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  • 1.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Ohlsson, Ulla
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Kullén Engström, Agneta
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Sundler J, Annelie
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Gustafsson, Margareta
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Nursing students' assessment of the learning environment in different clinical settings2014In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 304-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Nursing students perform their clinical practice in different types of clinical settings. The clinical learning environment is important for students to be able to achieve desired learning outcomes. Knowledge is lacking about the learning environment in different clinical settings. Aim The aim was to compare the learning environment in different clinical settings from the perspective of the nursing students. Design A cross-sectional study with comparative design was conducted. Method Data was collected from 185 nursing students at three universities by means of a questionnaire involving the Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES + T) evaluation scale. An open-ended question was added in order to ascertain reasons for dissatisfaction with the clinical placement. Results The nursing students' satisfaction with the placement did not differ between clinical settings. However, those with clinical placement in hospital departments agreed more strongly that sufficient meaningful learning situations occurred and that learning situations were multi-dimensional. Some students reported that the character of the clinical setting made it difficult to achieve the learning objectives. Conclusion In the planning of the clinical placement, attention must be paid to whether the setting offers the student a meaningful learning situation where the appropriate learning outcome may be achieved.

  • 2.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    A Learning Model for Nursing Students during Clinical Studies2011In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 384-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a research project where the aim was to develop a new model for learning support in nursing education that makes it possible for the student to encounter both the theoretical caring science structure and the patient’s lived experiences in his/her learning process. A reflective group supervision model was developed and tested. The supervision was lead by a teacher and a nurse and started in patient narratives that the students brought to the supervision sessions. The narratives were analyzed by using caring science concepts with the purpose of creating a unity of theory and lived experiences. Data has been collected and analyzed phenomenologically in order to develop knowledge of the students’ reflection and learning when using the supervision model. The result shows that the students have had good use of the theoretical concepts in creating a deeper understanding for the patient. They have learned to reflect more systematically and the learning situation has become more realistic to them as it is now carried out in a patient near context. In order to reach these results, however, demands the necessity of recognizing the students’ lifeworld in the supervision process.

  • 3.
    Eskilsson, Camilla
    et al.
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Carlsson, Gunilla
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Ekebergh, Margaretha
    University of Borås, Faculty of Caring Science, Work Life and Social Welfare.
    Hörberg, Ulrica
    Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö, Institutionen för hälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    The experiences of patients receiving care from nursing students at a Dedicatd Education Unit: A phenomenological study2015In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 353-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to describe how patients perceive being cared for by student nurses, in aclinical context in the form of a Dedicated Education Unit (DEU). The study has been performed with aReflective Lifeworld Research (RLR) approach grounded in phenomenology. Lifeworld interviews wereconducted with patients who had received care from student nurses on an orthopaedic DEU and datahave been analysed for meanings. The findings reveal how patients experience to be carried along as apart of the students' learning process. This is described in more detail via the constituents: a mutualinvitation to participate, the importance of genuine encounters, and essential support. Patients experienceboth a stable and a less stable care in a learning environment and it is thus essential for them to beinvited to be a part of both the students' learning process and their own health process. The findings alsohighlight the key role of the supervisors for patients' sense of security. Finally there are indications thatconcepts such as DEU with a lifeworld-led didactic, based on reflection on both the patients' stories andthe students' experiences, can create learning environments that support patients' health processes andalso students’ learning processes.

  • 4. Henoch, Ingela
    et al.
    Jakobsson Ung, Eva
    Ozanne, Anneli
    Falk, Hanna
    Falk, Kristin
    Kenne Sarenmalm, Elisabeth
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Fridh, Isabell
    University of Borås, School of Health Science. Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
    Nursing students' experiences of involvement in clinical research: An exploratory study2014In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 188-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Nursing education can positively affect nurses' attitudes toward nursing research, resulting in better patient outcomes. Experiential learning theory was the basis for this study. Objectives To explore nursing students' experiences of involvement in clinical research, their approach to learning and their interest in nursing research. Design Cross-sectional. Methods One hundred and twenty-six nursing students were invited to be involved as data collectors in a research project as part of their training in research methodology. The students completed an evaluation form and the Revised Study Process Questionnaire. The questionnaires were analyzed quantitatively and one open-ended question was analyzed qualitatively. Results On the whole, the students were happy to be involved in the data collection although a minority felt uncertain and exposed. Students with a deeper approach to learning felt that their involvement had increased their interest in nursing research and they stated that data collection should be a regular feature of the course. Conclusions Participation as data collectors in research has the potential to increase interest in nursing research among students with higher levels of deep learning. Further studies are needed to examine ways to increase interest in research among students with lower levels of deep learning.

  • 5.
    Lindahl, Berit
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Dagborn, Kerstin
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Nilsson, M
    A student-centered clinical educational unit: a description of a model2008In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 5-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes a model of a student-centered Clinical Education Unit (CEU) within an undergraduate nursing education programme. The model comprises three various levels of learning in the nursing education programme at School of Health Sciences, University College of Borås, Sweden. The three levels of learning correspond to the first, second and third programme years of the nursing education. Each level of learning is represented by clinical training in three different hospital care settings. The educational model was developed through a co-operation between hospital representatives and nurse educators at the university college. The model is built on a human caring science perspective and knowledge that focuses on patients’ lived experience of their care and illness. The model emphasises collaboration in communion between students, hospital and faculty members as an alternative to bridge the gap between theory and practice in nursing. Reflection and critical thinking are the vital components in a clinical learning environment.

  • 6.
    Lindahl, Berit
    et al.
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Dagborn, Kerstin
    University of Borås, School of Health Science.
    Nilsson, Maud
    A student-centered clinical educational unit: description of a reflective learning model2009In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 5-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes a model of a student-centered Clinical Education Unit (CEU) within an undergraduate nursing education programme. The model comprises three various levels of learning in the nursing education programme at School of Health Sciences, University College of Borås, Sweden. The three levels of learning correspond to the first, second and third programme years of the nursing education. Each level of learning is represented by clinical training in three different hospital care settings. The educational model was developed through a co-operation between hospital representatives and nurse educators at the university college. The model is built on a human caring science perspective and knowledge that focuses on patients’ lived experience of their care and illness. The model emphasises collaboration in communion between students, hospital and faculty members as an alternative to bridge the gap between theory and practice in nursing. Reflection and critical thinking are the vital components in a clinical learning environment.

  • 7. Melender, Hanna-Leena
    et al.
    Jonsén, Elisabeth
    Hilli, Yvonne Elisabet
    Yrkeshögskolan Novia.
    Quality of clinical education - Comparison of experiences of undergraduate student nurses in Finland and Sweden2013In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 256-261Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Sandvik, Ann-Helén
    et al.
    Eriksson, Katie
    Hilli, Yvonne Elisabet
    Yrkeshögskolan Novia.
    Becoming a caring nurse - A Nordic study on students’ learning and development in clinical education2013In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 286-292Article in journal (Refereed)
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