish intensive care units.

    DESIGN, METHODS: A cross-sectional study using a 16-question survey based on family-centred end-of-life care was sent to all 81 adult intensive care units. Data were analysed by descriptive statistics and chi-square. Respondents were able to add individual comments to the questionnaire.

    RESULTS: Although the majority (76.7%) offered some kind of follow up, this service was not always offered. Modes for invitation, timing, and contents in the follow up varied between the units. The staff tried to individualize the follow-up service according to the family's needs. Nurses and social workers were the only professionals who provided follow-up conversations on their own. Most of the intensive care units (97.3%) kept diaries that were handed over to the family when they left the unit after the patient's death or at a follow-up visit. Only 8.8% reported that they always offer the family the opportunity to be present during resuscitation. Most respondents reported that patients (60.6%) died in a private room.

    CONCLUSIONS: Family-centred end-of-life care varied among the intensive care units, and some families were not offered any follow up at all. Timing, invitation, and elements in the follow up differ between the units. Diaries were commonly kept and usually given to the family. Few units offered the family to be present during resuscitation.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: There is a need for national guidelines to ensure that all bereaved families receive equal and individual family-centred end-of-life care.

  • 6.
    Kauppi, Wivica
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ward nurses´ experiences of the discharge process between ICU and general ward2018In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 127-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: ICU discharges are challenging practices that carry risks for patients. Despite the existing body of knowledge, there are still difficulties in clinical practice concerning unplanned ICU discharges, specifically where there is no step-down unit.

     

    Aim: The aim of this study was to explore general ward nurses´ experiences of caring for patients being discharged from an ICU.

     

    Design and Methods: Data were collected from focus groups and in-depth interviews with a total of 16 nurses from three different hospitals in Sweden. An inductive qualitative design was chosen.

     

    Findings: The analysis revealed three themes that reflect the challenges in nursing former ICU patients: a vulnerable patient, nurses’ powerlessness and organisational structure. The nurses described the challenge of nursing a fragile patient based on several aspects. They expressed feeling unrealistic demands when caring for a fragile former ICU patient. The demands were related to their own profession and knowledge regarding how to care for this group of patients. The organisational structure had an impact on how the nurses’ caring practice could be realised. This evoked ethical concerns that the nurses had to cope with, as the organisation’s care guidelines did not always favour the patients. 

                                                                                                                                                 

    Conclusions and Relevance to Clinical Practice: The structure of the organisation and its leadership seem to have a significant impact on the nurses´ ability to offer patients the care they need. Moreover, this study sheds light on the need for extended outreach services in order to meet the needs of patients after the intensive care period.

  • 7.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Bergbom, I.
    Nurses´ and Physicians´ viewpoints regarding children visiting/not visiting adult ICUs2007In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 64-73Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Suserud, Björn-Ove
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    A new profession in the pre-hospital care field: the ambulance nurse2005In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 10, no 6, p. 269-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Historically, the ambulance service has been viewed as an organization responsible for the transportation of sick people into hospital, but as a result of advances in surgical techniques, resuscitation and pharmacology, this has led to the discipline of pre-hospital emergency care becoming established and recognized as an important part of the patient's total care. In addition, medical and technical developments have led to pre-hospital emergency care becoming a kind of advanced nursing and an important first link in the chain of care. This has resulted in the emergence of a new discipline of ambulance nurses. Their entrance onto the scene is gradually changing and developing the ambulance service. Nurses with a background in anaesthetics, intensive care and cardiology units have for many years been employed for pre-hospital work (Suserud et al. 1998). In Sweden, nurses, and in particular anaesthetic nurses, have been increasingly used for pre-hospital work in Mobile Intensive Care Units (MICU) and on medical emergency teams. These nurses have traditionally taken an active part in the intra-hospital routine treatment of patients with complex conditions and who are clinical unstable. Medical directors' and ambulance chiefs' views have been that those nurses who are used to working independently and have competence in advanced life support are suitable for this role. I also think that many of them, as well as many ambulance nurses, are attracted to working at the front line. However, I would say that most are not prepared for the diversity of patient they will meet outside the acute hospital.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf