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  • 1.
    Axelsson, Christer
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Herrera, Maria Jimenez
    Bång, Angela
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    How the context of ambulance care influences learning to become a specialist ambulance nurse a Swedish perspective.2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Ambulance emergency care is multifaceted with extraordinary challenges to implement accurate assessment and care. A clinical learning environment providing opportunities for mastering these essential skills is a key component in ensuring that prehospital emergency nurse (PEN) students acquire the necessary clinical competence.

    AIM: The aim is to understand how PEN students experience their clinically based training, focusing on their learning process.

    METHOD: We applied content analysis with its qualitative method to our material that consisted of three reflections each by 28 PEN students over their learning process during their 8weeks of clinical ambulance practice. The research was carried out at the Center for Prehospital Care, University of Borås, Sweden.

    RESULTS: The broad spectrum of ambulance assignments seems to awaken great uncertainty and excessive respect in the students. Student vulnerability appears to decrease when the clinical supervisor behaves calmly, knowledgeably, confidently and reflectively. Early traumatic incidents on the other hand may increase the students' anxiety. Each student is offered a unique opportunity to learn how to approach patients and relatives in their own environments, and likewise an opportunity to gather information for assessment. Infrequency of missions seems to make PEN students less active in their student role, thereby preventing them from availing themselves of potential learning situations. Fatigue and hunger due to lack of breaks or long periods of transportation also inhibit learning mode.

    CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest the need for appraisal of the significance of the clinical supervisor, the ambulance environment, and student vulnerability. The broad spectrum of conditions in combination with infrequent assignments make simulation necessary. However, the unique possibilities provided for meeting patients and relatives in their own environments offer the PEN student excellent opportunities for learning how to make assessments.

  • 2.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Lepp, Margret
    Dahlberg, Karin
    Reflective learning with Drama in Nursing Education: a Swedish attempt to overcome the theory praxis gap2004In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 622-628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is obvious that the gap between theory and praxis in nursing education affects the students’ ability to develop understanding and professional knowledge that stems both from theory and practice. Appropriate didactic methods are thus needed in nursing education. In a project we developed and practised a didactic model with the intention of encouraging a reflective attitude within the student, considering caring science in theory as well as in praxis. The didactic model, based on educational drama, was implemented during three terms of the nursing education programme. In this paper we present the educational model and its theoretical foundation. We also present the preliminary outcomes of the project.

  • 3.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    et al.
    Örebro Universitet.
    Kullén Engström, Agneta
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    Örebro Universitet.
    Sundler J, Annelie
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Karlstad universitet.
    Nurse teacher models in clinical education from the perspective of student nurses - A mixed method study2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 1289-1294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim was to describe and compare the clinical teacher's role in different models of clinical practice from the perspective of student nurses.

    DESIGN AND SETTINGS: The study took place in collaboration with two Swedish universities that applied different educational models in clinical practice. A mixed method approach was used. The quantitative part had a comparative design and the qualitative part had a descriptive design.

    PARTICIPANTS: The study group consisted of 114 student nurses (response rate 87%). Fifty-three of them had met clinical teachers employed at the university and not participating in the daily clinical work (University Nurse Teachers, UNTs), whilst 61 had met clinical teachers dividing their time between teaching and nursing (Clinical Nurse Teachers, CNTs). Eight students participated in the qualitative part of the study.

    METHODS: A questionnaire including the CLES+T scale was used to ascertain the students' perception of the clinical teacher's role, complemented by interviews directed towards an enrichment of this perception.

    RESULTS: Students meeting CNTs agreed more strongly than those meeting UNTs that the teacher had the ability to help them integrate theory and practice. Whilst spontaneous meetings between students and CNTs occurred, students mostly met UNTs in seminars. Students meeting UNTs felt alone but did appreciate having someone outside the clinical environment to provide support if they did not get along with their preceptor.

    CONCLUSIONS: In the case of UNTs, it is important that they keep their knowledge of clinical issues updated and visit the clinical placement not only for seminars but also to give students emotional support. In the case of CNTs, it is important that they are members of the faculty at the university, take part in the planning of the clinical courses and are able to explain the learning goals to the students.

  • 4.
    Hammar, Lena Marmstål
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Holmström, Inger K
    Mälardalens University.
    Skoglund, Karin
    Mälardalens University.
    Meranius, Martina Summer
    Mälardalens University.
    Sundler, Annelie Johansson
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    The care of and communication with older people from the perspective of student nurses. A mixed method study.2017In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 52, p. 1-6, article id S0260-6917(17)30025-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Undergraduate nurse education needs to prepare student nurses to meet the demands and to have the necessary communication skills for caring for an increasing older population. The challenges involve how best to support and empower student nurses to learn the communication skills needed to care for older people.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate student nurses' views on the care of and communication with older people.

    DESIGN: A descriptive study with a mixed-method approach was conducted.

    METHODS: Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from a questionnaire completed by third-year Swedish student nurses in 2015.

    RESULTS: The student nurses reported positive attitudes to the care of and communication with older people. The findings focus on the central aspects related to relationship building, techniques for communication and external prerequisites.

    CONCLUSIONS: Despite positive attitudes, student nurses had a limited view of communication with older people. Educators need to increase student nurses' capacity to communicate effectively with older people. Educational interventions to improve and evaluate the communication competency of nurses and student nurses are needed.

  • 5.
    Hedén, Lena
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Åhlström, Linda
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Individual response technology to promote active learning within the caring sciences: An experimental research study.2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: One major challenge in delivering lectures to large and diverse classes is the maintenance of a high standard of lecturing in order to engage students and increase their participation and involvement. The lecturer's assignment is to arrange and prepare the lecture before teaching, hence enabling students' enhanced learning. Individual response technology could encourage students' active learning and activate higher cognitive levels.

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate individual response technology as a complement during lectures for students in higher education, in terms of the students' experiences of participation, engagement, and active learning. Also of interest was whether this technology can be considered a supportive technical system.

    DESIGN: Data were collected through a questionnaire where levels of each condition were reported on a numeric rating scale (0-10) at baseline and after the introduction of individual response technology. To get a broader perspective, two types of lectures (pediatric and statistical) were included, giving a total of four assessment times.

    PARTICIPANTS: The participants comprised 59 students in Bachelor of Nursing program at a Swedish metropolitan university.

    RESULTS: Overall, when individual response technology was used, students reported increased experience of engagement (n=82, mean 6.1 vs. n=65, mean 7.3, p<0.001), participation (n=92, mean 6.1 vs. n=79, mean 7.7, p<0.001), and active learning (n=92, mean 7.3 vs. n=79, mean 8.2 p<0.001). Additionally, the students experienced this technology as a supportive technical system during lectures (mean 6.6 vs. mean 8.1, p<0.001).

    CONCLUSIONS: The use of individual response technology during teaching is one way to enhance students' experiences of engagement, participation, and learning within the caring sciences.

  • 6. Hilli, Yvonne Elisabet
    et al.
    Melender, Hanna-Leena
    Vaasan Ammattikorkeakoulu .
    Salmu, Marita
    Vaasan Ammattikorkeakoulu.
    Jonsén, Elisabeth
    Umeå Universitet.
    Being a preceptor – a Nordic qualitative study2014In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 34, no 12, p. 1420-1424Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Jonsén, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Melender, Hanna-Leena
    Hilli, Yvonne Elisabet
    Yrkeshögskolan Novia.
    Finnish and Swedish nursing students’ experiences of their first clinical practice placement – a qualitative study2013In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 33, p. 297-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nursing is a practice-based discipline. Clinical practice settings are important in preparing un- dergraduate nursing students for the role of registered nurse. Aim: The aim of this Nordic qualitative study is to illuminate first year undergraduate nursing students' expe- riences of clinical practice during their first clinical placement, with a focus on preception, reflection, and the link between theory and practice.

    Method: Data were collected by focus group interviews with 22 nursing students, and analyzed with qualita- tive content analysis. Findings: Positive experiences included stimulating and visible preceptors, a permissive atmosphere, and reflec- tion as a matter of course. Negative experiences were related to feelings of abandonment and powerlessness when preceptors were invisible and the atmosphere at the ward was non-permissive. The implementation of research-based knowledge was insufficient.

    Conclusions: A permissive atmosphere and visible preceptors are crucial if learning is to be maximized. Conse- quently, it is important to set aside time for preceptors to be more visible and to make the atmosphere at the clinical placement more permissive. The student must have the opportunity to combine scientific knowledge with evidence-based knowledge in order to develop nursing actions. 

  • 8.
    Lindberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Karlsson, Pernilla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Knutsson, Susanne
    Avdelningen för Omvårdnad Hälsohögskolan Jönköping.
    Reflective seminaries grounded in caring science and lifeworld theory – A phenomenological study from the perspective of nursing students2018In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 61, p. 60-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Creative strategies are needed in nurse education to integrate theory, practice and lived experiences.Towards that end, reflective seminars, conducted in congruence with reflective lifeworld theory andcaring science, were implemented during a three-year nursing programme. The reflection seminars took placeduring the theoretical parts of education and the clinical placements. Each reflection group consisted of six tonine students, and the seminars were led by a lecturer from the university.

    Objectives: This article aims to describe the experiences of learning about caring science by participating inreflective seminars that were integrated into courses during a three-year nursing education programme.

    Design: A phenomenological approach was used, and qualitative group interviews were conducted.

    Setting: The study was conducted at a university in southern Sweden.

    Participants: Twenty three students, 19 women and four men, volunteered to participate. All participants were atthe end of a three-year nurse education programme. Data were collected through four group interviews with fiveto seven participants in each group.

    Methods: This study used a reflective lifeworld research approach based on phenomenological philosophy

    Results: The findings reveal that nursing students experience reflective seminars as being valuable for theirprofessional development. The result is described in more detail via four meaning units: An obtained awarenessof the value of reflection in clinical practice; Reflection contributes to an approach of thoughtfulness; Caringscience has become second nature, and Reflection as a strength and a challenge at the threshold of a profession.

    Conclusions: This study contributes to the understanding of reflective seminars grounded in lifeworld theory as adidactic strategy that enables students to increase their knowledge of caring science and develop their reflectiveskills

  • 9.
    Sundler J, Annelie
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    Björk, Maria
    Kullén Engström, Agneta
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    Student nurses' experiences of the clinical learning environment in relation to the organization of supervision: A questionnaire survey2014In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 661-666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim was to investigate student nurses' experiences of the clinical learning environment in relation to how the supervision was organized. Background The clinical environment plays an essential part in student nurses' learning. Even though different models for supervision have been previously set forth, it has been stressed that there is a need both of further empirical studies on the role of preceptorship in undergraduate nursing education and of studies comparing different models. Method A cross-sectional study with comparative design was carried out with a mixed method approach. Data were collected from student nurses in the final term of the nursing programme at three universities in Sweden by means of a questionnaire. Results In general the students had positive experiences of the clinical learning environment with respect to pedagogical atmosphere, leadership style of the ward manager, premises of nursing, supervisory relationship, and role of the nurse preceptor and nurse teacher. However, there were significant differences in their ratings of the supervisory relationship (p < 0.001) and the pedagogical atmosphere (p 0.025) depending on how the supervision was organized. Students who had the same preceptor all the time were more satisfied with the supervisory relationship than were those who had different preceptors each day. Students' comments on the supervision confirmed the significance of the preceptor and the supervisory relationship. Conclusion The organization of the supervision was of significance with regard to the pedagogical atmosphere and the students' relation to preceptors. Students with the same preceptor throughout were more positive concerning the supervisory relationship and the pedagogical atmosphere.

  • 10.
    Sundler J, Annelie
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Pettersson, Annika
    Berglund, Mia
    Undergraduate nursing students' experiences when examining nursing skills in clinical simulation laboratories with high-fidelity patient simulators: A phenomenological research study.2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Simulation has become a widely used and established pedagogy for teaching clinical nursing skills. Nevertheless, the evidence in favour of this pedagogical approach is weak, and more knowledge is needed in support of its use. The aim of this study was (a) to explore the experiences of undergraduate nursing students when examining knowledge, skills and competences in clinical simulation laboratories with high-fidelity patient simulators and (b) to analyse these students' learning experiences during the examination. A phenomenological approach was used, and qualitative interviews were conducted among 23 second-year undergraduate nursing students-17 women and 6 men. The findings revealed that, irrespective of whether they passed or failed the examination, it was experienced as a valuable assessment of the students' knowledge and skills. Even if the students felt that the examination was challenging, they described it as a learning opportunity. In the examination, the students were able to integrate theory with practice, and earlier established knowledge was scrutinised when reflecting on the scenarios. The examination added aspects to the students' learning that prepared them for the real world of nursing in a safe environment without risking patient safety. The study findings suggest that examinations in clinical simulation laboratories can be a useful teaching strategy in nursing education. The use of high-fidelity patient simulators made the examination authentic. The reflections and feedback on the scenario were described as significant for the students' learning. Undergraduate nursing students can improve their knowledge, understanding, competence and skills when such examinations are performed in the manner used in this study.

  • 11.
    Westerbotn, Margareta
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University, Box 5605, 114 86 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kneck, Åsa
    Sciences Karolinska Institutet, Division of Nursing, Department of Neurolobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Sweden.
    Hovland, Olav Johannes
    University of Agder, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, Institute of Health and Nursing Science, Postbox 422, 4604 Kristiansand, Norway.
    Elrond, Malene
    University College Sjælland (UCSJ), Sygeplejerskeuddannelsen, Ingemannsvej 17, 4200 Slagelse, Denmark.
    Pedersen, Ingrid
    University College Lillebaelt, 5220 Odense SØ, Denmark.
    Lejonqvist, Gun-Britt
    Arcada University of Applied Sciences, Jan-Magnus Janssons plats 1, 00550 Helsingfors, Finland.
    Dulavik, Johild
    Faculty of Natural and Health Sciences, Department of Nursing, University of the Faroe Islands, Jónas Broncksgøta 25, Fo 100 Tórshavn, Faroe Islands.
    Ecklon, Tove
    University College Lillebaelt, Department of Nursing, Svendborg, Baagoesalle 8 b, 5700 Svendborg, Denmark.
    Nilsson, Inga-Lill
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Sigurdardottir, Árún K.
    School of Health Sciences, University of Akureyri, Nordurslod, 600 Akureyri, Iceland.
    Taking part in Nordic collaboration; nursing students' experiences and perceptions from a learning perspective: A qualitative study2015In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 712-717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SummaryBackground Nordic networking of different kinds has a long tradition aiming to increase collaboration and understanding between citizens in different countries. Cultural competence in relation to health care and nursing is important for clinical nurses and is a central issue in nurse education. Objective To gain an understanding of what nurse students experienced and learned during an intensive course in diabetes together with students and nurse educators from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden and the Faroe Islands. Methods In 2012, an intensive course within the Nordic network, Nordkvist, was conducted in Faroe Islands with the theme “Nursing — to live a good life with diabetes”. To answer the objective of the study, 26 students conducted written reflections based on two questions. The data was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results Through meetings with nurse students and educators from the Nordic countries the intensive course strengthened the students' identification with the nursing profession. The students gained new perspectives on diabetes, such as how complex it can be to live with a chronic illness. Because of the difficulties in understanding one another and because of different mother tongues, the students gained a better understanding of patients' vulnerability in relation to hospital jargon and how it felt to be in an unfamiliar place. Conclusions The intensive course increased the students' personal and professional growth, cross-cultural competence, and their identification with nursing. Students' understanding of health care in the Nordic countries improved as similarities and differences were recognized.

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